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Why are You Neglecting the Highest-Traffic Lowest-Converting Page on Your Website?

I’m not talking about your home page. Sure that gets the most traffic, but notice the qualifier in the post title; highest-traffic “lowest-converting”.

But why would you care about a low converting page? Because chances are, it’s not converting because you forgot to add a call to action (CTA).

I’m sure you know about some pages like this on your website, but you’re using one of the following excuses to do nothing about it:

  1. I don’t have the bandwidth to deal with it.
  2. It’s not my responsibility.
  3. I don’t know what to do with it.
  4. I’ll get to it later.

The last excuse is the absolute worst. Because you never will “get to it”.

It’s 2018 – Stop Wasting Time Ignoring This Page

Don’t start this year with yet another failed attempt to go to the gym. Commit one day to optimizing just one page.

For Unbounce, that page is “What is a landing page?“. We’ve held the #1 spot in Google for this term since early 2010, and guess what? We haven’t updated it since early 2010.

Every time we look at Google Analytics, we see this:

10,000 unique visitors every month to that page. And 84.15% of them are NEW visitors. That’s an incredible amount of value.

What does the page look like?

It was embarrassing, to say the least. Spoiler alert I updated it last night. But here’s a screenshot of the abomination that was our previous 8 years of letting visitors down.

A few observations

  • The content is ancient, and has a lot of useless information. Some of which is fundamentally wrong.
  • The CSS is all broken making the layout and reading experience terrible.
  • It links to a bad blog post I wrote in 2010 that has a photo of Miley Cyrus wearing a carrot costume.

You read that right. Miley Cyrus in a carrot costume is the call to action on the highest traffic page on our website (aside from our homepage). #facepalm

How to Convert Top-of-Funnel (TOFU) Traffic

“What is a Landing Page?” is the most TOFU page on our website, which means we need to choose carefully when we ask people to do something.

I decided to go with three options in a choose-your-own-adventure format, as a learning exercise so we can study what these visitors are actually looking for.

Option 1: “I’m new to landing pages, and want to learn more.”
CTA >> [ Watch The Landing Page Sessions Video Series ]

Option 2: “I have a landing page, but I’m not sure how good it is.”
CTA >> [ Grade Your Page With The Landing Page Analyzer ]

Option 3: “I need to build a landing page.”
CTA >> [ Try The Unbounce Builder in Preview Mode ]

The New “What is a…” Page

(Click to see the full-length page in a scrolling lightbox.)

High-Traffic, Yes. High-Converting? We’ll see.

I’ll be looking at the analytics (Hotjar click and scroll heatmaps), Google Analytics (changes in basic behavior), KISS Metrics (changes in signups), and I’ll report back with the results later in Product Awareness Month.

Find your highest-traffic lowest-converting page, now

Do it.

Cheers
Oli Gardner

p.s.

Originally posted here: 

Why are You Neglecting the Highest-Traffic Lowest-Converting Page on Your Website?

Eye-Catching App Icon Design: How To

Creating that singular piece of graphic design that users will first interact with each time they encounter your product can be intimidating. A beautiful, identifiable and memorable app icon design can have a huge impact on the popularity and success of the app. But how exactly does one make a “good” app icon? What does that even mean? Fear not, I’ve put together some tips and advice to help answer these questions and to guide you on your way to designing great app icons.

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Eye-Catching App Icon Design: How To

Infographic: How Much Copy Should You Use On Your Home Page?

how much copy

There’s no question that your home page is the most important page on your website. It’s incredibly important for converting visitors into customers and it’s also deathly important to your SEO. Usually, having concise home page copy in addition to a clutter-free experience tends to be the best for increasing conversions. But on the other hand, it’s the worst for SEO. Generally, a long and descriptive home page is probably your best shot at letting the search engines know what your business is about. So what do you do? If you’re a startup – Shoot for descriptive copy. Keep your…

The post Infographic: How Much Copy Should You Use On Your Home Page? appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Infographic: How Much Copy Should You Use On Your Home Page?

Micro and Macro Conversions | Choosing the Right CRO Metrics

Clearly defining the key performance indicators, or KPIs, is the first step to any Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) campaign. It is only through tracking and measuring results on these KPIs that a business can optimize for growth.

The KPIs in CRO can be broadly divided into two categories: macro and micro conversions (or goals).

  • Macro conversions are the primary goals of a website. Examples of macro conversions for SaaS, eCommerce, or any other online enterprise could be revenue, contact us, request a quote, and free-trial.
  • Micro conversions are defined as steps or milestones that help you reach the end goal. Micro conversion examples would include email clicks, downloads on white paper, blog subscriptions, and so on.

Improving macro goals is imperative to the growth of any enterprise. However, it is equally important that enterprises measure micro goals so as to enhance overall website usability. Avinash Kaushik talks on similar lines: “Focus on measuring your macro (overall) conversions, but for optimal awesomeness, identify and measure your micro conversions as well.”

In this blog post, we discuss why enterprises should:

  • Track Micro Conversions Alongside Macro Conversions
  • Optimize Micro Conversions That Impact Macro Conversions

Track Micro Conversions Alongside Macro Conversions

Each micro conversion acts as a process milestone in the conversion funnel and impacts the ultimate step, or macro conversion. The following example explains this in a simple manner. Let’s take the case of a regular conversion funnel of a SaaS website. The funnel starts at the home page and ends with a purchase.

The visits from the home page to the features page and from the features page to the pricing page are micro conversions in this example. These micro conversions have the same end goal, that is, “purchases”.

conversion funnel SaaS - Micro Goals and Macro Goals

If we were to double micro conversions from the home page to the “features” page, the result would be almost same as shown in the table below:

Increase in Micro Conversions Impacts Macro Conversions

The number of completed purchases, that is, the macro conversion, also doubled. This example illustrates how micro conversions can have an impact on the macro conversions in a funnel.

 Dr. Flint McGlaughlin, Managing Director and CEO of MECLABS, shares the same thoughtThe funnel represents and should be thought of as a representation of what is the heart of marketing, and that is a series of decisions. Those decisions are key transitions; I would call them micro-yeses. There are a series of micro-yeses necessary to help someone achieve an ultimate yes. The Ultimate Yes is the sale in most cases. At each of these junctures, we have to help people climb up the funnel.”

While there are a number of reasons why micro conversions should be tracked, here are the two main arguments:

  • Micro conversions help you assess buyer readiness, or intent.
  • Micro conversions help you assess points of friction in a buyer’s journey.

Micro Conversions Help You Assess Buyer Readiness or Intent

All visitors who land on your website don’t have the intent to make a purchase. Some of them could be running a quick comparative research while others could be checking out your products or services during their first visit. Tracking micro conversions helps you understand whether a visitor could be a potential customer. For instance, tracking micro conversions, such as downloading a product brochure or adding a product to a wishlist, shows the future possibility of conversions on a macro goal.

NN Group has defined micro conversions as, “These are not the primary goals of the site, but are desirable actions that are indicators of potential future macro conversions.”

These micro conversions, or secondary goals, are worth tracking as they clearly show that a visitor might have an interest in your business or product.

Here is an example:

PriceCharting conducted a preliminary A/B test to study if their buyers intended to buy from them at higher prices. They used the learning from this preliminary test for future testing. The objective of the test was defined as: Figuring out how price sensitive were the customers. On the “control,” they used “Starts at $4” next to the “Price Guide” CTA. Two other variations were studied against control. One of them stated a starting price of $2 next to the CTA, and the other mentioned $1 as the starting price. 

micro conversions on CTA for Control
Control
Micro Conversions on CTA for Variations
Variations

The test results showed that the variation which stated the highest buys won the most clicks on the “Pricing Guide” CTA. This implied that people visiting PriceCharting valued their products and showed readiness to buy even at higher prices. The learning from this exercise for PriceCharting’s future tests was that price was not a major factor influencing their visitors. 

Micro Conversions  Help You Assess Points of Friction in Your Buyer’s Journey

Along with providing a complete view of your buyer’s journey, tracking micro conversions also helps identify drop-offs on the conversion funnel. For example, on an eCommerce website, users frequently visiting the product page but not adding products to cart implies something is putting off the visitors for moving from “product” to “add-to-cart.” Optimizing the micro goal here, which is increasing “add-to-cart” actions, will ultimately result in increased revenue.

Here’s an example of a multi-step sign-up form on a SaaS website. Suppose many users do not complete the form. By tracking micro conversions on the form, you will be able to identify the friction points. Maybe one of the steps in the form that asks for credit card information of users brings the most friction. With this knowledge, you can assess where users lie in their buyer journey and optimize the form accordingly. Optimizing each step in the form or micro conversions will help you improve your macro conversion.

When testing, the primary goal in the above examples can be to improve micro conversions. A case study by VWO talks about how displaying a banner for top deals increased engagement by 105% for eCommerce client Bakker-helligom. Ben Vooren, an online marketer at Bakker, realized that visitors go to the information pages and read the information, but leave without buying from the website, which was the macro goal. This was the friction that Ben wanted to address. He hypothesized that adding commercially-focused banners at the top of all the information pages (micro goal) will help resolve this friction. The test was run for 12 days on 8,000 visitors. The winning variation led to a 104.99% increase in visits to the “top deals page” and a statistical significance of 99.99%.

Optimize Those Micro Conversions Which Impact Macro Conversions

While running an A/B test for multiple variations, studying micro conversions on each of those variations can provide valuable insights. It can show you which changes impacted micro conversions, resulted in improved macro conversions, and which ones did not. As we mentioned, there are a number of micro conversions that you can look to optimize. But not all of these would contribute equally to macro conversions.

For instance, to optimize an eCommerce product page with macro goal of “increasing checkout”, there could be a number of test variations that you can run:

In Variation 1 the CTA ‘add to wish-list’ is made prominent
In Variation 2 the CTA ‘save for later’ is made prominent

Both of these variations will not yield the same impact on the macro goal of increasing checkouts. You may realise that making the “save for later” CTA more prominent is yielding more increase in checkouts. So you would want to prioritize that micro conversion in the subsequent tests.

That said, when running a conversion rate optimization program, the test goal should be set as close to revenue as possible. There are two scenarios explained here wherein optimization for micro conversions can prove disastrous:

When Macro Conversions are Not Considered

Solely optimizing for micro conversions without considering how it impacts a major business goal is a total waste of time and efforts.

Peep Laja from ConversionXL says, “If you don’t have enough transaction volume to measure final purchases or revenue, that sucks. But if you now optimize for micro conversions instead, you might be just wasting everyone’s time as you can’t really measure business impact.”

For example, an eCommerce website  can increase micro conversions (visits from the home page to the product page) by making the menu bar prominent on the home page. This change might result in higher visits to the product page. However, if you are not tracking the impact of this change on macro conversion (checkouts),  the whole optimization process would lack direction.

When the Focus is on Quick Results

A/B tests with macro conversions as the primary goal can take a long time to provide conclusive results. Conversely, certain tests which measure micro conversions have a lesser testing time.

This happens because macro goals are always less in number in comparison to micro. For statistically significant results, a good amount of conversions on the macro goal are required. This exercise would take comparatively much more time than collecting micro conversions.

For example, on a SaaS website, if your primary goal was to increase visits from “the home page to the products page,” the test will take lesser time (because it has higher traffic) to give conclusive results compared to if the primary goal for the test was “Request a Demo.”

However, testing micro conversions with the objective of completing an experiment faster can lead to failure. While you can track different micro conversions, each of them may not result in a winning variation. This happens because each of those micro conversions might not directly lead to a lift in conversion rates. The false Micro-Conversion Testing Assumption example explained in a post on WidderFunnel, is one example that explains this. The gist of the proposed example is that optimizing micro conversions by assuming an equal drop-off at each stage of the funnel ultimately led to the loss of revenue.

Conclusion

The success of a CRO program rests on how well you define your micro and macro goals. The closer your micro goals are to the end goal in the funnel, the higher are your chances of getting a winning variation. On the other hand, tracking micro conversions and improving them can help you enhance the overall UX of your website.

What metrics are you tracking and optimizing for your conversion rate optimization program? Drop us a comment and let us know.

Free-trial CTA

The post Micro and Macro Conversions | Choosing the Right CRO Metrics appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Micro and Macro Conversions | Choosing the Right CRO Metrics

ProcessWire CMS – A Beginner’s Guide

Systems for managing content are more often than not rather opinionated. For example, most of them expect a certain rigid content structure for inputting data and then have a specific engraved way of accessing and outputting that data, whether or not it makes sense. Additionally, they rarely offer effective tools to break out of the predefined trails if a case requires it.
ProcessWire is a content management system (CMS) distributed under the Mozilla Public License version 2.

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ProcessWire CMS – A Beginner’s Guide

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Testimonial Messaging A/B Test Increases Conversion Rate by 22%

This case study is Part 1 of a two-part series that comprises A/B tests conducted by Buildium, a property management software company, that is used to manage more than 600,000 residential units in 31 countries worldwide. The aim of these tests was to market their product to a wider range of property managers.

Background

Buildium‘s competitors have pigeonholed us by claiming we are only appropriate for small property managers (50 units or less)*. To combat this perception, we decided to change a few elements on our website through A/B testing different variations of our messaging.

Test Information
buildium_logo_small Company: Buildium Category: Real Estate Goal: Form Submission / Free Trial
Conversation Rate: 22%

We ran two separate A/B tests to see how we could improve the messaging on both the homepage and pricing page. The aim of these tests was to increase conversions by more effectively advertising the number of units that Buildium supports. In this case study, we’ll take a look at how improving our homepage testimonials improved our conversions.

Hypothesis

The test on the homepage was to see whether we could increase conversions by displaying testimonials from small, medium, and large property managers, communicating that our software works great no matter how many units you manage.

Test

The control on our website had a heading: “Proof, meet pudding. We can help you too”, with the subhead that read: “We have over 8000 happy customers across the world.”  This was followed by testimonials from our customers with no mention of the the customer’s unit size. This failed to bring out the fact that we’re serving customers ranging from small, medium to large property managers. This is what the control looked like:

Builium-Control-Testimonials

In an attempt to boost free trial sign-ups, we decided to test a new presentation of our testimonials that more clearly articulated the scalability of our product. Each testimonial displayed the company’s unit count for context, and the testimonial copy itself spoke to the specific benefits that Buildium provides to a company of that size. We also introduced a new headline (Whatever your size, Buildium is the perfect fit) to echo this messaging. Though we understand that the most statistically significant tests only change one element on the page, for the sake of this test we chose to introduce these three changes that all work together to form the new experience. We tested three variations of this new experience against the control, each with a different subhead. Here’re how the winning variation read:

Builium-Variation-Testimonials

 Results

For the home page, the winning variation was the one that specifically mentioned our ability to handle small, medium, and large companies. The new headline, testimonial copy and the addition of the unit count had a positive effect on conversions, as all of the new variations converted at a higher rate than the control. I believe that subhead of the variation above was the most successful because it set the expectation that the three testimonials below would be from companies of these three sizes. And since we followed this by mentioning the units of the property owners, we were successful in getting across the message that Buildium serves more than just small businesses. 

buildium-comparison

Our new marketing site has a trial form embedded directly at the bottom of the homepage, which means that we needed to track for two separate conversion goals: submitting the form, or clicking the CTA to go to free-trial. Below you will find the results for each goal, with the sum of the two used to calculate the total success of the variation.

buildium-table-1

Based on the VWO results, all of the variations had conversion rates higher than the control. This leads me to believe that regardless of the subhead, the addition of the new headline, testimonials, and unit count all created an experience that more effectively communicated the scalability of our product, attracting a wider range of customers.

Note*: In our industry, small property management companies generally manage up to 100 units, medium ones manage 100 to 600 units, and large ones manage more than 600 units. Our largest customer uses our software to manage over 7,000 units. There are also “extra-large” companies who might manage tens of thousands of units, but we do not market to these companies as they would be better suited with an enterprise solution.

The post Testimonial Messaging A/B Test Increases Conversion Rate by 22% appeared first on Visual Website Optimizer Blog.

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Testimonial Messaging A/B Test Increases Conversion Rate by 22%

When Editors Design – Controlling Presentation In Structured Content

Thanks to the skyrocketing popularity of mobile devices, a new generation of designers and CMS developers has found the religion of Structured Content. Once the domain of semantic markup purists and information architects, structured content models are at the heart of most multi-channel and multi-device Web projects.
At Lullabot, we often work with media, publishing and enterprise clients. Those businesses produce so much content and manage so many publishing channels that keeping presentation and design-specific markup out of their content is an absolute requirement.

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When Editors Design – Controlling Presentation In Structured Content

Frank: A Free WordPress Theme Designed For Speed

Today we are pleased to release Frank, an open-source WordPress theme designed and built to provide a light, responsive and unobtrusive reading experience. The theme’s default home page makes 9 database queries and consists of 2 requests weighing at roughly 30KB (9.5KB gzipped). Frank keeps it basic: no Javascript dependence, no unnecessary images, just a simple, no-frills, fast blog theme. The theme is introduced by its developer, P.J. Onori. —Ed.

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Frank: A Free WordPress Theme Designed For Speed

Do Mobile And Desktop Interfaces Belong Together?

The term “responsive design” has gathered a lot of well-deserved buzz among Web designers. As you probably know, it refers to an easy way to dynamically customize interfaces for different devices and to serve them all from the same website, with no need for a separate mobile domain.
It solves one major problem, and very elegantly: how to adapt visual interfaces for mobile, tablet and desktop browsers. But when unifying a website, you have to solve problems other than how it will appear in different browsers, which could make the task much more difficult than you first realize.

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Do Mobile And Desktop Interfaces Belong Together?

Best Newspaper Themes For WordPress

In this article, the first in our WordPress “Best of” series, we’ll go over WordPress newspaper themes. We’ll bring you the 30 best WordPress newspaper themes, as well as two news-aggregator themes. We haven’t included “news magazine” themes, but we’ll get to those in our upcoming article on magazine-style themes.

The themes are categorized a bit differently than what you may be used to. The line between magazine and newspaper themes is blurry, but we’ve tried to make that distinction.

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Best Newspaper Themes For WordPress