Tag Archives: html

Learning Elm From A Drum Sequencer (Part 1)

If you’re a front-end developer following the evolution of single page applications (SPA), it’s likely you’ve heard of Elm, the functional language that inspired Redux. If you haven’t, it’s a compile-to-JavaScript language comparable with SPA projects like React, Angular, and Vue.
Like those, it manages state changes through its virtual dom aiming to make the code more maintainable and performant. It focuses on developer happiness, high-quality tooling, and simple, repeatable patterns.

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Learning Elm From A Drum Sequencer (Part 1)

Stop Designing For Only 85% Of Users: Nailing Accessibility In Design

As designers, we like to think we are solution-based. But whereas we wouldn’t hesitate to call out a museum made inaccessible by a lack of wheelchair ramps, many of us still remain somewhat oblivious to flaws in our user interfaces. Poor visual design, in particular, can be a barrier to a good user experience. Whereas disability advocacy has long focused on ways to help the user adapt to the situation, we have reached a point where users expect products to be optimized for a broad range of needs.

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Stop Designing For Only 85% Of Users: Nailing Accessibility In Design

How To Easily Put A Form On Your Website

forms

Contact Forms. Everyone wants them on their website. It seems like quite a standard component that anybody should know about like the back of their hand. But it’s not true. Time and again I run into people who are pulling their hair out trying to get a simple contact form (or any type of form) on their site, or accomplishing it in a very long-winded and inefficient manner. This guide will teach you how to use the best tools to quickly create forms and embed them on your website, whether it’s a plain HTML / PHP website or a WordPress…

The post How To Easily Put A Form On Your Website appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How To Easily Put A Form On Your Website

Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM

Some people hate writing documentation, and others just hate writing. I happen to love writing; otherwise, you wouldn’t be reading this. It helps that I love writing because, as a design consultant offering professional guidance, writing is a big part of what I do. But I hate, hate, hate word processors.

Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM

When writing technical web documentation (read: pattern libraries), word processors are not just disobedient, but inappropriate. Ideally, I want a mode of writing that allows me to include the components I’m documenting inline, and this isn’t possible unless the documentation itself is made of HTML, CSS and JavaScript. In this article, I’ll be sharing a method for easily including code demos in Markdown, with the help of shortcodes and shadow DOM encapsulation.

The post Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM

Introducing Mavo: Create Web Apps Entirely By Writing HTML!

Have you ever wanted to make a website that non-technical folks can edit right in the browser? Or have you ever wanted to make a website that presents an editable collection of items (e.g. your portfolio)? Or simply upload images to a website you made, right from the browser?

Introducing Mavo: Create Web Apps Entirely By Writing HTML!

Well, what if I told you, that you can do these things (and more!), just with HTML and CSS? No programming code to write, no servers to manage. You can make any element editable and saveable just by adding one HTML attribute to it. In fact, you can store your data locally in the browser, on Github, on Dropbox, or any other service just by changing an HTML attribute.

The post Introducing Mavo: Create Web Apps Entirely By Writing HTML! appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Introducing Mavo: Create Web Apps Entirely By Writing HTML!

A Comprehensive Guide To HTTP/2 Server Push

The landscape for the performance-minded developer has changed significantly in the last year or so, with the emergence of HTTP/2 being perhaps the most significant of all. No longer is HTTP/2 a feature we pine for. It has arrived, and with it comes server push!
Aside from solving common HTTP/1 performance problems (e.g., head of line blocking and uncompressed headers), HTTP/2 also gives us server push! Server push allows you to send site assets to the user before they’ve even asked for them.

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A Comprehensive Guide To HTTP/2 Server Push

What Are the SEO Benefits of XML & HTML Sitemaps?

seo sitemaps

A sitemap is (usually) an XML document, containing a list of pages on your website that you have chosen to tell Google and other search engines to index. Google often uses the sitemap file as a guide to the pages available on your website — even though it may decide not to index every page you list on your sitemap. The sitemap also carries information about each page, including when it was created and last modified, and its importance relative to other pages on your site. This speeds up the process of indexing pages. A sitemap is one of those…

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What Are the SEO Benefits of XML & HTML Sitemaps?

MJML – How To Make Responsive HTML Email Coding Easy

Email is one of the best ways to engage with your users, especially during the holiday season. However, if you want to stand out, no matter how beautiful your emails are, you need to make sure they render correctly in your reader’s inbox, regardless of what email client they’re using. Creating responsive email is not an easy task, and there are various reasons for that.
First, there is no standard in the way email clients render HTML.

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MJML – How To Make Responsive HTML Email Coding Easy

An Introduction To Building And Sending HTML Email For Web Developers

HTML email: Two words that, when combined, brings tears to a developer’s eyes. If you’re a web developer, it’s inevitable that coding an email will be a task that gets dropped in your lap at some time in your career, whether you like it or not. Coding HTML email is old school. Think back to 1999, when we called ourselves “webmasters” and used Frontpage, WYSIWYG editors and tables to mark up our websites.

An Introduction To Building And Sending HTML Email For Web Developers

Not much has changed in email design. In fact, it has gotten worse. With the introduction of mobile devices and more and more email clients, we have even more caveats to deal with when building HTML email.

The post An Introduction To Building And Sending HTML Email For Web Developers appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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An Introduction To Building And Sending HTML Email For Web Developers

CSS Inheritance, The Cascade And Global Scope: Your New Old Worst Best Friends

I’m big on modular design. I’ve long been sold on dividing websites into components, not pages, and amalgamating those components dynamically into interfaces. Flexibility, efficiency and maintainability abound.

CSS Inheritance, The Cascade And Global Scope: Your New Old Worst Best Friends

But I don’t want my design to look like it’s made out of unrelated things. I’m making an interface, not a surrealist photomontage. As luck would have it, there is already a technology, called CSS, which is designed specifically to solve this problem. Using CSS, I can propagate styles that cross the borders of my HTML components, ensuring a consistent design with minimal effort.

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CSS Inheritance, The Cascade And Global Scope: Your New Old Worst Best Friends