Tag Archives: holiday

Thumbnail

Get Your Mobile Site Ready For The 2018 Holiday Season




Get Your Mobile Site Ready For The 2018 Holiday Season

Suzanne Scacca



After reading the title of this article, it might seem like it’s jumping the gun, but with retailers turning on holiday music and putting out holiday-related displays earlier and earlier every year, your consumers are primed to start thinking about the holidays earlier, too. In fact, a study done by the Tampa Bay Times revealed that in-store shoppers were exposed to holiday music as early as October 22 in 2017.


Holiday music in retail


Results from TBT’s survey on when holiday music starts (Source: Tampa Bay Times) (Large preview)

Of course, e-commerce handles the holiday season a bit differently than brick-and-mortar. It’s not really necessary to announce promotions or run sales in late October or early November. However, that doesn’t mean you should wait until the last minute to prepare your mobile website for the holidays.

In this article, I’m going to give you a quick rundown of what happened during the 2017 holiday sales season and, in particular, what role mobile played in it. Then, we’re going to dig into holiday design and marketing tactics you can use to boost sales through your mobile website for the 2018 holiday season.

Recommended reading: How Mobile Web Design Affects Local Search (And What To Do About It)

A Recap Of The 2017 Holiday Sales Season

Before we get started, I want to quickly add a disclaimer:

This particular section focuses on e-commerce statistics because this kind of data is readily available. Something like the total number of page visits, subscribed readers, and leads generated… well, it’s not.

So, although I only use data to express how important mobile was to 2017 holiday sales, keep in mind that the tips that follow pertain to all websites. Even if your site doesn’t expressly sell goods or services, blogs and other content-driven sites can take advantage of this, too!

Now, let’s take a look at the numbers:

Total Retail Sales

The National Retail Federation calculated the total amount of retail sales–online and in-store–to be $691.9 billion between November and December, a 5.5% bump from 2016.

Total e-Commerce Sales

Adobe put the total amount of e-commerce sales during that same timeframe at $108.15 billion in 2017.


2017 holiday e-commerce revenue


Adobe’s stats on 2016 and 2017 holiday e-commerce revenue (Source: Adobe) (Large preview)

e-Commerce Sales By Device

Adobe takes it even further and breaks down the share of revenue by device:


Device-specific sales during 2017 holidays


Breakdown of desktop, smartphone and tablet sales for 2017 holiday season (Source: Adobe) (Large preview)

e-Commerce Sales vs. Traffic

While smartphone and tablet sales still trail those on desktop, there are a couple interesting things to note here. For starters, desktop revenue has mostly flatlined year-over-year whereas mobile continues to grow. In addition, there’s an interesting disparity between how much traffic comes from each device and what percentage of revenue it generates:


Traffic vs. revenue breakdown


Traffic vs. revenue for desktop, smartphone, tablet (Source: Adobe) (Large preview)

Pay close attention to desktop and smartphone. As you can see, more visits stem from smartphones than any other device and, yet, desktop leads the way in conversions:


Conversion rates by device


Statista shows the breakdown between desktop, smartphone, and tablet conversions in Q1 2018 (Source: Statista) (Large preview)

Is this indicative of a lack of trust in smart devices to handle purchases?

In all likelihood, it probably isn’t. Data from other sources indicates that on holidays, in particular, mobile reigns supreme in terms of visits and conversions:

  • Thanksgiving Day: 62% of traffic / 46% of purchases.
  • Christmas Day: 68% of traffic / 50% of purchases.

Also, let’s not forget to take into account the strengths of mobile devices within the shopper’s experience. According to the four micro-moments as defined by Google, a large number of mobile users commonly search for the following:

  • “I want to know.”
  • “I want to go.”
  • “I want to do.”
  • “I want to buy.”

The second and third are clearly indicative of a searcher’s desire to find something outside their devices (and their homes) to spend money on. That might even be so for the fourth, though it could also be an indication that they want to do their research on mobile and complete the purchase on desktop.

Either way, we know that smartphones tend to be a primary facilitator in the customer’s journey and not something that’s putting an end to the shopping experience as a whole.

Recommended reading: Designing For Micro-Moments

5 Tips To Prepare Your Mobile Site For The 2018 Holiday Season

While the overall numbers indicate that desktop is the leading platform for holiday sales, it’s not a universal rule that can be applied to each and every day in November and December. This is why your own data will have to play a big role in the design choices you make for your mobile site this season.

You have to admit, no matter how stressed or unhappy you might feel around the holidays, there is something nice about encountering just the right hint of holiday “cheer”. And that’s one of the keys to doing this right: finding the right amount of holiday flavor to infuse into your website.

Before we get into what you can do to spruce up your mobile web design, I want to remind you that security and speed are critical elements to check off your list before November gets here. These might not be in your realm of responsibilities, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t keep an eye on them.

If you’re doing all this design work in anticipation of boosting conversions over the holidays, don’t let it all be for nothing by forgetting about performance and security essentials. To protect your site from potentially harmful traffic surges, start with this front-end performance checklist. With regards to security, you can use these security improvement tips.

Now, let’s talk about the five ways in which you can prepare your mobile website for the 2018 holiday season:

1. Study Last Year’s Data

If your website has been live and actively doing business for more than a year, you need to start with the data from 2017. Using Google Analytics and your CRM platform, locate answers to the following questions:

What was the prominent device that generated traffic? Sales?

Google Analytics allows you to divvy up traffic based on technology in a number of ways:

Under Browser & OS, you can sort visitors by browser:


Google Analytics browser data


Google Analytics shows which browsers users visited from (Source: Google Analytics) (Large preview)

There is a small tab at the top of the table for “Operating System”. Click that to reveal which OS were used:


Google Analytics operating system data


Google Analytics breaks down traffic by operating system (Source: Google Analytics) (Large preview)

You can use the MobileOverview tab to look at the simple breakdown between desktop, mobile, and tablet users.


Google Analytics device data


Google Analytics division between device traffic (Source: Google Analytics) (Large preview)

Really, your goal here is to weed out desktop users so you can focus strictly on mobile traffic as you assess the following data points.

When did your site experience an increase in traffic in November or December?

Every website’s holiday traffic history will look a little different. Take mine, for example:


A sample Google Analytics holiday traffic chart


An example of holiday traffic up and downs in Google Analytics (Source: Google Analytics) (Large preview)

My business really isn’t affected by the holidays at all… except that I know things are going to be super quiet on and around Thanksgiving and the major holidays in December. This is still important information for me to have.

For businesses that directly sell products or services through their site or content-based sites that plan publication schedules based on traffic, you’ll likely see a different trajectory in terms of highs and lows.

When did sales start to increase (if they don’t coincide with traffic)?

Again, for some of you, the matter of sales is irrelevant if you don’t offer any through your site. For everyone else, however, use the Google Analytics Conversions tab along with sales logged through your payment gateway or CRM to check this number.

Just remember that you have to activate the Conversions module in Google Analytics if you want it to track that data. If you didn’t remember last year, put it in place for this year.

Did the holiday uptick remain consistent until the end of the season or were there temporary dropoffs?

Much of this has to do with how you promote holiday-related events, promotional offers or content through your website. If you consistently market around the holidays from November 1 to the end of the year, you should see relatively steady traffic and sales.

Some days, of course, may be slower than others (like during workdays or earlier in the season), so it’s good to get a sense for the ebb and flow of your site’s holiday traffic. On the other hand, your website might be a major draw only on special sales days and the holidays themselves, so you can use this data to harness your energy for a big push on the days when it’ll have the greatest impact.

Try to identify patterns, so you can plan your design and marketing strategy accordingly.

When did traffic and sales return to their usual amount?

At some point, your site is going to see a dip in activity. There are some businesses that embrace this.

Let’s use Xfinity as an example. Around mid-November of last year, this is the holiday-centric message the top of the home page was pushing:


Xfinity holiday promotion


Xfinity promotes ways to make your home holiday ready (Source: Xfinity) (Large preview)

A month later, on December 9, any mention of the holidays was gone and replaced by a promotion of the upcoming Olympic Winter Games.


Xfinity December promotion


Xfinity stops promoting holidays in December (Source: Xfinity) (Large preview)

One can only assume that a major sporting event like the Olympics helps Xfinity sign more subscribers than trying to capture last-minute sales for the holidays.

Logically, this makes sense. December is a busy time for families. They’re planning travel, purchasing gifts and running around town in preparation for the upcoming celebrations. Most people probably don’t have time to set up a new cable or Internet package and wait around for Xfinity to configure it then.

Bottom line: it’s okay if your holiday-related traffic and sales drop off earlier than December 31. Study your data and let your user behavior guide you in your mobile design and promotion strategy.

What were the most popular sources for mobile traffic?

It’s actually not enough to identify the most popular sources of mobile traffic for your site. Sure, you want to know if organic SEO and social media promotional efforts worked to bring traffic to it… but it won’t really matter if those visitors abandoned the site without taking action.

When you start digging through the ways in which you acquired mobile visitors, make sure to review the sources and keywords used against other telling metrics, like:

  • Bounce rate
  • Time on site
  • Pages visited

This will give you a good sense for what sources — e.g. keywords, PPC ads, social media content, promotional backlinks from other sites — that attracted high-quality leads to it during the holiday season.

What were the most/least successful promotions?

One more thing to look at is what exactly performed the best between November and December with mobile visitors.

Did you run a pop-up promoting free shipping that was dismissed by most mobile visitors, but greatly taken advantage of by those on desktop? Did your custom home page banner touting an upcoming Black Friday sale get more clicks than the home page banner otherwise does at other times of the year? And what pathway resulted in the most conversions?

Dig into what exactly it was that appealed to your mobile visitors. Then, as you work on this year’s plan, focus on reproducing that success.

2. Assess The Navigation

The navigation plays two important roles on a website:

  1. High-level tabs inform visitors on what they’ll find on the site; essentially answering the question, “Is this of relevance to me?”
  2. The navigation itself provides visitors with shortcuts to parts of the site that matter most to them, simplifying their pathway to conversion.

When reviewing your navigation in the context of holiday traffic, you must ensure that it fulfills both of these roles.

Let’s look at two websites that provide relevant links during the holidays while also streamlining the visitors’ journey from entry to holiday-related pages.

Food52 is an online hub for people who enjoy cooking. You can buy kitchen gadgets from the site and peruse a whole bunch of content related to food and cooking.

I want to call out a number of things Food52 does especially well in terms of navigation:


Thanksgiving categories on Food52


The Food52 home page includes Thanksgiving-related categories (Source: Food52) (Large preview)

  1. The hamburger menu is prominently displayed in the top-left, which is exactly where visitors’ eyes will go as they follow the Z-shaped pattern for reading.
  2. The shopping cart, search bar shortcut and profile link are also displayed in the top header, making it easy to navigate to elements that support the shopping experience.
  3. If you scroll down on the home page (as I’ve done in the screenshot above), Food52 includes a good mix of Thanksgiving-related content along with its standard fare. In addition, it includes categories that help users filter through content that’s most relevant to them.

One other thing I’d like to point out is the navigation itself:


Simplified mobile navigation from Food52


Simplified and customized navigation from Food52 for Thanksgiving (Source: Food52) (Large preview)

There are a number of things you’ll notice:

  • The mobile navigation is quite simplified. Despite how many categories and types of pages the site has, the navigation keeps this from being an overwhelming choice.
  • There are special tabs for Thanksgiving and Holiday. This will get users directly to content related to the holiday they’re cooking for.
  • The Hotline — which is its customer service forum — is also featured in the mobile navigation. This element is especially important around the holidays when visitors have questions they need answered quickly.

L.L.Bean is another website that handles mobile navigation well.


L.L.Bean Navigation


L.L.Bean puts the essentials in the navigation (Source: L.L.Bean) (Large preview)

As you can see, there are four buttons located within the mobile header:

  • Hamburger navigation icon: bolded and well-placed;
  • L.L.Bean logo for easy backtracking to the home page;
  • A shopping cart icon which will keep stored items top-of-mind with mobile users;
  • An ever-present search bar to speed up navigation even further.

Once a mobile user expands the hamburger navigation, they encounter this:


L.L.Bean hamburger navigation


L.L.Bean prioritizes customer service and gifts around the holidays (Source: L.L.Bean) (Large preview)

As you can see, “Call Us” is the first option available within the mobile navigation. Again, with people in a rush and trying to get purchases done right over the holidays, having a direct line of communication to the company is important. The account link and “Ship To” personalization are also nice touches as these icons keep conversion top-of-mind.

Now, looking down the navigation, you’ll see this is a pretty standard mega menu. However, take note that at the very top of this category (as is the case for all others) appears a page for “Gifts”. This is not something you see the rest of the year, so that’s another holiday-related touch meant to streamline searches and sales.

3. Use Add-ons At Checkout

Here is everything you need to know to optimize conversions at mobile checkout. If I can add an additional two cents to this matter, though, I’d like to briefly talk about add-ons at checkout… but only around the holidays.

Typically, I believe that a fully streamlined checkout process is essential to capturing as many conversions as possible on mobile devices. It’s hard enough typing out all that information (if it doesn’t auto-populate) and trusting that devices and websites will keep payment information secure.

However…

When it comes to designing the checkout for holiday shoppers, I think it’s at least worth experimenting with add-ons. For example:

  • Promo codes
  • Free delivery options
  • Shorter, but more premium delivery or pick up in store options
  • Gift wrapping.

Nordstrom doesn’t even wait for visitors to get to the checkout to promote this.


Nordstrom free shipping


Nordstrom promotes free shipping and returns right away (Source: Nordstrom) (Large preview)

The very top of the site has a sticky bar promoting the free shipping and returns offer. This way, visitors are already in the mindset that they can get their Black Friday purchases or holiday gifts for even cheaper than planned.

Fitbit has another example of this I really like:


Fitbit holiday promotions


Fitbit promotes sales and free expedited shipping (Source: Fitbit) (Large preview)

The top-half of the Fitbit homepage gets visitors into the mindset that there are cost savings galore here. Not only are items on sale, but certain orders come with free and expedited shipping. And the site clearly states when the sale ends, which will keep customers from getting upset if gifts don’t arrive on time. (It will also probably motivate them to get their shopping done sooner if they want to cash in on the sale.)

So all appropriate expectations regarding pricing and shipping are set right from the very get-go, making checkout go more smoothly.

I know that some may argue these will be bad for UX (and normally I’d join them), but I don’t see them as distractions during the holidays. This is an expensive and busy time of year.

Anything you can add to checkout that says, “Hey, we’re thinking about you and want to make this holiday season go just a little more smoothly” would go over well with your users.

4. Give Images A Seasonal Touch

Images are a tricky thing this time of year. You want to use them to appeal to holiday-minded visitors, but you don’t want to overdo it because images add a lot of pressure to your server. You need your site running fast, so be smart about what you do with them.

  1. Resize them before you ever add them to your site. There’s no need to use oversized images if they’re going to appear smaller online.
  2. Optimize your images with compression tools before and after they’re added to the design. This will free up some space they would otherwise take.
  3. If your users’ journey starts above-the-fold, you might want to consider lazy-loading images.

That said, images can go a long way in communicating to visitors that your site and business are ready to spread some holiday cheer without having to ever explicitly say it. This might be the ideal choice for those of you who design websites for global audiences. Perhaps you’d rather use an image that evokes a festive feeling because you don’t want to unintentionally offend anyone who doesn’t celebrate the holiday your copy calls express attention to.

Here is a great example from Uncommon Goods:


Uncommon Goods holiday home page


Uncommon Goods holiday home page (Source: Uncommon Goods) (Large preview)

I wouldn’t necessarily say the images used here are festive, but there are unique elements that evoke a certain association with the holidays. Like the color green used within the photos. Or the partial glances of what appear to be snow globes. They’re seasonal elements, but not necessarily relegated to Christmas, Hanukkah or Kwanzaa.

Then, there’s the United States Postal Service (USPS) website. Granted, this website targets visitors within the United States, but it remains mindful of the differences in religions practiced and holidays celebrated.


USPS festive image


USPS uses a non-denominational image to promote the holidays (Source: USPS) (Large preview)

The message remains neutral as does the image itself. The USPS is simply trying to help people quickly and festively send holiday cards, gifts and other items to distant relatives and friends.

5. Review The Customer Journey

The factor of speed is a big one when it comes to designing the customer journey. While the navigation cuts down on any unnecessary steps that might be taken when visitors can afford a more leisurely pace, your design should expedite the rest.

In other words:

  • Start talking about holiday-related content, products, pages and links right on the home page.
  • Make sure you have at least one mention above-the-fold, whether it’s in the navigation, in a blog link or in a seasonal promo.
  • Use the data from last year to streamline the ideal pathway from the home page to conversion.
  • Walk through that pathway as a visitor on both desktop and mobile. Is it as clear, concise and direct as possible?
  • Check the responsiveness of the pathway. Your site, in general, needs to be responsive, but if you’re optimizing a certain journey for visitors and you want them to convert on mobile, then extra care needs to be taken.

Below is another example from the Food52 website from the holidays. As you can see in this snippet, two kinds of holiday-related content are promoted. What’s cool about them, though, is that it’s not necessarily in-your-face.


Food52’s festive home page design


Food52 adds a holiday touch to its home page design and copy (Source: Food52) (Large preview)

The relish recipe could easily be used any time of the year. However, because pomegranates are often considered a winter food, this falls into the category of holiday-related content. The second post is more blatant about attracting holiday readers.

The final element in this screenshot is also worth taking note of. To start, it appears they’ve customized the copy specifically for this time of year. All it takes is one addition of the word “joyfully” to let visitors know that Food52 took time to make its site just a little more festive.

I also want to give them kudos for including a newsletter subscription box here and in other key areas of the site.

If the research from Adobe is right and only about half of mobile visitors convert, then this is a smart design choice. This way, Food52 can collect visitor information on mobile and contact them later. When interested visitors receive the reminder at a more convenient time and place, they can hop onto their desktop or other preferred device and finish the conversion process.

Another site which I think handles the customer journey optimization well is Cracker Barrel.


Cracker Barrel home page design


Cracker Barrel home page design (Source: Cracker Barrel) (Large preview)

Cracker Barrel doesn’t overdo it when it comes to designing for the holidays. Instead, it’s developed a series of calls-to-action that set certain types of visitors on the right path.

The first one features an image of what looks like a holiday feast with the CTA “Order Heat N’ Serve”. That’s brilliant. If people are taking the time to visit this site right before Thanksgiving, it’s probably to see if they can get help preparing their major feast… which it appears they can.

The second section sort of looks festive, though I’d still say they play it safe with choice of color, texture and gift card image. With a CTA of “Buy Gift Cards”, they’re now appealing to holiday shoppers. Not only can you get a whole feast conveniently prepared by Cracker Barrel, but you can buy gifts here, too.

Sometimes designing for the holidays isn’t about the blatant use of snowflake imagery or promoting recipes for cooking a turkey. Sometimes it’s about understanding what your users’ particular needs are at that time and helping setting them on that exact journey right away.

Wrap-Up

I understand that there are ways to add a dancing Santa to a site or to spruce up pop-ups with animated text and images, but I think subtler is better.

It’s kind of like the whole holiday music and decorations thing. How many times have you gone to your local drug store at the end of October for the purposes of getting Halloween candy, only to be met by an entire aisle full of holiday decorations? Or maybe you entered a department store like Macy’s in November, thinking you’ll beat the crazy holiday crowds. And, yet, holiday music is already playing. It’s overkill.

If you want to impress mobile visitors with your website around the holidays, focus on making this a worthwhile experience. Optimize your server for high volumes of traffic, put extra security in place, reorganize the navigation and add some small festive touches to your design that call attention to the most relevant parts of your site at this time of year.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, yk, il)


Excerpt from: 

Get Your Mobile Site Ready For The 2018 Holiday Season

How to use pricing psychology to motivate your shoppers: Two test results just in time for Black Friday

Reading Time: 8 minutesBlack Friday, Cyber Monday, holiday sales, and post-Christmas blow-outs: We’re coming up to the biggest buying season of the year….Read blog postabout:How to use pricing psychology to motivate your shoppers: Two test results just in time for Black Friday

The post How to use pricing psychology to motivate your shoppers: Two test results just in time for Black Friday appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

Originally posted here:  

How to use pricing psychology to motivate your shoppers: Two test results just in time for Black Friday

Free Icon Set: Happy 4th Of July (20 Icons, PNG, EPS, AI, SVG)

Every once in a while, we publish freebies related to different occasions and themes. Today, we’d like to share an icon set dedicated to a well-known upcoming American holiday. Some of you may already be working on the usual flyers or brochures, so we thought we’d help you out with a set of colorful icons to spice up your designs a bit differently this year. Thank us later!
Designed by the creative folks at Vecteezy, this freebie contains 20 illustrations of some lovely things that shouldn’t be left out on this particular holiday.

Visit link:

Free Icon Set: Happy 4th Of July (20 Icons, PNG, EPS, AI, SVG)

Better Form Design: One Thing Per Page (Case Study)

In 2008, I worked on Boots.com. They wanted a single-page checkout with the trendiest of techniques from that era, including accordions, AJAX and client-side validation.
Each step (delivery address, delivery options and credit-card details) had an accordion panel. Each panel was submitted via AJAX. Upon successful submission, the panel collapsed and the next one opened, with a sliding transition.
It looked a little like this:
Boots’ single-page checkout, using an accordion panel for each step.

Read original article: 

Better Form Design: One Thing Per Page (Case Study)

MJML – How To Make Responsive HTML Email Coding Easy

Email is one of the best ways to engage with your users, especially during the holiday season. However, if you want to stand out, no matter how beautiful your emails are, you need to make sure they render correctly in your reader’s inbox, regardless of what email client they’re using. Creating responsive email is not an easy task, and there are various reasons for that.
First, there is no standard in the way email clients render HTML.

More here:  

MJML – How To Make Responsive HTML Email Coding Easy

Get a Jump-Start on 2017 with These Free Webinars

If you’re like me, your inbox is a mix of professional emails sprinkled with a dash of webinars and a touch of ebooks.

Sometimes, I’ll open one of these hyper-actionable and insightful emails, but no matter how hard I try, I can’t follow through (despite my good intentions).

The truth is, even if I carve out time during the day, I focus on what needs to be accomplished now, and often that doesn’t include improving my marketing skills for the future.

There, I said it.

Now that I’ve revealed the truth, I have to admit that operating this way will only get me so far.

Which is why this holiday season, I’m taking advantage of some much-needed free time to level up my conversion marketing skills. And you can too! 

We’ve handpicked some of our most actionable webinars, filled with expert advice that will not only help you increase your conversions, but also get you on track to becoming the marketer you want to be in 2017.

So instead of spending the holidays eating yourself into a peppermint bark-induced coma, brush up on the skills that will make the most impact in 2017. (Or do both — we vote for both.)

Link: 

Get a Jump-Start on 2017 with These Free Webinars

Thumbnail

Happy High-Converting Howl-idays from Unbounce [VIDEO]

screen-shot-2016-12-19-at-10-46-14-am

Working at Unbounce has its perks. But the best perk by far is working with some of the most talented, friendly people dogs.

There’s Darwin, Gonzo, Winnie, Tribble, Stella, Luna, Billy, Kiki, Carter, Izu, Mango, Leo, Ted, Bruno, Molly, Captain, Falcon, Timmy, Hambone and Lola… just to name a few.

Now you might think the life of an Unbounce office dog is all fun and games, but they’re expected to hit their targets just like the rest of us. In fact, they’ve been working tirelessly on a holiday campaign just for you.


So if you’re running campaigns and need to get a hold of us during the holidays, we’re offering email support during our office closure! Simply shoot an email to support@unbounce.com and the lovely peeps in Customer Success will get back to you. Check out our hours below:

December 24
8AM – 6PM PST / 11AM – 9PM EST

December 26 – December 30
8AM – 9PM PST / 11AM – MIDNIGHT EST

December 31
8AM – 8PM PST / 11AM – 11PM EST

January 2
9AM – 9PM PST / NOON – MIDNIGHT EST

January 5
5AM – MIDNIGHT PST / 8AM – 3AM EST

December 25 & January 1
CLOSED

And while we love delighting you all year long, we’re taking a little break from our regular publishing schedule to spend some time with our loved ones. But don’t fret, we’ll be back in action come the New Year.

So happy holidays, from our family to yours! And may you be blessed with conversions galore this holiday season!

Excerpt from: 

Happy High-Converting Howl-idays from Unbounce [VIDEO]

How Big Brands Use Urgency to Drive Conversions During the Holidays

urgency-holidays-blog
Hurry! Holiday shopping is upon us, which means big conversion opportunities await. Image via Shutterstock.

What’s worse than not being able to find the perfect Christmas gift for someone you love?

How about finding it, then realizing it’s sold out? Sold out.

The thought alone is enough to cause a pre-Christmas meltdown, but while we’re all fretting over the perfect gift, big-brand retailers and ecommerce site owners are off singing carols, waiting for the dollars to roll in. But how do they do it? How do they make us want to buy so feverishly every year? It’s not as if holiday marketing differs significantly from one year to the next.

Holiday marketing is — and always has been — all about urgency, about creating a real (or at least semi-real) timeframe in which people need to act, or they’ll miss out.

In this post, we’re going to look at how brands including Apple, Toys R’ Us, Target and Starbucks use the power of the ‘limited time only’ offer, to turn browsers into customers, who combined will spend billions of dollars online and in-store over the holidays. Then, we’re going to show you how to apply those same principles to your landing pages, so that you can create high-converting offers in time for the Christmas sales.

Urgency: Nothing new at Target

If anyone knows when these Target ads are from, please drop a comment below. They certainly predate the internet, but look at the copy; it wouldn’t look out of place on landing page made today.

The ad features a catchy headline with a clear CTA (“Charge it!”), a descriptive subheader (“Open to midnight! Every weeknight till Christmas.”) and a few simple visuals to show the reader exactly what to expect.

target-full-page-ad
This ad may be decades old, but the principles that made it a success then still ring true today. Image via Target.

It might be a print ad from the 1950s or 60s, but this Christmas ad from Target has almost everything a great landing page needs. Let’s examine it a bit more closely.

target-headline

We talk about headers and headlines a lot at Unbounce. They’re the first port of call for visitors to your landing page, and if you’re not pitching something worth their time, they’re going to bounce.

Your headline creates intrigue, suggests benefits and, especially in the case of holiday campaigns, creates urgency.

Target’s “Be gifty, be thrifty” approach is cutesy and memorable, but also totally appropriate for introducing a holiday sale — it’s about gifts and savings. But “Be gifty, be thrifty” isn’t strong enough on its own. Adding ‘but hurry!’ turns the appreciative smile that comes with a good rhyme, toward a sense of urgency. Better hurry, this ad says, or all the best deals will be gone. It’s a technique that’s been used since cavemen first scratched ads for saber-toothed tiger skins onto the walls of their caves, and it works every time.

Show ’em what you’ve got

Here’s something else we see on modern landing pages — show the people what you’ve got. It doesn’t matter whether it’s an ad, a landing page or an overlay, it’s a pitch. You’re showing people what you’ve got, and at Christmas time, the best way to show people what you’ve got, is to literally show them what you’ve got.

target-featured-products

Make it easy

There’s another key tactic at play here: Make it easy. That means, make it clear that shopping with you is going to be simple and straightforward (more so than if you were to shop with the competition). Time is short, and you need gifts — we’re here to help. Target makes it easy by telling its customers that their Dayton’s credit cards are good there.

Apply it: Target’s four simple rules for creating urgency

  1. Create an attention-grabbing headline which mentions gifts, savings and timeframe.
  2. Ramp up the urgency by getting specific about limited availability.
  3. Show the people what you’ve got.
  4. Suggest to the people how easy the shopping experience can be.

Buy one get one free at Starbucks

For Starbucks lovers, the BOGOF on holiday drinks offer is legendary. And so is the three-hour window in which you can redeem that offer. You’ll rally your friends, you’ll take a half day if need be, but you’re getting to Starbucks between the hours of 2:00 and 5:00.

starbucks-bogo
One for me, one for you… or maybe two for me, none for you. Image via Starbucks.

The variety of holiday drinks on offer is actually secondary in this ad. The focus here in on getting you into the store at a very specific time (between 2:00 and 5:00, when Starbucks is likely to be less busy because everyone’s at work.)

Where’s the urgency? It’s unlikely that they’ll sell out of your favorite, unless they run out of gingerbread syrup. The urgency lies in getting in before the offer closes. You can always come back tomorrow, but Starbucks has us by the brain and we want it now.

The BOGOF offer is so effective, and not just on Starbucks holiday drinks, it almost doesn’t matter what you’re giving away, because one of them is free. That’s evidenced here by the headline and subheader, which are literally a statement of the what/when/where of the offer — no frills required!

Use images that resonate

You go to Starbucks for one reason and one reason only — coffee. Starbucks creates urgency with its visuals by showing customers what they want to see — red cups.

Apply It: Create urgency using limited time offers

Whether it’s a countdown, an end date or a specific timeframe during which people can redeem your offer, or sign up for your webinar, create urgency on your landing page by guiding visitors towards not only what they can get, but also when. Making your countdown highly visible, with either a static image or an animated countdown, only adds to the sense of urgency, too.

Super crazy Christmas cracker bonanza!

If it looks urgent, it’ll make people feel urgent. Most of us are highly receptive to design elements such as color, font, font size and the shape of various elements. Seeing lots of different sized fonts on an ad can be distracting, but it can also create a sense of urgency and liveliness. Look at this example from Toys R’ Us:

toys-r-us
Only a toy store at Christmas could get away with design this over the top. Image via Toys R’ Us.

Most of this is just branding — it’s the way Toys R’ Us does its thing — but around the holidays, the mixing of lower and upper case letters, the bouncy font and the enlarging of certain words has the effect of creating a sort of… hysteria. That’s perhaps not the right way to describe it, but you get the idea, right? It’s all SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! THOUSANDS! TOYS! SHOP EARLY! BIGGEST EVER! QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED!

Apply it: No holds barred

Let’s just go ahead and list every bit of urgency and sale-related copy in this ad:

  • Biggest Cyber Monday Sale Ever!
  • Online only!
  • Save up to 60% on THOUSANDS of items!
  • Quantities are limited, so SHOP EARLY!
  • Shop now

Liberal use of the exclamation mark, capital letters in the middle of sentences and restrictions on when and where you can shop, turn this ad into an assault on your sense of urgency. You know what they say: Go big, or go home. When you’ve got product to move, and if you’ve got the confidence to shout about it from the rooftops, then you go all in.

Stuff, stuff stuff: Shop now for some stuff

What was true fifty years ago is true now; people love stuff, and if you show it to them in a thoughtful way, they’ll buy it.

apple
Apple might have all the budget in the world, but the principles they leverage are free for the taking. Image via Apple.

This ad from Apple is actually for the Black Friday sales, but it works just as well as a Christmas sales ad. Remember in our first vintage Target ad where they showed us what was on offer? Apple doesn’t just show us what’s on offer, they base their entire design on it.

Normally, it’d be pretty crude (and difficult) to sneak your logo into the same ad five times, but don’t forget, when it comes to Christmas sales and ecommerce, as with your landing page, those who dare, win.

Ready. Set. Shop.

How many times do we need to say this? There’s nothing subtle about creating urgency in Christmas sales ads. Apple’s “Ready. Set. Shop.” headline pulls no punches. This is a race, son, and if you’re not quick, all the best stuff will be gone, gone, gone before grandpa nods off after his second cup of eggnog.

And, like old-school Target wanted you to know that your Drayton’s credit card was ok with them. Apple wants you to know that you can shop online or in-store, it’s totally your choice.

Apply It: Leverage your products

There’s a theme running through most of these Christmas ads, and it’s that your product is your greatest asset when it comes to creating urgency.

There will be people who want what you’ve got, and those people are your target audience. The Christmas sales are not a time to pitch for new customers, necessarily. What they are, is a chance to ride the wave of urgency and raise both awareness and revenue. If that means pushing your product more than usual, now is the time to do it.

As quick as a kiss underneath the mistletoe

There certainly is plenty of room for festive cheer, and we encourage you to Christmas up your landing pages as much as possible. But the fact is, people respond to urgency, we don’t want to miss out. It’s why the same techniques work year upon year, and why creating a high-converting holiday landing page really isn’t so complicated.

Still not sure how to build high-converting holiday landing pages?

Download Unbounce and Campaign Monitor’s free guide: The Ultimate Holiday Email Marketing + Landing Page Guide
By providing your contact information, you’re authorizing Unbounce and Campaign Monitor to contact you with marketing materials. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Excerpt from:

How Big Brands Use Urgency to Drive Conversions During the Holidays

How to NOT Distract, Destroy and Decimate Your Google Shopping Traffic

Google Shopping is taking off like a rocket ship. Consumers love the visually based Product Listing Ads, especially on mobile. Retailers are also taking note, spent big on the channel in 2015. That spending paid off: Research showed that Google Shopping Product Listing Ads (PLAs) drove 15% of retailers’ sitewide revenue during Holiday 2015, up from 9.6% in 2014. It’s safe to say that competition in Google Shopping is sure to continue heating up — especially now that Google Shopping ads dominate the right-hand side of the desktop SERP (pictured): So the time is now for Google Shopping users to…

The post How to NOT Distract, Destroy and Decimate Your Google Shopping Traffic appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read original article: 

How to NOT Distract, Destroy and Decimate Your Google Shopping Traffic

Happy High-Converting Holidays from Unbounce [VIDEO]

Unbounce holiday video

When you think of Unbounce, a few key things probably come to mind: landing pages, A/B testing, #CTAConf, exceptionally good looking people (okay, maybe not that one). But what about — dun, dun, dun — Canadian?

Yep, Unbounce is proudly Canadian, with headquarters in Vancouver, British Columbia and a satellite office in Montreal, Quebec. Move over, Silicon Valley, there’s a new tech hub in town… Icicle, err, Mountain Range. (Excuse the dad joke.)

In addition to wishing you a happy, high-converting holiday, we’re here to dispel and reinforce some Canadian stereotypes, including:

  • We are cold. Like, all the time.
  • We don’t live in igloos. I mean, that would be super cool, but where would we charge our smartphones?
  • We do wear an obscene amount of plaid. It is fashionable after all.
  • We don’t drink maple syrup. Because that would result in another Canadian stereotype: We all have diabetes.

But there’s more! So without further ado…

If you’re running campaigns and need to get a hold of us during the holidays; we’re offering email support during our office closure! Simply shoot an email to support@unbounce.com and the lovely peeps in Customer Success will get back to you. Check out our hours below:

December 26 – December 27
9AM – 9PM PST / NOON – MIDNIGHT EST

December 28 – December 31
8AM – 9PM PST / 11AM – MIDNIGHT EST

January 2 – January 3
9AM – 9PM PST / NOON – MIDNIGHT EST

December 25 & January 1
CLOSED

And while we love delighting you all year long, we’re taking a little break from our regular publishing schedule to spend some time with our loved ones. But don’t fret, we’ll be back in action come the New Year.

So happy holidays, from the Great White North! And may you be blessed with conversions galore this holiday season!

View original article: 

Happy High-Converting Holidays from Unbounce [VIDEO]