Tag Archives: international

Infographic: The Evolution of Web Design

26 Years. Over a quarter century. That’s how long it’s been since the publication of the first website in 1991, info.cern.ch. That’s right. That right there is a link to the very first website ever published. Since then we’ve created banner ads, pop-ups, CAPTCHAs, social media, and countless layers of the front end tech stack we enjoy today with HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript. Let’s also ponder what trends web design will follow during the next quarter century. We are definitely getting a VR enabled web. Check out the VRVCA, a consortium of venture capital funds, including HTC and NVIDIA, who…

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Infographic: The Evolution of Web Design

Master Your Next Feature Launch: How Vimeo Uses Unbounce Landing Pages to Go to Market Faster

You’re a product marketer and it’s five weeks away from a major launch.

The office is buzzing with excitement and tensions are rising by the day. Your marketing team is busy prepping all the essential pieces in your marketing launch toolkit, from email communications to paid advertising to PR initiatives and beyond.

But something’s missing.

Your website needs updating to reflect the launch of your new feature or product… and then you need somewhere to send your paid campaign traffic.

If you’re relying on your developers to build a new page for you, it could take weeks (or longer). Besides, shifting your devs’ focus away from the product launch probably isn’t the best use of their time. Adding work to their plates could mean having to delay going to market (and miss your launch deadlines) — and that could be deadly for business.

The marketing team at Vimeo has experienced this stress first-hand. Garrett Bugbee, Manager of Search and International Marketing, recently described to me how product launches have put a strain on his team in the past:

We had a huge creative backlog, especially during product launches. We relied on our devs to build our pages for us. It was a slow and painful process, from design to the kick-off meetings and then actually waiting for it to be built and QA’d… It was a massive issue.

Fast forward to today, Garrett and his team have removed many of these pre-launch bottlenecks. When it came time to launch their new product, Vimeo 360, they’d mastered the art of going to market with new products on time and on budget.

So what’s Vimeo’s secret recipe to making every product launch a smash hit?

Garrett teases at it in the video below. Have a look, or read on for the blueprint to their success.

Make every product a smash hit: Watch this video to learn how Vimeo removed bottlenecks from their launches so they could go to market faster.

Meet Vimeo and their latest product, Vimeo 360

As one of the internet’s most popular video sharing websites, Vimeo attracts more than 100 million unique visitors per month and is home to over 50 million creators worldwide (and counting).

As their popularity increases so too does the competition.

In order to stay on top, Vimeo has to evolve and innovate. With at least four new video products or features being introduced to the platform each year, a failed launch for Vimeo could mean a loss of thousands (dare we say millions) in company dollars, so there’s infinite pressure to get it right — every time.

You can imagine then, the pressure that Garrett (the hero from our intro) must have felt when he and his team set out to launch Vimeo 360, a new product that allows users to upload 360-degree videos in stunning high quality:

Because some of Vimeo’s competitors were already dabbling in 360-degree video, Garrett knew they had to launch quickly — and with a splash:

It’s a tool that other platforms have already, and it’s something that we wanted to give our creators so they have a new venue for expression and a new way to produce, make and showcase content.

Removing bottlenecks from the campaign launch

Vimeo’s main goal for the 360 launch was to drive engagement, measured by new subscribers and 360 video uploads.

While part of their homepage was to briefly feature Vimeo 360, Garrett and his team wanted to build out a page to better explain the product and all the amazing things it could do, including:

  • An example of a 360 video for prospects who were not yet familiar with the technology (shown above)
  • A showcase of 360 video content created by some of Vimeo’s power users
  • A detailed breakdown of features that make Vimeo 360 stand a cut above the rest (high-quality resolution, intuitive controls, powerful integrations)
  • A promo for their 360 video school, which teaches creators of all stripes to make better videos

That’s a lot of heavy lifting for a website that is also serving a general audience, so Garrett and his team turned to Unbounce to create a click-through landing page for their campaign:

Garrett’s team used Unbounce design features like parallax scroll to appeal to his visually-inclined user base. Click to view full-length landing page.

Beautiful isn’t it?

Garrett explained why empowering his marketing team to build this page themselves was key:

The big benefit here is the flexibility we have to produce a marketing-specific landing page without the help of our engineering team.

Our devs get to focus on building a great product, and we can focus on designing a page built specifically for marketing purposes without pulling our front-end devs away from their work. We can go to market a lot faster by parallel-pathing both the product build and the page build.


Don’t pull devs away from work – your marketing team can build launch landing pages themselves.
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The best part? The campaign landing page that the Vimeo marketing team created drove engagement, which was the campaign goal.

Garrett explains:

[Using scroll mapping,] we saw people scrolling all the way down the page, interacting with the content throughout. It really achieved the goal which was to drive engagement, not just with our paid subscribers but with everybody on the platform.

Better performing paid and social advertising campaigns

A beautiful, engaging landing page is well and good, but at the end of the day, your boss wants hard numbers that show that your campaigns performed.

Since adding dedicated campaign landing pages to their marketing launch toolkit, Vimeo has also seen better results for their paid and social advertising campaigns.

Some paid ads created by Vimeo for Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, the Google Display Network and DoubleClick Bid Manager.

Before Unbounce, Garrett humbly admits that they were letting their website get in the way of their campaign success:

Before Unbounce, we simply directed prospects to a page [on our website] with a pricing grid, and that’s pretty extreme to just throw that in someone’s face right away.

But now that Vimeo is sending paid traffic to product launch-specific landing pages like the one above (as opposed to generic pages like their /upload/ page and homepage), their campaigns are kicking serious butt. Check out these impressive results:

  • 730% increase in subscribers from 360-related paid keywords
  • 4529% increase in total video uploads from 360-related paid keywords

Bonus: Dedicated landing pages aren’t only bringing Vimeo better campaign results — Garrett explained that they’re also improving user experience and Google’s relevance score:

Unbounce has allowed us to target specific landing pages for top keywords, which is a huge win. I think that this one of the best use cases for Unbounce.

You can use Dynamic Text Replacement or make specific pages, and you just target your top terms, it’s highly relevant… I have complete control of that experience and that’s the marketer’s dream.

Unbounce’s Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) feature gives Garrett and his team the capability to swap out text on their landing page — so that their ads and landing pages present exactly what visitors searched for.

Unbounce’s Ryan Engley explains how Dynamic Text Replacement works. See DTR in action here.

That level of message match across the entire buyer journey is key to strong PPC performance.

When prospects click on an ad and see a landing page with a headline that matches exactly what they searched for, they’re reassured that they’ve made a “good click” and are more likely to stick around (and even convert) — and that in turn positively impacts Quality Score in AdWords.

What you can learn from Vimeo’s success

If there’s one thing we’ve learned from Vimeo’s 360 campaign, it’s this:

Yes, product launches are a lot a pressure, but they don’t have to be painfulnot when marketing teams are empowered to move nimbly without bottlenecks.

According to Garrett, it’s all about focusing on your core competencies:

With Unbounce, we can now generate marketing-specific landing pages quickly and easily and translate those across different languages.

It takes the pressure off our devs and engineers, and lets them focus on what’s core — what’s vital to the business — which is building video tools for creators. We handle the marketing side.

By making Unbounce landing pages an essential part of your marketing launch toolkit, not only can you gain the competitive edge by going to market faster, you’ll also:

  • Free up dev resources so they can focus on building and innovating your product
  • Convert more prospects by sending paid traffic to relevant, high-converting pages
  • Create beautifully designed pages that showcase your product in the best light possible
  • Make your boss really happy by saving the company precious time and money

And that folks, is why you should NSAPLCWADLP… Never Start A Product Launch Campaign Without A Dedicated Landing Page. ;)

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Master Your Next Feature Launch: How Vimeo Uses Unbounce Landing Pages to Go to Market Faster

Whatever Steve Jobs Thought, Thermonuclear War Is NOT the Best Way to Get & Keep Talent

It’s nothing personal. It’s just business. Except when it’s not. When Google brought out a smartphone OS in 2008 that let some competition into what had been an Apple-only field, the reception was mixed. Just like with any new tech product, a lot of people were sure they’d never feel the need for one. (I thought the same. Now I have a Samsung the size of a door. I wrote some of this post on it.) Some people were overjoyed – it’s just like an iPhone, except I can afford it. Awesome! And then there was Steve Jobs. Boy, was…

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Whatever Steve Jobs Thought, Thermonuclear War Is NOT the Best Way to Get & Keep Talent

Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions

One of the upcoming features of JavaScript that I especially like is the support for asynchronous functions. In this article, I would like to show you a very practical example of building a server-side application using Koa 2, a new version of the web framework, which relies heavily on this feature.

Getting Started With Koa 2

First, I’ll recap what async functions are and how they work. Then, I’ll highlight the differences between Koa 1 and Koa 2. After that, I will describe my demo app for Koa 2, covering all aspects of development, including testing (using Mocha, Chai and Supertest) and deployment (using PM2).

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Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions

Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2

One of the upcoming features of JavaScript that I especially like is the support for asynchronous functions. In this article, I would like to show you a very practical example of building a server-side application using Koa 2, a new version of the web framework, which relies heavily on this feature.

Getting Started With Koa 2

First, I’ll recap what async functions are and how they work. Then, I’ll highlight the differences between Koa 1 and Koa 2. After that, I will describe my demo app for Koa 2, covering all aspects of development, including testing (using Mocha, Chai and Supertest) and deployment (using PM2).

The post Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2 appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2

Move Fast, Break Things and Get Rejected: Day 2 of the Call to Action Conference

Day two of the Call to Action Conference was stacked with a lineup of some of the brightest minds in marketing, including the wizard of MOZ, Rand Fishkin, copywriter and comedy-sketch genius Amy Harrison and our very own CRO viking, Michael Aagaard — just to name a few.

cta-spakrles
And there were sparkles.

It can be easy to forget that even the smartest people can make mistakes. Many of our humble speakers today had their own stories of failure.

But they also made it clear that mistakes aren’t game over.

They’re opportunities to change your perspective, test new ideas and even turn a disastrous situation into a delightful one.

Disappointment is an opportunity for delight

Stefanie Grieser, Unbounce International Marketing Manager and Call to Action Conference Founder, has seen her fair share of delightful marketing experiences… and not-so-delightful ones.

As much as we all aim to delight and over-deliver to our audience, sometimes we all mess up.

But for Stef, even the biggest goofs and gaffes are really just opportunities to delight.

Case in point? At Unbounce, we send a few more “oops” emails than we’d like to admit — whether we’re sending apologies for swag mix-ups or newsletters with broken !firstname merge fields.

And these emails have some of our hottest open and and click-through rates:

s-grieser-cta-2016

We’re talking 3x the opens and 5x the click-through of standard “non-oops” emails.

These emails get engagement because they are so clearly from one vulnerable human to another. They remind us that we’re speaking to a human, not a company.

And for marketers, they give the opportunity to connect with our audience and provide even more delight — by poking fun at ourselves or offering up something more (like an additional discount).

Open yourself up to failure and rejection

In the spirit of messing up, Aaron Orendorff of iconiContent had a thing or two to say about what makes for good content.

Contrary to what most people might think, you don’t always want to focus on success in your content. Sometimes, highlighting your failures can be more impactful.

This doesn’t necessarily work for all content (you wouldn’t want a hyper-tactical post about how to fail, would you?), but if you want impactful brand-defining content, you’re gonna have to be willing to air your dirty laundry.

What do we mean by brand-defining content? It’s the content that makes readers question what they thought they knew about your brand. Aaron uses Rand’s post, “A Long, Ugly Year of Depression That’s Finally Fading” as an example, or Domino’s Pizza’s, “The Pizza Turnaround” — a documentary addressing customer complaints.

These pieces of content — while not pretty — came from a place of transparency, vulnerability and failure. And guess what? They worked.

If you’re willing to share the dark stuff, you open yourself to criticism, failure… all that good stuff. But you also open yourself up to building lasting connections with your readers.

So, in the words of Aaron:

Get rejected. Make it about them, not you. Make it about salvation, not sales. Make it about failure, not success.

#letsgetrejected

Be bold and dare to break things

For most content marketing teams, the idea of simply freezing all content production sounds like a recipe for disaster. (Or a recipe for getting fired.)

But for Uberflip, it was about a shift in priorities. As their VP of Marketing Hana Abaza explained, more content doesn’t necessarily mean more results. It might just mean more wasted effort.

So they stopped producing content for three weeks, and instead focused on how they could optimize their existing content for more conversions. That meant putting better calls to action on high-traffic, low-converting content, and driving more traffic to posts that were already converting well.

If you want to run any kind of experiments, you have to be prepared for failure.

But being accepting of failure gives you the power to make bigger and bolder bets.

Pobody’s nerfect

It seems weird to have to reassure ourselves that it’s okay to be human.

But there’s something comforting in knowing that sometimes, it’s our shortcomings and flaws that draw people to us (and to our marketing).

After all, you’re only human, right?

Right?

giphy

Psst. The Call to Action Conference might be over, but we don’t want you to miss out on any of the learnings — sign up for all the notes here.

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Move Fast, Break Things and Get Rejected: Day 2 of the Call to Action Conference

The Making of a Localized Digital UK Marketing Campaign

Globes
Thinking about going global? Dip your toes in with a geo-targeted marketing campaign. Image via Shutterstock.

If your company is based in North America, you’re probably marketing to North Americans. Heck, even if you’re not based in North America, you might be focusing your marketing efforts on Americans.

We do it at Unbounce. Even though we’re Canadian, we focus our marketing primarily on the USA. We even spell things the way our friendly southern neighbors do (see what I did there?). Not to mention we schedule our emails, webinars, blog posts, marketing campaigns and pretty much anything else based on North American time zones.

Unbounce holiday video screenshot
Yes, we made a Canadian-themed holiday video filled with stereotypes like plaid-wearing curlers :)

I wrote a post a few months back titled “Kick-Start Your International Marketing Strategy by Leveraging Your Content.” In it I talked about how investing in a global marketing strategy isn’t as daunting as you might think, nor is it rocket science. It’s about taking what works and doing more of it.

Part of that strategy outlined hiring a local marketer, a “mini CMO” or a full-funnel growth marketer who is also a massively talented “doer” and can crank out impossible amounts of work (like our DACH Marketing Manager, Ben Harmanus, and our Brazilian Marketing Manager, Andrea Amaral).

But what about for places such as the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or — heck — even Canada? Do you hire a local marketer there?

Maybe you do, maybe you don’t. But what if I told you that you could implement a localized, geo-targeted digital marketing campaign without having to hire a local marketer or leave the comfort of your office?

We did it at Unbounce, and you can, too.

1. Create an online event for a specific region

The United Kingdom is Unbounce’s third largest market, right after the US and Canada. Even so, we had never done anything targeted to get more UK business. Nor had we done anything to address their unique concerns as customers (yet).

All our webinars are hosted at 11:00 am PST / 2:00 pm EST. This meant that any savvy marketer in the UK would have to watch a webinar in real-time at 7:00 pm GMT. Right between work and dinner — or wait, should I say supper?

Sure, our UK audience could always watch the recording — but what about that feeling associated with watching an event live? What about asking a question during Q&A? What about participating in the Twitter chat in real-time?

Enter UK Marketing Day.

UK Marketing Day landing page
Our UK Marketing Day landing page Made in Unbounce and integrated with Marketo.

The campaign idea was simple: to recognize the UK market by delivering something especially for them, a carefully curated online event — a virtual conference — scheduled in their time zone.

2. Partner with local marketers

Don’t have a local marketer (yet)? You don’t need one.

Partner with people who are local marketers.

For UK Marketing Day we partnered with Marketo and Citrix Gotowebinar. I know what you’re thinking — isn’t Marketo headquartered in San Mateo, CA? And isn’t Citrix Gotowebinar from Fort Lauderdale, FL? Yep, they are. But they also have UK offices. Which means they hired local marketers who knew the local market and would double and triple check my North American habits. And when you’re doing localized marketing campaigns the devil is in the details.

For example, when I wrote the initial landing page copy, I used the date format MMDDYYYY. Gemma Falconer, Campaign Manager, Northern Europe for Citrix Gotowebinar, quickly corrected my mistake before the campaign launched.

Date format by country
Oh hey look. The US is apparently the only country that uses the MMDDYYYY format.

Partnering with marketers and companies on the ground not only makes sure your localized, geo-targeted campaign is on point, it’s also huge in terms of reach and exposure.

Plus co-marketing allows two or more companies to work on a project together, doing less work for more reward. Who doesn’t want that?

By levering the relationships and reach of a partner, co-marketing campaigns are designed to deliver more leads, buzz and awareness, with less work.

While we could have just marketed this virtual event to our own UK audience, co-marketing offered us an incredibly valuable ingredient that should be part of every successful marketing campaign — localized or not.

3. Hammer down content and speakers

Should you get local experts to attract the local target audience? Or should you get international thought leaders? There is no wrong answer here.

For UK Marketing Day we decided to go with a mix of both.

We wanted to make sure we had a range of international speakers, local marketers and, most importantly, thought leaders who specialize in a range of marketing verticals (such as SEO, PPC, CRO and email).

We included Dave Chaffey, a well-known email and marketing automation expert in the UK and Europe, as well as Amy Harrison, a web copywriter based out of Brighton.

We called up PPC expert Purna Virji from Philly, and also Chicago-based Andy Crestodina, speaker and author focused on content marketing and analytics. Orbit Media, the agency Andy heads up actually responded with this when we asked Andy to partake:

We would love to join in on the UK love. We actually have a surprisingly large audience over there as well.

CRO expert Talia Wolf, based out of Israel, and international SEO consultant Aleyda Solís, based in Madrid, joined the day as well.

4. Market to your geo-targeted audience (and their neighbors!)

It may sound obvious, but make sure to market to your geo-targeted audience in their language (watch that North American spelling) and in their time zone.

UK Marketing Day promo tweet
3:00 am in Vancouver means it’s 11:00 am in the UK.

Schedule your social media posts, emails and blog posts (like the one I sent below) during their business hours.

UK Marketing Day email example

And invite their neighbors, too.

Although we blatantly called the event UK Marketing Day, we made a point to reach out to marketing folks in Ireland. And we ensured our email copy reflected that invitation.

UK Marketing Day tweet

5. Nurture your leads

The marketing campaign is done. What now?

In the pre-marketing phase, I sent an email to our Director of Campaign Strategy. I wanted to talk about what we could do with those fresh UK Marketing Day leads after we got ‘em.

Hey Corey,

UK Marketing Day is coming up. Which means it is going to end. Which means we need to think about nurturing those leads.

I would like to chat quickly about a lead nurture track that is keeps in mind localization. The last thing I want is a UK-dedicated marketing campaign and we drop the ball when it finishes.

Ideas I have:

  • A demo in the UK time zone.
  • A customer webinar that is in the UK

The most important element post-campaign? Make sure you don’t drop the ball on the localized marketing campaign you worked so hard to create. If you invite leads to a product demo after the campaign or host a “further down the funnel” webinar, make sure it’s scheduled during their business hours.

Is a localized campaign really necessary?

You might be thinking why go through all this trouble to create something localized? Is the ROI really there? Maybe, maybe not.

You don’t have to start big and hire a full-on dedicated EMEA team. You can also start smaller and initiate a localized marketing campaign.

My advice to you: If you’re planning on investing in a global go-to-market strategy, creating a localized marketing campaign before you even hire in that area is a great first step.

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The Making of a Localized Digital UK Marketing Campaign

Write Your Next Web App With Ember CLI


When you start a fresh web project or start digging into an existing code base, chances are you’re trying to create or enhance a feature for your users. The last thing you want to do is spend time customizing build tools and creating infrastructure to develop your application. If you land a new client, you want to show them features today, not in a week after you’ve cobbled together a build pipeline.

Write Your Next Web App With Ember CLI

As you might already know, Ember is an “opinionated” JavaScript web framework focused on building ambitious, rich client web applications. Technologically, Ember has positioned itself as the antidote to hype fatigue. It’s a framework that just won’t die, but keeps pressing on with each innovation and with a commitment to backwards-compatibility.

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Write Your Next Web App With Ember CLI

Around the CRO World in a Day: The Epic Story of Unbounce’s Biggest Campaign Yet

international croday

On March 4, 2014, Unbounce Event Marketing Manager Stefanie Grieser started an email thread with Unbounce’s co-founder Oli Gardner and VP of Marketing Georgiana Laudi. She wrote:

Another idea I’ve been toying with was declaring an International Conversion Day. Similar to Mashable’s International Social Media Day.

We would round up a bunch of experts, partners and companies and make a huge digital scene. We’d have a day full of webinars, Google Hangouts, AMAs and Twitter chats. And lastly, we’d encourage in-person world-wide conversion meetups.

A little more than a year later, Unbounce hosted the first ever International Conversion Rate Optimization Day (CRO Day).

The event featured almost 60 conversion rate optimization experts in 30 different webinars that revealed the art and science behind effective copywriting, A/B testing, landing page design, email marketing and other aspects of the online marketing universe.

The webinars were attended by more than 4,000 people and included industry experts like Andy Crestodina, Joanna Wiebe, Talia Wolf, Bryan Eisenberg and Larry Kim. And by the end of the day, almost 6,000 tweets went out with the hashtag #CROday, making this a day of learning and conversation that exceeded every single one of the KPIs that we had set out to achieve.

As you might expect, putting together something like this was not easy. Along the way there were many hiccups, roadblocks and challenges.

But in the end, there were smiles, cheers, congratulations, songs, high fives – and many lessons learned. We gleaned a lot of insights along the way, and are sharing them here in hopes that it will inspire you in your own campaign planning and execution.

Why CRO Day?

Stef’s initial email appealed to Oli’s longstanding desire to beat the record for world’s largest webinar, set by Hubspot in 2011. But as more people joined in, they realized they could do something even more epic.

Since webinars had proven to be a key acquisition tool for Unbounce in the past, the idea of holding a day’s worth of webinars was an easy sell to stakeholders.

More than just a lead generation campaign on a grand scale, it was important to everyone at Unbounce that it celebrate a specific topic that marketers of all stripes could get behind. If it could do that, then brand awareness and lead generation would follow.

The topic we chose was conversion rate optimization; it was about time that CRO had a day to call its own.

Getting CRO Day started

With Campaign Strategist Courtenay Ledding managing the internal team that would make CRO Day a reality, Customer Success Manager Tia Kelly became Unbounce’s point of contact for partners.

In the end, Tia exchanged an astounding 1,193 emails with representatives from WordStream, Hanapin Marketing, Copy Hackers and more to make sure everyone knew what they should be doing, when it should be done and how to go about it. Says Tia:

I just reached out to a ton of potential partners to see who would be interested in presenting, but the response was so overwhelming that I ended up with way more people than I thought I would.

If every partner had their own time slot, it may have ended up being CRO Week. In order to make it more manageable, Tia went through the unenviable task of matching up webinar presenters speaking on the same subject.

Meanwhile, Stefanie Grieser was helping to coordinate a meetup in Vancouver on the day of the event. Although CRO Day was a virtual event, there were also 12 offline meetups that day. Stef explains:

CRO Day was a way for us to celebrate something international — something as far reaching as conversion rate optimization. And there’s a real value to face-to-face meetups, just as much as the online webinars. Whether it’s just a few people getting together for a drink, or a 60-person conversion event, there is great value in meeting people in person.

Building the foundation and dealing with snafus

Even with strained resources and a tight schedule, Courtenay wrangled the internal team and got the website finished on schedule.

But then things got tricky.

The original name for the event had been Conversion Marketing Day. “Conversion marketing” was a term that Unbounce had been using to describe results-oriented marketing that revolves around optimizing for conversions. But when Oli saw the first iteration of the site, things came to a halt. The term “conversion marketing” was not sitting right with him.

At this point Corey Dilley, Unbounce’s Director of Campaign Strategy, stepped in to help mediate between Oli and the rest of the team. “There was a lot of swearing about Oli,” Corey told me as he sat back in his chair and laughed.

I asked Oli where the term “conversion marketing” came from in the first place. “My disdain for the name leads me to believe it’s my fault,” he said with a wink and a smile.

Oli recalled that this started a more fruitful discussion with Stefanie and Tia about rebranding the event, which eventually led to the name International Conversion Rate Optimization Day (CRODay for short).

Luckily, Courtenay had budgeted time to deal with potential snafus. The team was able to pivot, start again from the wireframe stage and come up with a design and copy that worked for everyone involved – and, more importantly, served the goals of the campaign. Courtenay gave credit where credit was due:

Everyone definitely pulled together and worked really hard on it. Interactive Designer Alejandra Porta was a key part of the success, and the entire team was just outstanding.

Despite the setback, the team was able to launch the website on time. Partners began signing up to take part, and attendees started signing up to attend webinars. Crisis averted.

Building a CRO community

As D-Day drew closer, promotion began in earnest. Unbounce’s Community Manager, Hayley Mullen, began promoting the event on our social channels about two months out, but it was the community who really took over and started pushing the event with about a month to go.

The first mention of the hashtag #CROday went out on March 7 in a conversation between Talia Wolf and Joanna Wiebe.

croday-hashtag

As the days went by, more and more people from the marketing community started tweeting about CRO Day. From speakers to attendees, #CROday began to snowball. As bigger names like Larry Kim, Joanna Wiebe, and Alex Harris started signing up, others gained the confidence to come on board. And then they began to come in droves, looking to get in on the action. With a week to go, the final schedule was set, and the last push for promotion began. A special edition of #bufferchat, the popular Twitter marketing chat, was held featuring Oli, who discussed conversion rate optimization.

Inbound.org began promoting an AMA that they would host on their site on April 9 that featured 20 of the CRO Day experts and garnered 58,853 page views on the AMA thread.

The day before CRO Day, there were hundreds of tweets promoting the event and the excitement was palpable.

By April 9, there were 13,531 total registrations for the 30 webinars.

The challenges had been met, the team had risen to the occasion, and CRO Day was ready to kick off!

CRO Day at last!

CRO Day kicked off with a bang at 6am EDT with two webinar for attendees to choose from. For most of the day, there were two webinars per hour, in order to make enough room for all of them.

Webinar topics ranged from design to copy, and from lead generation to A//B testing. There was, literally, something for everyone in marketing happening that day.

Anxious to ensure that everything was running smoothly, Community Manager Hayley Mullen was up at the crack of dawn, making sure that everything was ready to go. Said Hayley:

I prepared nothing else for that day. I did nothing else that day. CRO Day was my whole world from 6am to 9pm.

She started monitoring social media activityjumping in on conversations, helping people with questions, keeping the conversation going and making sure that Unbounce was a part of as many conversations as possible.

Meanwhile, while on vacation in Mexico, Tia began checking Twitter on her phone at 8am local time.

I was so worried that it would be a dead hashtag, but it was crazy! I couldn’t even scroll down to the end. I started getting emails from all kinds of people that #CROday was trending, which was such a relief. I hadn’t relaxed at all up until then.

Tweets rolled out fast and furious, with people tweeting what they learned during webinars, or promoting upcoming sessions.

In total, 549 people were tweeting about CRO Day, with 2,508 total tweets sent with that hashtag, which resulted in 30.5 million impressions worldwide.

As the cherry on a rather deliciously satisfying cake, Stefanie Grieser had organized a special meetup at Unbounce’s Vancouver office. Stef says:

We knew we wanted to do something different, and someone came up with the idea of a CRO trivia night.

Teams of people, who didn’t necessarily know each other, were matched to compete for the CRO knowledge crown in a trivia contest much like what you’d find at your local pub, including the beer.

Other meetups took place in places as close to Unbounce HQ as Seattle, and as far away as China.

With the day behind the Unbounce team, all that was left was to look at the results — examine successes, look deeper into the challenges faced along the way, and assess what could be done differently next time.

Wins, challenges and takeaways

CRO Day had two marketing goals:

  1. Creating leads through a channel (webinars) that had been proven successful for Unbounce, and
  2. Branding Unbounce as a leader in CRO.

Here are a few of the wins from the first International CRO Day:

  • #CROday was trending on Twitter worldwide all day
  • 2508 tweets about #CROday on the day of the event
  • 5963 tweets about #CROday in the month leading up to it
  • 30.5 million Twitter impressions worldwide (we had people tweeting in Australia, Europe and Asia along with North America)
  • 549 people tweeting about #CROday (including hosts and us)
  • Tons of love for the idea — great for brand awareness and placing us at the center of the CRO conversation

Overall, the biggest win was the number of people who were involved, both internally and externally, and the enthusiasm they had for the event. Even though challenges in planning and execution cropped up, they could not have been handled as well as they were if not for the fact that so many people had bought into the idea so wholeheartedly.

Without the love for the idea from the people in the marketing community, CRO Day could never have been the success that it was. It feels great to know that so many people are willing to get involved in sharing their knowledge to such a vast group of people, and that the online marketing community can come together to support and educate each other.

The next CRO Day

Will there be a CRO Day next year? Maybe. Probably. We’re not sure yet. Everyone I spoke to expressed their hope for an even bigger CRO Day next time around, with more countries involved, more languages and more participants. To sum up: even more epic.

The discussions I had with people during the interviews were all positive. Even when discussing setbacks and challenges, it was with a smile and fond remembrance.

Stefanie summed it up nicely in our last conversation.

At the end of the day, the most important thing was the concept. The concept was to get a huge group of people to celebrate conversion rate optimization.

Mission accomplished.

…But don’t take our word for it. Check out the recordings below.


See original article: 

Around the CRO World in a Day: The Epic Story of Unbounce’s Biggest Campaign Yet

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Build a Killer Conversion Strategy with Nothing but Time and Empathy

Clear Your Calendar
You don’t need to hire an expensive CRO team to do great work. Just be ready to clear your calendar.

Conversion rate optimization is about different things to different people. For some, it’s simply about haphazardly changing elements on a page until people click more, and then it’s optimized! High fives all around!

You should not listen to those people.

If you want to build a real CRO strategy, based on sustainable optimization practices that will help you build a long-term business, ask the real experts. The ones who have staked their reputations and their livelihoods on their CRO knowledge.

This past April 9th, those experts came together to create over 24 hours of free programming, and over 10,000 people attended online and in-person events throughout the world.

We called it CRO Day. Well, we actually called it 2015 International Conversion Rate Optimization Day, but that didn’t fit into a hashtag.

With so many of the world’s top conversion minds sharing their techniques with the world, we thought this the perfect time to distill their wisdom into a punchy blog post!

Read on to learn what pros like Joanna Wiebe, Brian Massey, Talia Wolf and others think is crucial to building a killer CRO strategy that won’t just get you more clicks, but give you a better understanding of your customers.

If you don’t have the money, you’ll have to make the time

Joanna Wiebe and Brian Massey
Joanna Wiebe and Brian Massey, pictured at Call to Action Conference 2014

In their Ask Me Anything About CRO session, Joanna and Brian were asked what they felt the proper budget for a CRO team was. Their answer was instant and simultaneous:

One million dollars.

Okay, great. If you have a million dollars to spend on CRO, hit these two up.

On the off-chance that you don’t, you can work out a rough budget by multiplying the value of your conversions by a reasonable, estimated increase. Brian explained:

If I increase things by 10%, what is my annual increase in profit? That gives you an idea of what the upside is. So if you say, we could make $200,000 more with a 10% increase, yeah, I’m willing to spend $10,000, $20,000, $50,000 on conversion optimization.

If you can quantify the business impact that will come with increased conversions, you’ll have a better idea of just how much you should invest in CRO.

But how do you make CRO work on a small or non-existent budget? Joanna has some choice advice:

Take the budget that you have and apply it to learning. If you don’t have a lot of money, you have to have time. You don’t get to have no money and no time.

Thankfully, there are tons of free resources available that will help you become a CRO expert. (Like the over 24-hours of freely available content that was recorded during CRO day.)

And as Brian went on to elaborate, there are various free or inexpensive tools for analytics, click-tracking, session-tracking and conversion testing that become incredibly powerful once you’ve mastered the CRO basics.


If you can’t invest in a CRO team, spend your time learning to be a team of one.
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For the biggest conversion wins, test content over style

One of the most common CRO anecdotes is that changing the button color will increase your conversions, from anywhere between 5% and 100-billion-percent, depending on who’s telling the story.

It’s true that visual elements like button colors and background images can make measurable differences, but you’re not likely to see a huge impact from just fiddling with graphics. At least, that’s according to Ben Hunt, author of Convert!.

Ben HuntDuring his When CRO Goes Wrong webinar, he presented the results of 50 A/B tests he had run on both his own site and his clients’ sites, and broke down the differences in impact between style changes, content changes and changes that included both.

Ben Hunt's Graph
Comparing 50 A/B tests he had run, Ben realized that content changes far outperformed stylistic ones.

What he found was that purely stylistic changes tended to impact a page’s conversion rate by a mere 5%, and that he’s never reached a double-digit impact with stylistic changes alone.

Color, graphics, typography — does it matter? Yes, a little bit. But look at the content changes. They are typically between 5 and 20% — that’s the normal range when you’re changing content — and generally positive.

When someone comes to your site, they’re looking for real answers to a problem that they can’t solve on their own. Your content — be it copy, video, or informational graphics — is what’s going to provide those answers. So test it and perfect it.

This isn’t to say that strong design isn’t critical to having high-performing landing pages. But if you start by perfecting your message, you can then move on to create a design that supports it.

And that’s a surefire way to generate bigger wins with less effort.


To win big conversion boosts, test and perfect your message, not your color palette.
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Always be testing! No, seriously, do it

Once you’ve tested and discovered elements that perform well, it can be tempting to apply them all across your site and then move on something shiny and new.

While you shouldn’t necessarily spend all of your time iterating on basic elements, you should continue to explore new ideas for every element of your marketing campaigns. After all, the web is always changing, and so is your audience.

Adam AvramescuIf anyone knows about page optimization, it would be Adam Avramescu, head of education at Optimizely. He’s designed an experimental framework to help ensure that you are always learning from your tests, which he presented in a webinar entitled How To Create High-Converting Marketing Experiences with CCD and A/B Testing, which also included our own Oli Gardner.

Experimental-Framework

Adam’s framework is a cyclical process, with the final step leading back to the first. Let’s break down each step:

  • Determine the conversions to improve based on the KPIs that matter to your business (like your existing conversions, traffic, or revenue)
  • Form a hypothesis on how the conversion rate could be improved
  • Identify the variables — elements on your site — that can be adjusted to fulfill your hypothesis, and how they must be adjusted to do so
  • Run the experiment — an A/B or multivariate test — and wait patiently until you have enough conversions to be confident in the result
  • Measure the results and, based on what you can glean from them, decide which conversions you should improve next

As Adam says:

Optimization is a journey, not a destination. If testing is something you’re doing once, you’re leaving money on the table. Instead of testing one thing once, test everything, all of the time.


Hypothesize, test, learn and iterate — and do it all over again. Forever.
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Learn from your losers

Talia WolfIn the Top 5 Obstacles in CRO & How to Overcome Them Hangout, Talia Wolf of Conversioner reminded us that the the purpose of running optimization tests isn’t solely about increasing your conversion rate — it’s about learning from your experiments.

The whole idea of conversion optimization is not just to increase your conversion rate, per se. You want to be able to scale it and learn from the results of your tests. …

When you’re doing CRO the right way and you build hypotheses, and you have a strategy for each test, you are then able to understand the results — fail or win — because they are about your customer.

Bryan EisenbergWhat does it mean for your tests to be “about your customer”? Bryan Eisenberg of Market Motive suggests that instead of being in the business of selling your products, you should be in the business of helping your customers buy them:

Missed clicks, bounced visits and missed conversions are failures. When we throw ads up there and people don’t click, it means that we missed our targets. We didn’t understand them. When they click and they bounce right off, we didn’t satisfy them.

If they go through and they browse several pages but don’t convert, we didn’t help them buy. We didn’t answer all of their objections, answer all the questions they have in order to feel confident in purchasing from us.

Reframing failure not as a failure to convince, but as a failure to adequately address the concerns and needs of our audience will allow you to understand not just went wrong with a losing variant, but why.


Conversion failures are a failure to understand your audience.
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Play the long game

Conversion rate optimization isn’t about short-sighted “hacks” to get people to click a button that does whatever. If you approach it from that perspective, you might see some short-term gains, but you’ll fail to attract the very best customers for your business. And who are they? These are the questions Joanna recommends you ask yourself:

Who is most likely to buy your product, use it, be happy with it, tell their friends and then come back for more? … Does your value prop resonate with your ideal customer so strongly that they are absolutely willing to part with their money to get what you got?

CRO is a process that you have to invest in. And not just money or your time, but your intellect and your heart. Doing so is what has made the above experts so renowned for their work.

We’re only able to scratch the surface here, but if you want access to the 24+ hours of recordings from CRO Day, head over to the CRO Day website. It’ll take a while to get through everything, so consider starting with the events mentioned in this article. Trust us — it’s worth the time investment.


Continued here:  

Build a Killer Conversion Strategy with Nothing but Time and Empathy