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Everything You Need To Know About Alignment In Flexbox




Everything You Need To Know About Alignment In Flexbox

Rachel Andrew



In the first article of this series, I explained what happens when you declare display: flex on an element. This time we will take a look at the alignment properties, and how these work with Flexbox. If you have ever been confused about when to align and when to justify, I hope this article will make things clearer!

History Of Flexbox Alignment

For the entire history of CSS Layout, being able to properly align things on both axes seemed like it might truly be the hardest problem in web design. So the ability to properly align items and groups of items was for many of us the most exciting thing about Flexbox when it first started to show up in browsers. Alignment became as simple as two lines of CSS:

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: center an item by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

The alignment properties that you might think of as the flexbox alignment properties are now fully defined in the Box Alignment Specification. This specification details how alignment works across the various layout contexts. This means that we can use the same alignment properties in CSS Grid as we use in Flexbox — and in future in other layout contexts, too. Therefore, any new alignment capability for flexbox will be detailed in the Box Alignment specification and not in a future level of Flexbox.

The Properties

Many people tell me that they struggle to remember whether to use properties which start with align- or those which start with justify- in flexbox. The thing to remember is that:

  • justify- performs main axis alignment. Alignment in the same direction as your flex-direction
  • align- performs cross-axis alignment. Alignment across the direction defined by flex-direction.

Thinking in terms of main axis and cross axis, rather than horizontal and vertical really helps here. It doesn’t matter which way the axis is physically.

Main Axis Alignment With justify-content

We will start with the main axis alignment. On the main axis, we align using the justify-content property. This property deals with all of our flex items as a group, and controls how space is distributed between them.

The initial value of justify-content is flex-start. This is why, when you declare display: flex all your flex items line up against the start of the flex line. If you have a flex-direction of row and are in a left to right language such as English, then the items will start on the left.


The items are all lined up in a row starting on the left


The items line up to the start (Large preview)

Note that the justify-content property can only do something if there is spare space to distribute. Therefore if you have a set of flex items which take up all of the space on the main axis, using justify-content will not change anything.


The container is filled with the items


There is no space to distribute (Large preview)

If we give justify-content a value of flex-end then all of the items will move to the end of the line. The spare space is now placed at the beginning.


The items are displayed in a row starting at the end of the container — on the right


The items line up at the end (Large preview)

We can do other things with that space. We could ask for it to be distributed between our flex items, by using justify-content: space-between. In this case, the first and last item will be flush with the ends of the container and all of the space shared equally between the items.


Items lined up left and right with equal space between them


The spare space is shared out between the items (Large preview)

We can ask that the space to be distributed around our flex items, using justify-content: space-around. In this case, the available space is shared out and placed on each side of the item.


Items spaced out with even amounts of space on each side


The items have space either side of them (Large preview)

A newer value of justify-content can be found in the Box Alignment specification; it doesn’t appear in the Flexbox spec. This value is space-evenly. In this case, the items will be evenly distributed in the container, and the extra space will be shared out between and either side of the items.


Items with equal amounts of space between and on each end


The items are spaced evenly (Large preview)

You can play with all of the values in the demo:

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: justify-content with flex-direction: row by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

These values work in the same way if your flex-direction is column. You may not have extra space to distribute in a column however unless you add a height or block-size to the flex container as in this next demo.

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: justify-content with flex-direction: column by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

Cross Axis Alignment with align-content

If you have added flex-wrap: wrap to your flex container, and have multiple flex lines then you can use align-content to align your flex lines on the cross axis. However, this will require that you have additional space on the cross axis. In the below demo, my cross axis is running in the block direction as a column, and I have set the height of the flex container to 60vh. As this is more than is needed to display my flex items I have spare space vertically in the container.

I can then use align-content with any of the values:

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: align-content with flex-direction: row by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

If my flex-direction were column then align-content would work as in the following example.

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: align-content with flex-direction: column by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

As with justify-content, we are working with the lines as a group and distributing the spare space.

The place-content Shorthand

In the Box Alignment, we find the shorthand place-content; using this property means you can set justify-content and align-content at once. The first value is for align-content, the second for justify-content. If you only set one value then both values are set to that value, therefore:

.container 
    place-content: space-between stretch;

Is the same as:

.container 
    align-content: space-between; 
    justify-content: stretch;

If we used:

.container 
    place-content: space-between;

This would be the same as:

.container 
    align-content: space-between; 
    justify-content: space-between;

Cross Axis Alignment With align-items

We now know that we can align our set of flex items or our flex lines as a group. However, there is another way we might wish to align our items and that is to align items in relationship to each other on the cross axis. Your flex container has a height. That height might be defined by the height of the tallest item as in this image.


The container height is tall enough to contain the items, the third item has more content


The container height is defined by the third item (Large preview)

It might instead be defined by adding a height to the flex container:


The container height is taller than needed to display the items


THe height is defined by a size on the flex container (Large preview)

The reason that flex items appear to stretch to the size of the tallest item is that the initial value of align-items is stretch. The items stretch on the cross access to become the size of the flex container in that direction.

Note that where align-items is concerned, if you have a multi-line flex container, each line acts like a new flex container. The tallest item in that line would define the size of all items in that line.

In addition to the initial value of stretch, you can give align-items a value of flex-start, in which case they align to the start of the container and no longer stretch to the height.


The items are aligned to the start


The items aligned to the start of the cross axis (Large preview)

The value flex-end moves them to the end of the container on the cross axis.


Items aligned to the end of the cross axis


The items aligned to the end of the cross axis (Large preview)

If you use a value of center the items all centre against each other:


The items are centered


Centering the items on the cross axis (Large preview)

We can also do baseline alignment. This ensures that the baselines of text line up, as opposed to aligning the boxes around the content.


The items are aligned so their baselines match


Aligning the baselines (Large preview)

You can try these values out in the demo:

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: align-items by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

Individual Alignment With align-self

The align-items property means that you can set the alignment of all of the items at once. What this really does is set all of the align-self values on the individual flex items as a group. You can also use the align-self property on any individual flex item to align it inside the flex line and against the other flex items.

In the following example, I have used align-items on the container to set the alignment for the group to center, but also used align-self on the first and last items to change their alignment value.

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: align-self by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

Why Is There No justify-self?

A common question is why it is not possible to align one item or a group of the items on the main axis. Why is there no -self property for main axis alignment in Flexbox? If you think about justify-content and align-content as being about space distribution, the reason for their being no self-alignment becomes more obvious. We are dealing with the flex items as a group, and distributing available space in some way — either at the start or end of the group or between the items.

If might be also helpful to think about how justify-content and align-content work in CSS Grid Layout. In Grid, these properties are used to distribute spare space in the grid container between grid tracks. Once again, we take the tracks as a group, and these properties give us a way to distribute any extra space between them. As we are acting on a group in both Grid and Flexbox, we can’t target an item on its own and do something different with it. However, there is a way to achieve the kind of layout that you are asking for when you ask for a self property on the main axis, and that is to use auto margins.

Using Auto Margins On The Main Axis

If you have ever centered a block in CSS (such as the wrapper for your main page content by setting a margin left and right of auto), then you already have some experience of how auto margins behave. A margin set to auto will try to become as big as it can in the direction it has been set in. In the case of using margins to center a block, we set the left and right both to auto; they each try and take up as much space as possible and so push our block into the center.

Auto margins work very nicely in Flexbox to align single items or groups of items on the main axis. In the next example, I am achieving a common design pattern. I have a navigation bar using Flexbox, the items are displayed as a row and are using the initial value of justify-content: start. I would like the final item to be displayed separated from the others at the end of the flex line — assuming there is enough space on the line to do so.

I target that item and give it a margin-left of auto. This then means that the margin tries to get as much space as possible to the left of the item, which means the item gets pushed all the way over to the right.

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: alignment with auto margins by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

If you use auto margins on the main axis then justify-content will cease to have any effect, as the auto margins will have taken up all of the space that would otherwise be assigned using justify-content.

Fallback Alignment

Each alignment method details a fallback alignment, this is what will happen if the alignment you have requested can’t be achieved. For example, if you only have one item in a flex container and ask for justify-content: space-between, what should happen? The answer is that the fallback alignment of flex-start is used and your single item will align to the start of the flex container. In the case of justify-content: space-around, a fallback alignment of center is used.

In the current specification you can’t change what the fallback alignment is, so if you would prefer that the fallback for space-between was center rather than flex-start, there isn’t a way to do that. There is a note in the spec which says that future levels may enable this.

Safe And Unsafe Alignment

A more recent addition to the Box Alignment specification is the concept of safe and unsafe alignment using the safe and unsafe keywords.

With the following code, the final item is too wide for the container and with unsafe alignment and the flex container on the left-hand side of the page, the item becomes cut off as the overflow is outside the page boundary.

.container   
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
    width: 100px;
    align-items: unsafe center;


.item:last-child 
    width: 200px;

The overflowing item is centered and partly cut off


Unsafe alignment will give you the alignment you asked for but may cause data loss (Large preview)

A safe alignment would prevent the data loss occurring, by relocating the overflow to the other side.

.container   
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
    width: 100px;
    align-items: safe center;


.item:last-child 
    width: 200px;

The overflowing item overflows to the right


Safe alignment tries to prevent data loss (Large preview)

These keywords have limited browser support right now, however, they demonstrate the additional control being brought to Flexbox via the Box Alignment specification.

See the Pen Smashing Flexbox Series 2: safe or unsafe alignment by Rachel Andrew (@rachelandrew) on CodePen.

In Summary

The alignment properties started as a list in Flexbox, but are now in their own specification and apply to other layout contexts. A few key facts will help you to remember how to use them in Flexbox:

  • justify- the main axis and align- the cross axis;
  • To use align-content and justify-content you need spare space to play with;
  • The align-content and justify-content properties deal with the items as a group, sharing out space. Therefore, you can’t target an individual item and so there is no -self alignment for these properties;
  • If you do want to align one item, or split a group on the main axis, use auto margins to do so;
  • The align-items property sets all of the align-self values as a group. Use align-self on the flex child to set the value for an individual item.
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Everything You Need To Know About Alignment In Flexbox

Best Practices With CSS Grid Layout




Best Practices With CSS Grid Layout

Rachel Andrew



An increasingly common question — now that people are using CSS Grid Layout in production — seems to be “What are the best practices?” The short answer to this question is to use the layout method as defined in the specification. The particular parts of the spec you choose to use, and indeed how you combine Grid with other layout methods such as Flexbox, is down to what works for the patterns you are trying to build and how you and your team want to work.

Looking deeper, I think perhaps this request for “best practices” perhaps indicates a lack of confidence in using a layout method that is very different from what came before. Perhaps a concern that we are using Grid for things it wasn’t designed for, or not using Grid when we should be. Maybe it comes down to worries about supporting older browsers, or in how Grid fits into our development workflow.

In this article, I’m going to try and cover some of the things that either could be described as best practices, and some things that you probably don’t need to worry about.

The Survey

To help inform this article, I wanted to find out how other people were using Grid Layout in production, what were the challenges they faced, what did they really enjoy about it? Were there common questions, problems or methods being used. To find out, I put together a quick survey, asking questions about how people were using Grid Layout, and in particular, what they most liked and what they found challenging.

In the article that follows, I’ll be referencing and directly quoting some of those responses. I’ll also be linking to lots of other resources, where you can find out more about the techniques described. As it turned out, there was far more than one article worth of interesting things to unpack in the survey responses. I’ll address some of the other things that came up in a future post.

Accessibility

If there is any part of the Grid specification that you need to take care when using, it is when using anything that could cause content re-ordering:

“Authors must use order and the grid-placement properties only for visual, not logical, reordering of content. Style sheets that use these features to perform logical reordering are non-conforming.”

Grid Specification: Re-ordering and Accessibility

This is not unique to Grid, however, the ability to rearrange content so easily in two dimensions makes it a bigger problem for Grid. However, if using any method that allows content re-ordering — be that Grid, Flexbox or even absolute positioning — you need to take care not to disconnect the visual experience from how the content is structured in the document. Screen readers (and people navigating around the document using a keyboard only) are going to be following the order of items in the source.

The places where you need to be particularly careful are when using flex-direction to reverse the order in Flexbox; the order property in Flexbox or Grid; any placement of Grid items using any method, if it moves items out of the logical order in the document; and using the dense packing mode of grid-auto-flow.

For more information on this issue, see the following resources:

Which Grid Layout Methods Should I Use?

”With so much choice in Grid, it was a challenge to stick to a consistent way of writing it (e.g. naming grid lines or not, defining grid-template-areas, fallbacks, media queries) so that it would be maintainable by the whole team.”

Michelle Barker working on wbsl.com

When you first take a look at Grid, it might seem overwhelming with so many different ways of creating a layout. Ultimately, however, it all comes down to things being positioned from one line of the grid to another. You have choices based on the of layout you are trying to achieve, as well as what works well for your team and the site you are building.

There is no right or wrong way. Below, I will pick up on some of the common themes of confusion. I’ve also already covered many other potential areas of confusion in a previous article “Grid Gotchas and Stumbling Blocks.”

Should I Use An Implicit Or Explicit Grid?

The grid you define with grid-template-columns and grid-template-rows is known as the Explicit Grid. The Explicit Grid enables the naming of lines on the Grid and also gives you the ability to target the end line of the grid with -1. You’ll choose an Explicit Grid to do either of these things and in general when you have a layout all designed and know exactly where your grid lines should go and the size of the tracks.

I use the Implicit Grid most often for row tracks. I want to define the columns but then rows will just be auto-sized and grow to contain the content. You can control the Implicit Grid to some extent with grid-auto-columns and grid-auto-rows, however, you have less control than if you are defining everything.

You need to decide whether you know exactly how much content you have and therefore the number of rows and columns — in which case you can create an Explicit Grid. If you do not know how much content you have, but simply want rows or columns created to hold whatever there is, you will use the Implicit Grid.

Nevertheless, it’s possible to combine the two. In the below CSS, I have defined three columns in the Explicit Grid and three rows, so the first three rows of content will be the following:

  • A track of at least 200px in height, but expanding to take content taller,
  • A track fixed at 400px in height,
  • A track of at least 300px in height (but expands).

Any further content will go into a row created in the Implicit Grid, and I am using the grid-auto-rows property to make those tracks at least 300px tall, expanding to auto.

.grid   
  display: grid;  
  grid-template-columns: 1fr 3fr 1fr;  
  grid-template-rows: minmax(200px auto) 400px minmax(300px, auto);  
  grid-auto-rows: minmax(300px, auto);  
  grid-gap: 20px;  

A Flexible Grid With A Flexible Number Of Columns

By using Repeat Notation, autofill, and minmax you can create a pattern of as many tracks as will fit into a container, thus removing the need for Media Queries to some extent. This technique can be found in this video tutorial, and also demonstrated along with similar ideas in my recent article “Using Media Queries For Responsive Design In 2018.”

Choose this technique when you are happy for content to drop below earlier content when there is less space, and are happy to allow a lot of flexibility in sizing. You have specifically asked for your columns to display with a minimum size, and to auto fill.

There were a few comments in the survey that made me wonder if people were choosing this method when they really wanted a grid with a fixed number of columns. If you are ending up with an unpredictable number of columns at certain breakpoints, you might be better to set the number of columns — and redefine it with media queries as needed — rather than using auto-fill or auto-fit.

Which Method Of Track Sizing Should I Use?

I described track sizing in detail in my article “How Big Is That Box? Understanding Sizing In Grid Layout,” however, I often get questions as to which method of track sizing to use. Particularly, I get asked about the difference between percentage sizing and the fr unit.

If you simply use the fr unit as specced, then it differs from using a percentage because it distributes available space. If you place a larger item into a track then the way the fr until will work is to allow that track to take up more space and distribute what is left over.

.grid 
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 1fr 1fr 1fr;
  grid-gap: 20px;


A three column layout, the first column is wider


The first column is wider as Grid has assigned it more space.

To cause the fr unit to distribute all of the space in the grid container you need to give it a minimum size of 0 using minmax().

.grid 
    display: grid;
    grid-template-columns: minmax(0,1fr) minmax(0,1fr) minmax(0,1fr);
    grid-gap: 20px;

three equal columns with the first overflowing


Forcing a 0 minimum may cause overflows

So you can choose to use fr in either of these scenarios: ones where you do want space distribution from a basis of auto (the default behavior), and those where you want equal distribution. I would typically use the fr unit as it then works out the sizing for you, and enables the use of fixed width tracks or gaps. The only time I use a percentage instead is when I am adding grid components to an existing layout that uses other layout methods too. If I want my grid components to line up with a float- or flex-based layout which is using percentages, using them in my grid layout means everything uses the same sizing method.

Auto-Place Items Or Set Their Position?

You will often find that you only need to place one or two items in your layout, and the rest fall into place based on content order. In fact, this is a really good test that you haven’t disconnected the source and visual display. If things pretty much drop into position based on auto-placement, then they are probably in a good order.

Once I have decided where everything goes, however, I do tend to assign a position to everything. This means that I don’t end up with strange things happening if someone adds something to the document and grid auto-places it somewhere unexpected, thus throwing out the layout. If everything is placed, Grid will put that item into the next available empty grid cell. That might not be exactly where you want it, but sat down at the end of your layout is probably better than popping into the middle and pushing other things around.

Which Positioning Method To Use?

When working with Grid Layout, ultimately everything comes down to placing items from one line to another. Everything else is essentially a helper for that.

Decide with your team if you want to name lines, use Grid Template Areas, or if you are going to use a combination of different types of layout. I find that I like to use Grid Template Areas for small components in particular. However, there is no right or wrong. Work out what is best for you.

Grid In Combination With Other Layout Mechanisms

Remember that Grid Layout isn’t the one true layout method to rule them all, it’s designed for a certain type of layout — namely two-dimensional layout. Other layout methods still exist and you should consider each pattern and what suits it best.

I think this is actually quite hard for those of us used to hacking around with layout methods to make them do something they were not really designed for. It is a really good time to take a step back, look at the layout methods for the tasks they were designed for, and remember to use them for those tasks.

In particular, no matter how often I write about Grid versus Flexbox, I will be asked which one people should use. There are many patterns where either layout method makes perfect sense and it really is up to you. No-one is going to shout at you for selecting Flexbox over Grid, or Grid over Flexbox.

In my own work, I tend to use Flexbox for components where I want the natural size of items to strongly control their layout, essentially pushing the other items around. I also often use Flexbox because I want alignment, given that the Box Alignment properties are only available to use in Flexbox and Grid. I might have a Flex container with one child item, in order that I can align that child.

A sign that perhaps Flexbox isn’t the layout method I should choose is when I start adding percentage widths to flex items and setting flex-grow to 0. The reason to add percentage widths to flex items is often because I’m trying to line them up in two dimensions (lining things up in two dimensions is exactly what Grid is for). However, try both, and see which seems to suit the content or design pattern best. You are unlikely to be causing any problems by doing so.

Nesting Grid And Flex Items

This also comes up a lot, and there is absolutely no problem with making a Grid Item also a Grid Container, thus nesting one grid inside another. You can do the same with Flexbox, making a Flex Item and Flex Container. You can also make a Grid Item and Flex Container or a Flex Item a Grid Container — none of these things are a problem!

What we can’t currently do is nest one grid inside another and have the nested grid use the grid tracks defined on the overall parent. This would be very useful and is what the subgrid proposals in Level 2 of the Grid Specification hope to solve. A nested grid currently becomes a new grid so you would need to be careful with sizing to ensure it aligns with any parent tracks.

You Can Have Many Grids On One Page

A comment popped up a few times in the survey which surprised me, there seems to be an idea that a grid should be confined to the main layout, and that many grids on one page were perhaps not a good thing. You can have as many grids as you like! Use grid for big things and small things, if it makes sense laid out as a grid then use Grid.

Fallbacks And Supporting Older Browsers

“Grid used in conjunction with @supports has enabled us to better control the number of layout variations we can expect to see. It has also worked really well with our progressive enhancement approach meaning we can reward those with modern browsers without preventing access to content to those not using the latest technology.”

Joe Lambert working on rareloop.com

In the survey, many people mentioned older browsers, however, there was a reasonably equal split between those who felt that supporting older browsers was hard and those who felt it was easy due to Feature Queries and the fact that Grid overrides other layout methods. I’ve written at length about the mechanics of creating these fallbacks in “Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid.”

In general, modern browsers are far more interoperable than their earlier counterparts. We tend to see far fewer actual “browser bugs” and if you use HTML and CSS correctly, then you will generally find that what you see in one browser is the same as in another.

We do, of course, have situations in which one browser has not yet shipped support for a certain specification, or some parts of a specification. With Grid, we have been very fortunate in that browsers shipped Grid Layout in a very complete and interoperable way within a short time of each other. Therefore, our considerations for testing tend to be to need to test browsers with Grid and without Grid. You may also have chosen to use the -ms prefixed version in IE10 and IE11, which would then require testing as a third type of browser.

Browsers which support modern Grid Layout (not the IE version) also support Feature Queries. This means that you can test for Grid support before using it.

Testing Browsers That Don’t Support Grid

When using fallbacks for browsers without support for Grid Layout (or using the -ms prefixed version for IE10 and 11), you will want to test how those browsers render Grid Layout. To do this, you need a way to view your site in an example browser.

I would not take the approach of breaking your Feature Query by checking for support of something nonsensical, or misspelling the value grid. This approach will only work if your stylesheet is incredibly simple, and you have put absolutely everything to do with your Grid Layout inside the Feature Queries. This is a very fragile and time-consuming way to work, especially if you are extensively using Grid. In addition, an older browser will not just lack support for Grid Layout, there will be other CSS properties unsupported too. If you are looking for “best practice” then setting yourself up so you are in a good position to test your work is high up there!

There are a couple of straightforward ways to set yourself up with a proper method of testing your fallbacks. The easiest method — if you have a reasonably fast internet connection and don’t mind paying a subscription fee — is to use a service such as BrowserStack. This is a service that enables viewing of websites (even those in development on your computer) on a whole host of real browsers. BrowserStack does offer free accounts for open-source projects.


Screenshot of the download page


You can download Virtual Machines for testing from Microsoft.

To test locally, my suggestion would be to use a Virtual Machine with your target browser installed. Microsoft offers free Virtual Machine downloads with versions of IE back to IE8, and also Edge. You can also install onto the VM an older version of a browser with no Grid support at all. For example by getting a copy of Firefox 51 or below. After installing your elderly Firefox, be sure to turn off automatic updates as explained here as otherwise it will quietly update itself!

You can then test your site in IE11 and in non-supporting Firefox on one VM (a far less fragile solution than misspelling values). Getting set up might take you an hour or so, but you’ll then be in a really good place to test your fallbacks.

Unlearning Old Habits

“It was my first time to use Grid Layout, so there were a lot of concepts to learn and properties understand. Conceptually, I found the most difficult thing to unlearn all the stuff I had done for years, like clearing floats and packing everything in container divs.”

Hidde working on hiddedevries.nl/en

Many of the people responding to the survey mentioned the need to unlearn old habits and how learning Layout would be easier for people completely new to CSS. I tend to agree. When teaching people in person complete beginners have little problem using Grid while experienced developers try hard to return grid to a one-dimensional layout method. I’ve seen attempts at “grid systems” using CSS Grid which add back in the row wrappers needed for a float or flex-based grid.

Don’t be afraid to try out new techniques. If you have the ability to test in a few browsers and remain mindful of potential issues of accessibility, you really can’t go too far wrong. And, if you find a great way to create a certain pattern, let everyone else know about it. We are all new to using Grid in production, so there is certainly plenty to discover and share.

“Grid Layout is the most exciting CSS development since media queries. It’s been so well thought through for real-world developer needs and is an absolute joy to use in production – for designers and developers alike.”

Trys Mudford working on trysmudford.com

To wrap up, here is a very short list of current best practices! If you have discovered things that do or don’t work well in your own situation, add them to the comments.

  1. Be very aware of the possibility of content re-ordering. Check that you have not disconnected the visual display from the document order.
  2. Test using real target browsers with a local or remote Virtual Machine.
  3. Don’t forget that older layout methods are still valid and useful. Try different ways to achieve patterns. Don’t be hung up on having to use Grid.
  4. Know that as an experienced front-end developer you are likely to have a whole set of preconceptions about how layout works. Try to look at these new methods anew rather than forcing them back into old patterns.
  5. Keep trying things out. We’re all new to this. Test your work and share what you discover.
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Best Practices With CSS Grid Layout

Designing For Accessibility And Inclusion




Designing For Accessibility And Inclusion

Steven Lambert



“Accessibility is solved at the design stage.” This is a phrase that Daniel Na and his team heard over and over again while attending a conference. To design for accessibility means to be inclusive to the needs of your users. This includes your target users, users outside of your target demographic, users with disabilities, and even users from different cultures and countries. Understanding those needs is the key to crafting better and more accessible experiences for them.

One of the most common problems when designing for accessibility is knowing what needs you should design for. It’s not that we intentionally design to exclude users, it’s just that “we don’t know what we don’t know.” So, when it comes to accessibility, there’s a lot to know.

How do we go about understanding the myriad of users and their needs? How can we ensure that their needs are met in our design? To answer these questions, I have found that it is helpful to apply a critical analysis technique of viewing a design through different lenses.

“Good [accessible] design happens when you view your [design] from many different perspectives, or lenses.”

The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses

A lens is “a narrowed filter through which a topic can be considered or examined.” Often used to examine works of art, literature, or film, lenses ask us to leave behind our worldview and instead view the world through a different context.

For example, viewing art through a lens of history asks us to understand the “social, political, economic, cultural, and/or intellectual climate of the time.” This allows us to better understand what world influences affected the artist and how that shaped the artwork and its message.

Accessibility lenses are a filter that we can use to understand how different aspects of the design affect the needs of the users. Each lens presents a set of questions to ask yourself throughout the design process. By using these lenses, you will become more inclusive to the needs of your users, allowing you to design a more accessible user experience for all.

The Lenses of Accessibility are:

You should know that not every lens will apply to every design. While some can apply to every design, others are more situational. What works best in one design may not work for another.

The questions provided by each lens are merely a tool to help you understand what problems may arise. As always, you should test your design with users to ensure it’s usable and accessible to them.

Lens Of Animation And Effects

Effective animations can help bring a page and brand to life, guide the users focus, and help orient a user. But animations are a double-edged sword. Not only can misusing animations cause confusion or be distracting, but they can also be potentially deadly for some users.

Fast flashing effects (defined as flashing more than three times a second) or high-intensity effects and patterns can cause seizures, known as ‘photosensitive epilepsy.’ Photosensitivity can also cause headaches, nausea, and dizziness. Users with photosensitive epilepsy have to be very careful when using the web as they never know when something might cause a seizure.

Other effects, such as parallax or motion effects, can cause some users to feel dizzy or experience vertigo due to vestibular sensitivity. The vestibular system controls a person’s balance and sense of motion. When this system doesn’t function as it should, it causes dizziness and nausea.

“Imagine a world where your internal gyroscope is not working properly. Very similar to being intoxicated, things seem to move of their own accord, your feet never quite seem to be stable underneath you, and your senses are moving faster or slower than your body.”

A Primer To Vestibular Disorders

Constant animations or motion can also be distracting to users, especially to users who have difficulty concentrating. GIFs are notably problematic as our eyes are drawn towards movement, making it easy to be distracted by anything that updates or moves constantly.

This isn’t to say that animation is bad and you shouldn’t use it. Instead you should understand why you’re using the animation and how to design safer animations. Generally speaking, you should try to design animations that cover small distances, match direction and speed of other moving objects (including scroll), and are relatively small to the screen size.

You should also provide controls or options to cater the experience for the user. For example, Slack lets you hide animated images or emojis as both a global setting and on a per image basis.

To use the Lens of Animation and Effects, ask yourself these questions:

  • Are there any effects that could cause a seizure?
  • Are there any animations or effects that could cause dizziness or vertigo through use of motion?
  • Are there any animations that could be distracting by constantly moving, blinking, or auto-updating?
  • Is it possible to provide controls or options to stop, pause, hide, or change the frequency of any animations or effects?

Lens Of Audio And Video

Autoplaying videos and audio can be pretty annoying. Not only do they break a users concentration, but they also force the user to hunt down the offending media and mute or stop it. As a general rule, don’t autoplay media.

“Use autoplay sparingly. Autoplay can be a powerful engagement tool, but it can also annoy users if undesired sound is played or they perceive unnecessary resource usage (e.g. data, battery) as the result of unwanted video playback.”

Google Autoplay guidelines

You’re now probably asking, “But what if I autoplay the video in the background but keep it muted?” While using videos as backgrounds may be a growing trend in today’s web design, background videos suffer from the same problems as GIFs and constant moving animations: they can be distracting. As such, you should provide controls or options to pause or disable the video.

Along with controls, videos should have transcripts and/or subtitles so users can consume the content in a way that works best for them. Users who are visually impaired or who would rather read instead of watch the video need a transcript, while users who aren’t able to or don’t want to listen to the video need subtitles.

To use the Lens of Audio and Video, ask yourself these questions:

  • Are there any audio or video that could be annoying by autoplaying?
  • Is it possible to provide controls to stop, pause, or hide any audio or videos that autoplay?
  • Do videos have transcripts and/or subtitles?

Lens Of Color

Color plays an important part in a design. Colors evoke emotions, feelings, and ideas. Colors can also help strengthen a brand’s message and perception. Yet the power of colors is lost when a user can’t see them or perceives them differently.

Color blindness affects roughly 1 in 12 men and 1 in 200 women. Deuteranopia (red-green color blindness) is the most common form of color blindness, affecting about 6% of men. Users with red-green color blindness typically perceive reds, greens, and oranges as yellowish.


Color Blindness Reference Chart for Deuternaopia, Protanopia, and Tritanopia


Deuteranopia (green color blindness) is common and causes reds to appear brown/yellow and greens to appear beige. Protanopia (red color blindness) is rare and causes reds to appear dark/black and orange/greens to appear yellow. Tritanopia (blue-yellow colorblindness) is very rare and cases blues to appear more green/teal and yellows to appear violet/grey. (Source) (Large preview)

Color meaning is also problematic for international users. Colors mean different things in different countries and cultures. In Western cultures, red is typically used to represent negative trends and green positive trends, but the opposite is true in Eastern and Asian cultures.

Because colors and their meanings can be lost either through cultural differences or color blindness, you should always add a non-color identifier. Identifiers such as icons or text descriptions can help bridge cultural differences while patterns work well to distinguish between colors.


Six colored labels. Five use a pattern while the sixth doesn’t


Trello’s color blind friendly labels use different patterns to distinguish between the colors. (Large preview)

Oversaturated colors, high contrasting colors, and even just the color yellow can be uncomfortable and unsettling for some users, prominently those on the autism spectrum. It’s best to avoid high concentrations of these types of colors to help users remain comfortable.

Poor contrast between foreground and background colors make it harder to see for users with low vision, using a low-end monitor, or who are just in direct sunlight. All text, icons, and any focus indicators used for users using a keyboard should meet a minimum contrast ratio of 4.5:1 to the background color.

You should also ensure your design and colors work well in different settings of Windows High Contrast mode. A common pitfall is that text becomes invisible on certain high contrast mode backgrounds.

To use the Lens of Color, ask yourself these questions:

  • If the color was removed from the design, what meaning would be lost?
  • How could I provide meaning without using color?
  • Are any colors oversaturated or have high contrast that could cause users to become overstimulated or uncomfortable?
  • Does the foreground and background color of all text, icons, and focus indicators meet contrast ratio guidelines of 4.5:1?

Lens Of Controls

Controls, also called ‘interactive content,’ are any UI elements that the user can interact with, be they buttons, links, inputs, or any HTML element with an event listener. Controls that are too small or too close together can cause lots of problems for users.

Small controls are hard to click on for users who are unable to be accurate with a pointer, such as those with tremors, or those who suffer from reduced dexterity due to age. The default size of checkboxes and radio buttons, for example, can pose problems for older users. Even when a label is provided that could be clicked on instead, not all users know they can do so.

Controls that are too close together can cause problems for touch screen users. Fingers are big and difficult to be precise with. Accidentally touching the wrong control can cause frustration, especially if that control navigates you away or makes you lose your context.


Tweet that says Software being Done is like lawn being Mowed. Jim Benson


When touching a single line tweet, it’s very easy to accidentally click the person’s name or handle instead of opening the tweet because there’s not enough space between them. (Source) (Large preview)

Controls that are nested inside another control can also contribute to touch errors. Not only is it not allowed in the HTML spec, it also makes it easy to accidentally select the parent control instead of the one you wanted.

To give users enough room to accurately select a control, the recommended minimum size for a control is 34 by 34 device independent pixels, but Google recommends at least 48 by 48 pixels, while the WCAG spec recommends at least 44 by 44 pixels. This size also includes any padding the control has. So a control could visually be 24 by 24 pixels but with an additional 10 pixels of padding on all sides would bring it up to 44 by 44 pixels.

It’s also recommended that controls be placed far enough apart to reduce touch errors. Microsoft recommends at least 8 pixels of spacing while Google recommends controls be spaced at least 32 pixels apart.

Controls should also have a visible text label. Not only do screen readers require the text label to know what the control does, but it’s been shown that text labels help all users better understand a controls purpose. This is especially important for form inputs and icons.

To use the Lens of Controls, ask yourself these questions:

  • Are any controls not large enough for someone to touch?
  • Are any controls too close together that would make it easy to touch the wrong one?
  • Are there any controls inside another control or clickable region?
  • Do all controls have a visible text label?

Lens Of Font

In the early days of the web, we designed web pages with a font size between 9 and 14 pixels. This worked out just fine back then as monitors had a relatively known screen size. We designed thinking that the browser window was a constant, something that couldn’t be changed.

Technology today is very different than it was 20 years ago. Today, browsers can be used on any device of any size, from a small watch to a huge 4K screen. We can no longer use fixed font sizes to design our sites. Font sizes must be as responsive as the design itself.

Not only should the font sizes be responsive, but the design should be flexible enough to allow users to customize the font size, line height, or letter spacing to a comfortable reading level. Many users make use of custom CSS that helps them have a better reading experience.

The font itself should be easy to read. You may be wondering if one font is more readable than another. The truth of the matter is that the font doesn’t really make a difference to readability. Instead it’s the font style that plays an important role in a fonts readability.

Decorative or cursive font styles are harder to read for many users, but especially problematic for users with dyslexia. Small font sizes, italicized text, and all uppercase text are also difficult for users. Overall, larger text, shorter line lengths, taller line heights, and increased letter spacing can help all users have a better reading experience.

To use the Lens of Font, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is the design flexible enough that the font could be modified to a comfortable reading level by the user?
  • Is the font style easy to read?

Lens Of Images and Icons

They say, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” Still, a picture you can’t see is speechless, right?

Images can be used in a design to convey a specific meaning or feeling. Other times they can be used to simplify complex ideas. Whichever the case for the image, a user who uses a screen reader needs to be told what the meaning of the image is.

As the designer, you understand best the meaning or information the image conveys. As such, you should annotate the design with this information so it’s not left out or misinterpreted later. This will be used to create the alt text for the image.

How you describe an image depends entirely on context, or how much textual information is already available that describes the information. It also depends on if the image is just for decoration, conveys meaning, or contains text.

“You almost never describe what the picture looks like, instead you explain the information the picture contains.”

Five Golden Rules for Compliant Alt Text

Since knowing how to describe an image can be difficult, there’s a handy decision tree to help when deciding. Generally speaking, if the image is decorational or there’s surrounding text that already describes the image’s information, no further information is needed. Otherwise you should describe the information of the image. If the image contains text, repeat the text in the description as well.

Descriptions should be succinct. It’s recommended to use no more than two sentences, but aim for one concise sentence when possible. This allows users to quickly understand the image without having to listen to a lengthy description.

As an example, if you were to describe this image for a screen reader, what would you say?


Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night


Source (Large preview)

Since we describe the information of the image and not the image itself, the description could be Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night since there is no other surrounding context that describes it. What you shouldn’t put is a description of the style of the painting or what the picture looks like.

If the information of the image would require a lengthy description, such as a complex chart, you shouldn’t put that description in the alt text. Instead, you should still use a short description for the alt text and then provide the long description as either a caption or link to a different page.

This way, users can still get the most important information quickly but have the ability to dig in further if they wish. If the image is of a chart, you should repeat the data of the chart just like you would for text in the image.

If the platform you are designing for allows users to upload images, you should provide a way for the user to enter the alt text along with the image. For example, Twitter allows its users to write alt text when they upload an image to a tweet.

To use the Lens of Images and Icons, ask yourself these questions:

  • Does any image contain information that would be lost if it was not viewable?
  • How could I provide the information in a non-visual way?
  • If the image is controlled by the user, is it possible to provide a way for them to enter the alt text description?

Lens Of Keyboard

Keyboard accessibility is among the most important aspects of an accessible design, yet it is also among the most overlooked.

There are many reasons why a user would use a keyboard instead of a mouse. Users who use a screen reader use the keyboard to read the page. A user with tremors may use a keyboard because it provides better accuracy than a mouse. Even power users will use a keyboard because it’s faster and more efficient.

A user using a keyboard typically uses the tab key to navigate to each control in sequence. A logical order for the tab order greatly helps users know where the next key press will take them. In western cultures, this usually means from left to right, top to bottom. Unexpected tab orders results in users becoming lost and having to scan frantically for where the focus went.

Sequential tab order also means that they must tab through all controls that are before the one that they want. If that control is tens or hundreds of keystrokes away, it can be a real pain point for the user.

By making the most important user flows nearer to the top of the tab order, we can help enable our users to be more efficient and effective. However, this isn’t always possible nor practical to do. In these cases, providing a way to quickly jump to a particular flow or content can still allow them to be efficient. This is why “skip to content” links are helpful.

A good example of this is Facebook which provides a keyboard navigation menu that allows users to jump to specific sections of the site. This greatly speeds up the ability for a user to interact with the page and the content they want.


facebook


Facebook provides a way for all keyboard users to jump to specific sections of the page, or other pages within Facebook, as well as an Accessibility Help menu. (Large preview)

When tabbing through a design, focus styles should always be visible or a user can easily become lost. Just like an unexpected tab order, not having good focus indicators results in users not knowing what is currently focused and having to scan the page.

Changing the look of the default focus indicator can sometimes improve the experience for users. A good focus indicator doesn’t rely on color alone to indicate focus (Lens of Color), and should be distinct enough to easily allow the user to find it. For example, a blue focus ring around a similarly colored blue button may not be visually distinct to discern that it is focused.

Although this lens focuses on keyboard accessibility, it’s important to note that it applies to any way a user could interact with a website without a mouse. Devices such as mouth sticks, switch access buttons, sip and puff buttons, and eye tracking software all require the page to be keyboard accessible.

By improving keyboard accessibility, you allow a wide range of users better access to your site.

To use the Lens of Keyboard, ask yourself these questions:

  • What keyboard navigation order makes the most sense for the design?
  • How could a keyboard user get to what they want in the quickest way possible?
  • Is the focus indicator always visible and visually distinct?

Lens Of Layout

Layout contributes a great deal to the usability of a site. Having a layout that is easy to follow with easy to find content makes all the difference to your users. A layout should have a meaningful and logical sequence for the user.

With the advent of CSS Grid, being able to change the layout to be more meaningful based on the available space is easier than ever. However, changing the visual layout creates problems for users who rely on the structural layout of the page.

The structural layout is what is used by screen readers and users using a keyboard. When the visual layout changes but not the underlying structural layout, these users can become confused as their tab order is no longer logical. If you must change the visual layout, you should do so by changing the structural layout so users using a keyboard maintain a sequential and logical tab order.

The layout should be resizable and flexible to a minimum of 320 pixels with no horizontal scroll bars so that it can be viewed comfortably on a phone. The layout should also be flexible enough to be zoomed in to 400% (also with no horizontal scroll bars) for users who need to increase the font size for a better reading experience.

Users using a screen magnifier benefit when related content is in close proximity to one another. A screen magnifier only provides the user with a small view of the entire layout, so content that is related but far away, or changes far away from where the interaction occurred is hard to find and can go unnoticed.

GIF of CodePen showing that clicking on a button does not update the interface
When performing a search on CodePen, the search button is in the top right corner of the page. Clicking the button reveals a large search input on the opposite side of the screen. A user using a screen magnifier would be hard pressed to notice the change and would think the button doesn’t work. (Large preview)

To use the Lens of Layout, ask yourself these questions:

  • Does the layout have a meaningful and logical sequence?
  • What should happen to the layout when it’s viewed on a small screen or zoomed in to 400%?
  • Is content that is related or changes due to user interaction in close proximity to one another?

Lens Of Material Honesty

Material honesty is an architectural design value that states that a material should be honest to itself and not be used as a substitute for another material. It means that concrete should look like concrete and not be painted or sculpted to look like bricks.

Material honesty values and celebrates the unique properties and characteristics of each material. An architect who follows material honesty knows when each material should be used and how to use it without tarnishing itself.

Material honesty is not a hard and fast rule though. It lies on a continuum. Like all values, you are allowed to break them when you understand them. As the saying goes, they are “more what you’d call “guidelines” than actual rules.”

When applied to web design, material honesty means that one element or component shouldn’t look, behave, or function as if it were another element or component. Doing so would cheat the user and could lead to confusion. A common example of this are buttons that look like links or links that look like buttons.

Links and buttons have different behaviors and affordances. A link is activated with the enter key, typically takes you to a different page, and has a special context menu on right click. Buttons are activated with the space key, used primarily to trigger interactions on the current page, and have no such context menu.

When a link is styled to look like a button or vise versa, a user could become confused as it does not behave and function as it looks. If the “button” navigates the user away unexpectedly, they might become frustrated if they lost data in the process.

“At first glance everything looks fine, but it won’t stand up to scrutiny. As soon as such a website is stress‐tested by actual usage across a range of browsers, the façade crumbles.”

Resilient Web Design

Where this becomes the most problematic is when a link and button are styled the same and are placed next to one another. As there is nothing to differentiate between the two, a user can accidentally navigate when they thought they wouldn’t.


Three links and/or buttons shown inline with text


Can you tell which one of these will navigate you away from the page and which won’t? (Large preview)

When a component behaves differently than expected, it can easily lead to problems for users using a keyboard or screen reader. An autocomplete menu that is more than an autocomplete menu is one such example.

Autocomplete is used to suggest or predict the rest of a word a user is typing. An autocomplete menu allows a user to select from a large list of options when not all options can be shown.

An autocomplete menu is typically attached to an input field and is navigated with the up and down arrow keys, keeping the focus inside the input field. When a user selects an option from the list, that option will override the text in the input field. Autocomplete menus are meant to be lists of just text.

The problem arises when an autocomplete menu starts to gain more behaviors. Not only can you select an option from the list, but you can edit it, delete it, or even expand or collapse sections. The autocomplete menu is no longer just a simple list of selectable text.




With the addition of edit, delete, and profile buttons, this autocomplete menu is materially dishonest. (Large preview)

The added behaviors no longer mean you can just use the up and down arrows to select an option. Each option now has more than one action, so a user needs to be able to traverse two dimensions instead of just one. This means that a user using a keyboard could become confused on how to operate the component.

Screen readers suffer the most from this change of behavior as there is no easy way to help them understand it. A lot of work will be required to ensure the menu is accessible to a screen reader by using non-standard means. As such, it will might result in a sub-par or inaccessible experience for them.

To avoid these issues, it’s best to be honest to the user and the design. Instead of combining two distinct behaviors (an autocomplete menu and edit and delete functionality), leave them as two separate behaviors. Use an autocomplete menu to just autocomplete the name of a user, and have a different component or page to edit and delete users.

To use the Lens of Material Honesty, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is the design being honest to the user?
  • Are there any elements that behave, look, or function as another element?
  • Are there any components that combine distinct behaviors into a single component? Does doing so make the component materially dishonest?

Lens Of Readability

Have you ever picked up a book only to get a few paragraphs or pages in and want to give up because the text was too hard to read? Hard to read content is mentally taxing and tiring.

Sentence length, paragraph length, and complexity of language all contribute to how readable the text is. Complex language can pose problems for users, especially those with cognitive disabilities or who aren’t fluent in the language.

Along with using plain and simple language, you should ensure each paragraph focuses on a single idea. A paragraph with a single idea is easier to remember and digest. The same is true of a sentence with fewer words.

Another contributor to the readability of content is the length of a line. The ideal line length is often quoted to be between 45 and 75 characters. A line that is too long causes users to lose focus and makes it harder to move to the next line correctly, while a line that is too short causes users to jump too often, causing fatigue on the eyes.

“The subconscious mind is energized when jumping to the next line. At the beginning of every new line the reader is focused, but this focus gradually wears off over the duration of the line”

— Typographie: A Manual of Design

You should also break up the content with headings, lists, or images to give mental breaks to the reader and support different learning styles. Use headings to logically group and summarize the information. Headings, links, controls, and labels should be clear and descriptive to enhance the users ability to comprehend.

To use the Lens of Readability, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is the language plain and simple?
  • Does each paragraph focus on a single idea?
  • Are there any long paragraphs or long blocks of unbroken text?
  • Are all headings, links, controls, and labels clear and descriptive?

Lens Of Structure

As mentioned in the Lens of Layout, the structural layout is what is used by screen readers and users using a keyboard. While the Lens of Layout focused on the visual layout, the Lens of Structure focuses on the structural layout, or the underlying HTML and semantics of the design.

As a designer, you may not write the structural layout of your designs. This shouldn’t stop you from thinking about how your design will ultimately be structured though. Otherwise, your design may result in an inaccessible experience for a screen reader.

Take for example a design for a single elimination tournament bracket.


Eight person tournament bracket featuring George, Fred, Linus, Lucy, Jack, Jill, Fred, and Ginger. Ginger ultimately wins against George.


Large preview

How would you know if this design was accessible to a user using a screen reader? Without understanding structure and semantics, you may not. As it stands, the design would probably result in an inaccessible experience for a user using a screen reader.

To understand why that is, we first must understand that a screen reader reads a page and its content in sequential order. This means that every name in the first column of the tournament would be read, followed by all the names in the second column, then third, then the last.

“George, Fred, Linus, Lucy, Jack, Jill, Fred, Ginger, George, Lucy, Jack, Ginger, George, Ginger, Ginger.”

If all you had was a list of seemingly random names, how would you interpret the results of the tournament? Could you say who won the tournament? Or who won game 6?

With nothing more to work with, a user using a screen reader would probably be a bit confused about the results. To be able to understand the visual design, we must provide the user with more information in the structural design.

This means that as a designer you need to know how a screen reader interacts with the HTML elements on a page so you know how to enhance their experience.

  • Landmark Elements (header, nav, main, and footer)
    Allow a screen reader to jump to important sections in the design.
  • Headings (h1h6)
    Allow a screen reader to scan the page and get a high level overview. Screen readers can also jump to any heading.
  • Lists (ul and ol)
    Group related items together, and allow a screen reader to easily jump from one item to another.
  • Buttons
    Trigger interactions on the current page.
  • Links
    Navigate or retrieve information.
  • Form labels
    Tell screen readers what each form input is.

Knowing this, how might we provide more meaning to a user using a screen reader?

To start, we could group each column of the tournament into rounds and use headings to label each round. This way, a screen reader would understand when a new round takes place.

Next, we could help the user understand which players are playing against each other each game. We can again use headings to label each game, allowing them to find any game they might be interested in.

By just adding headings, the content would read as follows:

“__Round 1, Game 1__, George, Fred, __Game 2__, Linus, Lucy, __Game 3__, Jack, Jill, __Game 4__, Fred, Ginger, __Round 2, Game 5__, George, Lucy, __Game 6__, Jack, Ginger, __Round 3__, __Game 7__, George, Ginger, __Winner__, Ginger.”

This is already a lot more understandable than before.

The information still doesn’t answer who won a game though. To know that, you’d have to understand which game a winner plays next to see who won the previous game. For example, you’d have to know that the winner of game four plays in game six to know who advanced from game four.

We can further enhance the experience by informing the user who won each game so they don’t have to go hunting for it. Putting the text “(winner)” after the person who won the round would suffice.

We should also further group the games and rounds together using lists. Lists provide the structural semantics of the design, essentially informing the user of the connected nodes from the visual design.

If we translate this back into a visual design, the result could look as follows:


The tournament bracket


The tournament with descriptive headings and winner information (shown here with grey background). (Large preview)

Since the headings and winner text are redundant in the visual design, you could hide them just from visual users so the end visual result looks just like the first design.

“If the end result is visually the same as where we started, why did we go through all this?” You may ask.

The reason is that you should always annotate your design with all the necessary structural design requirements needed for a better screen reader experience. This way, the person who implements the design knows to add them. If you had just handed the first design to the implementer, it would more than likely end up inaccessible.

To use the Lens of Structure, ask yourself these questions:

  • Can I outline a rough HTML structure of my design?
  • How can I structure the design to better help a screen reader understand the content or find the content they want?
  • How can I help the person who will implement the design understand the intended structure?

Lens Of Time

Periodically in a design you may need to limit the amount of time a user can spend on a task. Sometimes it may be for security reasons, such as a session timeout. Other times it could be due to a non-functional requirement, such as a time constrained test.

Whatever the reason, you should understand that some users may need more time in order finish the task. Some users might need more time to understand the content, others might not be able to perform the task quickly, and a lot of the time they could just have been interrupted.

“The designer should assume that people will be interrupted during their activities”

— The Design of Everyday Things

Users who need more time to perform an action should be able to adjust or remove a time limit when possible. For example, with a session timeout you could alert the user when their session is about to expire and allow them to extend it.

To use the Lens of Time, ask yourself this question:

  • Is it possible to provide controls to adjust or remove time limits?

Bringing It All Together

So now that you’ve learned about the different lenses of accessibility through which you can view your design, what do you do with them?

The lenses can be used at any point in the design process, even after the design has been shipped to your users. Just start with a few of them at hand, and one at a time carefully analyze the design through a lens.

Ask yourself the questions and see if anything should be adjusted to better meet the needs of a user. As you slowly make changes, bring in other lenses and repeat the process.

By looking through your design one lens at a time, you’ll be able to refine the experience to better meet users’ needs. As you are more inclusive to the needs of your users, you will create a more accessible design for all your users.

Using lenses and insightful questions to examine principles of accessibility was heavily influenced by Jesse Schell and his book “The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses.”

Smashing Editorial
(il, ra, yk)


Taken from – 

Designing For Accessibility And Inclusion

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Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid

When using any new CSS, the question of browser support has to be addressed. This is even more of a consideration when new CSS is used for layout as with Flexbox and CSS Grid, rather than things we might consider an enhancement.
In this article, I explore approaches to dealing with browser support today. What are the practical things we can do to allow us to use new CSS now and still give a great experience to the browsers that don’t support it?

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Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

When first learning how to use Grid Layout, you might begin by addressing positions on the grid by their line number. This requires that you keep track of where various lines are on the grid, and also be aware of the fact the line numbers reverse if your site is displayed for a right-to-left language.

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Built on top of this system of lines, however, are methods that enable the naming of lines and even grid areas. Using these methods enables easier placement of items by name rather than number, but also brings additional possibilities when creating systems for layout. In this article, I’ll take an in-depth look at the various ways to name lines and areas in CSS Grid Layout, and some of the interesting possibilities this creates.

The post Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Wireframing – The Perfectionist’s Guide

When I was a developer, I often had a hundred questions when building websites from wireframes that I had received. Some of those questions were:
How will this design scale when I shrink the browser window? What happens when this shape is filled out incorrectly? What are the options in this sorting filter, and what do they do? These types of questions led me to miss numerous deadlines, and I wasted time and energy in back-and-forth communication.

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Wireframing – The Perfectionist’s Guide

The State Of Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been around for some years now, and it was a hot topic in 2012. Many well-known people such as Brad Frost and Luke Wroblewski have a lot of experience with it and have helped us make huge improvements in the field. But there’s still a whole lot to do. [Links checked February/09/2017]
In this article, we will look at what is currently possible, what will be possible in the future using what are not yet standardized properties (such as CSS Level 4 and HTML5 APIS), and what still needs to be improved.

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The State Of Responsive Web Design