Tag Archives: institute

Why Your B2B Needs Account Based Content Marketing & How You Should Do It

abc

Content Marketing Institute’s 2017 report stated that over 60% of B2B marketers saw more success from their content marketing efforts this past year. What does this mean? It means – as so many of us have stated before – that Content is King. When it comes to digital marketing, there is truly no better way to convey value and transparent authority to your users. However, even if the majority of B2B search marketers are reporting strong growth stats, there is still a large discrepancy between how our content performs in theory and how it performs in reality. Ironically, content marketing…

The post Why Your B2B Needs Account Based Content Marketing & How You Should Do It appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read this article: 

Why Your B2B Needs Account Based Content Marketing & How You Should Do It

A Handy List of Resources for Picking the Perfect Website Color Palette

picking color palettes

Creating an effective color palette is a vital part of designing a website that works. But how do we get there? For some projects, you already have one or two colors picked out – maybe they’re your logo, or brand colors, and you’re working within those limitations when you create your site. For others, you’re starting from scratch. And some projects just need tweaking – minor adjustments to the color palette to make it more beautiful or usable. Whether you’re a seasoned pro looking to outsource some of the spadework of design, or you’re building a website for the first…

The post A Handy List of Resources for Picking the Perfect Website Color Palette appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Original link:  

A Handy List of Resources for Picking the Perfect Website Color Palette

How to Write a Case Study That’ll Make People Love Your Business

how-to-write-a-case-study

Marketers often have a love/hate relationship with case studies. Writing case studies can be nothing short of a chore. They are an incredibly time-consuming task and require tons of scheduling. And when you think about it, why would anyone trust your side of a case study story? Despite that, case studies have their place as a top-performing addition to the content marketing strategy and work wonders in your sales funnel. According to data from Content Marketing Institute, case studies rank as one of the most popular content marketing tactics with 65% of marketers perceiving them as effective. They’re so effective,…

The post How to Write a Case Study That’ll Make People Love Your Business appeared first on The Daily Egg.

See the original article here:

How to Write a Case Study That’ll Make People Love Your Business

15 Ways Marketers Use Overlays to Get More Conversions

Let me paint an ugly picture for you.

The end of the month is approaching. In one week, you have to report to your boss about marketing metrics… and you’re not even halfway to your targets.

Maybe you call an emergency brainstorm meeting with your team:

giphy
Are there any last-minute email or social campaigns we can run? Image source.

Maybe you pump more money into your PPC campaigns. Or maybe you do nothing at all and start a mental list of excuses reasons you couldn’t meet your targets.

At the end of the day, you didn’t meet your goals because you’re lacking something — resources, know-how, money or bandwidth.

You need more conversions without the overhead of running a major campaign or redesigning your entire website, regardless of how you define a “conversion”:

  1. Driving immediate sales
  2. Building email subscriber lists
  3. Reducing shopping cart abandonment
  4. Generating sales leads
  5. Moving traffic to high-converting pages (to get more conversions)

Let’s see how marketers are using overlays — modal lightboxes that launch within a web page and focus attention on a single offer — to get more conversions without more overhead.

Part I: Drive immediate sales

Research indicates that an average of 68.8% of shoppers will abandon their carts — that’s well over the majority. What then can you do to secure a sale before users ever leave your site to begin with?

You offer something irresistible at the moment prospects are ready to give up.

Note that the key word here is irresistible. You’re asking for a lot (for prospects to whip out their wallets), so you need to over-deliver in value. Your offer must be generous.

Here are five high-value approaches to securing a last-second purchase from abandoning users.

1. Offer a coupon or immediate discount

A coupon or discount is the most popular way to secure last-second purchases with overlays.

Below is an example from Neil Patel of Quick Sprout, who uses an overlay to offer a massive discount on his consulting services.

overlay-ideas-quicksprout-discount

Test different discounts values, but be careful not to downplay the value of your offering with a super-steep discount, which could hurt your credibility.

Target this offer at: First-time visitors, paid traffic

Place this offer on: Pricing or sign-up pages, product pages, landing pages

2. Offer a shipping discount

Shipping is a pain point for many online shoppers. No matter how well the costs are disclosed throughout the shopping process, many will leave once they see the final price with shipping included.

For that reason, a discount on shipping can often make the difference between a new customer and a lost sale.

overlay-ideas-canvas-prints-free-shipping

In the example above, Easy Canvas Prints uses an overlay to not only offer a last-second discount on shipping, but also capture an email address in the process. More on that later!

Target this offer at: First-time or repeat visitors, paid traffic

Place this offer on: Product pages, pricing or sign-up pages, shopping cart pages

3. Offer a free gift

Free giveaways have been a standard marketing tactic for decades.

They work well on the web because a free giveaway often comes at no cost to the vendor (you), especially if you offer subscription tools or services.

overlay-ideas-crazyegg-heatmap-offer

In the above example, Crazy Egg attempts to capture abandoning users by offering a free heatmap — one of its most popular tools.

Other ideas for free giveaways include ebooks, whitepapers, estimates/quotes or consultations.

Target this offer at: First-time or repeat visitors, paid traffic, organic traffic

Place this offer on: Pricing or sign-up pages, product pages, landing pages

Never launch an overlay without this 24-point checklist

Do you have all your bases covered? Double-check your overlay design, copy and triggering with our 24-point checklist.


By entering your email you'll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

4. Offer a time-based discount

Here’s where things get a bit risky. Time-based overlays can be effective because they add an element of urgency, but only if they are sincere.

overlay-ideas-time-based-discount-babyage

In the above example, BabyAge uses a countdown clock to promote a coupon, which (ideally) invokes a feeling of urgency in its users, pushing them toward the conversion.

This may be effective for some audiences, but I encourage you to test. And whatever you do, make sure your users only ever see it once. If you serve this offer on too many pages or put it in front of too broad a user segment, you risk losing credibility.

Target this offer at: First-time visitors only

Place this offer on: Pricing or sign-up pages, landing pages

5. Offer customer support

Some prospects might appreciate being able to talk to a human before they make up their minds about converting.

In the example below, Timesulin uses an overlay as a standin for a virtual salesperson, tapping you on the shoulder and asking if you have any questions:

overlay-ideas-timesulin-customer-support

Especially for more complicated or high-commitment offers, an overlay like this can help squash doubts and counter objections that your visitors have.

Target this offer at: First-time visitors, repeat visitors, paid traffic

Place this offer on: Pricing or sign-up pages, product pages, landing pages

Part II: Building email subscriber lists

If you need convincing that email marketing is an effective marketing channel, consider this eye-popping stat from the Direct Marketing Association:

Email marketing has an ROI of 3800%.

What have you done lately to ensure that your email list is continuously growing? And not a bunch of unqualified subs  — I’m talking about warm email leads that are familiar with your products and have recently interacted with your brand.

Overlays work well for building a subscriber base because it’s easy to offer value that outweighs the small ask of an email address.

Here are the four best approaches for building email subscriber lists with overlays:

6. Offer a discount in exchange for an email address

Offering deals in exchange for an email address has two benefits:

  1. It greatly increases your chances of securing an immediate sale
  2. You can establish a customer relationship through email

Have a look at this example by PetCare:

overlay-examples-petcare-discount

PetCare offers a substantial discount in exchange for an email address. It’s a win for your prospect, because they’ll save on their next order. And it’s a win-win for you, should you make a sale and snag and email.

Target this offer at: First time or repeat visitors, social media traffic, paid traffic

Place this offer on: Homepage, product pages, blog pages, company pages (ex: ‘About,’ ‘Contact’)

7. Collect newsletter subscribers

Though not as lucrative as they once were, newsletters can still drive revenue. The Chive uses an overlay to grab signups in the example below:

overlay-ideas-chive-newsletter

This type of overlay is especially effective when you’re reaching out to a user base that has already interacted with your content and likes what you have to say. It should be targeted only at repeat visitors and lower-converting segments like social media traffic.

Target this offer at: Repeat visitors, social media traffic

Place this offer on: Homepage, product pages, blog pages, company pages (e.g., ‘About,’ ‘Contact’)

8. Offer an ebook, case study or course

Ebook, case study or course offers generally convert at a higher rate than newsletters, because it’s easier to communicate the value to the reader.

Done right, this type of overlay will clearly communicate the benefit of reading, as in this stellar example from ContentVerve:

overlay-ideas-offer-ebook-content-verve

Offering a course has the advantage of securing multiple user interactions, as you can serve this offer piece-by-piece to keep users engaged.

Target this offer at: Repeat visitors, social media traffic

Place this offer on: Homepage, product pages, blog pages, company pages (e.g., ‘About,’ ‘Contact’)

Part III: Reduce cart abandonment

68.81% of online shopping carts are abandoned, according to the Baymard Institute.

People abandon shopping carts for a variety of reasons, and understanding these various behaviors can help you better optimize your sales funnel. Check out the top six reasons for cart abandonment according to Savvy Panda:

why-web-abandonners-abandon-shopping-carts

Two of the top six reasons have nothing to do with the cart itself, but rather the mindset of the shopper, who is expressing only interest in the product, not commitment.

So how do we engage cart abandoners who are only loosely committed to our products?

To extend the engagement — and build a mutually beneficial relationship — you must either:

  1. Get an email address and remarket through triggered emails
  2. Offer a discount or incentive that convinces the shopper to buy before abandoning the cart

With this in mind, here are four approaches to reduce shopping cart abandonment using overlays.

9. Collect an email (to follow up later)

Post-abandonment emails are a great way to continue telling the story you began telling cart abandoners. You can use them to build upon momentum established on your cart page, and nurture a customer relationship.

PetFlow uses this tactic well in the above example, though the “deal” is actually entry into a contest. But hey, it’s a win anytime you can have a kitten and a puppy sitting in your email form field:

overlay-ideas-petflow-reduce-cart-abandonment

Sending a cart-triggered email puts you a step ahead of most competition, as roughly 80% of retailers fail to send triggered emails after cart abandonment. Why not test following up with a free shipping discount?

Target this offer at: Cart abandoners from both paid and organic traffic sources

Place this offer on: Cart pages, checkout pages

10. Notify visitors that they’ve left something in their cart

This is a simple tactic for notifying cart abandoners they’ve left items behind at the checkout.

overlay-ideas-cart-notification-babyage

In this example, BabyAge links its overlay directly to the next step in the checkout process. This may not generate earth-shattering results, but it’s definitely something to test.

Target this offer at: Cart abandoners from both paid and organic traffic sources

Place this offer on: Cart pages, checkout pages

11. Offer telephone support

Many shoppers routinely struggle to complete online checkout processes without assistance.

For companies with complicated products or checkouts, using an overlay to offer help at checkout can significantly reduce cart abandonment.

overlay-ideas-telephone-support-massage-magazine

Massage Magazine’s example above shows how an overlay can used to help clarify the terms of complicated products or subscriptions. It also has the added benefit of grabbing a valuable email address.

Target this offer at: Cart abandoners from both paid and organic traffic sources

Place this offer on: Cart pages, checkout pages

Part IV: Generate sales leads

Generating sales leads with an overlay is closely related to our previous section on building email lists — but with a few subtle differences.

Sales leads don’t necessarily require collecting contact information in exchange for a free resource; reaching out to a visitor on your site can also produce a lead, and is often incentive enough.

Further, you can generate a sales lead by merely offering help — free advice, free quotes — on your product.

Finally, whereas marketing to email list prospects often requires multiple engagements, sales leads usually just a one-time engagement.

12. Offer a free quote or advice

Free quotes have long been used as a lead generation tactic in brick-and-mortar organizations. On the web, free quotes are a great way to offer value without actually giving anything away.

overlay-ideas-free-quote

The example above from YourMechanic uses a free quote offer to drive home the ease and convenience of using mobile mechanics.

I would generally advise against using this type of offer on paid traffic, as “paid” implies these users should already be strong leads. An offer that drives an immediate sale is better suited to this type of user.

Target this offer at: First-time or repeat visitors, organic traffic, social media traffic

Place this offer on: Homepage or any high-traffic/low-converting page, product pages, blog pages

13. Offer a resource that qualifies prospects

Offering a resource to prospects is a great way to demonstrate that you understand their pains — all while confirming that they’re a good fit for your solution.

Gr8fires created an overlay with an “installation calculator” that detailed the costs associated with installing a Gr8fires product:

overlay-ideas-estimate-calculator-gr8-fires

The results of Gr8fires’ overlay campaign were incredible: 300% increase in monthly sales leads and a 48.54% lift in sales.

As with any information resource offer, this works best if you have already established an audience. If you don’t already have a rapport with your visitors, this offer may go ignored.

Target this offer at: Repeat visitors, organic traffic, social media traffic

Place this offer on: Homepage or any high-traffic/low-converting page, product pages, blog pages

Part V: Traffic-shaping (driving traffic to high-converting pages)

As you look through your analytics, you may notice that there are certain pages on your site — like your blog homepage or ecommerce site — that don’t have particularly high conversion rates.

This is where traffic shaping overlays can come in handy.

Traffic shaping overlays allow you to direct users from a low-converting to a high-converting page, whether your conversion goal is lead generation or revenue generation.

For example, you could direct traffic from a well-performing blog post about watch reviews to a product page for the best-reviewed watch.

14. Cross-sell

Regular blog visitors likely already recognize your brand, but they could have blinders up when it comes to the calls to action you have embedded on your site.

A cross-sell overlay can help focus a user’s attention on a relevant offer.

For example, at Unbounce, our analytics showed that a roundup of the 16 Best Digital Marketing Conferences of 2016 was bringing in a lot of organic traffic.

Assuming that people who read about marketing conferences are also interested in attending marketing conferences, we served up this overlay (with a ticket discount to sweeten the pot) that directed people to our Call to Action conference microsite:

overlay-ideas-cross-sell-unbounce-cta-conf
Target this offer at: First-time and repeat visitors, social media traffic, organic traffic

Place this offer on: Homepage, blog pages, company pages (e.g.,: ‘About,’ ‘Contact’)

15. Re-engage with more content

Keeping visitors on your blog or resource library has a lot of advantages. The more they stick around, the more opportunities you have to:

  • Show visitors that you understand their pain and are uniquely qualified to help alleviate it
  • Educate visitors about your solution (ideally the solution to their problem)

A strategically placed exit or timed overlay on your blog can help keep visitors on site by recommending content similar to what they were reading previously:

overlay-ideas-content-re-engage

This type of overlay is most effective when targeted at first-time visitors.

These are the prospects that need a lil’ warming up before you ask them for their email address.

More conversions, less overhead

Next time the end of the month is rolling around and you haven’t met your targets, don’t scramble to run one-off campaigns to make up the difference.

Instead, pick one of these overlay campaigns and create a baseline of conversions every monththe type of campaign that keeps on giving without more overhead.

And when building your overlays, don’t forget the following:

The best marketing is mutually beneficial.

Conversions happen in that magical moment where your goals as a marketer align precisely with the goals of the user. You want the sale, they want the bargain. You want the email, they want the ebook.

If you focus on delivering relevant, timely offers that minimize intrusiveness and respect the user experience, your users will thank you — with their conversion.

See original - 

15 Ways Marketers Use Overlays to Get More Conversions

10 Requirements For Making Home Page Carousels Work For End Users (If Needed)

Are home page carousels actually helpful to users? Or are they simply popular because they are an easy tool for solving internal discussions in large organizations about who gets to put their banner on the home page?
The short answer is that home page carousels can work, but in practice the vast majority of implementations perform poorly with end users.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: An Exploration Of Carousel Usage On Mobile E-Commerce Websites Dropbox’s Carousel Design Deconstructed A Definitive Guide To The Android Carousel Design Pattern How To Poison The Mobile User At the Baymard Institute, we’ve conducted large-scale usability tests for the past seven years of both desktop and mobile e-commerce websites.

Source article – 

10 Requirements For Making Home Page Carousels Work For End Users (If Needed)

WTF Are Hedonic Shoppers and Why Should You Care?

abandoned shopping cart
It’s a lonely life for an abandoned shopping cart. Photo by Chris Glass.

67.89% of online shopping carts are abandoned, according to the Baymard Institute.

Across the web, we see toolmakers capitalizing on this number, and promoting the idea that poorly optimized carts are costing retailers two-thirds of their sales.

But is it really true?

Yes, many ecommerce companies are letting sales slip through the cracks because their checkout process isn’t optimized.

But retailers are not losing 67% of sales simply because their shopping carts suck.

Simply put, not every fish that nibbles your line is “one that got away.”

The fish that got away
Yeah, yeah, it was the biggest fish you’d ever seen, right?

And not every user that ditches your shopping cart does so because your checkout CTA is the wrong colour.


Etailers aren’t losing 67% of sales simply because their shopping carts suck. #CRO
Click To Tweet


Shopping cart abandonment rates are inflated by a group called hedonic shoppers, and they fill carts for much different reasons than normal utilitarian shoppers.

The bad news is you won’t capture sales from most hedonic shoppers by A/B testing your checkout process.

But by understanding hedonic motivations, you can build a relationship with these shoppers and eventually convert them to valuable customers. It just takes a bit of effort and creativity.

In this post, we’ll discuss:

  1. The differences between hedonic and utilitarian shoppers
  2. Why hedonic shoppers inflate cart abandonment rates
  3. Strategies and tools for converting hedonic shoppers

So let’s tuck in.

Hedonic vs. utilitarian shopping

According to research, people have two primary shopping motivations: hedonic and utilitarian.

Utilitarian vs. Hedonic

Utilitarian shopping is all about actual need and function. We need clothes, we need food, we need dental floss — and utilitarian motives drive these needs. (My dentist recently advised me to “only floss the ones you want to keep.” Good one, dentist).

Our utilitarian motives for shopping include: meeting our basic needs, finding greater convenience, seeking variety, seeking greater quality of merchandise and searching for better prices. For these shoppers, purchasing is a problem-solving activity that follows a series of logical steps.

Alternatively, hedonic shopping is driven by our desire for fun, entertainment and satisfaction. It’s derived from the perceived fun or playfulness of shopping experiences.

We don’t do it because we need to. We do it because we’re huge jerks.

Hedonic shopping stirs emotional arousal within us — both physiological and psychological. The individual is deeply involved in the satisfaction of shopping, and the higher the level of involvement, the greater the level of hedonism experienced by the shopper.


Hedonic shopping is driven by desire for fun & entertainment; we do it because we’re jerks.
Click To Tweet


Kind of makes us sound like a pack of lunatics, doesn’t it? There’s actually a more innocent explanation.

In their 2003 paper, “Hedonic shopping motivations”, Mark Arnold and Kristy Reynolds argue that there are six categories of hedonic shopping:

  1. Adventure shopping for stimulation and excitement
  2. Gratification shopping to enhance mood
  3. Social shopping to experience pleasure from interacting with others
  4. Idea shopping to stay current with trends
  5. Role shopping to gain pleasure from buying for others
  6. Value shopping to gain pleasure from finding deals (though not necessarily acting on them)
  7. Hedonic shopping predates ecommerce, but it’s amplified on the web.

Online, hedonic shoppers are free to fulfill their motives without the inconvenience, distance barriers, embarrassment and time constraints of traditional brick-and-mortar shopping.

Hedonic shopping and virtual cart abandonment

The web is a playground of escapism for hedonic shoppers. And within this playground, websites provide the stimuli they’re looking for.


The web is a playground of escapism for hedonic shoppers, where websites provide the stimuli #CRO
Click To Tweet


This stimulation means the hedonically motivated shopper doesn’t need to complete the transaction. The shopping experience itself was the outcome they desired. They don’t need to buy to get satisfaction; they need only browse.


Hedonic shoppers need not buy to get satisfaction; they need only browse #CRO #CartAbandonment
Click To Tweet


Because of this, the effects of hedonic shopping manifest themselves most noticeably in shopping cart abandonment.

Despite placing items in shopping carts, the majority of online shoppers are quick to abandon carts without a moment’s hesitation.

Conventional wisdom tells us cart abandonment results from breakdowns in the purchasing stage. But hedonic shopping theory counters that many carts are abandoned because the consumer is satisfied — they’ve had their fun.

To dig deeper, let’s look at the most common reasons customers give for abandoning shopping carts, as per a 2013 Shopify survey.

Cart abandonment stats

Looks like the usual suspects, (i.e., a list of utilitarian motivations). But wait…

Cart abandonment stats

Oh you were just browsing were you, you depraved little hedonists!?

Yes, we know your game. Abandoning your cart as part of some twisted charade, laughing as site owners wrack their brains for answers.

But perhaps there’s more to it. Here’s another interesting survey of shopping cart abandoners:

Cart abandonment stats

Taking a closer look, we can identify three main groups of shopping cart abandoners: process abandoners, utilitarian abandoners and hedonic abandoners.

Cart abandonment stats

In both surveys, we see a hedonic motive appear second on the list, with various utilitarian motives near the top. Further down, we see that process issues are cited less frequently. Since hedonic abandoners seem to leave carts regardless of price and functionality, what can site owners do to capture value from them? Aren’t they bound to leave no matter what?

The answer is yes and no. Yes, hedonic shoppers are likely to abandon on their first visit. But no, that doesn’t mean they can’t be converted to customers.

Although 70–95% of first-time visitors to a site abandon the page without taking your desired action — a number that includes shopping cart abandoners — that doesn’t mean they’ve given up on the idea.

And if you can fulfill their motivations, you will convert them. Hedonic shoppers can be some of your most valuable customers, so it’s worth putting in the effort to engage them. Like any potential sales lead, there’s value to capture.

It just takes a little longer.

Extending your engagement with hedonic shoppers

So the question now is obvious: How do we engage hedonic shoppers beyond that initial joyride?

To extend the engagement — and build a mutually beneficial relationship — you must:

  1. Get an email address or other means of contact
  2. Remarket to hedonic cart abandoners through triggered emails
  3. Promise hedonic shoppers more of the rich, engaging experiences they desire within your emails

Let’s tackle email first.

No matter what type of hedonic shopper frequents your website (and bloats your shopping cart abandonment rate), you must be able to stay in contact in order to build the relationship.

Email is key. According to MarketingLand, 77% of us prefer to receive our marketing messages by email, and second place isn’t even close.

But marketers are behind the eight-ball. BizReport states that 80% of online retailers fail to send triggered emails after shopping carts are abandoned.


80% of online retailers fail to send triggered emails after cart abandonment #CRO
Click To Tweet


These marketers are missing out on a great opportunity. A survey by ExactTarget showed that 78% of marketers experienced “good to excellent success” with cart abandonment emails.

Post-abandonment emails provide fertile ground for continuing the story you began telling hedonic shoppers on your website, and carrying that momentum toward establishing a customer relationship.

Take every opportunity you can to build your email list. Promise shoppers more of what they want — engaging shopping environments, new ideas, great value — by signing up for regular updates.

The second part of the equation is engagement.

Engagement is defined as the quality of user experience as a measurement of Focused Attention, Perceived Usability, Endurability, Novelty, Aesthetics, and Felt Involvement.

Engagement chart

These 6 factors are critical to engaging all shoppers. The difference is how these vehicles work. Novelty, for example, means something different to different shoppers.

To be successful, marketers must address these motivations on their landing pages. But when dealing with hedonic shoppers, it’s not quite enough — you’re going to need to get a bit more creative and appeal to these motivations throughout the entire remarketing process.

When an adventure shopper receives your triggered follow-up email, for example, you must convey an exciting shopping experience to come.

With novelty shoppers, you should promise a certain measure of exclusivity, something not everyone has access to already.

So accounting for the six hedonic shopping motives, here are some ideas you can employ to engage these shoppers and extend the relationship.

1. Adventure shoppers

Key engagement driver: Aesthetics

Adventure shoppers seek stimulation and excitement. If adventure shoppers are frequenting your website, you’re likely offering a fun shopping experience.

To extend the interaction, you could:

  • Test teasing the user with more excitement to come in your follow-up emails
  • Create landing pages and emails with rich graphics and imagery
  • Test using rich multimedia experiences for users with videos, infographics and podcasts
Adventure time
GoPro may have the best adventure shopping experience I’ve ever seen.

With the promise of stimulating their need for adventure, adventure shoppers may be enticed to return to your site to continue the process, rather than finding enjoyment elsewhere.

2. Gratification shoppers

Key engagement driver: Aesthetics, felt involvement

Hedonic shoppers who shop for gratification purposes are often doing so to improve mood. For the online retailer, the goal here is to make the shopper feel better.

  • Make the shopper feel comfortable, don’t push the sell too hard
  • Encourage and support the shopper throughout the decision-making process
  • Test using encouraging and complimentary language (for example, “5 new candle scents you deserve”)
Gratification
Suddenly craving a cinnamon bun… Image Source.

After a gratification shopper abandons your cart, focus on building the relationship. Pressure tactics aren’t comforting or reassuring.

3. Social shoppers

Key engagement driver: Felt involvement

This type of hedonic shopper loves to bring others along for the ride. In a traditional brick-and-mortar scenario, they would shop with friends or chat with salespeople.

On the web, it’s a bit different, but that doesn’t mean a friendly, social shopping environment can’t be created:

  • Urge shoppers to review your products and/or read reviews from fellow shoppers
  • Try including a chat link where shoppers can leave comments and engage with employees
  • Include an embedded Twitter and/or Facebook feed with discussions related to the products
  • Create a friendly, people-focused design that relies on imagery of people using and enjoying the product with friends; stress the social aspects of products you sell in your copy

4. Idea Shoppers

Key engagement driver: Novelty

Idea shoppers like to be trendsetters. They value staying current and the novelty of new and exciting ideas.

idea shoppers
Fancy.com has perfected idea shopping.

Try testing these ideas:

  • Play to the motivations of idea shoppers by implying they’ll be the first to jump on new trends such as tech developments, fashion ideas or food trends
  • Include a newsletter signup with a strong callout box to capture email addresses, and newsletter content that plays to the idea shopper’s motivations
  • Focus your headlines and email subject lines on ideas and creativity; remember that novelty is the key engagement driver for these shoppers

5. Role shoppers

Key engagement driver: Felt involvement

Role shoppers are stimulated by the act or idea of purchasing for others. To increase engagement with them, test out these ideas:

  • Focus on targeted messaging; examples could include “Pick one up for the kids” or “The in-laws will love it”
  • Try using imagery reflecting the joys of gift-giving and sharing
  • Create a friendly, people-focused design that relies on imagery of people using and enjoying the product with friends; stress the social aspects of products you sell in your copy

6. Value Shoppers

Key engagement driver: Novelty, felt involvement

If there’s any group of users perfectly suited to an email campaign, it’s value shoppers. Groupon built their entire empire off this strategy, and one could argue the majority of their customers are hedonically motivated value shoppers.

value shopper
Groupon’s homepage focuses on just one goal: email signups.

Promising value shoppers a steady stream of exclusive deals is a great idea for appeasing value shoppers.

You’ll absolutely need a strong email signup strategy, as the size and quality of your list will dictate success.

Email is the key profit driver

Capturing email addresses is critical to extending the relationship with hedonic shoppers, and thus reducing cart abandonment rates.

Without a strong list, you won’t be able to remarket effectively or take advantage of your customers’ preferred marketing channel.

PRO TIP: Some country’s anti-spam laws require you to obtain explicit consent before sending prospects promotional emails. Make sure you’re abiding by your local legislation.

The tools you use to build email lists depend on your business, but here are three that should be part of every marketer’s toolbox:

1. Landing pages

Unlike home pages, landing pages focus on a single conversion goal, whether to warm visitors up to make a purchase or to collect their email addresses in exchange for something they want, such as an ebook, white paper or coupon code.

Landing pages don’t have all the leaks found on your typical home page, so the attention ratio is 1:1. That is, there’s only one goal and therefore only one call to action on the page. In the words of Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner: “One page. One purpose. Period.”

Test after test has shown the conversion benefits of landing pages, making them an indispensable tool to build your email list.

Basecamp landing page
Basecamp’s landing page focuses on a single conversion goal.
unbounce logo icon - light backgroundBuild Lead Gen Landing Pages Quickly & Easily with Unbounce Templates Start your 30-day trial now

2. Exit-intent technology

An exit-intent tool measures users’ mouse movements to detect abandoning visitors. When an abandoning user is detected, an exit overlay is activated to engage the user one last time to convince the user to stick around, make a purchase, or sign up.

Exit overlay
An exit overlay from BabyAge.com, activated when the user begins to abandon their shopping cart

Exit overlays (driven by exit-intent technology) are particularly effective for building cart abandoner email lists because they a) only activate when the user is about to abandon the page, and b) can be targeted at cart abandoners specifically.

Key Takeaways

  • Hedonic shoppers make up a significant percentage of shopping cart abandoners thereby bloating abandonment figures.
  • Rather than bemoaning the shopper who fills your cart but doesn’t convert, treat abandonment as an expression of interest, an invitation to make contact.
  • There’s a tremendous opportunity to follow up with hedonic shoppers (and cart abandoners) via email; however, 80% of marketers don’t take advantage of this opportunity.
  • To effectively market to hedonic shoppers, you must appeal to their motivations throughout the entire marketing process (including in emails).
  • Building a strong email list is critical; landing pages, value-driven signup forms, and exit-intent technology are all effective tools for making this happen.

Finally, reframe the task in a positive context. Instead of trying to reduce your shopping cart abandonment rate, try increasing your engagement of shoppers who abandon your cart.


Instead of reducing shopping cart abandonment, try increasing shopping cart retention #CRO
Click To Tweet


More here:

WTF Are Hedonic Shoppers and Why Should You Care?

Infinite Scrolling, Pagination Or “Load More” Buttons? Usability Findings In eCommerce

What is the best UX pattern to display products on an e-commerce website: pagination, a “Load more” button or infinite scrolling? At Baymard Institute, we’ve conducted several year-long large-scale usability studies of more than 50+ leading e-commerce websites. We tested (among other things) these three design patterns for loading products, both on desktop and mobile.
Further reading on Smashing: Infinite Scrolling: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This Get the Scrolling Right Reapplying Hick’s Law of Narrowing Decision Architecture 6 Design Principles To Evaluate Your Product How To Change User Behavior With UX Design And Psychology Pagination is still the most popular way to load new items on a website because it ships by default in almost every single e-commerce platform.

This article is from:

Infinite Scrolling, Pagination Or “Load More” Buttons? Usability Findings In eCommerce

Improving Reviews And Testimonials Using Science-Based Design

Reviews, testimonials and word of mouth are winning the war in branding. A sea of research is out there about social proof and what to do and what not to do about soliciting customer reviews. It’s overwhelming to read and digest it all, let alone to know which nuggets are gold and which are fool’s gold. For a designer or business owner or marketer, knowing who or what to listen to can be difficult.

Original link – 

Improving Reviews And Testimonials Using Science-Based Design

Color Contrast And Why You Should Rethink It

When you browse your favorite website or check the latest version of your product on your device of choice, take a moment to look at it differently. Step back from the screen. Close your eyes slightly so that your vision is a bit clouded by your eyelashes.
Can you still see and use the website? Are you able to read the labels, fields, buttons, navigation and small footer text?

See original – 

Color Contrast And Why You Should Rethink It

Form-Field Validation: The Errors-Only Approach

Error pages for form-field validation are dreadful. You’ve just filled out 20 form fields, yet you get the same bloated page thrown back in your face because a single field failed to validate.
I clearly recall the often loud sighs of despair during our last usability study each time a test subject encountered a validation error page.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Web Form Validation: Best Practices and Tutorials Useful Ideas And Guidelines For Good Web Form Design Web Form Design: Showcases And Solutions We also noticed that test subjects who had been exposed to validation errors began to take preventive actions to avoid them in subsequent steps, by writing things such as “N/A” in the “Company name” field if in doubt about whether the field was optional.

Link to article – 

Form-Field Validation: The Errors-Only Approach