Tag Archives: layout

How Big Is That Box? Understanding Sizing In CSS Layout

A key feature of Flexbox and Grid Layout is that they can deal with distributing available space between, around and inside grid and flex items. Quite often this just works, and we get the result we were hoping for without trying very hard. This is because the specifications attempt to default to the most likely use cases. Sometimes, however, you might wonder why something ends up the size that it is.

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How Big Is That Box? Understanding Sizing In CSS Layout

Building Better UI Designs With Layout Grids

Designers of all types constantly face issues with the structure of their designs. One of the easiest ways to control the structure of a layout and to achieve a consistent and organized design is to apply a grid system.
A grid is like invisible glue that holds a design together. Even when elements are physically separated from each other, something invisible connects them together.
While grids and layout systems are a part of the heritage of design, they’re still relevant in this multiscreen world we live in.

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Building Better UI Designs With Layout Grids

Understanding CSS Layout And The Block Formatting Context

There are a few concepts in CSS layout that can really enhance your CSS game once you understand them. This article is about the Block Formatting Context (BFC). You may never have heard of this term, but if you have ever made a layout with CSS, you probably know what it is. Understanding what a BFC is, why it works, and how to create one is useful and can help you to understand how layout works in CSS.

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Understanding CSS Layout And The Block Formatting Context

Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid

When using any new CSS, the question of browser support has to be addressed. This is even more of a consideration when new CSS is used for layout as with Flexbox and CSS Grid, rather than things we might consider an enhancement.
In this article, I explore approaches to dealing with browser support today. What are the practical things we can do to allow us to use new CSS now and still give a great experience to the browsers that don’t support it?

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Using CSS Grid: Supporting Browsers Without Grid

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

When first learning how to use Grid Layout, you might begin by addressing positions on the grid by their line number. This requires that you keep track of where various lines are on the grid, and also be aware of the fact the line numbers reverse if your site is displayed for a right-to-left language.

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Built on top of this system of lines, however, are methods that enable the naming of lines and even grid areas. Using these methods enables easier placement of items by name rather than number, but also brings additional possibilities when creating systems for layout. In this article, I’ll take an in-depth look at the various ways to name lines and areas in CSS Grid Layout, and some of the interesting possibilities this creates.

The post Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Wireframing – The Perfectionist’s Guide

When I was a developer, I often had a hundred questions when building websites from wireframes that I had received. Some of those questions were:
How will this design scale when I shrink the browser window? What happens when this shape is filled out incorrectly? What are the options in this sorting filter, and what do they do? These types of questions led me to miss numerous deadlines, and I wasted time and energy in back-and-forth communication.

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Wireframing – The Perfectionist’s Guide

The State Of Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been around for some years now, and it was a hot topic in 2012. Many well-known people such as Brad Frost and Luke Wroblewski have a lot of experience with it and have helped us make huge improvements in the field. But there’s still a whole lot to do. [Links checked February/09/2017]
In this article, we will look at what is currently possible, what will be possible in the future using what are not yet standardized properties (such as CSS Level 4 and HTML5 APIS), and what still needs to be improved.

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The State Of Responsive Web Design

Introducing The Magento Layout

In this tutorial, we introduce the Magento layout by creating a simple module that will add some custom HTML content to the bottom of every customer-facing page, in a non-intrusive manner. In other words, we will do so without actually modifying any Magento templates or core files.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: The Basics Of Creating A Magento Module How To Create Custom Shipping Methods In Magento How To Create An Admin-Manageable Magento Entity For Brands How To Create An Affiliate Tracking Module In Magento This kind of functionality is a common requirement for many things such as affiliate referral programs, customer tracking analytics, adding custom JavaScript functionality, etc.

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Introducing The Magento Layout

Responsive Web Design – What It Is And How To Use It

Almost every new client these days wants a mobile version of their website. It’s practically essential after all: one design for the BlackBerry, another for the iPhone, the iPad, netbook, Kindle — and all screen resolutions must be compatible, too. In the next five years, we’ll likely need to design for a number of additional inventions. When will the madness stop? It won’t, of course. [Links checked January/13/2017]
In the field of Web design and development, we’re quickly getting to the point of being unable to keep up with the endless new resolutions and devices.

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Responsive Web Design – What It Is And How To Use It

Free Typographic XHTML/CSS-Layouts For Your Designs

In May we announced the Typographic Layout Design Contest that aimed to collect beautiful typographic (X)HTML+CSS-based layouts created by the design community and release them for free as a gift for the web design community. The response was overwhelming and we really had a hard time going through the designs, analyzing them and deciding which templates deserve the awards. Unfortunately, many templates were just copies of the current designer’s blog and some weren’t related to typography at all.

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Free Typographic XHTML/CSS-Layouts For Your Designs