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Monthly Web Development Update 1/2019: Rethinking Habits And Finding Custom Solutions




Monthly Web Development Update 1/2019: Rethinking Habits And Finding Custom Solutions

Anselm Hannemann



What could be better than starting the new year with some new experiments? Today I figured it was time to rethink JavaScript tooling in one of my projects. And since we wrote everything in plain ECMAScript modules already, I thought it would be easy to serve them natively now and remove all the build and transpilation steps. Until I realized that — although we wrote most code ourselves — we have a couple of third-party dependencies in there and, of course, not all of them are ECMAScript modules. So for now, I have to give up my plans to remove all the build steps and continue to bundle and transpile things, but I’ll try to figure out a better solution to modernize and simplify our tooling setup while providing a smaller bundle to our users.

Another experiment: Just a few weeks ago I had to build a simple “go to the top of the page” button for a website. I used requestAnimationFrame and similar stuff to optimize event handling, but today I found a way nicer and more efficient solution that uses IntersectionObserver to toggle the button on the viewport. You will find that article in the JavaScript section below. The reason I wanted to share these little stories is because I believe that the most important thing is that we review our habits and current solutions and see whether there are better, newer, simpler ideas that could improve a product. Keep playing, keep researching, and be sure to rethink existing systems from time to time.

News

UI/UX

Web Performance

JavaScript


Infographic showing how authentication and verification work without a password


Passwordless authentication? The WebAuthn API makes it possible. (Image credit)

CSS


An example text with randomly generated underlines.


Una Kravet’s “super underline” example uses randomly generated underlines for each element. Made possible with Houdini and the Paint API. (Image credit)

Work & Life

  • “Feeling a sense of accomplishment is an important part of our sense of self-worth. Beating up on yourself because you think you could have accomplished more can dent your confidence and self-esteem and leave you feeling depleted at the end of the day.” Lisa Evans shares what we can do to avoid falling into that trap.
  • Itamar Turner-Trauring shares his thoughts on how to get a job with a good work-life balance when you’re competing against people who are willing to work long hours.
  • Is it a good idea to provide healthcare and treatment based on digital products like apps? And if so, what are the requirements, the standards for this? How can we ensure this is done ethically correct? How do we set the limits, the privacy boundaries, how far do we allow companies to go with experiments here? Would personalized content be fine? Is it okay to share data collected from our devices with healthcare providers or insurances? These are questions we will have to ask ourselves and find an individual answer for.
  • This article about how Millenials became the burnout generation hit me hard this week. I see myself in this group of people described as “Millenials” (I do think it affects way more people than just the 20-year-olds) and I could relate to so many of the struggles mentioned in there that I now think that these problems are bigger than I ever imagined. They will affect society, politics, each individual on our planet. Given that fact, it’s crazy to hear that most people today will answer that they don’t have a friend they could talk to about their fears and anything else that disturbs them while two decades ago the average answer was still around five. Let’s assure our friends that we’re there for them and that they can talk to us about tough things. 2019 should be a year in which we — in our circle of influence — make it great to live in a human community where we can think with excitement and happiness about our friends, neighbors, and people we work with or talk to on the Internet.
  • We all try to accommodate so many things at the same time: being successful and productive at work, at home, with our children, in our relationships, doing sports, mastering our finances, and some hobbies. But we blindly ignore that it’s impossible to manage all that on the same level at the same time. We feel regret when we don’t get everything done in a specific timeframe such as at the end of a calendar year. Shawn Blanc argues that we should celebrate what we did do instead of feeling guilty for what we didn’t do.

Going Beyond…

  • There are words, and then there are words. Many of us know how harmful “just” can be as a word, how prescriptive, how passively aggressive it is. Tobias Tom challenges whether “should” is a useful word by examining the implicit and the result of using it in our daily language. Why “should” can be harmful to you and to what you want to achieve.
  • “We all know what we stand for. The trick is to state our values clearly — and to stand by them,” says Ben Werdmuller and points out how important it is to think about your very own red line that you don’t want to cross regardless of external pressure you might face or money you might get for it.
  • Exciting news for climate improvement this week: A team of arborists has successfully cloned and grown saplings from the stumps of some of the world’s oldest and largest coast redwoods, some of which were 3,000 years old and measured 35 feet in diameter when they were cut down in the 19th and 20th centuries. Earlier this month, 75 of the cloned saplings were planted at the Presidio National Park in San Francisco. What makes this so special is the fact that these ancient trees can sequester 250 tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere over their lives, compared to 1 ton for an average tree.
  • The ongoing technological development and strive to build new services that automate more and more things make it even more critical to emphasize human connection. Companies that show no effort in improving things for their clients, their employees, or the environment will begin to struggle soon, Ryan Paugh says.
  • We usually don’t expect much nice news about technology inventions from the car industry and their willingness to share it with others. But Toyota now has decided to share their automated safety system ‘Guardian’ with competitors. It uses self-driving technology to keep cars from crashing. “We will not keep it proprietary to ourselves only. But we will offer it in some way to others, whether that’s through licensing or actual whole systems,” says Gill Pratt from the company.

Thank you for reading! I’m happy to be back with this new edition of my Web Development Update in 2019 and grateful for all your ongoing support. It makes me happy to hear that so many people find this resource helpful. So if you enjoyed it, please feel free to share it with people you know, give me feedback, or support it with a small amount of money. —Anselm

Smashing Editorial
(cm)


Original source:

Monthly Web Development Update 1/2019: Rethinking Habits And Finding Custom Solutions

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Online Marketing Steps You Can Take to Make Your Small Business Stand Out

Online marketing tips for small businesses

Content, brand stories, and social media have been dominating marketing conversations for years now.  Big brands are creating whole platforms of content that may or may not even feature their products. Social media is exploding with businesses that don’t advertise any other way. And it’s all moving a mile a minute. It makes a small […]

The post Online Marketing Steps You Can Take to Make Your Small Business Stand Out appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Originally posted here – 

Online Marketing Steps You Can Take to Make Your Small Business Stand Out

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Grabbing Visual Attention With The Visual Cortex




Grabbing Visual Attention With The Visual Cortex

Susan Weinschenk



(This is a sponsored post.) You are designing a landing page. The goal of the page is to get people to notice, and hopefully click on a button on the screen to subscribe to a monthly newsletter. “Make sure the button captures people’s attention” is the goal you’ve been given.

So how, exactly, do you do that?

Research on the visual cortex in the brain can give you some ideas. The visual cortex is the part of the brain that processes visual information. Each of the senses has an area of the brain where the signals for that sensory perception are usually sent and processed. The visual cortex is the largest of the sensory cortices because we are very visual animals.

Recommended reading: What Is The Role Of Creativity In UX Design?

The Pre-Attention Areas Of The Visual Cortex

There are special areas of the visual cortex that process visual information very quickly. These are called the “pre-attention” areas because they process information faster than someone may realize they’ve even noticed something visually.

Within the visual cortex are four areas called V1, V2, V3 and V4. These are the “pre-attention” areas of the visual cortex, and they are dedicated to very small and specific visual elements.

Let’s take a look at each one:

Orientation

If one item is oriented differently than others, then it is noticed right away:


An image of fifteen short lines with one that stands out because it is oriented differently


(Large preview)

Size And Shape

If one item is either a different size or shape than others then it is noticed right away:


An image of twelve circles with one larger than the rest


(Large preview)

Color

If one item is a different color than others around it then it is noticed right away:


An image of thirteen black circles with one of them shown in red


(Large preview)

Movement

If one item moves in quickly, especially if it zooms in from starting at a small size and then becoming larger quickly (think tiger running quickly towards you), that grabs attention.

But Only One At A Time

The interesting, not immediately obvious factor here is that if you use these factors together at the same time then nothing really attracts attention.


An abstract image of colorful circles in different sizes


(Large preview)

If you want to capture attention then, pick one of the methods and use it only.

Take a look at the two designs presented below. Which one draws your attention to the idea that you should enroll?


A minimalistic image that uses mostly two colors


(Large preview)


An image using a variety of colors and tones


(Large preview)

Obviously, the image that has just one color area draws your attention more, rather than the one area that is color.

The Fusiform Facial Area

The pre-attention areas of the visual cortex are not the only visual/brain connection to use. Another area of the brain you can tap to grab attention on a page could be the Fusiform Facial Area (or FFA).

The FFA is a special part of the brain that is sensitive to human faces. The FFA is located in the mid/social part of the brain near the amygdala which processes emotions. Faces grab attention because of the FFA.


A screenshot of the WIX website with a smiling person presented on the front page


(Large preview)

The FFA identifies:

  • Is this a face?
  • Someone I know?
  • Someone I know personally?
  • What are they feeling?

What stimulates the FFA?

  • Faces that look straight out stimulate the FFA.
  • Faces that are in profile may eventually stimulate the FFA, but not as quickly. In the example below the face is in profile and obscured by hair. It may not stimulate the FFA at all.

  • An image of a woman with her face covered by her hair so that her facial features cannot be seen well


    (Large preview)

  • Even inanimate objects like the picture of the car below may stimulate the FFA area if they have things that look like facial parts such as eyes and a mouth.

A picture of a car that looks like it has facial parts such as eyes and a mouth (front)


(Large preview)

Looking Where The Face Looks?

You may have seen the heat maps that show that if you show a face and the face is looking at an object (for example, a button or a product) on the screen then the person looking at the page will also look at the same object. Here’s an example:


An advertisement for Sunsilk Shampoo in which the lady in the picture is looking at the product compared to a picture of her looking straight


(Large preview)

The red areas show where people looked most. When the model looks at the shampoo bottle then people tend to look there too.

But be careful about drawing too many conclusions from this. Although the research shows that people’s eye gaze will follow the eye gaze of the photo, that doesn’t necessarily mean that people will take action. Highly emotional facial expressions lead to more action taking than just eye gaze.

Recommended reading: The Importance Of Macro And Micro-Moment Design

Takeaways

If you want to grab someone’s visual attention:

  • Use the pre-attention areas of the visual cortex: make everything on the page plain except for one element.

or

  • Show a large face, facing forward;
  • If you want to spur action have the face show a strong emotion;
  • Resist the urge to use many methods at once, such as a face, and color, and size, and shape, and orientation.

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(cm, ms, yk, il)


Continued here:  

Grabbing Visual Attention With The Visual Cortex

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HTML5 Input Types: Where Are They Now?




HTML5 Input Types: Where Are They Now?

Drew McLellan



One of the stand-out headline features of HTML5 for many designers and developers was the addition of a number of new types of form input that could be used. For years, we’d been confined to using single-line text inputs (type="text") and laying on JavaScript and user instructions to try an accurately capture valid data of different types through that one unsophisticated field.

HTML5 brought with it new values of the type attribute that enabled us to be much more specific about the types of data we needed to capture through the field, with the promise being that the browser would then provide the interface and validation required to coerce the user into completing the field accurately.

From URLs to emails, and from search fields to dates, the hope was that instead of needing to write cumbersome JavaScript to try and validate those fields, we could just leave it to the browser to do that hard work for us. What’s more, by adding what it knows about the user’s context (type of device, type of interaction, timezones, and so on) the browser would be able to do a much better job of tailoring the interface to meet the user’s needs that we ever could as page authors.

Recommended reading: UX And HTML5: Let’s Help Users Fill In Your Mobile Form

Having new items in a spec is one thing, but it doesn’t really mean too much unless the browsers our audience are using support those features. These new values of the type attribute had the big advantage of falling back to type="text" if the browser had no support, but this may have also come at the cost of removing the browsers makers’ imperative when it came to implementing those new types in their products.

It’s the start of 2019, and HTML5 has been the current version of HTML now for more than four years. Which of those new types have been implemented, which can we use, and are there any we should be avoiding?

  1. Search Fields
  2. Telephone Number Fields
  3. URL Fields
  4. Email Fields
  5. Number Fields
  6. Range Fields
  7. Color Fields
  8. Date Fields

1. Search Fields

The type="search" input is intended to be used for search fields. Functionally, these are very the same as basic text fields, but having a dedicated type enables the browser to apply different styling. This is particularly useful if the user’s operating system has a set style for search fields, as this enables the browser to style the search fields on web pages to match.

The specification states that the difference between search and text is purely stylistic, so it may be best to avoid this if you intend to restyle the field with CSS anyway. There appears to be no semantic advantage to its use.

Can I Use input-search? Data on support for the input-search feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

Use type="search" if you intend to leave the styling of the search field up to the browser.

2. Telephone Number Fields

The type="tel" input is used for entering telephone numbers. These are like the unique usernames used by Whatsapp. If you’re unsure, ask your grandparents.

Internationally, telephone numbers take on lots of different formats, for both technical and localization reasons. Due to this, the tel input doesn’t attempt to validate the format of a phone number. You can make use of the associated validation tools such as the pattern attribute on the tag, or the setCustomValidity() JavaScript method to enforce a format if required.

On desktop browsers, the use of telephone fields seems to have little impact. On devices with virtual keyboards, however, they can be really useful. For example, on iOS, focusing input on a telephone field brings up a numeric keypad ready for keying in a number. In addition, the device’s autocomplete mechanisms kick in and suggest phone numbers that can be autofilled with a single tap.

Can I Use input-email-tel-url? Data on support for the input-email-tel-url feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

Use type="tel" for any phone number fields. It’s very useful where implemented, and comes at no cost when it’s not.

3. URL Fields

The type="url" field can be used for capturing URLs. You might use this when asking a user to input their website address for a business directory, for example. The curious thing about the URL field is that it takes only full, absolute URLs. There’s no option to be able to capture just a domain name, or just a path, for example. This does restrict its usefulness in some respects, as I imagine CMS and web app developers would have found lots of uses for a field that accepts and validates relative paths.

While this would be a valid absolute URL:

https://twitter.com/drewm

Both of these would not pass the field’s validation:

smashingmagazine.com
/2019/01/css-multiple-column-layout-multicol/

It feels like a missed opportunity that different parts of a URL cannot be specified, but that’s what we have. Browser support is across the board pretty great, with virtual keyboard devices offering some customization for URL entry. iOS customizes its keyboard with ., / and an autocomplete button for common TLDs such as .com and for my locale, .co.uk. This is a good example of the browser being able to offer more intelligent choices than we can as web developers.

Can I Use input-email-tel-url? Data on support for the input-email-tel-url feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

Use type="tel" whenever you need to collect a full, absolute URL. Browser support is great, but remember that it’s no good for individual URL components.

4. Email Fields

Possibly one of the most commonly used of the newer options is type="email" for email addresses. Much like we’ve seen with telephone numbers and URLs, devices with virtual keyboards customize the keys (to include things like @ buttons) and enable autofill from their contacts database.

Desktop browsers make use of this too, with Safari on macOS also enabling autofill for email fields, based on data in the system Contacts app.

Email addresses often seem like they follow a very simple format, but the variations actually make them quite complex. A naive attempt to validate email addresses can result in a perfectly good address being marked as invalid, so it’s great to be able to lean on the browser’s more sophisticated and well-tested validation methods to check the format.

Usefully, the multiple attribute can be added to email fields to collect a list of email addresses. In this case, each email address in the list is individually validated.

<input type="email" multiple>

Can I Use input-email-tel-url? Data on support for the input-email-tel-url feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

Use type="email" for email address fields whenever possible.


A combined screenshot showing the three custom keyboards offered by Safari on iOS for telephone, email and number field types.


Safari on iOS shows custom keyboards for telephone, email and number fields, amongst others. (Large preview)

5. Number Fields

The type="number" field is designed for numerical values, and has some very useful attributes along with it in the shape of min, max and step. A valid value for a number field must be a floating point number between any minimum and maximum value specified by the min and max attributes.

If step is set, then a valid value is divisible by the step value.

<input type="number" min="10" max="30" step="5">

Valid input for the above field would be 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30, with any other value being rejected.

Browser support is broad, again with virtual keyboards often defaulting to a numeric input mode for keying in values.

Some desktop browsers (including Chrome, Firefox and Safari, but not Edge) add toggle buttons for nudging the values up and down by the value of step, or if no step is specified, the default step appears to be 1 in each implementation.

Can I Use input-number? Data on support for the input-number feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

Use type="number" for any floating point numbers, as it’s widely supported and can help prevent accidental input.

6. Range Fields

Less obvious in use that some of the other types, type="range" can be thought of as being an alternative for type="number" where the user doesn’t care about the exact value.

Range fields take, and will often use, the same min, max and step attributes as number fields, and browsers almost universally display this as a graphical slider. The user doesn’t necessarily get to see the exact value they’re setting.

Range fields might be useful for those sorts of questions on forms like “How likely are you to recommend this to a friend?” with “Likely” at one end and “Unlikely” at the other. The user could slide the slider to wherever they think represents their opinion, and under the hood that gets submitted as a numerical value that you can store and process.

Browser support is good, although the appearance varies between implementations.

Can I Use input-range? Data on support for the input-range feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

The uses for type="range" might be a bit niche, but support is good and the slider provides a user-friendly input method where appropriate.

7. Color Fields

The type="color" field is design for capturing RGB colors in hexadecimal notation, such as #aabbcc. The HTML specification calls this a “color well control”, with the intention that the browser should provide a user-friendly color picker of some sort.

Some browsers do provide this, notably Chrome and Firefox both providing access to the system color picker through a small color swatch.

Neither IE nor Safari provide any support here, leaving the user to figure out that they’re supposed to enter a 7-digit hex number all by themselves.

Color fields might find use in theming for personalization and in CMS use, but unless the users are sufficiently technical to deal with hex color codes, it may be better not to rely on the browser providing a nice UI for these.

Can I Use input-color? Data on support for the input-color feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

Unless you know your users will be happy to fall back to entering hexadecimal color codes, it’s best not to rely on browsers supporting type="color".


A combined screenshot showing the different visual representations of range, color and date fields in three different browsers: Edge, Firefox and Chrome.


Range, color and date fields as displayed by Edge, Firefox and Chrome. (Large preview)

8. Date Fields

HTML5 introduced a number of different type values for creating inputs for dates and times. These included date, time, datetime-local, month and week.

At first glance, these appear to be heaven-sent, as collecting dates in a form is a difficult experience for both developer and user, and they’re needed pretty frequently.

The promise here is that the new field types enable the browser to provide a standardized, accessible and consistent user interface to capture dates and times from the user with ease. This is really important, as date and time formats vary world-over based on both language and locale, and so a friendly browser interface that translates an easy-to-use date selection into an unambiguous technical date format really does sound like the ideal solution.

As such, valid input for type="date" field is an unambiguous year-month-day value such as 2019-01-16. Developers like these, as they map pretty much to the ISO 8601 date format, which is used in most technical contexts. Unfortunately, few regular human beings use this date format and aren’t likely to reach for it when asked to provide a date in a single empty text field.

And, of course, a single empty text field is what the user is presented with if their browser does not provide a user interface for picking dates. In those cases, it then becomes very difficult for a user to enter a valid date value unless they happen to be familiar with the format required or the input is annotated with clear instructions.

Many browsers do provide a good user interface for picking dates, however. Firefox has a really excellent date picker, and Chrome and Edge also have pretty good interfaces. However, there’s no support in poor old IE and none in Safari, which could be an issue.

Can I Use input-datetime? Data on support for the input-datetime feature across the major browsers from caniuse.com.

Recommendation

While convenient where it works, the failure mode of type="date" and its associated date and time types is very poor. This makes it a risky choice that could leave users struggling to meet validation criteria.

Conclusion

A lot has changed in the browser landscape in the four years since the HTML5 specification became a recommendation. Support for the newer types of input is fairly strong — particularly in mobile devices with virtual keyboards such as tablets and phones. In most cases, these inputs are safe to use and provide some extra utility to the user.

There are a couple of notable exceptions, the worst of which being the date and time fields, which not only lack utility, but also have more patchy browsers support. When support isn’t available, the fallback mode of these fields is poor. In these cases, it might be best to stick to JavaScript-based solutions for progressively enhancing the basic type="text" input fields.

If you’d like to read more, I’d thoroughly recommend the MDN web docs on these field types, and as ever, the W3C specification.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, il)


See the article here – 

HTML5 Input Types: Where Are They Now?

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How Improving Website Performance Can Help Save The Planet




How Improving Website Performance Can Help Save The Planet

Jack Lenox



You may not think about it often, but the Internet uses a colossal amount of electricity. This electricity needs to be produced somewhere. In most countries, this means the burning of fossil fuels. This, in turn, means that the Internet’s carbon footprint has grown to the point where it may have eclipsed global air travel, and this makes the Internet the largest coal-fired machine on Earth.

The Mozilla Internet Health Report 2018 states that — especially as the Internet expands into new territory — “sustainability should be a bigger priority.” But as it stands, websites are growing ever more obese, which means that the energy demand of the Internet is continuing to grow exponentially.

All the while, the impacts of climate change grow worse and more numerous with each passing year. The vast majority of climate scientists attribute the increasing ferocity and frequency of extreme weather events around the world to climate change, which they largely attribute to human activity. While some question the science, even the world’s largest oil companies now accept it, and concede that their business models need to change.

Every country on Earth (with the exception of the US), is signed up to the Paris Climate Agreement. Although the US controversially pulled out, many of America’s most influential individuals, cities, states, and companies — representing more than half the US population and economy — have retained their commitment to the agreement by way of the America’s Pledge initiative.

As web developers, it’s understandable to feel that this is not an issue over which we have any influence, but this isn’t true. Many efforts are afoot to improve the situation on the web. The Green Web Foundation maintains an ever-growing database of web hosts who are either wholly powered by renewable energy or are at least committed to being carbon neutral. In 2013, A List Apart published Sustainable Web Design by James Christie. For the last three years, the SustainableUX conference has seen experts in web sustainability sharing their knowledge across an array of web-based disciplines.

Since 2009, Greenpeace has been putting pressure on big Internet companies to clean up their energy mix by way of their Clicking Clean campaign. Partly as a result of this campaign, Google announced last year that for the first time it had purchased enough renewable energy to match 100% of its global consumption for operations.

So, apart from powering servers with renewable energy, what else can web developers do about climate change?

“You Can’t Manage What You Can’t Measure”

Perhaps the biggest win when it comes to making websites more sustainable is that performance, user experience and sustainability are all neatly intertwined. The key metric for measuring the sustainability of a digital product is its energy usage. This includes the work done by the server, the client and the intermediary communications networks that transmit data between the two.

With that in mind, perhaps the first thing to consider is how do we measure the energy usage of our website? This is actually a trickier undertaking than you might imagine, and it’s difficult to get precise data here. There are, however, some good fallbacks which we can use that demonstrate energy usage. These include data transfer (i.e. how much data does the browser have to download to display your website) and resource usage of the hardware serving and receiving the website. An obvious metric here is CPU usage, but memory usage and other forms of data storage also play their part.

Data transfer is one thing that we can measure quite easily. All of the major browsers provide developer tools that allow us to measure network activity. In this screenshot below, for example, we can see that loading the Smashing Magazine website for the first time incurs just under a megabyte of data transfer. Firefox’s developer tools actually provide us with two numbers: the first is the uncompressed size of the files that have been transferred, and the latter is the compressed size.


SmashingMag - Firefox Developer Edition


(Large preview)

The most common tool for compressing assets as they travel across the network is gzip, so the difference between those two numbers is typically a result of gzip’s work. This latter number represents how much data has actually been transmitted and is the one to keep an eye on.

Note: There are plenty of other tools that provide us with a metric for data transfer including the much revered WebPagetest.

For measuring CPU usage, Chrome provides us with a granular Task Manager that shows the memory footprint, CPU usage and network activity of individual tabs. For the more adventurous/technical, the top (table of processes) command provides similar metrics on most Unix-like operating systems such as macOS and Ubuntu. Generally speaking, we can also run the top command on any server to which we have shell access.

Fortunately, there are efforts such as WebsiteCarbon and Ecograder that seek to translate these metrics into a specific CO2 figure (in the case of WebsiteCarbon) or a score (in the case of Ecograder).

Sustainable Web Design

Now we know how to measure the impact of our site, it’s time to think about how we can optimize things to make it more sustainable, more performant, and generally a better experience to use.

There are some existing works we can draw on to help us here. In 2016, O’Reilly published “Designing For Sustainability” by Tim Frick. In this book, Tim takes us on a tour of the whys and hows of sustainable design. But we can also draw on a wealth of existing ideas, conference talks and articles which — while not having an explicit focus on sustainability — have a huge overlap with the philosophy of sustainable web design. Particularly good examples here are Brad Frost’s side-project, “Death To Bullshit”, Heydon Pickering’s articles and talks about writing less damn code, and Adam Silver’s blog post, “Designing For Actual Performance.”

If we’re doing a complete redesign of a website, or starting a new one from scratch, we can start with some really high-level questions here. For example, what actually deserves or needs to be on a homepage? And more specifically, what value does each element on a homepage bring? As Heydon Pickering puts it:

“The most performant, accessible and easily maintainable feature of a website is the one that you don’t make in the first place.”

I work on the WordPress.com VIP team, so in this vein, I decided to challenge myself by putting together a minimalist WordPress theme to see how far I could take the techniques of sustainable web design. The result is a theme called Susty, and it can be seen in action on the accompanying website I put together: sustywp.com. In that particular example, the website is delivered in just over 6KB of data transfer, which feels good given that the median website is about 1.5MB.

So, what did I do? Well, I’ll tell you.

Reduce Network Requests

As I have outlined above, network requests are something we can easily measure, so they make for a good starting point. In putting Susty together, I noticed there were a number of HTTP requests going on that didn’t appear to be necessary. For example, WordPress bundles some CSS and JavaScript that detects the usage of emojis and makes sure they don’t appear as illegal characters. There’s nothing inherently wrong with this, but if you aren’t planning to use emojis, or you’re happy and confident that the various system defaults will have you covered, you can prevent these from loading.

This represents a relatively meager saving, but by establishing a philosophy of pruning unwanted code and requests from our pages, we can make much more significant performance improvements. For example:

  • Are we loading the whole of jQuery for some basic DOM operations?
    Could we achieve the same ends with pure JavaScript? You can read about more advanced dead code elimination (aka tree shaking) in this post for Google by Jeremy Wagner.
  • Do we have a carousel of images?
    Do we really need all those images? Are they significantly enhancing the user experience? Or could we reduce it to just one, strong image? Or even randomly show one of a selection of images, to give a sense of dynamism to returning users? By the way, the research that has been done here shows that most users neither like nor engage with carousels.
  • If we are using a lot of images, would we benefit from providing our images using the WebP format for those browsers that support it?
    For the longest time, WebP’s support has been frustratingly limited. But with Firefox due to begin support for it in version 65 (due in January 2019), it’s only a matter of time before remaining stragglers like Safari catch up.
  • Are we loading hundreds of kilobytes of web fonts?
    Are we using all of the web fonts that we’re loading? Do we even need web fonts? Most devices these days have a stack of half-decent fonts, could we just specify a list of fonts we’d like to see arranged by preference? If we must use web fonts, we should make sure our fonts are as performant as is reasonably possible.
  • Are we embedding YouTube videos?
    An embedded YouTube video typically adds about a megabyte of data transfer before anyone even interacts with it. If only a fraction of our users are actually going to sit and watch the embedded video on our website, could we just link to it instead?

Scrutinise Everything

In this vein, we can also interrogate every aspect of our pages. What really deserves to be there? Does our sidebar add any real value, or have we just put one there because convention dictates that websites have sidebars? So, we’ve added one and filled it with crap.

With Susty, I’ve experimented with the somewhat unorthodox approach of relegating the navigation to its own page. This allows me to have pages that are stripped down to literally the bare essentials, with additional content only being loaded at the user’s explicit request. Susty is so lightweight and so fast that I realized through some user research (aka my partner) that the loading of the menu didn’t really feel like a new page, so I decided to make it look like an overlay, with a cross to dismiss that actually just takes you back to the previous page.

As well as helping me to create pleasingly lightweight pages, the relegated navigation also removes the need for any fancy hide/reveal code for showing it. At this point, I’d like to make it clear that Susty is an example of taking sustainable web design techniques to an extreme (I’m not suggesting it’s an archetype of a good website).

Write CSS Like Your Grandmother

When it comes to serious performance enhancement, we should bear in mind that literally every character of code counts. Every character represents a byte, and even after they’ve been compressed by gzip, they’re still taking up weight. CSS is a domain where we often see a lot of bloat. Fortunately, there are a growing number of increasingly complex tools that can help you weed out unused CSS. This fantastic post by Sarah Dayan outlines how she reduced her CSS bundle from 259KB to 9KB!

If we’re starting from scratch, perhaps we should think more deeply about how we write CSS in the first place. Heydon Pickering wrote an excellent post about how we can write CSS in a way that plays to the strengths of how the syntax was designed, and how this can help developers prevent repetition. Heydon also points out how much wastage goes on with excessive usage of divs and classes — both in HTML and CSS.

What Are You Analyzing?

It seems to have become more-or-less ubiquitous on the web for everyone to analyze what their website’s visitors do via tools like Google Analytics, KISSmetrics, Piwik, etc. While I have no doubt that there are legitimate use cases, do we really need analytics on every website? I, for one, have typically added Google Analytics to every site I manage as a matter of course. But it dawned on me relatively recently that for most of the websites in question, this has been an almost completely pointless endeavor: “Oh, six people came to this post via Facebook today.” Who cares?

Unless you really need it, and you’re going to analyze and act upon the data, just ditch analytics and find a better way to spend your time than gawping at the mundanity of how many people visited website X today.

As well as adding to your page weight, usage of something like Google Analytics raises ethical questions around the data you’re collecting on your users on Google’s behalf, i.e. there’s a reason Google provides you with Analytics for free.

Let’s Not Forget The Basics

There’s so much information around these days about the following, but we should never get complacent and forget about them. Alongside everything above, we absolutely should always minify HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and concatenate where appropriate. We should also compress all images to ensure they are as small as possible, use the right formats in the right settings, and use progressive rendering.

Server-Side Performance

So far, our focus has been almost entirely on the front-end, but a lot of this is made irrelevant if we don’t also optimize things on the server-side. I’ve already mentioned it a couple of times, but we should absolutely enable gzip compression at all times.

We should make serving our website as easy for our server as possible. I predominantly use Nginx, and I have a particular fondness for FastCGI cache and have found it to be especially efficient. If you have shell access to your own server, here’s a post that explains how to configure it. There are less technical options if you don’t have (or don’t want) as much control over your server. A particular favorite in the WordPress space is WP Super Cache.

We should use HTTP2 over HTTPS. Using HTTPS opens up a world of new web technologies like service workers that allow us to treat the network itself as a nice-to-have. If you want to learn more about this, I highly recommend Jeremy Keith’s new book, “Going Offline.”

Note: You also may want to investigate Google’s PageSpeed Module, available for both Apache and Nginx.

Finally, the biggest impact we can have here is to host our websites in data centers powered by renewable energy. In the UK, I can highly recommend Krystal and Kualo in terms of companies with which I directly host my sites. (For a full directory of green web hosts, check out The Green Web Foundation.)

In Conclusion

I hope I have convinced you that it’s worth putting in the effort to make our websites more sustainable. Especially given that in the process we also make our websites:

  • More performant,
  • More user-friendly,
  • More accessible,
  • More server-friendly,
  • Better optimized for search engines.

A response that some people have to the idea of sustainable web design — which is not unreasonable — is that it seems to be a very small concession to the environmental cause. Of course, how much of an impact you can have depends on how busy the websites are that you work on. But as well as helping the web become a bit more environmentally friendly, sustainable web design is fundamentally best practice web design.

It’s also worth thinking about offsetting the carbon emissions that you can’t avoid. Carbon offsetting is sometimes derided, and with good cause. The main problem with offsetting is that typically the term over which carbon will be offset is quite long. For example, with tree planting, the figure given for an amount of carbon sequestering is typically based over a 100-year period. So, in terms of reducing carbon emissions now, it’s not really a solution. But it is better than nothing.

The motto of myclimate is to do your best, and offset the rest. I have written a blog post about rolling your own carbon offset scheme. I also highly recommend the 1% For The Planet initiative. Finally, if you are a business owner and would like to join an alliance of companies that want to see better social, environmental and economic justice, check out the Certified B Corporation scheme.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, il)


See the article here:  

How Improving Website Performance Can Help Save The Planet

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Designing A Font Based On Old Handwriting




Designing A Font Based On Old Handwriting

Carolyn Porter



Designers create handwriting-based connected cursive fonts for a variety of reasons: to immortalize the loops and swirls of a loved one’s handwriting, to digitize the penmanship of a person or document of historic significance, or to transform charming handwriting into a creative asset that can be licensed.

Let’s say you found a beautiful old handwriting specimen you want to digitize. You might presume you can trace individual letters, then seamlessly convert those tracings into a font. I will confess that was my assumption before I began to work on my first font. I had not taken into account the myriad of thoughtful and intentional decisions required to transform the specimen into an artful and functional font.

Before you begin the process of digitizing your specimen, it would be worthwhile to ask yourself a few questions about your goals and intent. Think of it as writing a creative brief for your project. Begin by assessing the importance of historical accuracy. Then conduct a close examination of the specimen: look at the idiosyncrasies in the handwriting, the variation in shape and position of individual letters, the method for connecting letters, and the texture. Possessing a keen familiarity of your specimen will allow you to make informed decisions about aesthetics as you design your font.

Recommended reading: Hands On The Sigmund Freud Typeface: Making A Font For Your Shrink

How Important Is Historical Accuracy?

One of the biggest decisions you will need to make is whether you want to capture every nuance of your handwriting specimen, or if you want to design something inspired by that handwriting. It is like watching a movie “based on a true story” versus one “inspired by real events.” In the first scenario, you can expect the movie (or font) maintains a higher degree of factual integrity than the second option, where the director (or designer) may take wide-ranging creative liberties.

If you choose to replicate your specimen with utmost precision, be aware that rigorously honoring accuracy may mean compromising legibility. “Old scripts, in particular, include letterforms that are less legible — even virtually illegible, like the old-style long s — than in modern handwriting,” notes Brian Willson, who has designed more than two dozen fonts based on the handwriting of notable figures such as Abigail Adams, Frederick Douglass, and Sam Houston.


Three examples of fonts based on, or inspired by, the handwriting of Abraham Lincoln.


Compare the similarities in these three fonts based on (or inspired by) the handwriting of Abraham Lincoln. Although 1863 Gettysburg (the font shown on the far right) was inspired by documents written by President Lincoln, the designer’s stated goal was not to replicate Lincoln’s exact writing, but to create a font that represented the era. (From left to right: LD Abe Lincoln by Lettering Delights/Illustration Ink, a Lincoln by Steve Woolf, and 1863 Gettysburg designed by GLC.) (Large preview)

You may find you want to make thoughtful revisions to strike a balance between historical accuracy and optimized legibility. As I designed the P22 Marcel Script, which is a connected cursive font based on handwritten WWII love letters, I chose to make small revisions to improve legibility.

The font retains the essential character of the original writing, but it is not a precise replica. Many of the original j’s, for example, did not have a tittle (a dot), and the original lowercase p did not have a closed curve on the bottom of the bowl. It looked like a hybrid between a p and an n. Knowing some people struggle to read cursive writing, I chose to dot the j and revise the shape of the p.


Three images showing original letter written by WWII French forced laborer Marcel Heuzé, a close-up of the greeting “Mes chères petites,” and the font P22 Marcel Script based on the handwriting sample shown.


Note the small revisions to improve legibility. (From left to right: The original handwriting specimen, a close-up of the greeting “Mes chères petites”, and a sample of the font P22 Marcel Script.) (Large preview)

Does Your Source Document Include Enough Material To Work With?

John Hancock had a fantastic signature, but designing an entire font based on the eight letters in his name — J, o, h, n, H, a, c, and k — would be a challenge. Assess whether your specimen is complete enough to support an entire font. Does it include both upper and lowercase letters? How about numbers?

When designing the font based on the handwriting of Jane Austen, designer Pia Frauss discovered she did not have a handwritten letter X to reference. If, like Frauss, you have a specimen that is mostly complete, you should be able to extrapolate what a specific letter might have looked like. That skill will also be necessary when it comes time to design new glyphs — the term for a specific character in a font file — like the Euro, which has only existed since 1999.

If your specimen only has a limited set of characters, gauge whether you feel comfortable designing the missing letters. If not, consider finding a handwritten specimen that is similar in style, then pulling the missing letters from the supplementary specimen.

What Idiosyncrasies Make The Handwriting Special?

Are crossbars unusually high, low, or angled? Are ascenders or descenders abnormally long or short? Are letters strikingly narrow or wide? Do specific letters extend above or below the baseline? Do letters loop in unusual ways?

If your goal is to create a historically accurate font, you will want to take care to ensure those idiosyncrasies are not lost as you digitize individual glyphs. If you are comfortable taking creative liberties, you might exaggerate those points of differentiation.

In the font Marydale, Brian Willson included quirky glyphs such as the loopy, two-story serif g found in the original handwriting. Brian thought it added friendly charm. But a risk of embracing idiosyncrasies is that some users may not like those letterforms — and indeed some users complained to Brian that the g was too unusual. Nevertheless, Marydale is one of Brian’s best-selling fonts.

To help you decode shapes and understand the mechanics behind some of your specimen’s idiosyncrasies, it may be helpful to identify the type of writing utensil that was used. A ballpoint pen will create uniform-width strokes; a split-nib pen can create graceful thicks and thins; a dip pen may carry evidence of ink being reapplied; a brush can create dramatic variation in thickness. You may also consider how the writing utensil had been held or if the writer had been in a hurry, since hand position and speed can influence the shape and style of the handwriting, too.

Assess Variations In Axis, Letter Height, Alignment To Baseline, And Stroke Width

Within any single handwriting specimen, you will likely see variation in axis, letter height, alignment to baseline, and stroke width. These irregularities enhance the individuality of handwriting — but transferring those irregularities to a digital font can be a challenge. If your font includes too many variations in axis, letter height, alignment to baseline, or stroke width, it may not reflect the visual unity of the original specimen. If your font does not include enough variation, it may lack the charm of the original writing.

Take time to assess which elements in the original specimen are consistent and which vary, then plan how you could incorporate those variations into your font. If you employ a consistent axis, consider varying alignment to baseline or stroke width. If you standardize stroke widths, consider varying axes and letter heights.


The word “Smashing” typeset in three different fonts that have three different levels of variability in stroke height, stroke width, and angle.


Fonts with increasing variability in axes, letter heights, alignment to baseline, and stroke thicknesses. (From left to right: Texas Hero by Brian Willson/Three Islands Press, P22 Cezanne Pro by Michael Want and James Grieshaber, and Selima by Jroh.) (Large preview)

When I began working on the P22 Marcel Script, I sourced favorite individual letters from five separate handwritten pages. The first time I pieced glyphs into words, I could see that the axes, letter heights, and stroke thicknesses were too variable. Even though each glyph had been a careful re-creation of one man’s handwriting, the resulting look was haphazard. I decided on a standard for axis and stroke thickness, then adjusted every glyph to that standard. Varying letter heights and alignment to baseline prevented the font from looking too mechanical.

Where And How Do Individual Letters Connect?

Are the connecting lines that sweep from one letter to the next high or low? Are the connecting lines thick or thin? Are there some letters that do not connect?

The key to designing a successfully connected cursive script font is to create an overlap so individual letters appear to seamlessly flow from one into the next. The trick is to identify one location for that overlap, then to start and end every glyph in that precise position. Some designers place those overlaps along the left-hand edge of a glyph, other designers place the overlap in the space between the glyphs. Some designers place the overlap low, others place the overlap high. There is no right or wrong answer; choose the location and method that makes sense for you.


Three detailed examples of ways glyphs in cursive script overlap to appear as if the letters connect in a fluid, seamless way.


Fonts that overlap on the left-hand edge of each glyph. The magenta circle shows the overlap; the horizontal magenta line shows the consistent placement of the sweeping connecting line on the letters m and a. (From left to right: Douglass Pen by Brian Willson/Three Islands Press, Rough Love by Positype, and Bambusa Pro by FontForecast.) (Large preview)


Three detailed examples of ways glyphs in cursive script overlap to appear as if the letters connect in a fluid, seamless way.


Fonts that overlap in the space between the glyphs. (From left to right: Dear Sarah Pro by Christian Robertson, Storyteller Script by My Creative Land, and Mila by Facetime.) (Large preview)

You may also discover that not all letters in your specimen connect. In that case, you will still need to identify one location and implement a consistent strategy for the overlaps, though you will only create the overlap on those glyphs that connect.* *


The word “Smashing” typeset in three different fonts where not all letters connect with the surrounding letters.


Fonts where some, but not all, letters connect. (From left to right: Blooms by DearType, JoeHand 2 by JOEBOB Graphics, and Brush Marker by Fenotype.) (Large preview)

Do You Want Your Font To Include A Texture Effect?

Adding texture can enhance a feeling of antiquity or nostalgia, but this treatment adds time, complexity, and increases file size. And it may influence whether or not someone will want to license and use your font, since they may or may not be looking for that specific effect.

Examine your original specimen to determine where the texture came from. Was it caused by the paper surface? Was variation caused by the writing tool or writing speed? Are irregularities clustered on curves? Does one side of the letter include more texture than the other? Do brush strokes or splatters of ink extend into the space surrounding each letter?


The word “Smashing” typeset in three different fonts that have three different textured looks: a paper texture look, rough edges, and brush strokes.


The word “Smashing” typeset in three different fonts that have three different textured looks: a paper texture look, rough edges, and brush strokes. (From left to right: Paper texture; Thirsty Rough by Yellow Design Studio, Scratchy pen and ink texture, Azalea Rough by Laura Worthington; Brush strokes, Sveglia by Wacaksara Co.) (Large preview)

Once you’ve made high-level decisions on the importance of historical accuracy, identified what idiosyncrasies make the handwriting special, considered how to add variation in axis, letter height, alignment to baseline, or stroke width, assessed how to connect glyphs, and decided if you want to include texture, it’s time to forge ahead with the design of your font.

Pick Your Letters

Make a copy of your specimen, and go through it line by line, flagging the specific characters you want to incorporate into your font. When designer Brian Willson begins a new font, it is not unusual for him to spend hours poring over the source material to select the individual letters he plans to include.

Consider flagging two types of letters:

  1. Favorite “workhorse” letters
    Workhorse letters will make up your basic glyph set. They might not be the fanciest option, but workhorse characters will make for a reliable and legible glyph set.

  2. Favorite swash letters
    Swash letters might include extra loops or flourishes, more or less texture, greater variation in position above or below the baseline, or exaggerated features such as extra-long crossbars.

Swash letters may be less legible, or may only be appropriate for use in specific instances, but can add variety, beauty, and personality. (Swash glyphs will be added later in the process; focus first on designing the workhorse glyph set.)

Ideally, at the end of your review, you will have flagged a complete set of upper and lowercase workhorse letters, numbers, punctuation marks, and an array of swash characters.

Scan Individual Letters And Prepare To Vectorize

Create high-resolution bitmap images of all letters you plan to include in your font. I have always used a flatbed scanner to capture those images, but I have heard of people exporting sketches from Procreate or taking high-resolution photos on their phones. If you take a photo, be sure your phone is parallel to your specimen to avoid distortion.

Once you have assembled a collection of bitmap images, you will need to choose between vectorizing the letterforms using Adobe Illustrator’s Image Trace feature or importing the scans directly into font editing software then vectorizing them by hand.

Using Illustrator’s Image Trace feature may be preferred if your specimen includes lots of texture since Illustrator can capture that texture for you. To create a vector outline, import a bitmap image into Illustrator, then using advanced Image Trace menu options, test combinations of Paths, Corners, and Noise to get the tracing result you prefer. Expand to get your vector outline.

Importing scans directly into font editing software may be preferred if your font is not going to include texture, if you are comfortable generating Bezier lines, or if you intend to make significant revisions to letter shapes.

Recommended reading: How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web

Establish A New Font File

Popular font editing software options include FontLab Studio VI (Mac or Windows OS, $459), Glyphs (Mac OS, €249.90), Robofont (Mac OS, $490), Font Creator (Windows, $79–199), and Font Forge (free). There is also an extension for Illustrator and Photoshop CC called FontSelf which allows you to convert lettering into a font ($49–$98).

Establish a new font file. If you created vector outlines using Illustrator, import each outline into the applicable glyph cell (that is, place the vector outline of the letter a in the a glyph cell so that an a appears when you hit the a key on your keyboard).

If you chose to vectorize the glyphs within the font editing software, import each bitmap scan as a background sketch, then trace.

Identify Archetype Letters

Some font designers begin by designing or refining the letters n, b, o, v, A, H and O since those letters contain clues to the shape of many other letters. The n, for example, holds clues to the shape of the i and h; the b holds clues to the shape of d, p, and q; the O holds clues to C and G. Other designers begin with the most frequently used letters of the alphabet: e, t, a, o, i, and n. In the fantastic book Designing Type, which is chock full of images that compare variations in letter shapes, Karen Cheng notes some designers begin with the letters a, e, g, n, and o.

You may begin with one of those glyph sets, but if you’ve identified a few letters that quintessentially represent the aesthetic of your font, consider starting by refining those glyphs. When I began to work on the P22 Marcel Script, I began by working on the capital M for no other reason than the swoop of the original handwritten M was exquisite, and it brought joy to see that letter come to life as a glyph. (After working on the M, I focused on refining archetype letters n and e.)


Four images showing the original handwritten “M,” the original tracing, initial digitization, and the final letter “M” from the font P22 Marcel Script.


From left to right: Original scan, original tracing, glyph outline in FontLab (note the refinements to stroke width and axis), and final M in P22 Marcel Script. (Large preview)

No matter which glyphs you begin with, you will quickly want to establish standards for the axis, letter heights, alignment to baseline, and stroke widths. Ensure all glyphs meet those standards while simultaneously keeping in mind incorporating variability to achieve an organic look.

In order to introduce variability in an intentional way, it might be helpful to add guidelines to your workspace to define the lower and upper ranges of variability. Use these guidelines to introduce variation in ascender height, descender length, or in alignment to the baseline.

Do you want your font to have more variability? Increase the distance between the guidelines. Do you want your font to have less variability? Decrease the distance between the guidelines. Add variability to stroke widths in a similar way.


Lowercase a-z of connected cursive font P22 Marcel Script.


Lowercase glyph set of P22 Marcel Script. Notice variability in length of the descenders in the letters f, g, y, and z, variability in the height of letters i and j, and how I chose not to connect letters v and w with the following letter. (Large preview)

You will also want to establish a standard position for the overlap. Since there is not one correct place for these overlaps, experiment with a limited number of glyphs until the overlaps appear as natural as if the letters had been written with a pen without lifting the pen off the page. Then, test the position of the overlap on tricky letters such as r, o, s, f, v and w to confirm the overlap works. You’ll know if there are issues because glyphs won’t connect, or the connection won’t appear smooth. (If you see white where two black letters overlap, check for a Postscript path direction error.)

The good news is that once you have established the successful position for your overlaps you should be able to cut, copy, and paste the connecting line to replicate the position of the overlap on all remaining letters.


The word “Smashing” typeset in P22 Marcel Script with small circles highlighting small overlapping areas between letters.


Overlaps in P22 Marcel Script (Large preview)

Test As You Go

As soon as you have a collection of glyphs — even if it isn’t the entire alphabet — generate a test file and preview your font. If your goal was to replicate your specimen with accuracy, assess whether the font reflects the rhythm and character of the original handwriting. Evaluate whether the “color” — the overall darkness or lightness — matches the original. Refine glyphs as necessary to achieve the right rhythm, character, and color.

If you have chosen to take liberties with the shapes of letters or to introduce variability, your goal should still be to achieve an overall cohesive aesthetic. It is up to you as the designer to define precisely what that means.

As you test, it will be helpful to print blocks of sample text at a range of sizes. Reverse letters out of black. Look at the spaces between letters. Look at the spaces inside of letters. Look at strings of glyphs backwards, then upside down. Look at the font both when printed on paper and on a computer monitor. Testing under different conditions will help you notice glyphs that need additional refinement. I found that when I tested sample text set in a foreign language the unfamiliar letter combinations would help me see individual glyphs that were too heavy, too light, too narrow or too wide, along with individual curves that seemed too rounded or too flat.

For the first-time type designer, I recommend the book Inside Paragraphs: Typographic Fundamentals by Cyrus Highsmith (see list of references below). The book provides an invaluable primer on learning how to look at shapes and spaces in and around letters.

Continue testing and revising glyphs until your font includes a–z lowercase, A–Z uppercase, numbers, fractions, punctuation marks, and diacritics (marks such as the umlaut, acute, or tilde added to letters to indicate stress or change in pronunciation).

Add Swashes And Alternate Characters

Once your workhorse glyph set is complete, consider adding the swash characters you flagged when you picked your initial letters. A digital font can never offer the infinite variability found in handwriting, but by writing lines of OpenType code and incorporating swashes, ligatures (two or more letters that are combined into a single glyph), and alternate characters, you can begin to close the gap between the mechanical nature of a font and organic variation of handwriting. OpenType code allows you to do things like ensure two of the same glyphs never appear next to each other, or replace a workhorses glyph with a fancy swash or with a glyph that has more (or less) texture.

This work can be time-consuming, but you just might find it is addictive. You might discover every word you test could benefit from some custom flourish. The font Suomi, designed by Tomi Haaparanta, includes more than 700 ligatures. The font Hipster Script, designed by Ale Paul has 1,066. Syys Script by Julia Sysmäläinen for Art. Lebedev Studio has more than 2,000 glyphs. And between the Latin and Cyrillic versions, the font NIVEA Care Type by Juliasys has more than 4,000 glyphs.

Between swashes, ornaments, and alternate characters, the Pro version of the P22 Marcel Script includes more than 1,300 glyphs. Many of the alternate glyphs were inspired by flourishes in the original specimen; other glyphs were of my own invention, but were made in the style of the original writing. In my experience, incorporating swashes, ligatures, and alternate characters is the most exciting part about designing a connected cursive script font. In fact, it is what brings a connected cursive script font to life.


Four variations of the glyphs in the font P22 Marcel Script, beginning with the basic  “workhorse” glyphs progressing to variations with lots of flourishes.


From left to right: P22 Marcel Script basic (workhorse) glyph set, P22 Marcel Script Pro incorporating alternate glyphs, and P22 Marcel Script Pro showing additional alternate glyphs, swashes, and an ornament. (Large preview)

Final Steps

Once all your glyphs have been designed and the font has been thoroughly tested for technical performance and aesthetics, it is time to name the font and release it into the world.

Ensure no other font is already using the name you are considering. You can do a preliminary search on aggregator websites such as MyFonts, Fonts.com, FontShop, or Creative Market. Fonts are also distributed by individual font foundries and designers. Because there are so many distribution channels, the only way to guarantee availability and protect a name is to apply for a copyright with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (for U.S. designers). Consider hiring a lawyer to help with the filing process.

Finally, when it is time to release the font, if this is your first font it may be easiest to distribute your font through an established foundry or aggregator website. They should offer technical support, and will track licensing and sales tax. Consider working with one of the websites listed above; each website will have a different process to submit a font for consideration.

Further Reading

Smashing Editorial
(ah, ra, il)


Originally posted here: 

Designing A Font Based On Old Handwriting

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10 Effective FOMO Marketing Techniques to Increase Online Results

fomo-marketing-4

In case you’re allergic to social media and haven’t ever before heard the term, FOMO means “the fear of missing out.” But what is FOMO marketing? We’re all familiar with the fear of missing an amazing opportunity. We don’t want to look back on our lives and wonder, “What if?” Savvy marketers have tapped into […]

The post 10 Effective FOMO Marketing Techniques to Increase Online Results appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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10 Effective FOMO Marketing Techniques to Increase Online Results

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User Experience Design: 6 Simple Steps for Developing Your UX Design Process

user-experience-design-introduction

User Experience Design or UX design is the process for improving the satisfaction of your website visitors by making your site more usable, accessible, and pleasurable to interact with. When you consider that nearly 80% of buyers will quickly bounce from a site if they don’t like what they find, and will quickly choose another […]

The post User Experience Design: 6 Simple Steps for Developing Your UX Design Process appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link to original: 

User Experience Design: 6 Simple Steps for Developing Your UX Design Process

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What is Hypothesis Testing and How It’s Done – A Complete Guide with Examples!

hypotesis-testing-introduction

When attempting to optimize your web presence for maximum leads and conversions, you may come across terms like hypothesis testing. While the term sounds like something from a science test, marketers intent on boosting their digital results are increasingly turning to scientific methods to squeeze a little more juice from their online campaigns. If you […]

The post What is Hypothesis Testing and How It’s Done – A Complete Guide with Examples! appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Originally posted here:

What is Hypothesis Testing and How It’s Done – A Complete Guide with Examples!

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It’s Time to Retest Your Page Speed [Google’s latest update]

Back in October, we were the first to claim that 2019 will be the year of page speed. We’ve got our eyes on the market and lemme tell you: Google is sending serious signals that it’s crunch time to deal with your slow pages.

Faster pages are a strategic marketing priority.

And sure enough, Google has made yet another change to uphold that prediction. In early November, they quietly rolled out the most significant update to a core performance tool we’ve seen to date, announcing the latest version of PageSpeed Insights.

So what does this update mean for marketers and their bottom line?

If you’ve used PageSpeed Insights to test page performance, it’s time to retest! Because your old speed scores don’t matter anymore. The good news is that you’ll have new data at your fingertips to help you speed up in ways that actually matter to your prospects and potential conversions.

Let’s take a closer look at this update and explore why it should play a role in your page speed strategy in 2019.

“You can’t improve what you don’t measure.”

PageSpeed Insights is easily Google’s most popular tool for measuring web performance.

When you look at the screenshot below, you can see why. It provides an easy-to-interpret color-coded scoring system that you don’t need an engineering degree to understand—red is bad, green is good. Your page is either fast, average, or slow. The closer to a perfect 100 you can get, the better. The scores also come with recommendations of what you can do to improve. It’s almost too easy to understand.

PageSpeed Insights
PageSpeed Insights v.4 (October 2019)

Earlier versions of PageSpeed Insights had some issues with how they reported performance. Simple results could be misleading, and experts soon discovered that implementing Google’s suggested optimizations didn’t necessarily line up with a better user experience. You might’ve gotten great scores, sure, but your pages weren’t always any faster or your visitors more engaged. Don’t even get me started on your conversion rates.

As Benjamin Estes over at Moz explains, “there are smarter ways to assess and improve site speed. A perfect score doesn’t guarantee a fast site.” Many experts like Estes began turning to more reliable tools—like GTMetrix, Pingdom, or Google’s own Lighthouse—to run more accurate performance audits. And who would blame them?

The latest version of PageSpeed Insights (v.5) fixes these issues by putting the focus where it should be: on user experience. This is a huge leap forward for marketers because it means that the tool is directly relevant to conversion optimization. It can help you get faster in ways that translate into higher engagement and conversion rates.

For the full scoop, check out Google’s release notes here, but there are really two changes you should note:

1. PageSpeed Insights Now Uses Lighthouse

Lighthouse is excellent because it gives you a more accurate picture of how your landing pages perform with lab and field data. The lab data means you get results ASAP, whether you’ve seen traffic yet or not. This gives you a way to test and improve your pages before you point your ads at them.

An important note is that Lighthouse simulates a page load on a mid-tier device (Moto G4) on a mobile network—roughly equivalent to the fastest 25% of 3G and slowest 25% of 4G. So it’s a pretty solid estimate of what you’re likely to see in the wild. Here’s what it looks like:

New lab data from Lighthouse provides a much better picture of what a user experiences.

The Lighthouse engine behind PageSpeed Insights also brings more user-centric performance metrics with it, two of which are very important to your landing pages:

  • First Meaningful Paint (FMP) is the time it takes for the first valuable piece of content to load—usually a hero shot or video above the fold. It’s the “is this useful?” moment when you catch—or lose—a visitor’s attention. Even if the rest of your page loads later, it’s paramount that the first page elements appear as quickly as possible.
  • Time to Interactive (TTI) is the first moment a visitor can interact with your page. It’s the best measure of speed to determine if a visitor will happily engage with your content, or whether they’ll get annoyed and bounce because your landing page keeps choking on clunky JavaScript or poorly prioritized code.

2. PageSpeed Insights Gives You Better Opportunities and Diagnostics

You can bid adieu to the short checklist of optimizations that experts like Ben Estes called out. Google has replaced the (moderately useful) feature with new opportunities and audits that will actually help you improve your visitor experience. These include new suggestions and estimated savings for each.

Your priorities should be much clearer:

PageSpeed Insights Opportunities
Opportunities and Diagnostics in PageSpeed Insights

How your Unbounce Pages Stack Up

Faster pages earn you more traffic and better engagement. As a result, page speed has a major impact on your conversion rates and can even help you win more ad impressions for less. That’s why we’ve made page speed our priority into 2019.

To show how Unbounce stacks up in the real world, we chose to test an actual page created by one of our customers, Webistry, a digital marketing agency. Their “Tiny Homes of Maine” page is a real-world example.

Click here to expand.

It has tons of custom functionality, so it’s fairly representative of what many customers do with the Unbounce builder. (The ability to customize is often why customers choose Unbounce in the first place!) This page includes custom Javascript for smooth scrolling, a sticky header, fading header, some custom CSS, and a bunch of images of various file types.

We tested two versions of “Tiny Homes of Maine” using Google PageSpeed Insights v.5, running a minimum of three tests using the median results. The results below focus on the mobile scores:

Speed Boost

First, we tested the original Tiny Homes of Maine landing page using Unbounce’s Speed Boost, which optimizes landing page delivery to do things like leverage browser caching, prioritize visible content to load first, bundle Javascript, and so on. Speed Boost handles the technical recommendations from PageSpeed Insights that developers usually tackle behind the scenes. You can see the overall results of the test here:

Tiny Homes of Maine with Speed Boost

Speed Boost + Auto Image Optimizer

Next, we retested the Tiny Homes of Maine adding our upcoming Auto Image Optimizer into the mix. This new tool automatically optimizes your images as your page is published. You can fine-tune your settings, but we used the defaults here. Check out the mobile results:

Tiny Homes of Maine with Speed Boost + Auto Image Optimizer

The score jumped from a respectable 88 to an incredible 96 and, more meaningfully, we saw time to interactive improve from 4.4 sec to 2.7 sec. That’s 12.3 seconds faster than the average mobile web page, and 0.3 seconds faster than Google’s ideal 3 second load time.

Here we’ve shared the time to interactive speeds from both tests, for desktop and mobile, measured against the average web page:

Time to Interactive is the best measure for whether a visitor will engage or bounce. Our average mobile speed is based on Google’s mobile benchmarks, while the desktop average comes from a study by SEO Chat.

Overall, when we tested, we saw Speed Boost and Auto Image Optimizer create a dramatic difference in performance without sacrificing visual appeal or complexity. We took a compelling page that converts well and upped the ante by serving it at blazing speeds. Whether on a mobile or desktop, the page loads in a way that significantly improves the visitor’s experience.

Speed Boost is already available to all our customers, and the Auto Image Optimizer is coming very soon. This means your own landing pages can start achieving speeds like the ones above right now. Read more about our page speed initiatives.

But hold up. What about AMP? You might already know about AMP (accelerated mobile) pages, which load almost instantly—like, less than half a second instantly. Not only do they lead to crazy engagement, but they eliminate waiting on even slow network connections. This makes your content accessible to everyone, including the 70% of global users still on 3G connections—or 70% of pedestrians on their phones while they wait at a crosswalk.

While AMP can be complicated to build, Unbounce’s drag-and-drop builder lets you create AMP in the same way you create all your landing pages. If you’d like to try it out for yourself, you can sign up for AMP beta which opens in January 2019.

For the speed test above, we decided to leave AMP out of it since AMP restricts some custom functionality and the page we used would’ve required a few design changes. It wouldn’t be apples to apples. But we’re pretty pumped to show you more of it in the next while.

Page Speed & Your Bottom Line

Seconds are one thing, but dollars are another. Google recognizes the direct impact that fast load times have on your bottom line, which is why they released the Impact Calculator in February 2018. This tool sheds more light on why providing accurate measurements is so important.

Let’s revisit our Tiny Homes landing page above as an example. Imagine this landing page gets 1,000 visitors a month, at a conversion rate of 3.5% (which is just slightly higher than the average Real Estate industry landing page in our Conversion Benchmark Report). If the conversion rate from lead to sale is 5%, and each conversion is worth an average of $54,000 (which is the mid-priced home on their landing page), then their average lead value is $2700.

Tiny Homes of Maine in the Impact Calculator

When we input those numbers into the Impact Calculator and improve their mobile page speed from 4.4 seconds to 2.8 seconds, as shown in the test above, the impact to revenue for this one page could be $52,580.

Heck yes, speed matters.

And if we forecast the near-instant speeds promised by Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP), that page could see a potential annual revenue impact of more than $179,202 USD if it were to load in 1 second.

And that’s one landing page!

If you’ve been struggling with how to improve your page loading times, this latest version of PageSpeed Insights now gives you a much more meaningful picture of how you’re doing—and how to get faster.

You may not have considered speed a strategic priority, but when seconds can equate to tens of thousands of dollars, you need to. Try the Impact Calculator yourself or contact our sales team if you’d like to see what kind of revenue impact Unbounce landing pages can get you.

Read this article: 

It’s Time to Retest Your Page Speed [Google’s latest update]