Tag Archives: international

60 Travel Icons To Awaken Your Wanderlust (Freebie)

Summer might be over, but the memories of the places you’ve visited and the people you’ve met remain. No matter if you explored an exotic country, packed your car for a road trip or took out the hiking boots to discover the nature around you — traveling is a great opportunity to discover new places, gain a fresh view on things, and make lasting experiences.
To keep the essence of summer alive a bit longer, the creative minds at AgenteStudio dedicated an entire icon set to traveling.

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60 Travel Icons To Awaken Your Wanderlust (Freebie)

Infographic: The Evolution of Web Design

26 Years. Over a quarter century. That’s how long it’s been since the publication of the first website in 1991, info.cern.ch. That’s right. That right there is a link to the very first website ever published. Since then we’ve created banner ads, pop-ups, CAPTCHAs, social media, and countless layers of the front end tech stack we enjoy today with HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript. Let’s also ponder what trends web design will follow during the next quarter century. We are definitely getting a VR enabled web. Check out the VRVCA, a consortium of venture capital funds, including HTC and NVIDIA, who…

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Infographic: The Evolution of Web Design

Master Your Next Feature Launch: How Vimeo Uses Unbounce Landing Pages to Go to Market Faster

You’re a product marketer and it’s five weeks away from a major launch.

The office is buzzing with excitement and tensions are rising by the day. Your marketing team is busy prepping all the essential pieces in your marketing launch toolkit, from email communications to paid advertising to PR initiatives and beyond.

But something’s missing.

Your website needs updating to reflect the launch of your new feature or product… and then you need somewhere to send your paid campaign traffic.

If you’re relying on your developers to build a new page for you, it could take weeks (or longer). Besides, shifting your devs’ focus away from the product launch probably isn’t the best use of their time. Adding work to their plates could mean having to delay going to market (and miss your launch deadlines) — and that could be deadly for business.

The marketing team at Vimeo has experienced this stress first-hand. Garrett Bugbee, Manager of Search and International Marketing, recently described to me how product launches have put a strain on his team in the past:

We had a huge creative backlog, especially during product launches. We relied on our devs to build our pages for us. It was a slow and painful process, from design to the kick-off meetings and then actually waiting for it to be built and QA’d… It was a massive issue.

Fast forward to today, Garrett and his team have removed many of these pre-launch bottlenecks. When it came time to launch their new product, Vimeo 360, they’d mastered the art of going to market with new products on time and on budget.

So what’s Vimeo’s secret recipe to making every product launch a smash hit?

Garrett teases at it in the video below. Have a look, or read on for the blueprint to their success.

Make every product a smash hit: Watch this video to learn how Vimeo removed bottlenecks from their launches so they could go to market faster.

Meet Vimeo and their latest product, Vimeo 360

As one of the internet’s most popular video sharing websites, Vimeo attracts more than 100 million unique visitors per month and is home to over 50 million creators worldwide (and counting).

As their popularity increases so too does the competition.

In order to stay on top, Vimeo has to evolve and innovate. With at least four new video products or features being introduced to the platform each year, a failed launch for Vimeo could mean a loss of thousands (dare we say millions) in company dollars, so there’s infinite pressure to get it right — every time.

You can imagine then, the pressure that Garrett (the hero from our intro) must have felt when he and his team set out to launch Vimeo 360, a new product that allows users to upload 360-degree videos in stunning high quality:

Because some of Vimeo’s competitors were already dabbling in 360-degree video, Garrett knew they had to launch quickly — and with a splash:

It’s a tool that other platforms have already, and it’s something that we wanted to give our creators so they have a new venue for expression and a new way to produce, make and showcase content.

Removing bottlenecks from the campaign launch

Vimeo’s main goal for the 360 launch was to drive engagement, measured by new subscribers and 360 video uploads.

While part of their homepage was to briefly feature Vimeo 360, Garrett and his team wanted to build out a page to better explain the product and all the amazing things it could do, including:

  • An example of a 360 video for prospects who were not yet familiar with the technology (shown above)
  • A showcase of 360 video content created by some of Vimeo’s power users
  • A detailed breakdown of features that make Vimeo 360 stand a cut above the rest (high-quality resolution, intuitive controls, powerful integrations)
  • A promo for their 360 video school, which teaches creators of all stripes to make better videos

That’s a lot of heavy lifting for a website that is also serving a general audience, so Garrett and his team turned to Unbounce to create a click-through landing page for their campaign:

Garrett’s team used Unbounce design features like parallax scroll to appeal to his visually-inclined user base. Click to view full-length landing page.

Beautiful isn’t it?

Garrett explained why empowering his marketing team to build this page themselves was key:

The big benefit here is the flexibility we have to produce a marketing-specific landing page without the help of our engineering team.

Our devs get to focus on building a great product, and we can focus on designing a page built specifically for marketing purposes without pulling our front-end devs away from their work. We can go to market a lot faster by parallel-pathing both the product build and the page build.


Don’t pull devs away from work – your marketing team can build launch landing pages themselves.
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The best part? The campaign landing page that the Vimeo marketing team created drove engagement, which was the campaign goal.

Garrett explains:

[Using scroll mapping,] we saw people scrolling all the way down the page, interacting with the content throughout. It really achieved the goal which was to drive engagement, not just with our paid subscribers but with everybody on the platform.

Better performing paid and social advertising campaigns

A beautiful, engaging landing page is well and good, but at the end of the day, your boss wants hard numbers that show that your campaigns performed.

Since adding dedicated campaign landing pages to their marketing launch toolkit, Vimeo has also seen better results for their paid and social advertising campaigns.

Some paid ads created by Vimeo for Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, the Google Display Network and DoubleClick Bid Manager.

Before Unbounce, Garrett humbly admits that they were letting their website get in the way of their campaign success:

Before Unbounce, we simply directed prospects to a page [on our website] with a pricing grid, and that’s pretty extreme to just throw that in someone’s face right away.

But now that Vimeo is sending paid traffic to product launch-specific landing pages like the one above (as opposed to generic pages like their /upload/ page and homepage), their campaigns are kicking serious butt. Check out these impressive results:

  • 730% increase in subscribers from 360-related paid keywords
  • 4529% increase in total video uploads from 360-related paid keywords

Bonus: Dedicated landing pages aren’t only bringing Vimeo better campaign results — Garrett explained that they’re also improving user experience and Google’s relevance score:

Unbounce has allowed us to target specific landing pages for top keywords, which is a huge win. I think that this one of the best use cases for Unbounce.

You can use Dynamic Text Replacement or make specific pages, and you just target your top terms, it’s highly relevant… I have complete control of that experience and that’s the marketer’s dream.

Unbounce’s Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) feature gives Garrett and his team the capability to swap out text on their landing page — so that their ads and landing pages present exactly what visitors searched for.

Unbounce’s Ryan Engley explains how Dynamic Text Replacement works. See DTR in action here.

That level of message match across the entire buyer journey is key to strong PPC performance.

When prospects click on an ad and see a landing page with a headline that matches exactly what they searched for, they’re reassured that they’ve made a “good click” and are more likely to stick around (and even convert) — and that in turn positively impacts Quality Score in AdWords.

What you can learn from Vimeo’s success

If there’s one thing we’ve learned from Vimeo’s 360 campaign, it’s this:

Yes, product launches are a lot a pressure, but they don’t have to be painfulnot when marketing teams are empowered to move nimbly without bottlenecks.

According to Garrett, it’s all about focusing on your core competencies:

With Unbounce, we can now generate marketing-specific landing pages quickly and easily and translate those across different languages.

It takes the pressure off our devs and engineers, and lets them focus on what’s core — what’s vital to the business — which is building video tools for creators. We handle the marketing side.

By making Unbounce landing pages an essential part of your marketing launch toolkit, not only can you gain the competitive edge by going to market faster, you’ll also:

  • Free up dev resources so they can focus on building and innovating your product
  • Convert more prospects by sending paid traffic to relevant, high-converting pages
  • Create beautifully designed pages that showcase your product in the best light possible
  • Make your boss really happy by saving the company precious time and money

And that folks, is why you should NSAPLCWADLP… Never Start A Product Launch Campaign Without A Dedicated Landing Page. ;)

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Master Your Next Feature Launch: How Vimeo Uses Unbounce Landing Pages to Go to Market Faster

Left-Handed Brush Lettering: How To Get Started

Lettering and calligraphy are quickly becoming desired skills in a designer’s toolbox. Designers such as Marian Bantjes, Jessica Hische, Sean Wes and Martina Flor, just to name a few, have become not only an inspiration to the rest of us, but also a standard. Their work is not only client-based; they have become their own brand by providing products to their followers as well. Other designers have followed suit, and now it would seem that lettering and calligraphy are everywhere.

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Left-Handed Brush Lettering: How To Get Started

Whatever Steve Jobs Thought, Thermonuclear War Is NOT the Best Way to Get & Keep Talent

It’s nothing personal. It’s just business. Except when it’s not. When Google brought out a smartphone OS in 2008 that let some competition into what had been an Apple-only field, the reception was mixed. Just like with any new tech product, a lot of people were sure they’d never feel the need for one. (I thought the same. Now I have a Samsung the size of a door. I wrote some of this post on it.) Some people were overjoyed – it’s just like an iPhone, except I can afford it. Awesome! And then there was Steve Jobs. Boy, was…

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Whatever Steve Jobs Thought, Thermonuclear War Is NOT the Best Way to Get & Keep Talent

Freebie: Clothing Icons (40 Icons, 9 Styles, AI, EPS, SVG, PNG)

Winter means getting out your scarf and a cozy hat to brave the cold — if you’re located in the Northern hemisphere that is. For all those occasions when your projects may need to get dressed up a little, we are happy to present to you the free Clothing Icon Set created by the design team at Creativebin today. The set includes 40 icons with everything ranging from shirts, pants and dresses to a blazer, hat and even a scarf.

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Freebie: Clothing Icons (40 Icons, 9 Styles, AI, EPS, SVG, PNG)

Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions

One of the upcoming features of JavaScript that I especially like is the support for asynchronous functions. In this article, I would like to show you a very practical example of building a server-side application using Koa 2, a new version of the web framework, which relies heavily on this feature.

Getting Started With Koa 2

First, I’ll recap what async functions are and how they work. Then, I’ll highlight the differences between Koa 1 and Koa 2. After that, I will describe my demo app for Koa 2, covering all aspects of development, including testing (using Mocha, Chai and Supertest) and deployment (using PM2).

The post Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions

Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2

One of the upcoming features of JavaScript that I especially like is the support for asynchronous functions. In this article, I would like to show you a very practical example of building a server-side application using Koa 2, a new version of the web framework, which relies heavily on this feature.

Getting Started With Koa 2

First, I’ll recap what async functions are and how they work. Then, I’ll highlight the differences between Koa 1 and Koa 2. After that, I will describe my demo app for Koa 2, covering all aspects of development, including testing (using Mocha, Chai and Supertest) and deployment (using PM2).

The post Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2 appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2

Move Fast, Break Things and Get Rejected: Day 2 of the Call to Action Conference

Day two of the Call to Action Conference was stacked with a lineup of some of the brightest minds in marketing, including the wizard of MOZ, Rand Fishkin, copywriter and comedy-sketch genius Amy Harrison and our very own CRO viking, Michael Aagaard — just to name a few.

cta-spakrles
And there were sparkles.

It can be easy to forget that even the smartest people can make mistakes. Many of our humble speakers today had their own stories of failure.

But they also made it clear that mistakes aren’t game over.

They’re opportunities to change your perspective, test new ideas and even turn a disastrous situation into a delightful one.

Disappointment is an opportunity for delight

Stefanie Grieser, Unbounce International Marketing Manager and Call to Action Conference Founder, has seen her fair share of delightful marketing experiences… and not-so-delightful ones.

As much as we all aim to delight and over-deliver to our audience, sometimes we all mess up.

But for Stef, even the biggest goofs and gaffes are really just opportunities to delight.

Case in point? At Unbounce, we send a few more “oops” emails than we’d like to admit — whether we’re sending apologies for swag mix-ups or newsletters with broken !firstname merge fields.

And these emails have some of our hottest open and and click-through rates:

s-grieser-cta-2016

We’re talking 3x the opens and 5x the click-through of standard “non-oops” emails.

These emails get engagement because they are so clearly from one vulnerable human to another. They remind us that we’re speaking to a human, not a company.

And for marketers, they give the opportunity to connect with our audience and provide even more delight — by poking fun at ourselves or offering up something more (like an additional discount).

Open yourself up to failure and rejection

In the spirit of messing up, Aaron Orendorff of iconiContent had a thing or two to say about what makes for good content.

Contrary to what most people might think, you don’t always want to focus on success in your content. Sometimes, highlighting your failures can be more impactful.

This doesn’t necessarily work for all content (you wouldn’t want a hyper-tactical post about how to fail, would you?), but if you want impactful brand-defining content, you’re gonna have to be willing to air your dirty laundry.

What do we mean by brand-defining content? It’s the content that makes readers question what they thought they knew about your brand. Aaron uses Rand’s post, “A Long, Ugly Year of Depression That’s Finally Fading” as an example, or Domino’s Pizza’s, “The Pizza Turnaround” — a documentary addressing customer complaints.

These pieces of content — while not pretty — came from a place of transparency, vulnerability and failure. And guess what? They worked.

If you’re willing to share the dark stuff, you open yourself to criticism, failure… all that good stuff. But you also open yourself up to building lasting connections with your readers.

So, in the words of Aaron:

Get rejected. Make it about them, not you. Make it about salvation, not sales. Make it about failure, not success.

#letsgetrejected

Be bold and dare to break things

For most content marketing teams, the idea of simply freezing all content production sounds like a recipe for disaster. (Or a recipe for getting fired.)

But for Uberflip, it was about a shift in priorities. As their VP of Marketing Hana Abaza explained, more content doesn’t necessarily mean more results. It might just mean more wasted effort.

So they stopped producing content for three weeks, and instead focused on how they could optimize their existing content for more conversions. That meant putting better calls to action on high-traffic, low-converting content, and driving more traffic to posts that were already converting well.

If you want to run any kind of experiments, you have to be prepared for failure.

But being accepting of failure gives you the power to make bigger and bolder bets.

Pobody’s nerfect

It seems weird to have to reassure ourselves that it’s okay to be human.

But there’s something comforting in knowing that sometimes, it’s our shortcomings and flaws that draw people to us (and to our marketing).

After all, you’re only human, right?

Right?

giphy

Psst. The Call to Action Conference might be over, but we don’t want you to miss out on any of the learnings — sign up for all the notes here.

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Move Fast, Break Things and Get Rejected: Day 2 of the Call to Action Conference

The Making of a Localized Digital UK Marketing Campaign

Globes
Thinking about going global? Dip your toes in with a geo-targeted marketing campaign. Image via Shutterstock.

If your company is based in North America, you’re probably marketing to North Americans. Heck, even if you’re not based in North America, you might be focusing your marketing efforts on Americans.

We do it at Unbounce. Even though we’re Canadian, we focus our marketing primarily on the USA. We even spell things the way our friendly southern neighbors do (see what I did there?). Not to mention we schedule our emails, webinars, blog posts, marketing campaigns and pretty much anything else based on North American time zones.

Unbounce holiday video screenshot
Yes, we made a Canadian-themed holiday video filled with stereotypes like plaid-wearing curlers :)

I wrote a post a few months back titled “Kick-Start Your International Marketing Strategy by Leveraging Your Content.” In it I talked about how investing in a global marketing strategy isn’t as daunting as you might think, nor is it rocket science. It’s about taking what works and doing more of it.

Part of that strategy outlined hiring a local marketer, a “mini CMO” or a full-funnel growth marketer who is also a massively talented “doer” and can crank out impossible amounts of work (like our DACH Marketing Manager, Ben Harmanus, and our Brazilian Marketing Manager, Andrea Amaral).

But what about for places such as the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or — heck — even Canada? Do you hire a local marketer there?

Maybe you do, maybe you don’t. But what if I told you that you could implement a localized, geo-targeted digital marketing campaign without having to hire a local marketer or leave the comfort of your office?

We did it at Unbounce, and you can, too.

1. Create an online event for a specific region

The United Kingdom is Unbounce’s third largest market, right after the US and Canada. Even so, we had never done anything targeted to get more UK business. Nor had we done anything to address their unique concerns as customers (yet).

All our webinars are hosted at 11:00 am PST / 2:00 pm EST. This meant that any savvy marketer in the UK would have to watch a webinar in real-time at 7:00 pm GMT. Right between work and dinner — or wait, should I say supper?

Sure, our UK audience could always watch the recording — but what about that feeling associated with watching an event live? What about asking a question during Q&A? What about participating in the Twitter chat in real-time?

Enter UK Marketing Day.

UK Marketing Day landing page
Our UK Marketing Day landing page Made in Unbounce and integrated with Marketo.

The campaign idea was simple: to recognize the UK market by delivering something especially for them, a carefully curated online event — a virtual conference — scheduled in their time zone.

2. Partner with local marketers

Don’t have a local marketer (yet)? You don’t need one.

Partner with people who are local marketers.

For UK Marketing Day we partnered with Marketo and Citrix Gotowebinar. I know what you’re thinking — isn’t Marketo headquartered in San Mateo, CA? And isn’t Citrix Gotowebinar from Fort Lauderdale, FL? Yep, they are. But they also have UK offices. Which means they hired local marketers who knew the local market and would double and triple check my North American habits. And when you’re doing localized marketing campaigns the devil is in the details.

For example, when I wrote the initial landing page copy, I used the date format MMDDYYYY. Gemma Falconer, Campaign Manager, Northern Europe for Citrix Gotowebinar, quickly corrected my mistake before the campaign launched.

Date format by country
Oh hey look. The US is apparently the only country that uses the MMDDYYYY format.

Partnering with marketers and companies on the ground not only makes sure your localized, geo-targeted campaign is on point, it’s also huge in terms of reach and exposure.

Plus co-marketing allows two or more companies to work on a project together, doing less work for more reward. Who doesn’t want that?

By levering the relationships and reach of a partner, co-marketing campaigns are designed to deliver more leads, buzz and awareness, with less work.

While we could have just marketed this virtual event to our own UK audience, co-marketing offered us an incredibly valuable ingredient that should be part of every successful marketing campaign — localized or not.

3. Hammer down content and speakers

Should you get local experts to attract the local target audience? Or should you get international thought leaders? There is no wrong answer here.

For UK Marketing Day we decided to go with a mix of both.

We wanted to make sure we had a range of international speakers, local marketers and, most importantly, thought leaders who specialize in a range of marketing verticals (such as SEO, PPC, CRO and email).

We included Dave Chaffey, a well-known email and marketing automation expert in the UK and Europe, as well as Amy Harrison, a web copywriter based out of Brighton.

We called up PPC expert Purna Virji from Philly, and also Chicago-based Andy Crestodina, speaker and author focused on content marketing and analytics. Orbit Media, the agency Andy heads up actually responded with this when we asked Andy to partake:

We would love to join in on the UK love. We actually have a surprisingly large audience over there as well.

CRO expert Talia Wolf, based out of Israel, and international SEO consultant Aleyda Solís, based in Madrid, joined the day as well.

4. Market to your geo-targeted audience (and their neighbors!)

It may sound obvious, but make sure to market to your geo-targeted audience in their language (watch that North American spelling) and in their time zone.

UK Marketing Day promo tweet
3:00 am in Vancouver means it’s 11:00 am in the UK.

Schedule your social media posts, emails and blog posts (like the one I sent below) during their business hours.

UK Marketing Day email example

And invite their neighbors, too.

Although we blatantly called the event UK Marketing Day, we made a point to reach out to marketing folks in Ireland. And we ensured our email copy reflected that invitation.

UK Marketing Day tweet

5. Nurture your leads

The marketing campaign is done. What now?

In the pre-marketing phase, I sent an email to our Director of Campaign Strategy. I wanted to talk about what we could do with those fresh UK Marketing Day leads after we got ‘em.

Hey Corey,

UK Marketing Day is coming up. Which means it is going to end. Which means we need to think about nurturing those leads.

I would like to chat quickly about a lead nurture track that is keeps in mind localization. The last thing I want is a UK-dedicated marketing campaign and we drop the ball when it finishes.

Ideas I have:

  • A demo in the UK time zone.
  • A customer webinar that is in the UK

The most important element post-campaign? Make sure you don’t drop the ball on the localized marketing campaign you worked so hard to create. If you invite leads to a product demo after the campaign or host a “further down the funnel” webinar, make sure it’s scheduled during their business hours.

Is a localized campaign really necessary?

You might be thinking why go through all this trouble to create something localized? Is the ROI really there? Maybe, maybe not.

You don’t have to start big and hire a full-on dedicated EMEA team. You can also start smaller and initiate a localized marketing campaign.

My advice to you: If you’re planning on investing in a global go-to-market strategy, creating a localized marketing campaign before you even hire in that area is a great first step.

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The Making of a Localized Digital UK Marketing Campaign