Tag Archives: input

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The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions

popup-forms

The ultimate end goal for every single visitor to your website is to turn them into a customer or a recurring visitor. The problem is that turning visitors into regulars can be tricky. Really tricky. There is, however, an easier way to convert visitors without wasting your time or theirs—and it comes in an unexpected form. Pop-up form, to be exact. Simply by using well placed popup forms, you can boost your email subscription rate by 317% or more. With this in mind, we’re going to take a look at our top seven pop-up recommendations and discover how they’ll help…

The post The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions

Replacing jQuery With Vue.js: No Build Step Necessary

It’s been impossible to ignore all of the hype surrounding JavaScript frameworks lately, but they might not be the right fit for your projects. Perhaps you don’t want to set up an entire build system for some small abstractions you could feasibly do without. Perhaps moving a project over to a build system and thus, different deployment method would mean a lot of extra time and effort that you might not be able to bill to a client.

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Replacing jQuery With Vue.js: No Build Step Necessary

Be Watchful: PHP And WordPress Functions That Can Make Your Site Insecure

Security of a WordPress (or any) website is a multi-faceted problem. The most important step anyone can take to make sure that a site is secure is to keep in mind that no single process or method is sufficient to ensure nothing bad happens. But there are things you can do to help. One of them is to be on the watch, in the code you write and the code from others you deploy, for functions that can have negative consequences.

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Be Watchful: PHP And WordPress Functions That Can Make Your Site Insecure

15 Steps To Creating a Successful Event Marketing Campaign

event marketing

We know what events are. We know what marketing is. But when these two words come together, the whole becomes greater than the sum of its parts. Event marketing is a versatile and impactful marketing channel that is increasingly becoming more critical across various industries. According to Forrester research, events make up for 24% of the average CMO’s B2B marketing budget. This trend only seems to be growing with projections showing that 3.2 million global professional events will be taking place annually by 2020. Statistics like these should come as no surprise. In a digital age where consumers are inundated…

The post 15 Steps To Creating a Successful Event Marketing Campaign appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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15 Steps To Creating a Successful Event Marketing Campaign

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“Why We Didn’t Use A Framework” (Case Study)

When we set out to build MeetSpace (a video conferencing app for distributed teams), we had a familiar decision to make: What’s our tech stack going to be? We gathered our requirements, reviewed our team’s skillset and ultimately decided to use vanilla JavaScript and to avoid a front-end framework.
Using this approach, we were able to create an incredibly fast and light web application that is also less work to maintain over time.

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“Why We Didn’t Use A Framework” (Case Study)

Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

Building user interfaces on the web is hard, because the web and, thus, CSS were inherently made for documents. Some smart developers invented methodologies and conventions such as BEM, ITCSS, SMACSS and many more, which make building user interfaces easier and more maintainable by working with components.

Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

After this shift in mindset towards building component-based user interfaces, we are now in what we like to call the “component age.” The rise of JavaScript frameworks such as React, Ember and recently Angular 2, the effort of the W3C to standardize a web-native component system, pattern libraries and style guides being considered the “right way” to build web applications, and many other things have illuminated this revolution.

The post Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

PostCSS – A Comprehensive Introduction

The development of CSS, like all languages, is an iterative process. With every major release, we get new features and syntaxes that help us write our styles. CSS Level 3 introduced features that enable us to design interactions that previously were possible only with JavaScript. With every new day, tools emerge to make styling easier and more flexible.
One of the relatively recent tools introduced for styling is PostCSS.

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PostCSS – A Comprehensive Introduction

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Continuous Input In Mobile Devices: Pain Or Gain?

Working with text has long been the domain of desktops and notebooks. Yet the screen size, resolution and software of mobile devices have improved in recent years, which has made typing a fairly large amount of text quite achievable. A number of apps and techniques are intended to make this task easier, thus increasing productivity and increasing the amount of text that can be comfortably created or edited on a mobile device.

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Continuous Input In Mobile Devices: Pain Or Gain?

A Guide To Designing Touch Keyboards (With Cheat Sheet)

Touch devices have rightfully been praised for generally being much more intuitive than the decades-old computer mouse and keyboard. Users interact directly with touch interfaces, which narrows the gap between human act and software response. Yet typing on mobile devices — in particular on smartphones — is quite the horror story. It’s slow, painful and error-prone.
The obvious culprits are keyboard character size and proximity of the keys, but there are many other important aspects to consider, including:

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A Guide To Designing Touch Keyboards (With Cheat Sheet)

The Problem Of CSS Form Elements

Before 1998, the birth year of CSS Level 2, form elements were already widely implemented in all major browsers. The CSS 2 specification did not address the problem of how form elements should be presented to users. Because these elements are part of the UI of every Web document, the specification’s authors preferred to leave the visual layout of such elements to the default style sheet of Web browsers.

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The Problem Of CSS Form Elements