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CMOs are Becoming CROs: How to Integrate Marketing and Sales to Actually Drive Revenue

Note: This is a guest article written by David Zheng, the Founder of GrowthWit and WiseMerchant and the Head of Growth at BuildFire.Any and all opinions expressed in the post are David’s.

Marketing and sales teams have a reputation for rivalry.

Although they work toward the same outcome, each has a different approach.

As Chip Doyle once pointed out, marketing wants to tell you what to buy, while sales want to hear why you’re buying it (so they can sell you more).

Marketing requires a one-way communication, while sales require a two-way conversation.

But technology and buyer habits are changing all of that. Marketing is no longer a one-way communication, and both teams are relying more heavily on the other to truly understand what the customer wants. Now every task is a Sales and marketing collaboration.

This also means that roles are changing. Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) and Chief Revenue Officers (CROs) must find a way to play nice.

How the Relationship between CMO and CRO Is Changing

In the past, CROs were mostly responsible for driving profitability and sustainability. It was the job of the sales team to ensure financial success for the organization.

That typically meant putting people on phones to answer customer questions.

The CMO, on the other hand, was responsible for making sure that people knew about the organization—to gain awareness and find new potential markets for the sales team.

They both have the same ultimate goal, but each takes a different path to get there.

sales and marketing alignment activities flow chart
But the Internet changed all of that.

Where once the salesperson was the most trusted source of information about a given product or service, now shoppers have limitless access to information—product data, customer reviews, and so on.

One search gives them all the answers they need.

Customers also have a myriad of touchpoints with any given company. From social media to email outreach to an online contact form, they no longer have to call only one person to get what they need.

This has shifted the role of the CMO to the forefront.

In today’s digital market, it’s about finding ways to not only make people aware of the brand but also trust the brand’s message in the same way they earlier trusted the salesperson over the phone.

Of course, that doesn’t mean that the CRO is obsolete. Far from it, sales will always matter.

It simply means that the lines between the CRO/CMO are blurring together in a new way.

sales and marketing alignment for communication with customer

Following some of the Sales and marketing alignment best practices, both parties are now responsible for the financial well-being and reputation of the company. If one fails, the other fails too.

It’s more important than ever that these roles find ways to integrate so that both teams produce real, measurable results.

With that in mind, here are 5 best practices for sales and marketing to help them collaborate to drive revenue.

1. Sharing Sales and Marketing Data for Customer Research

Both marketing and sales use targeted buyer personas to inform their strategies.

According to the Data-Driven Marketing Survey by Teradata, 50% of marketers agree that data is the most underutilized asset in their organizations; but less than 10% use the data in a systematic way.

Salespeople have a leg up when it comes to data, as they’re often the first to develop buyer personas to understand their customers better.

But that data isn’t always accessible to the marketing department.

sales and marketing quality data report January 2017

Marketing teams also need these buyer personas to update its strategies.

The team may need to know whether the customer is a Millennial or a Gen X-er (social media or email?), their income level (affordable or luxury?), and any other behavioral drivers (mobile or desktop?) that might drive their purchasing decisions.

Who knows this data better than anyone else? Salespeople.

The sales team has insights into customer’s goals, mindset, and expectations, and potential obstacles to purchasing.

Marketing needs to have this data to create content and advertising that actually works.

Sales and Marketing Persona comic

To build an effective partnership, sales will need to share the following information with marketing:

  • Sales data:
    • Which products are selling well?
    • Which products are faltering?
  • Customer lifetime value:
    • How low or high are retention rates?
    • How long does the average customer stick around?
  • Internal performance metrics:
    • How fast is the turnaround for a product or service?
    • Are there any obvious bottlenecks?

In turn, marketing should share the following data with the sales team:

  • Traffic and engagement:
    • How many visitors are coming to the site? How many are engaging? Where are they coming from?
  • Email marketing: What are the open and click-through rates for each email campaign?
  • Clicks and conversions: What is the conversion rate of sales landing pages? What are the shopping cart abandonment rates?

With each party measuring these metrics, each can proactively adjust its strategies to achieve better results.

Lead flow for sales and marketing alignment

Marketing can see how its ad campaigns affect the lifetime value, or whether the promises are creating more demand than the team can keep up with (causing bottlenecks), for example.

Sales can see whether there is a significant gap in the sales process (too many people are leaving the website without buying!) or whether or not email is still the best outreach source for certain customer segments.

2. Using Sales CRM Data to Inform Marketing Strategies

Timing is critical in sales.

The sales team has a sense of its current month’s forecast (or even the next month’s) when it comes to the revenue. Part of the job of the CRO is to answer the “when” of the sales cycle.

When is the best time to promote a specific product or launch an outreach campaign? When should marketing initiatives be kicked off? When should sales expect to see results?

best time for sales team to contact customers

The marketing team is the “how” and “what.”

How should that product be promoted based on the sales cycle? Is it a seasonal product or available year-round? How will people be made aware of changes to the product? What is the desired outcome?

Sales should have a good idea of when the best time is to launch a new initiative, according to the purchasing data.

Marketing should know what that initiative should be and to whom it should be targeted, as well as the specifics of the time of the day and week (based on engagement metrics).

sales and marketing emails optimized for the best day of the week

Without both teams working in harmony, it’s possible to launch a revolutionary marketing campaign that doesn’t sell any products at a measurable level.

Here’s an example:

Say you have a 25% conversion rate for every step of the sales funnel. If your monthly sales target for the next quarter is $1 million and your average sales are around $10,000, you need around 100 conversions every month to achieve this goal.

But for some months, sales are slower than others.

Let’s assume that January and February are much slower sales months compared to June and July.

By using this information, the marketing team can determine what offer to include for customers during those months (discounts on orders over a certain price point, for example) in their campaigns.

But this means that the sales team needs a reliable way of identifying these trends, like a sales pipeline CRM, and give the marketing team access to this information.

sales pipeline

Sales should know where leads are coming from when the customers are more willing to buy, and what entices the customers the most so that the marketing team knows how to send out the right offer at the right time.

3. Adjusting Ad Campaigns by Using Sales Data

Advertising is one of the main drivers in sales, and one of the main tasks in marketing.

One of the challenges with advertising is that it’s easy for a company to spend more money compared to earn money.

It’s always a risk. You could drop millions on an ad campaign only to see a moderate sales increase. But this risk gap can be closed when sales and marketing work together to produce a certain outcome.

Take PPC advertising, for example.

For a marketer, a successful pay-per-click (PPC) advertising campaign might be the one that just drives engagement.

successful adwords campaign for driving more engagement

If someone clicks a Google PPC ad, goes to the home page, and then clicks through the website, that’s a success.

To that end, marketers may try to use specific keywords to improve website traffic or engagement.

But the sales team cares about one area—sales.

It doesn’t matter if website traffic improves but no qualified leads come from it. They might care if an ad had a high cost-per-click (CPC), and was essentially “ineffective” in producing a real, paying customer.

Sales is looking for revenue, not just metrics.

channel wise breakdown of ROI for marketing

So what does this mean for a partnership between sales and marketing? It means that both have to work together to create the most effective campaigns.

Marketers need to understand the Lead Scoring System (and subsequently, the sales CRM system) so that when they spend money on PPC ads, they know which targeted personas will be most likely to convert.

Both parties need to understand how the marketing funnel works and how it can be combined with the sales funnel to create something new.

new sales and marketing alignment funnelA top-of-the-funnel marketing “lead” (like a website visitor) may not ever turn into a customer, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t important for sales.

The marketing team needs to know how to measure successful campaigns based on sales data, not on just its own metrics.

4. Improving Brand Identity (and Sales) with Marketing

Not everything that impacts sales is measurable.

A study by Harvard Business Journal found that CEOs tend to favor sales over marketing because sales outcomes are often more “tangible.”

As a CEO puts it, “Why should I invest in more marketing when I can get better results by hiring more salespeople?”

Because of this mindset, many marketing teams are underfunded, and, as a result, underperforming.

suggested percentage of revenue that needs to be spent on marketing.

This is a problem because there are many immeasurable entities that can impact your bottom line.

Brand identity, for example, is not measurable by any metric, yet a brand’s reputation can be a key driver of that brand’s equity.

This is also known as the “halo effect,” or a situation when a customer buys from a brand based on its positive reputation, whether or not the product is truly inspirational.

In other words, the value of a brand can be measured by its marketing.

When Apple began marketing the iPod back in 2005, they put millions into advertising. You may remember the campaign.

marketing of apple ipod comic

Even though iPod (and iTunes) sales made up only 39% of Apple’s overall profits that year, by the end of their marketing campaign, they were hailed as a technology leader and revolutionaries.

As a result, its fiscal year sales in 2006 increased 38% and their profits rose by 384%.

It has since leveraged their reputation as tech innovators to create more and better products, making it one of the biggest companies in the world.

And it doesn’t even sell the iPod anymore.

sales of apple ipod year on year

This goes to show that when the marketing team is properly supported, they can produce results worthy of the sales department.

5. Improving Sales Outreach with Marketing Analytics

One of the biggest contention points between sales and marketing is measuring outcomes.

For marketers, a “good” outcome for an email outreach campaign is high click-through and open rates. However, sales don’t care about click-through rates. It cares about sales.

It might be better to measure your outreach campaign multidimensionally.

measuring content marketing valueOn the other hand, you won’t necessarily get sales if no one opens and clicks through the email.

This is where marketing and sales must come together to identify what a successful outreach campaign looks like.

The marketing team should introduce key analytic tools to the sales team.

While the marketing team can also forward crucial data or statistics, at some point, it inevitably will become an issue of “teaching a man to fish.”

Teaching helps as an economical resource

If the marketing team moves ahead based on important information, the sales team might accidentally ignore crucial statistics that can improve its sales strategy, just because they don’t fully understand it.

This can lead to miscommunication and a negative impact on sales.

If the sales team understands how to use the same tools that marketers use; however, it can create a seamless conversation between the two departments and reduce the odds of an essential piece of data being overlooked.

right marketing or sales tool for your job

Even beyond analytics, sales and marketing teams should a discuss other ways to use technology effectively.

For example, if the marketing team intends to produce content for potential customers on LinkedIn, then the sales team should guide it on best practices for targeted leads on that platform.

Marketing can also assist sales in some of its follow-up endeavors.

If the sales team becomes overwhelmed following up on cold email outreach, for example, the sales team can use a tool like Gmass to automate the process and eliminate the burden on the salesperson.

follow up email tools for sales.

This frees up the sales team to focus on metrics that matter rather than chasing down leads.

But if the sales team doesn’t understand how to use Gmail, they might not be automating their follow-up effectively and miss important sales opportunities in the process.

When marketing and sales work together with the same tools, they can maximize efficiency and move customers through the sales funnel as painlessly as possible.

Conclusion

Even though both the teams have notoriously been rivals in the past, it’s time for sales and marketing team to work together.

This process should be made easier with the addition of technologies that improve the marketing/sales relationships (automation tools like Gmass, or analytic tools like Google Analytics).

It’s important for the two teams to remember that when one succeeds, the other succeeds, even if they approach a problem from different angles.

When marketing is successful at getting traffic or open rates, for example, or improving brand reputation, sales will increase.

When sales are successful at closing leads and measuring their data, marketing will be more effective.

When the CMO and the CRO work together, everybody wins.

The post CMOs are Becoming CROs: How to Integrate Marketing and Sales to Actually Drive Revenue appeared first on Blog.

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CMOs are Becoming CROs: How to Integrate Marketing and Sales to Actually Drive Revenue

How To Conduct Competitor Research For Better Conversion Optimization Results

Note: This is a guest article written by Shane Barker, a renowned digital marketing consultant. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Shane’s.


You want to increase your conversion rate. And you’ve implemented several CRO, or conversion rate optimization, strategies to help you do so. But have you considered researching about your competitors?

Understanding competition is crucial for the success of your business in every aspect. It will help you determine what you’re doing wrong, and what you can do better. It will also help you identify and capitalize on the weaknesses of your competitors.

In this post, you’ll learn the basics of conducting competitor research to enhance your CRO efforts.

#1: Identify Your Top Competitors

Before beginning your research, you need to know whom to research. Who are your biggest competitors? The simplest definition would be businesses where your target customers can get the same kind of services or products you offer.

Include both direct and indirect competitors.

  • Direct competitors are businesses that sell the same products or services as you.
  • Indirect competitors are those who sell products or services that fulfil the same need.

For example, Burger King and McDonald’s would be considered direct competitors because they have similar product offerings, that is, burgers. But Pizza Hut or Domino’s would be an indirect competitor of both Burger King and McDonald’s. Although they’re both fast food joints, Pizza Hut and Domino’s specialize in pizzas while the other two specialize in burgers.

Here are some of the ways you can identify your top competitors to conduct competitor research:

Google Search for Relevant Keywords

Make a list of keywords relevant to your business, and conduct a Google search using those keywords. The businesses that show up on the first page of your search results are your top competitors. List them for further research.

Let’s say you’re a wedding planner based in Sacramento. You can conduct a Google search using keywords like, “wedding planning in Sacramento,” “wedding planner in Sacramento,” “wedding planner Sacramento,” and so on.

Your top competitors in this case are the businesses that show up in the local pack and whose ads are displayed on the top of the page.

image8
You can find more competitors on the actual websites that show up in your search results. For the above example, if there are any sites that list wedding planners in the Sacramento area, you would need to check out those as well.

image1

Use SimilarWeb

SimilarWeb is a highly effective tool for identifying your competitors and determining their performance. All you need to do is type your website URL in the search bar and then click Start.

image5
This step generates an overview of your site’s ranking and traffic, as shown in the screenshot below. As the goal here is to identify competitors, you need to click the option that says, “Similar Sites,” as shown on the left sidebar.

image2
You will then get a list of some of the websites similar to yours, which you can sort based on the extent of similarity or ranking. Add them to your list so that you have a clear idea about who your competitors are.

Additionally, click each of these results to check where the websites stand in terms of ranking, traffic, and so on. This performance analysis can be used as part of the third step in this guide.

image11

#2: Try Out Your Competition

Another important step in competitor research is to experience their services or products first-hand.

When dealing with ecommerce stores, try ordering from them. Analyze every aspect of the purchase process to identify what they’re doing right and what mistakes they’re making.

Maybe they’ve implemented a chatbot to help their shoppers find what they’re looking for quickly and easily. To improve your CRO, consider adding a chatbot to your website as well.

You should also analyze the user experience (UX) of your competitors’ websites. Ensuring a good user experience is an essential part of successful CRO.

To analyze the UX of your competitors, ask yourself questions such as:

  • How easy is it for you to navigate your competitor’s website?
  • Are there too many distractions on any of their webpages?
  • Are you having a tough time reading the copy because of a bad font choice?
  • Is the process of completing a purchase easy?

Additionally, analyze their post-purchase service to see how well they respond to customer complaints. These questions can help you understand more about your competition. Analyze their services to determine what they’re doing well, what you can improve on, and what mistakes you should avoid.

In the case of a brick-and-mortar shop, try visiting the establishment to experience its service. Make a note of the store’s ambiance, how friendly the staff is, how well they present their products, and so on.

You can also ask the opinions of friends and family or your customers who have visited the place.

#3: Analyze Competitor Performance and Strategy

This is one of the most important steps in competitor research. When you think of analyzing their performance and strategy, several aspects may come to mind. Not sure what exactly to prioritize, or where to start?

Analyze the following to conduct your competitor research more efficiently:

Traffic and Ranking

One of the key factors to consider when analyzing the performance of your competitors is their ranking. Find out how they rank for specific keywords, and compare their performance against your own.

For competitor performance analysis, you can use SEMrush, which you can access for free. You also have the option to upgrade to one of their paid plans, which allow for more results and reports per day.

In the screenshot below, the tool gives you a report on the website’s paid and organic search traffic. Using this tool, you can compare the amount of branded traffic and non-branded traffic and get some insight into the PPC campaigns of your competitors.

image7

SEMrush can help you find out what your competitors are doing right so that you can use those opportunities to improve your CRO efforts.

The tool will also give you a list of keywords for which each website is ranked, along with the position and search volume for each keyword.

image6
SpyFu is another useful tool for conducting competitor research. The tool helps you find your competitors on typing your website URL in the search bar.

The most useful aspect of this tool is that it identifies the top organic and paid keywords used by your competitors. It also helps you to identify the keywords you share with your competitors.

image4

Link Profiles

Link profiles is another important aspect to help you conduct competitor research. According to Moz, link profiles are among the top search ranking factors.

A good link profile will improve your website ranking, which will improve its visibility. The more visible your website is, the better your chances are of improving traffic. Increased traffic often leads to higher conversions.

This means that you need to conduct competitor research to find out where they stand in terms of backlinks. Find out which websites are linking to them and how many backlinks they currently have. This will help you determine what backlinking goals you should set and which websites you should target through your backlinking efforts.

You can use basic tools such as Backlink Checker from Small SEO Tools to check which pages are linking to your competitors. For more detailed reports, you can use the two tools mentioned earlier, SEMrush and SpyFu.

SpyFu gives you a list of pages linking to your competitors. In addition, it shows the number of organic clicks and domain strength of the websites linking to your competitors.

image3
SEMrush is even more comprehensive. It gives you a report on the number of backlinks your competitor has and the number of domains linking to these backlinks.

image10

Also, you can use SEMrush to view the top anchor texts being used to link to your competitors.

image9

Landing Page Strategy

In addition to your competitors’ performance, you need to determine their ability to impress their audience. This means that you need to analyze their landing page strategy and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

Ask yourself:

  • How strong is the headline?
  • Is the value proposition clear?
  • Is the landing page design aesthetically pleasing?
  • Are there any visuals on the page?

These are just some of the questions you need to ask when analyzing the landing pages of your competitors.

Pricing Strategy

When you conduct competitor research, it’s also important to analyze their pricing strategy. Their rates maybe are more competitive and, therefore, your target customers are choosing them over you.

What can you do to present your rates in a more appealing manner to enhance your CRO efforts?

  • Are your competitors offering multiple pricing options?
  • Are there any guarantees that make their offers more trustworthy?
  • Do they compare various pricing options?
  • What are the biggest strengths and weaknesses of their pricing strategies?

Next Steps

Now you know more about how to conduct competitor research to improve your conversions rate optimization strategy. Next, you need to make a list of the top strengths and weaknesses of each competitor based on the data you have collected.

For example, one competitor’s top strengths may be an excellent landing page design and a good backlinking strategy. But the same competitor could be lagging in terms of organic search ranking and customer service as well.

From this list, you can identify opportunities to improve your CRO efforts. Your competitor research can also provide you with insights into the mistakes you should avoid and ways to improve your service so that it stands out from your competitors.

Got any questions about the tips provided here? Feel free to ask them or to share your ideas in the comments below.

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How To Conduct Competitor Research For Better Conversion Optimization Results

Using Personalization To Increase AOV And Conversion Rates

Dear |FNAME|,

As a valued customer, we’d like to…

For many eCommerce companies, the first personalization project begins with FNAME. We have become really good at personalizing emails because we know that it works. Emails personalized with recipients’ first names increase open rates by 2.6 percent.

Shoppers are more attracted to marketing that targets their interests and purchase patterns. This doesn’t only apply to emails–using personalization in your eCommerce branded store is the best way to build a relationship and keep customers converting.

The more often customers return, the better you become at delivering relevant suggestions and content for them. According to an Adobe study, 40% of online revenue comes from returning customers…who only represent 8% of site traffic. Using personalized recommendations, enterprises can build a stronger, more profitable relationship with their users.

Now is the time to optimize revenue opportunities and become better at selling to the right customers at the right time. Read on to learn how to use personalization to drive up average order value, or AOV.

Importance of Good Data

Personalization doesn’t work if you don’t know anything about your customers. The more relevant and accurate data you gather, the more refined and detailed picture you can draw. Customers are happy to help you get to know them too. 75% of shoppers like it when brands personalize products and offers, while 74% of online customers get frustrated with a website when content that appears has nothing to do with their interests.

When customers sign up on your site or check out for the first time, use this opportunity to collect information. This will help you with informed promotion and planning recommendations in the future.

As your relationship grows, you can continue to learn more about your customers.

  • How often are they buying?
  • What is their AOV?
  • What campaigns have converted for them?

Finally, customers have the most information about themselves. Allowing them to personalize their own experience by sharing their gender or interest information is a simple way to ensure that you aren’t showing them irrelevant information or products.

Customer data can come from anywhere, and it’s necessary when personalizing experiences. In summary, look for the following data points:

  • Location/IP address
  • Channel of entry (social/email/Amazon)
  • New or Returning customer
  • Previous searches
  • Shopping history
  • Shopping patterns (based on parameters such as the AOV)
  • Customer segments (people who are like them)
  • Customer-provided information (gender, interests)

Enabling social logins like Connect with Facebook will also help you get demographic information about your customers, without them having to provide it themselves.

Now that we’ve got a good picture of our customers, we can start personalizing their experience. There’re three main ways to do this—by segmenting, history, or trend analysis.

Personalization by Segmenting Customers

There are several ways you can personalize a customer’s experience even without asking for any information. When customers land on your site, you already know more about them than you might think.

Practical Tips

Use geotargeting to show the correct language and currency.

Right now, I’m in Austria, so Wool and Gang default to Austria shipping rates and are showing me prices in Euros. This reduces concerns international customers might have about shipping abroad or currency exchange. Reducing concerns means an easier checkout experience, which means better conversions.

personalization example wool and the gang
Source

Using cookies to know if a customer is new or returning.

If they are new customers, prompt them with a pop-up module to sign up and get a discount on their first purchase. Welcome them to your site, explain who you are, and save their email addresses for future selling opportunities.

Spearmint LOVE offers 10% off for first-time visitors if they sign up for the newsletter. It’s a little bonus that later helps convert visitors at a higher value.

Personalization example Spearmint
Source

Segment on the basis of individual shoppers vs. wholesalers

“Wholesalers” is another segment of customers who have different needs. Individual shoppers want quick, one-off purchases and may not be as likely to sign in or create accounts on branded sites.

But catering to wholesale clients by allowing them to sign in to receive special discounts and review orders without calling an account management team makes the experience much better for them. Clarion Safety sells industrial grade safety labels. This organization has created a special experience for wholesale customers that allows them to use different check-out options, such as “charge to account.”

Personalization example Clarion
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Identify and segment by channel as a source of entry

Different paths signal different intents.

If they found your products through Pinterest, they are looking to browse and are more visual. If they clicked an email coupon, they could be price conscious and should be shown more sale items. Get inside your customers’ brains and show them what they want to see—this will provide you the highest chance of conversion.

Personalization by Previous Activity

After a relationship has been established between you and your customers—whether that’s just through visiting or years of purchasing history—you have information about them from their previous activity. Use this information to customize their experience, and upsell and cross-sell products that are relevant to them.

Practical Tip

Before purchasing, visitors go back and forth with regard to an item when not sure. They might visit the same site multiple times in a week. A surefire way to get them to convert is to show them their recently viewed items whenever they visit your website. If you’re able to offer a discount on products that they’ve viewed multiple times, it might help you seal the deal.

EpicTV combines this strategy with a least purchase amount for free shipping. This means that visitors will usually add something from their recently viewed list just to achieve that perk.

Personalization example Epic TV
Source

When customers are viewing their carts, at that instance, you can use previous searches or purchases to suggest complementary items. Red’s Baby uses this method to suggest accessories for the main purchase and incrementally increase the AOV. I added a stroller to my shopping cart, and this site suggested matching accessories—all under $50. At this instance, suggesting other types of strollers wouldn’t be effective.

Personalization example Red's Baby
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Think about what it’s like meeting customers in the real world. The more you see them, the more history you have of them. You might know that they have kids or that they like to play squash on weekends.

This context makes personalized recommendations and upsells easier. Try and replicate this online. Shopping at an eCommerce retailer doesn’t need to be impersonal, and it shouldn’t be.

Personalization by Building Patterns

Taking the time to build a better recommendation engine makes sense and helps generate additional revenue. According to Barilliance and data based on 1.5 billion online shopping sessions, personalized on-site product recommendations constitute 11.5% of revenue through eCommerce sites. That’s a big chunk of revenue to miss out on!  

Practical Tip

To optimize across all customer visits, dive into analytics and look for purchasing patterns. Do shoppers tend to return often if they buy a specific item? Do many shoppers buy a combination of items at the same time? Finding and taking advantage of these opportunities can help drive up AOV.

For example, recommending products that other customers bought helps crowd source the best options. Check out these suggestions by Blue Tomato when viewing an item. 

Personalization example Blue Tomato
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Flash Tattoos speaks their customer’s language and makes their Recommendation section fun. “You’d also look good in” is a flattering way to suggest similar products across different styles.

Personalization example Flash Tattoos
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If customers have viewed the shipping policy and not purchased, they might be hesitant about shipping costs. Try offering free shipping at a certain cart value to convert potentially cost-sensitive customers. Finding these patterns that expose reasons for cart abandonment helps create a better experience for your customers. They’ll feel like you are addressing their concerns before they even ask!

Final Tips

Now that you’re ready to start personalizing the shopping experience, we’ve got a few final tips for you:

When you’re suggesting or upselling, use your screen space wisely:

Remember the purpose of each screen, and don’t distract customers from completing their purchase. On the checkout screen, the single Call-to-Action should be to convert and pay for what they’ve selected. Cluttering the screen with additional products can reduce your overall conversion rate.

Personalization isn’t a set-it-and-forget-it tactic:

You need to constantly reevaluate your metrics, hypotheses, and experiments to keep getting better at selling to your customers. Don’t be afraid to try things out and get personal! Your customers will love it and reward you for it with higher AOVs.

Over to You

Have more ideas on how to increase AOV and conversion rates with personalization? Send us your feedback and views in the comments section below.


Kickstart_Personalization_Guide_Free_Trial

The post Using Personalization To Increase AOV And Conversion Rates appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Using Personalization To Increase AOV And Conversion Rates

Resolving User Pain Points Across eCommerce Conversion Funnel

As reported by Internet Retailer, the projected online global consumer spending by 2019 will more than double to $3.551 trillion of the global spending in 2015, accounting for 12.4% of the total retail sales.  These numbers show that consumer inclination toward online shopping is increasing. However, the gap between what consumers want and what they get is also widening. This is where the importance of providing visitors a friction-free experience across an eCommerce conversion funnel stems from.

Competition also has been becoming increasingly fierce. Global marketplaces like Amazon, eBay, and Alibaba are eating into a large share of the retail market. Numbers from Ecommerce News suggest that by 2020, Amazon, eBay, and Alibaba will own at least 40% of the global retail market. eCommerce enterprises and retailers, however, are confident that they can one-up players like eBay by providing enhanced customer experience and services.

eCommerce enterprises also realize that the modern consumer/customer journey is complex. Empowered and informed consumers neither have the patience nor any reason to buy from eCommerce establishments that fail to provide instant gratification.

In this blog post, we talk about how eCommerce enterprises can smooth out friction at each stage of the eCommerce conversion funnel—awareness, consideration, and purchase. We discuss how enterprises, regardless of where the customer enters the funnel, can provide an enhanced and optimized customer experience.

Addressing Pain Points at the Awareness Stage

A consumer at the awareness stage already has a preconceived notion, which is molded by social and digital content. The ability of consumers to create, absorb, and distribute information has increased manifold. The following Deloitte Consumer Review 2014, which represents consumer attitude toward digital content, validates the same.

user engagement through digital content
Source

To stand a chance of gaining user attention/awareness in the digital eCommerce arena, online enterprises need to ensure that they have a strong digital content strategy in place, which consists of formulating a clear objective, understanding the target audience, determining the brand’s voice, and more.

Let’s also not forget the impact of search engine optimization on accessibility and online presence. Forbes talks about SEO key trends 2016 for eCommerce, highlighting the measures that enterprises can ensure  to grow their online presence . A MOZ post discusses the changing face of search in the age of video transcription.

With mobile usage on the rise, consumers expect high quality and variety of content to be available on their smartphones. However, according to BrightEdge Content Engagement Report 2015, more than 1 in 4 mobile sites is misconfigured, which results in an average 68% loss of smartphone traffic to that content. These statistics don’t frame a great picture, given that the Google searches via mobile have already surpassed desktop searches.

While eCommerce enterprises need to optimize quality content for awareness through search, they need to do so with the goal of acquiring quality traffic. Analyze where most of your traffic is coming from. Go a step further to find out the traffic sources that are driving most engagements.

After you have figured out the traffic sources that are driving most conversions, you can create a winning user engagement strategy for those channels. Here’s an interesting case study on how Michael Kors integrates Instagram and other social media to boost eCommerce and store revenue.

awareness stage strategy example for eCommerce
Source

Addressing Pain Points at the Consideration Stage

A consumer at the consideration stage is well aware of your existence. The problem for eCommerce enterprises to address at this stage is understanding their visitors’ intent and motivations—what do the visitors want and what would make them convert. Addressing the following questions can help eCommerce enterprises ease the users’ pain points.:

  • Why certain visitors don’t buy right away while others do?
  • What can alter a visitor’s buying behavior?
  • What distractions can put off a potential customer?

Taking a predictive action approach at this stage of the funnel is one way of dealing with the friction before it happens. This approach requires creating customer personas, mapping user journeys to understand how users interact and engage with your website, and then using this information to work out tactics that ease user interactions and experiences.

Visitor recordings and heatmaps, as well as user feedback gathering tools such as on-page surveys, can be deployed by eCommerce enterprises to gain clear insights into the what and why of on-site behaviors of visitors.

Losing potential customers to competition at the consideration stage is another big challenge for eCommerce enterprises. Although an understanding of customer intent and motivation can make visitors’ experiences delightful—even to the extent that they  come back or spread a positive word around—there are high chances that even a positive on-site experience doesn’t make them buy from you.

Reason? Visitors at any stage of conversion are continuously relying on their own research and user-generated and influencer-generated content to reconsider their purchase decision.

Influencing Purchase at the Consideration Stage

There are a number of things influencing buyer behavior at the consideration stage. A ready-to-convert visitor might interact with your website and go back to the consideration stage if he/she is able to find a better deal elsewhere.

One of Harvard Business Review posts talk about why users need not choose a fixed path to conversion. An extract from the same HBR article is quoted below:
“Julie Bornstein, CMO at Sephora, has seen social media change how people buy beauty products. Recommendations from friends have always been important, but now these recommendations spread ‘quicker, faster, and further’ at every stage in the funnel. The decision on what to buy increasingly comes from advocates who share their experience in a way that pulls in new customers and informs their purchase decision. Sephora’s response has been to bring all the stages of the funnel together at a single place, creating its own online community where people can ask experts and each other about brands, products, and techniques.” 

From a user’s perspective, User-Generated Content (UGC) helps build trust  and mitigates the fear of buying, which could otherwise have been a huge point of friction. It has also changed the way eCommerce businesses build engagement. For a complete picture on how UGC can be leveraged, check out this article by MAVSOCIAL. Using trust seals and testimonials is equally important for easing out the fear of being cheated or misled. For more insights on the importance of trust, read how this eCommerce business established credibility by adding a trust badge and increased its conversion rate by 72.05%.

The takeaway here is to keep the visitor engaged through your eCommerce website and build trust. This can be achieved using a good mix of predictive analysis, user-generated content, and leveraging principles of persuasion that can turn user buying behavior in your favor (consider FOMO). User interface is another parameter that eCommerce enterprises must test and improve for driving more visitor engagement at the consideration stage of the funnel.

Addressing Pain Points at the Conversion Stage

The decision is made in your favor, and the visitor is going through the checkout on your site to buy the product. What could stop a visitor from converting at this stage? Is it that the visitor’s preferred mode of payment was not available? Is it that your shipping costs are exorbitantly high? VWO’s Shopping Cart Abandonment Report 2016 states, “One-fourth of the respondents will not check out if they encounter unexpected shipping cost.”

Regardless of the length of the checkout, the goal for eCommerce enterprises should always be to make the checkout distraction-free.

Consider Amazon’s example: At checkout, they have only two options listed—place order or close the window. Not providing unnecessary navigation options on the checkout eliminates distraction at this final step.

Amazon's example of distraction free navigation
Source

A thorough usability study for their checkout can help eCommerce enterprises find out what needs to be fixed and what can be made better. Here’s a usability benchmark of 100 eCommerce sites that have been ranked by Baymard, according to their checkout usability performance.

eCommerce checkout usability performance benchmark
Source

Another article by Baymard talks about mobile checkout usability, which is no less important than website optimization, considering that people are browsing their phones more than ever. However, there is still a huge potential for retailers to drive conversions directly from mobile.

Optimizing for mobiles and tablets becomes all the more important because consumers often browse one device and buy from another. The meandering that happens between different devices before a visitor converts, requires eCommerce enterprises to track and analyze cross-device behaviors.

Conclusion

An ideal funnel in the current dynamically changing times is not only the one that drives more conversions, but also the one that is able to provide exactly what customers want. Whether consumers are in the awareness, consideration, or conversion stage of the buying journey, eCommerce enterprises can help improve the online buying experience by understanding and addressing frictions at each stage.

What do you suggest can ease user pain-points at each stage of the eCommerce conversion funnel? Comment and let us know.

CTA Solving user pain-points in eCommerce conversion funnel

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Resolving User Pain Points Across eCommerce Conversion Funnel

Top 4 Ways to Recycle Content That You Can Practice Right Away

As a content marketer, you work hard to keep your content engine running. You are constantly curating ideas, creating compelling content and looking for ways to promote it.

But while you’re putting all these efforts in creating new content, what about the content stocked up in your archives? The content on which you had spent long hours earlier?

Your good quality content over time tends to gets shared, linked to, and clicked on, boosting its search engine rankings and continues to generate traffic long after it was originally published. But, this content, doesn’t have to be left to the search engines to be discovered. You can recycle your old content to improve its visibility and ROI, without spending additional hours on new content creation.

The power of recycling content was tested in an experiment conducted by Buffer. The content creators behind the experiment wanted to see what would happen if, instead of publishing any new content, they focused on reworking old content for the entire month of July 2015.

They carefully tracked their analytics and found that while the traffic remained almost the same, the organic traffic surged. Have a look:
Content Recycling: Buffer Experiment Analytics

In this post, we’re going to look at four ways to recycle content. But before we delve deeper into it, let’s first look at the premise for choosing content for recycling.

Prioritizing Which Content to Recycle

Before adapting your content to be used again, you should first evaluate which content is most worthy of your time.

You could zero in on the best contenders by considering the following questions:

Is the Content Evergreen?

Look into the contemporaneity of the topic you are planning to rework. You should plan to invest on content that’s evergreen in nature, i.e. content that continues to be valuable and relevant over months (or ideally years).

For instance, a survey report published a few years back wouldn’t be fit for recycling as the facts and opinions presented in it most likely would have changed. You should look for topics in your old content which may still be trending or are being talked about in your industry. You could use these tools to help you find the trending topics.

How is the Content Performing?

Next, gathering insights on content performance can help you prioritize recycling.

For blog posts, you could dig into your Google Analytics and see which posts are attracting most readers. You could measure metrics like page views, average time on page and bounce rate and prioritize accordingly. For instance, if you find that the page views of a particular post is high, but average time on page is low then probably the readers are not finding the content relevant and can be reworked, and republished. Content with high time on page but with low pageviews could mean that the content is effective, and repurposing it into a different content type might reap benefits.

For slide decks, Slideshare gives a detailed analytics report on the number of views including the full profiles of people who have downloaded the slides.

After you’ve shortlisted the content pieces that you want to rework on, you can begin with applying one or more of these recycling strategies to your content:

Content Repurposing

The first way to recycle your old content is to repurpose it across different channels.

People consume information in different ways. What one person might like to see as a video tutorial, another might like to see as a downloadable slide deck. Or, a podcast that one person wants to hear on their commute to work might also work as an eBook for avid readers.

Repurposing gives content a new makeover — along with exposure to new audiences and less time spent on content creation.

Blog posts are arguably the easiest content type to be repurposed. Here are a few ways you can do that:

Repurposing Blog Posts into eBooks

You could turn your best blog post or blog post series into eBooks to gain credibility. Studies suggest that nearly 57 percent consumers consider companies that publish industry specific eBooks more trustworthy, even if they don’t read them.

Look at how we at VWO repurposed our blog post on Hyundai case study into an eBook.

Further, lack of in-house design resources shouldn’t worry you. You could use tools like Papyrus or Beacon to make the layout process a breeze.

Repurposing Blog Posts into Infographics

According to CMO Council Report, 65% of senior marketing executives believe that visual assets (photos, video, illustrations and infographics) are core to how their brand story is communicated.

Look at how PushCrew repurposed their blog post on writing push copy notification into an infographic a month later.

Repurposed Infographic

You can create infographics using free online tools such as Easel.ly , Piktochart, and Infogr.am.

Repurposing Blog Posts into Video Series

Sites like Skillshare and the new Google Helpouts allow you to host a video course. Consider the possibility of converting a recent blog series into an engaging video.

Repurposing Blog Posts into Slide Decks or Presentations

You can turn your blog posts into a Keynote or PowerPoint presentation that could be shared online via SlideShare. This makes it easy for other blogs/websites to embed your slide deck within their own content. You could also use the same slide deck as a lead magnet in one of your web forms.

These are some more ideas to repurpose your visual or text content by scoop.it.
Ideas for Repurposing Content

Republishing Blog Posts

Hubspot analysis of their blog traffic revealed that that a majority of their traffic and leads were coming from old content.

hubspot-old-new-blog-distribution

Over time, there are quite a lot of things that can go stale and out of date over time, like the research and facts quoted, images used and more. For the content doing well on search, this outdated information can affect it negatively and should be updated.

Republishing can not only help boost SEO, but also provides an opportunity to improve the content quality.

To begin with republishing, first evaluate the post for accuracy and determine what needs to be modified, added, or removed. You could edit the meta description of the post to make it more enticing for users browsing SERPs. Also, re-check any CTA attached on the post and check if that is still relevant and working.

It would also be a great idea to add an editor’s note in your updated post or display the last updated date. This could build credibility as the readers would know that the content is regularly revised. Backlinko regularly updates its content and displays the date of last update.
Backlinko Content republishing

Content Syndication

Syndication is taking content that you’ve already published on your own site and posting it on third party websites. This strategy is useful because it’s a great way to get exposure to other websites’ audiences. Getresponse illustrates how republishing impacts pageviews(80%) and  reshares (+65%).

Content Syndication Impact

To avoid penalizing due to duplication, you could place a rel=canonical tag on the page with your article, and have that tag point back to the original article on your site. This tells the search engines that the syndicated copy is in fact just a copy, and that you are the original publisher.

LinkedIn Pulse, Inbound.org, Growthhackers, Medium, are amongst the popular free syndication websites. CoSchedule offers a nice roundup of good syndication sites.

Re-posting on Social Media

Re-promoting old content on social media bring your old content back into vicinity. Research shows that re-posting content can bring in 75% of the engagement reaped in the first posting.

You could actively include the old and relevant posts in your social media sharing schedule.

To retain freshness, you could create multiple unique social media updates that link back to the same content piece. Schedule these updates for multiple times, and keep track of which ones get the most user engagement.

For the VWO eCommerce report 2016, these are some of the updates we shared:

Content Recycling: Reposting on social media

Reposting on Social Media 2

Reposting on Social Media Update 3

Conclusion

All in all, content recycling can bring a wealth of resources to content marketers. Your time is precious, and content recycling can maximize your efforts. Instead of investing long hours into new content creation, content recycling lets you return to your existing content and magnify its achievements.

Are you recycling content? What have been the most successful examples of recycled content you’ve used or seen? Let us know in the comments below.

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Top 4 Ways to Recycle Content That You Can Practice Right Away

How to Deal with Negative Customer Feedback for your eCommerce Business

Customer feedback goes a long way in generating trust for your online store. Let’s just say that testimonials put the ‘T’ in Trust when buying online.

Going by the Brightlocal Survey 2014, 88% of consumers say they trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.

But customer feedback, as we all know, may not always be wrapped in adulation. According to the American Express Survey 2014, on an average consumers tell 8 people about their good experiences, and about 21 people about their bad experiences.

But on the positive side, reports also suggest that negative reviews can be in fact good for businesses and help build credibility and authenticity. Receiving negative feedback is a great chance for you to identify what can make your customers love you more.

So how do you go about handling negative customer feedback? Let’s find out.

In this post, first we’ll take a look at a three-fold solution to respond to negative reviews. Next, we’ll take a look at the different channels where you’re likely to receive negative customer feedback and what can be done for them in specific.

Responding to Negative Customer Feedback – The Three-Fold Solution

Research into the Incident

First and foremost, check for the validity and relevance of the feedback. Delete it, if it’s purely spam or profane. You could have to look at the commentator’s name and email address for more insights into the credibility of review.

After ensuring validity, look further into the particular incident. Some questions you need to ask yourself before hitting reply are:

  •    What went wrong? ( slip-up from a vendor, poor product quality, shipment gone wrong or a technical error)
  •    What can be done? (immediate solution that you can provide)
  •    Reputation and tone of the customer? (how influential and how angry is he)

This will help you tailor your response according to the situation and not send in an automated response. For example, if the commentator is complaining about poor product quality, give him an option of exchange or refund. Also discuss the situation with the people involved (internal team/vendor/shipment company) to avoid these mistakes in the future.

If it’s taking time for you to assess the situation, maintain communication still. Tell them that you’re looking into the problem and will get back to them as soon as possible.

This extract from an infographic by Kissmetrics depicts how quickly do customers expect a brand to reply based on different channels. A majority of them expect a response within one day.

Ideal Response Time for Customer Feedback

Craft a Reply

This is the most crucial part, as the response would most likely be read by not only the complaining customer, but also your potential customers.

You should look into incorporating these 3 ’A’s to craft a perfect reply:

  • Acknowledgement: Accepting and apologizing for your mistake and empathizing with the inconvenience that it may have caused to the customer.
  • Assistance: An immediate and handy solution for the problem at hand. Consider offering freebie/discount depending on the severity of the issue.
  • Assurance: Assuring them that the issue has been resolved and won’t recur — and if it did, that you’d only be more prompt with your service.

Also remember to personalize the response by addressing the issue at hand directly. Look at these responses which hit the nail:

Negative Customer Feedback Response by Amazon

Negative Customer Feedback Response Nordstrom
Source

Encourage them to Update/Revise their Review

After you have successfully resolved the issue, you could even venture to ask your customers to update their response. Exercise caution here. Timing is essential, gauge the sentiment of the affected customer and slip in a polite request to take down the negative review if their concerns have been addressed.

See how Nordstrom managed to turn a negative reviewer into an evangelist with great customer service (screenshot below).

How Nordstrom changed Negative Customer Review to Positive One

Negative Customer Feedback on Different Platforms

Apart from the solution described above, there is a little extra that you can do based on the channel on which the feedback is received. The popular channels (apart from the traditional email) where customers are likely to provide you with some kind of feedback are:

  • Reviews on your product page
  • Social Media
  • Third party review websites
  • App store/Play store

Reviews on your Product Page

Reviews provided by customers on the product pages are known to increase conversions highly. According to the eMarketer report, consumer reviews are significantly more trusted (nearly 12 times more) than descriptions that come from manufacturers.

A lot of negative product reviews can deter the potential buyers from your website. And if you closely examine a considerable number of these could be invalid, incorrect or simply mal-intentioned. The best way to deal with those is to delete them. However, make sure you don’t tamper with a genuine customer’s response while doing so.

To ensure the validity of the feedback, you could employ smart gamification tactics like upvote/downvote and special incentives. Amazon does this beautifully by categorizing reviews under two umbrellas of “most helpful” and “most critical.” (See image) Most helpful reviews are the ones found most helpful by other customer and most critical are are the ones with least ratings.

Amazon also offers a myriad of incentives to their top reviewers, like freebies, early access and more, encouraging others to do the same.

Amazon Review on Product Page
Source

Social Media

A 2013 survey by Zendesk found that 88% of the respondents said negative reviews on social media affected their purchasing decisions. No wonder then that consumers tend to use this one the most to air their feedback — negative feedback in particular. The same study found that customers are 15% more likely to leave a bad review on social media than they are to sing praises.

Customers choose social media to report issues to catch immediate attention. A majority of customers have noted a response within the same day on Facebook (51%) and  Twitter(83%).

Expected Reponse Time for Customer Feedback on Social Media

Customers flock to social media for faster response time, so active and regular presence there will be wise. You could use the many online reputation management tools to stay on top of all the mentions of your company on the internet. Apart from the popular monitoring tools like Hootsuite and Mention, you could also set up alerts to be updated on all that is being talked about you on social media.

Another thing that can be done on social media is to contact the negative reviewer by direct message. You could try to have a conversation about a problem in private, thereby allowing you to build a more personal relationship and an opportunity to delight.

This could also be helpful as offering discounts or freebies publicly to assuage the issue may lead to other people creating problems just to get that special treatment. So it’s best to keep these practices off the wall.

Third Party Review Websites

There is also a likelihood of customers giving you a negative feedback on various third party review websites like Trustpilot, Yotpo, Consumeraffairs, etc.

These reviews are important as your business pages on these sites tend to rank well in search engines. Look at these results that crop up on searching for “amazon reviews” on Google.

Amazon Third Party Customer Review

Google seller ratings, an automated extension that runs with your Google Ads, also picks and aggregates data from these platforms amongst others.

The best course to take for this channel is to claim your account on these websites, allowing you to be notified with each new comment. You could look at this list to find a list of online review collecting websites.

App Store/Play Store Review

Mobile apps are an important channel for driving eCommerce sales. Mobile commerce accounts for 30% of U.S. eCommerce and is expected to grow 300% faster than traditional e-commerce.

Ratings and reviews on App store are crucial to driving rankings, discovery, downloads, updates for your app mobile app.

One app maker reported that even a 0.1 drop in an online app rating caused a 5% decline in downloads, and a 0.3 decrease resulted in a 60% drop. Talking of reviews, about 70% of people read at least one review before downloading an app. Actively responding and resolving negative reviews thus becomes crucial.

Apart from regularly fixing reported bugs, you could begin with an in-app feedback loop. Asking for customer feedback within the app could make it less likely for your customers to leave a negative feedback in App store/Play store. Instabug — a beta testing, user engagement and crash reporting software for mobile apps, found an 80% decrease in negative reviews by doing so.

Since the reviews are, by default, shown in chronological order, you could look at ensuring that your latest few reviews are all positive or are dealt positively.

Conclusion

Mistakes happen and negative reviews are a business reality. Nevertheless, handled timely and patiently, negative feedback can turn into customer delight. Mistakes are forgivable if you’re willing to learn from them and fix them.

How have you been faring at dealing with negative reviews? Do you have a negative-feedback turning to customer delight story? Tell us and our readers right below in the comments.

The post How to Deal with Negative Customer Feedback for your eCommerce Business appeared first on VWO Blog.

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How to Deal with Negative Customer Feedback for your eCommerce Business

Importance of Trust in eCommerce and How to Build Trust on Your Website

I’ll go out on a limb and assume that you are doing some sort of business online.

That is great. Because eCommerce is booming as expected. Online sales are set to grow across the world, while store-based sales are on a decline.

Growth of Online Sales

Yet, 2 out of every 3 shopping carts get abandoned. Across the entire eCommerce landscape, that amounts to 5 trillion dollars in lost sales.

So what’s going wrong?

73% consumers feel that shopping online is riskier than shopping offline.

Taylor Nelson Sofres’s 2006 survey showed that customers cancel 70% of online purchases because of lack of trust. Since that time, users have only become more aware of fraudulent practices. Trust has become even harder to earn.

The onus is on site owners to create trust on their eCommerce website.

I’ll be honest with you. This is a long post. You can jump sections using the navigation links right below.

Introduction: What is Trust and its Role in eCommerce?
What Factors Influence Trust in eCommerce?
Factor #1: Trust Seals and SSL Certificates
Factor #2: Contact Information
Factor #3: Customer Reviews and Testimonials

At the end of each section you’ll also find a list of actionable tips to implement and improve the trust factor of your eCommerce website.

What is Trust And Its Role in eCommerce?

Understanding the nature of Trust is important. The problem with common words like ‘trust’ is that we all believe we understand it. ‘Trust’ in at least that sense, is taken for granted. That makes it all the more critical to establish a meaning that we understand the same way – a common frame of reference, if you will.

Mayer et al (1995) explains trust this way

The willingness of a party to be vulnerable to the actions of another party based on the expectation that the other will perform a particular action important to the trustor, irrespective of the ability to monitor or control that other party.

Three factors contribute to the state of trust: the chance for a gain, chance for a loss and an uncertainty regarding the matter.

What Creates Trust - Image

Let me bring this blog article itself into context. The expected gain from this article is deriving actionable knowledge about how to improve the trust factor on your eCommerce website. The potential loss is of time that could be used doing something else. The uncertainty is if the article will provide the value or not.

So if you are still reading this article, it means that you perceive that the probability of a gain (knowledge, insights) is more than the probability of loss (time, opportunity cost) even though you really can’t be certain. Thanks for trusting us, we won’t disappoint.

It’s important to understand that trust is not a choice, but an underlying psychological state that can be influenced.

In the context of eCommerce, trust is as big a factor as anything. The reason a user decides to visit your page is because of trust. Every conversion that occurs on an eCommerce page is a result of trust. Conversion Rate Optimization experts concern themselves with these problems:

  • Increasing motivation
  • Reducing anxiety
  • Reducing friction

Improving the trust factor of your website helps with each of these endeavors.

What Factors Influence Trust in eCommerce?

A survey by eConsultancy asked respondents this question:

If you are shopping from a retailer you don’t know well, how would you decide whether to trust the website?

Here’s what they found.

Graph: Role of Trust in Buying Decision

We’ll take the top 3 factors and rip them down to the bone and leave you with immediately actionable insights at the end of each section.

#1 Trust Seals and Security Certificates

In a survey conducted by Mathew at Actual Insights, we found reason to believe that trust seals really influence the buying decision of users.

Role of Trust Seals in Consumer Decision

An overwhelming majority of 61% respondents have cancelled a purchase because trust logos were missing on the website.

Before we move on, let’s also understand what these terms are.

What is a trust seal/badge?

Examples of Trust Badge

A trust seal on a website is a 3rd party badge shows that the website is legitimate. It is important to note that often trust seals by themselves do not indicate any technical security. Rather, they are simply a certification of the company.

What are SSL certificates?

SSL Certificate Badges

In contrast to trust seals, SSL certificates indicate actual technical security. They serve to show that there is a secure connection between the browser and the web server and they guard against network eavesdropping.

So you understand trust seals and SSL certificates and can even differentiate between the both of them. But what matters most is if your users understand it or not.

A 2005 study conducted by TNS, revealed that

  • 78 percent of online shoppers said that a seal indicates that their information is secure
  • Only one in five shoppers did not know what purpose trust seals served

Consumers are very aware of trust seals and understand what they represent.

There, trust seals do indeed work – a clear majority of people are aware of it and it plays an important part in deciding the trust your eCommerce site evokes. It’s been 10 years since the study and users have only become more internet-savvy and aware of trust seals now.

There are many kinds of trust seals out there.

Which Trust Seals Work Best?

Baymard conducted a research asking more than 1000 respondents,

“Which badge gives you the most sense of trust when paying online?”

Here is the result:

Which Trust Seals Work Best?
Here’s what was most interesting.

The second, third and fourth most trusted seals are trust badges where the rest are all SSL seals, including Norton that came in first, in terms of the trust they evoke. Interestingly, we find that users do not necessarily differentiate between trust badges and SSL badges.

Users are not as interested in the technical implications of the badges as much as the perceived sense of security the badges evoke.

Baymard notes that the two most trusted seals — Norton and McAfee — are anti-virus software brands. This shows that users naturally associate ‘security’ with these brands. The reason for this is that these brands are associated with ‘security’ in their more popular avatar as well — that of anti-virus software.

Does this mean having any trust seal is better than not having them at all?

Not really.

Recognition Precedes Presence

In the actual insights survey we already referred to, another interesting fact came to light.

Study: Recognition precedes Presence

A staggering 76% reported having cancelled their purchase decision because they didn’t recognize the trust logo.

The results suggest that your best bet is to have trust seals that are immediately recognizable.

But here is the caveat: Some trust badges are not globally recognizable but are still effective in improving the trust factor and sales. For instance, House of Kids added an e-mark badge (certifies ethical conduct of Danish businesses) to their site and reaped a 32% jump in conversions. The e-mark badge is relevant only to Danish businesses but that doesn’t stop it from being effective.

Remember: there are no rules to this game. The only best practice is to test.

So What Trust Seals Should You Use on Your eCommerce Platform?

As of 2012, 89% of brands were not using trust badges to bolster users’ trust. This statistic reveals the enormous gains that brands can achieve by acting fast and incorporating trust badges on their sites.

Based on its research, Baymard suggests that site owners include a

  • Norton badge, implying an encrypted connection
  • McAfee badge, indicating non-infected hacker-free site
  • A BBB or TRUSTe badge that shows good customer relations

Such a combination, they believe, will cater to all kinds of users — technical and non-technical. A technically sound user will be able to differentiate between these badges and the trust value they imply on three different areas, while a non-technical user will find three recognizable trust signals.

Apart from these trust badges, there are many others that website owners employ. A trust badge could be as simple as an “authorized dealer” badge. For instance, Express Watches added a “Seiko Authorized Dealer Site and achieved a 107% increase in sales.

Express Watches : Usage of Trust Seal

Then there is Bag Servant that improved conversions by 72.05% by including a WOW badge in its header.

Use of Trust Seal on Bag Servant

It is critical that you understand the nature of your business and choose trust badges that are relevant to your business. For instance, if you are selling eco-friendly products, it might be a good idea to have an Ecolabel certification and a related badge.

Presence and Placement of Trust Badges

When it comes to using trust badges, placement is just as important as presence. For your checkout page, we suggest boxing important fields like payment forms from the rest of the page. Aside from acting as a visual cue to direct the user towards the important part of the page, a box adds an extra sense of security. In a usability study by Baymard, it emerged that placing the trust badges close to payment fields increases the perceived security of the transaction.

See how Peapod does it.

Presence of Trust Seals - Peapod

But if you check out Symantec’s checkout page (Ranked #2 among the top 100 eCommerce checkouts), you’ll see this

Symantec Checkout - No Trust Seals

What? No trust badges! The secret lies in the brand. Bigger and more popular brands already have their users’ trust and don’t need trust badges as much as smaller brands do.

Small brands can gain big wins by incorporating trust badges.

Here’s a lowdown on all that you need to know about trust marks.

Actionable Tips for using Trust Badges in eCommerce

  • Use recognizable trust badges
  • Include different kinds of trust badges to influence trust on multiple levels
  • Look out for niche trust badges that are relevant to your business
  • Place payment related trust badges closer to critical page components, like credit card information fields
  • If you are a small brand, trust badges are likely to yield major dividends
  • Don’t believe these tips blindly, conduct A/B tests to be sure

Now we come to the second most critical component that influences trust.

#2 Contact Information

We don’t trust algorithms and machines as much as we trust humans. There are many reasons, known and unknown, for this. Part of the reason is that humans are capable of empathy and feel safer with other humans than with machines.

When a user is on your eCommerce store for the first time, their ‘danger’ antennae are in overdrive. In 2009, a Harris Interactive Survey found that 90% of people were jittery and concerned when shopping from new or unknown sites.

Displaying contact information says that you’ve nothing to hide from the user.

Contact information gives a strong indication that there is a real person at the other end who can be approached should anything go wrong.

Here’s how Zappos, renowned for their customer service, does it

Contact Page - Zappos
Notice how they establish a very human connection on the page. Words like ‘we’, ‘family’ are liberally used on the page to bring down user anxiety. Multiple ways are displayed for a user to get in touch with the team — 24×7 phone number, email or a direct conversation.

If there was just a phone number, you’d be relieved, but Zappos delivers over and above typical customer expectations by providing multiple channels of communication. It helps ease the slightest of anxieties users have about shopping online at Zappos.

Read about how Flowr increased conversions simply by adding a phone number to the header.

Apart from this obvious benefit, contact page is also a potent lead generation engine. Users can directly get in touch with your sales team. This is particularly important for professional services where client-consultant interactions are best done in person. The folks at DotCo draw an analogy between contact information on a website and business cards.

It’s not just contact information that can help establish the human connection. Using real images of the people behind a product can also help ease user anxiety.

VWO - About Us Page

See how at VWO we make sure that we reveal the people behind our product? The contact information and the physical address of our place of business is also clearly laid out on the map. With the images and physical proof, people warm up to your business, because they are able to relate with it. Without it, it’s just a faceless software product, one of the many out there.

Actionable Tips for Using Contact Information

  • Clearly display primary contact information and make it easy to find
  • Where ever possible, include actual images of the people behind the product
  • Include multiple channels for users to communicate with your brand
  • Use words that imply human presence

#3 Social Proof: Customer Reviews/Testimonials

In the annual VWO eCommerce Consumer Survey 2014, 55% consumers said that reviews are important to them while making decisions. Another report, BrightLocal consumer survey 2014, shows that 85% consumers  read up to 10 reviews before deciding whether to trust a site or not. Further more, 72% consumers said that positive reviews make them trust a site more.

Customer Reviews Study - Graph

It is clearly evident that customer reviews matter. A lot. But how do we use this knowledge?

It’s important to note that half of these customers would trust only if there are multiple reviews to read. For the other half, trust depends on the authenticity of the reviews. So it’s not a question of quantity versus quality. You need both.

Fake reviews are a nagging nuisance that review sites have to constantly deal with. Check out how Yelp is dealing with it.

To maintain authenticity, make sure you promote only genuine reviews and not ones that seem overtly promotional. Amazon does a great job at this.

Customer Reviews Management : Amazon

By displaying the reviewers’ identities, and providing a review rating system, Amazon is able to promote the reviews that are found most useful by its customers.

Corroborating this insight further, a survey found that most user-trust is gained through reviews written by other users. Reviews from associations and professional reviewers do not score as high as that from users.

Review Types and Trust

How About Bad Customer Reviews? 

In a study published in 2011, it emerged that reading one to three bad reviews would deter 67% of the shoppers from making a purchase.

Don’t lose heart though.

In a more recent study, 68% consumers said that they are inclined to trust more when there are both bad and good reviews. 30% consumers suspect inauthenticity when they don’t see anything negative.

It’s important to feature both negative and positive reviews.

For every consumer who seeks out positive reviews, there are three who actively seek out negative reviews. Believe it or not, negative reviews are more popular than positive reviews. On average, consumers tell 15 people about their good customer service experiences, and 24 people about their bad experiences.

(Tips on getting more customer reviews)

All the research points towards having authentic user-generated reviews, good or bad, on your site.

Actionable Tips on Using Customer Reviews

  • Focus both on quality and quantity of reviews
  • Feature both negative and positive reviews; consumers find it authentic and therefore more trustworthy
  • Generate reviews from actual users of the product rather than from associations or professional reviewers

Trust in eCommerce and Responsibility

It’s a precious commodity, trust. The purpose of the three measures that we detailed in this article is to improve the trust that users have in your business.  However, it’s important to understand that trust has a self-correcting nature. At the slightest hint of malpractice or incredulity, trust disappears. Businesses need to earn their users’ trust every day, over and over again.

There are umpteen ways to coerce a user into doing business with you, using fake trust signals and reviews and what not. But failing a user’s trust in your business can have catastrophic effects. Bad PR is only the beginning of it. The good part is that unless you are trying to create trust where there can be none, it’s not a difficult thing to do. There’s nothing that drives trust like some good old honesty.

Did this article resonate with your take on trust in eCommerce? Are you aware of more ways to generate trust? We and our readers would love to know.

Let us know below in the comments section :)

eCommerce Survey 2014 Report

The post Importance of Trust in eCommerce and How to Build Trust on Your Website appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Importance of Trust in eCommerce and How to Build Trust on Your Website

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Heatmaps Role in Conversion Optimization Q&A

Chris Goward presented a webinar on October 30th 2014 titled The 2 Ways to Use Heatmaps to Light the Fire Under your Website Tests (recorded).  The webinar, co-hosted by WiderFunnel and CrazyEgg, sparked some great questions during the Q&A period.  We are happy to share them with you.

Q&A Recap

Q: How do heatmaps compare to qualitative analytics?

A: Yes – heatmaps are a part of qualitative analytics. They are sort of a mixture of qualitative and quantitative. They share the features of quantitative in that you are using high volumes of clicks to get an aggregate view of how people are responding to the pages. It’s qualitative in that it doesn’t directly give you a yes-or-no answer to something.

Q: How do you determine the right amount of traffic to create a valid assessment of a heatmap? Or to make it statistically significant?

A: The thing to understand with click heatmaps is that you are not aiming for statistical significance. A click heatmap is an indicator of how people are acting that leads to hypotheses. It’s an exploratory method. Only in the reductive-conclusive side, when you are talking about A/B tests or multivariate tests, that’s where statistical significance matters. For click heatmaps it actually doesn’t, but the more clicks you get the more of an aggregate view you will get, and potentially, the more important hypotheses you’ll get. As a general rule of thumb, we’re seeing between 2,000-5,000 clicks on a page, is going to give you a good sample that shows you how people in general are responding to the page. You can use fewer clicks as well, it doesn’t matter as long as it gives you an idea because you are ultimately going to test it with an A/B test and that’s where you get statistical significance to find out what really works.

Q: What are hazy click zones?

A: ‘Hazy click zones’ are areas on the page where there aren’t a high concentration of clicks and you see a lot of clicks being spread over different areas of the page – especially where there is meant to be calls-to-action. This is showing you that people aren’t sure where they should click. Hazy click zones happen where there is a lot of diffused clicking, as people are just sort of browsing by braille and clicking on anything they think might be an indicator. If you see this, it means your design isn’t guiding your user clearly to show what they should click on. When a page is designed well from a conversion perspective, there will be no question of what to click. The call-to-action (CTA) will be prominent and attractive, and you will see concentrations of clicks. The click heatmap will show more on the orange and green and white spectrum, rather than just the blue haze that we have seen on that previous example.

Q: Is there a way to track click heatmaps based on returning versus new visitors?

A: Yes – you can do that. Actually, CrazyEgg has that as one of the reports in their confetti report, and you can just select new versus returning. Also, you can look at it using the cloud click heatmap if you were to segment your test by new vs. returning using a testing tool and funnel new vs. returning visitors into different variations/ different pages and tracking them separately using click heatmaps. That is a technical way of doing it, but it could be valuable. It is one example – of many examples – of possible segmentation hypotheses. I have another webinar coming up, probably in the next couple months, talking about segmentation. In the meantime, there is a lot more information on our blog about this. The blog post: 8 Steps to Amazing Website Segmentation Success goes into a lot of detail on how to test segmentation hypotheses and how to get the best results with segmentation. There is a lot of misunderstanding about segmentation today, so this is an important blog post to check out.

Q: Do heatmaps show you what people click on, or what they hover over?

A: The CrazyEgg heatmaps show what people click on. It is technically possible to have other heatmaps that show what people hover over. That’s only if you are using mouse interfaces, it doesn’t work for mobile of course. So ya, it is possible as there are other tools that do that as well. And in fact, heatmaps themselves are just a reporting method, the interaction can be a variety of things. There are also eye tracking heatmaps, which have similar looking reports, but use a smaller samples of visitors and use cameras to track where people are looking. That is just another way of doing the same thing – just a lot more expensive because you have to have individual users sitting in front of the camera.

Q: How are heatmaps impacted by tablets and ipads?

A: They interact in the same way, but of course they use finger presses rather than clicks. People interact differently with an ipad or a tablet, and because they are scrolling with their fingers the patterns will look different. They are still valuable, especially because they show directly where people are clicking just the same as a click heatmap, but there are some nuances to it.

Q: Does CrazyEgg show all pages of the website like Google Analytics?

A: CrazyEgg shows you the pages that you set up in the tool. To collect reporting for a page you have to put the script on the page and also set up that page within CrazyEgg. So reporting is not by default across the website like Google Analytics. Heatmap reporting is more focused, and should be used when you have a question about a particular page, rather than just generally splaying across the website.

Q: I work with a tool that uses Heatmaps and Clickmaps. Can you share a bit more on the value of Clickmaps?

A: Heatmaps are actually a type of clickmap (and vice versa). Heatmaps are a type of report that show concentration of activity, which can be clicks, mouse hovers, eye focal points, or something else. You may be referring to a “confetti” type of clickmap report that shows the individual clicks rather than the heatmap cloudy view. The confetti view allows you to see concentrations of individual segments with different coloured clicks. I explain the different type of clickmap reports in the first few minutes of this recorded webinar.

Q: What would be your take-away from a test version that had better scroll data, but worse results on the main CTA?

A: There could be several conclusions, depending on the context. Perhaps there’s too much content on the page that’s causing Distraction. Or, more CTA opportunities are needed further down the page. But, the reason they’re scrolling depends on the content. You can learn from where they pause and click on the page too. Most importantly, though, is which version has the highest total conversion rate.

The post Heatmaps Role in Conversion Optimization Q&A appeared first on WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization.

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Heatmaps Role in Conversion Optimization Q&A

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Using Heatmaps for Conversion Optimization Q&A

Chris Goward presented a webinar on October 30th 2014 titled The 2 Ways to Use Heatmaps to Light the Fire Under your Website Tests (recorded).  The webinar, co-hosted by WiderFunnel and CrazyEgg, sparked some great questions during the Q&A period.  We are happy to share them with you.

Q&A Recap

Q: How do heatmaps compare to qualitative analytics?

A: Yes – heatmaps are a part of qualitative analytics. They are sort of a mixture of qualitative and quantitative. They share the features of quantitative in that you are using high volumes of clicks to get an aggregate view of how people are responding to the pages. It’s qualitative in that it doesn’t directly give you a yes-or-no answer to something.

Q: How do you determine the right amount of traffic to create a valid assessment of a heatmap? Or to make it statistically significant?

A: The thing to understand with click heatmaps is that you are not aiming for statistical significance. A click heatmap is an indicator of how people are acting that leads to hypotheses. It’s an exploratory method. Only in the reductive-conclusive side, when you are talking about A/B tests or multivariate tests, that’s where statistical significance matters. For click heatmaps it actually doesn’t, but the more clicks you get the more of an aggregate view you will get, and potentially, the more important hypotheses you’ll get. As a general rule of thumb, we’re seeing between 2,000-5,000 clicks on a page, is going to give you a good sample that shows you how people in general are responding to the page. You can use fewer clicks as well, it doesn’t matter as long as it gives you an idea because you are ultimately going to test it with an A/B test and that’s where you get statistical significance to find out what really works.

Q: What are hazy click zones?

A: ‘Hazy click zones’ are areas on the page where there aren’t a high concentration of clicks and you see a lot of clicks being spread over different areas of the page – especially where there is meant to be calls-to-action. This is showing you that people aren’t sure where they should click. Hazy click zones happen where there is a lot of diffused clicking, as people are just sort of browsing by braille and clicking on anything they think might be an indicator. If you see this, it means your design isn’t guiding your user clearly to show what they should click on. When a page is designed well from a conversion perspective, there will be no question of what to click. The call-to-action (CTA) will be prominent and attractive, and you will see concentrations of clicks. The click heatmap will show more on the orange and green and white spectrum, rather than just the blue haze that we have seen on that previous example.

Q: Is there a way to track click heatmaps based on returning versus new visitors?

A: Yes – you can do that. Actually, CrazyEgg has that as one of the reports in their confetti report, and you can just select new versus returning. Also, you can look at it using the cloud click heatmap if you were to segment your test by new vs. returning using a testing tool and funnel new vs. returning visitors into different variations/ different pages and tracking them separately using click heatmaps. That is a technical way of doing it, but it could be valuable. It is one example – of many examples – of possible segmentation hypotheses. I have another webinar coming up, probably in the next couple months, talking about segmentation. In the meantime, there is a lot more information on our blog about this. The blog post: 8 Steps to Amazing Website Segmentation Success goes into a lot of detail on how to test segmentation hypotheses and how to get the best results with segmentation. There is a lot of misunderstanding about segmentation today, so this is an important blog post to check out.

Q: Do heatmaps show you what people click on, or what they hover over?

A: The CrazyEgg heatmaps show what people click on. It is technically possible to have other heatmaps that show what people hover over. That’s only if you are using mouse interfaces, it doesn’t work for mobile of course. So ya, it is possible as there are other tools that do that as well. And in fact, heatmaps themselves are just a reporting method, the interaction can be a variety of things. There are also eye tracking heatmaps, which have similar looking reports, but use a smaller samples of visitors and use cameras to track where people are looking. That is just another way of doing the same thing – just a lot more expensive because you have to have individual users sitting in front of the camera.

Q: How are heatmaps impacted by tablets and ipads?

A: They interact in the same way, but of course they use finger presses rather than clicks. People interact differently with an ipad or a tablet, and because they are scrolling with their fingers the patterns will look different. They are still valuable, especially because they show directly where people are clicking just the same as a click heatmap, but there are some nuances to it.

Q: Does CrazyEgg show all pages of the website like Google Analytics?

A: CrazyEgg shows you the pages that you set up in the tool. To collect reporting for a page you have to put the script on the page and also set up that page within CrazyEgg. So reporting is not by default across the website like Google Analytics. Heatmap reporting is more focused, and should be used when you have a question about a particular page, rather than just generally splaying across the website.

Q: I work with a tool that uses Heatmaps and Clickmaps. Can you share a bit more on the value of Clickmaps?

A: Heatmaps are actually a type of clickmap (and vice versa). Heatmaps are a type of report that show concentration of activity, which can be clicks, mouse hovers, eye focal points, or something else. You may be referring to a “confetti” type of clickmap report that shows the individual clicks rather than the heatmap cloudy view. The confetti view allows you to see concentrations of individual segments with different coloured clicks. I explain the different type of clickmap reports in the first few minutes of this recorded webinar.

Q: What would be your take-away from a test version that had better scroll data, but worse results on the main CTA?

A: There could be several conclusions, depending on the context. Perhaps there’s too much content on the page that’s causing Distraction. Or, more CTA opportunities are needed further down the page. But, the reason they’re scrolling depends on the content. You can learn from where they pause and click on the page too. Most importantly, though, is which version has the highest total conversion rate.

The post Using Heatmaps for Conversion Optimization Q&A appeared first on WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization.

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Using Heatmaps for Conversion Optimization Q&A

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Color your way to Conversions!

Red means passion, black is equal to luxury and yellow gives a feeling of freshness. Use orange for your CTAs to increase conversions and this case study proved that red is a better button color than green… BLAH!

There are more than 16 million colors and any great blog-post that you come across on the internet will tell you the “feelings” conveyed by only a handful of colors. If you sell to people from different ethnicity and cultures, choosing colors for your website can become even more difficult as one color that relates to wealth and prosperity in a country may relate to mourning in another. How do you go about it then?

In this post I will help you choose colors for your website’s CTAs, background and other important entities that you want people to focus on. A believer of “one size doesn’t fit all” and “data (not opinions and experience) gets most respect“, I will not be able to spill out some magic potion and tell you the exact colors you should use. But I promise to take you through 3 actionable tips that you could go back and test right away to increase your website’s conversions.

1) Color the Primary Goal of your Website to Make it Stand Out

Imagine a shopping list of 20 items, all items written in blue ink except for one which is in red. If asked to scan this list for 10 seconds, which item do you think you are most likely to recall later? Multiple experiments have confirmed that outliers (or the item in red in the example) is what people remember most often. This is because of a phenomenon known as the Von Restroff effect (also known as isolation effect) which states that an item that stands out is more likely to be remembered than others.

Applying this to your websites, if you want your calls to action to get immediate attention, make them stand out. Use a color that has high contrast compared to your background and that hasn’t been used for any other entity on the page. Look at how Facebook and LinkedIn do it on their homepage:

Facebook homepage
LinkedIn homepage

Choosing a contrasting color for your primary CTA is not very difficult. You just have to look for a color diagonally opposite to that of your background color or most-used color on your page from the color wheel.

color_wheel

Image Credit: Wikipedia

Let’s for a moment go back to the red button v/s green button case study. Have a closer look at the screenshot below. You will find that the color scheme of the original page has some emphasis towards green. The Performable logo is green, the screenshot used on the page has some elements in green and one of the features also has an icon in green. A quick scan doesn’t really make the CTA stand out from the rest of the elements. I wouldn’t be surprised if testing the original page against a variation with the CTA in yellow or orange would produce same or better results.

red_green_button_case_study

The important takeaway from this case study is to create a visual contrast for your goal. End of the day, it’s not the button color that is going to sell your stuff but how prominently you display it for people to take a decision before abandoning your website for the competitors’.

2) Choose Colors that are “All”-User Friendly

In United States alone, about 7% of males (roughly 10.5 million men) and 0.4% of females have some form of color blindness. In Australia, these percentages are 8 for men and 0.4 for women. The most common problem being difficulty in telling red from green.

Needless to say, when deciding colors for your website and the areas where you want people to focus on, it becomes imperative to keep in mind people who have some form of color blindness. And if you have a SaaS product, that shows some results in charts and graphs, it becomes even more important to choose the right colors so that they are easily distinguishable for everyone. See below, how a contrast between foreground and background appears to people with certain forms of color blindness. You will notice that while eyes with normal vision would easily be able to read the text, people with Protanopia and Deuteranopia (most common forms of color blindness) will just not be able to read what’s written.

Normal vision:

normal_color_vision

How the above appears to people with Protanopia:

protanopia

And to people with Deuteranopia:

deuteranopia

Image Credit: Studiopress.com

Common solutions to ensure a great experience for everyone:

  • Choose colors many steps away from each other on the color wheel
  • Use tints (mixture of color with white) for background and shades (mixture of color with black) for foreground (or vice versa). Or make one element even more dark and the other even more light to create better contrast.

3) Train Visitors with your Color Key

Consider how bar graphs work. To look at data of one particular type, you just follow its color or pattern. Once you understand what a particular color or pattern bar stands for, you are able to compare easily focusing only on that particular color or pattern.

Similarly, if you use one color consistently on your website for a particular CTA (say signup), you will subconsciously train your users with the meaning of that color on the website. As an example, let’s suppose someone is evaluating a SaaS product on your website. And you have a shiny orange button for free trial on every page. When done evaluating their eyes will look for the orange thing, on whichever page they are, to sign up.

This way, you can even tell them which colors correspond to a heading, which means links and which call for a purchase.

See how CampaignMonitor does it beautifully. CTA buttons on all of their pages, which ask people to sign up for an account, are in green. And for no other CTA has the same color been used. This createa a consistent visual memory for visitors.

campaignmonitor_homepage

Let’s Talk

How has your experience with website colors been? Tried any A/B tests that worked well? Or may be which didn’t? Would love to hear all of it in the comments section below!

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Color your way to Conversions!