Tag Archives: library

Web Development Reading List #184: New Library Updates, Page Load Performance, And Continuance

Our lives are in constant change, we never stop developing and evolving — our bodies, our minds, our views. And today’s technology supports us in doing that: We can access a lot more information as the generations before us, and with that, we have a variety of new possibilities to grow and develop our personalities.
We can see how work environments change, for example, we see resistance towards change and new methods, but slowly and over time, humanity is changing their overall behavior.

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Web Development Reading List #184: New Library Updates, Page Load Performance, And Continuance

How To Simplify Networking In Android: Introducing The Volley HTTP Library

In a world driven by the Internet, mobile apps need to share and receive information from their products’ back end (for example, from databases) as well as from third-party sources such as Facebook and Twitter.

How To Simplify Android Networking With The Volley HTTP Library

These interactions are often made through RESTful APIs. When the number of requests increases, the way these requests are made becomes very critical to development, because the manner in which you fetch data can really affect the user experience of an app.

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How To Simplify Networking In Android: Introducing The Volley HTTP Library

Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement

We talk a lot about progressive enhancement and how it improves backwards compatibility. But how straightforward is it to apply progressive enhancement concepts to a real-life project? When designing a rich interactive experience, it can be difficult to determine what can be implemented purely using HTML and CSS and what absolutely requires JavaScript.

Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement

Through this case study on redesigning the Building Social website, we’ll share some simple yet often overlooked front-end techniques that defer the use of JavaScript as much as possible, while providing some neat JavaScript enhancements, too.

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Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement

Developing For Virtual Reality: What We Learned

With the tools getting more user-friendly and affordable, virtual reality (VR) development is easier to get involved in than ever before. Our team at Clearbridge Mobile recently jumped on the opportunity to develop immersive VR content for the Samsung Gear VR, using Samsung’s 360 camera.

Developing For Virtual Reality: What We Learned

The result is ClearVR, a mobile application demo that enables users to explore the features, pricing, interiors and exteriors of listed vehicles. Developing this demo project gave us a better understanding of VR development for our future projects, including scaling, stereoscopic display and motion-tracking practices. This article is an introductory guide to developing for VR, with the lessons we learned along the way.

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Developing For Virtual Reality: What We Learned

I Contributed To An Open-Source Editor, And So Can You

A few months ago, Jason Grigsby’s post about autocompletion in forms made the rounds. I loved the idea of allowing users to fill in their credit card details by taking a picture of their card. What I didn’t love was learning all of the possible values for autofill by heart. I’m getting lazy in my old age.

Contributing to the open source community is easy

Lately, I’ve gotten spoiled from using an editor that does intelligent autocompletion for me, something that in the past only massive complex IDEs offered. Opening my editor of choice, I created an input element and added an autocomplete attribute, only to find that the code completion offered me the state of on or off. Disappointing.

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I Contributed To An Open-Source Editor, And So Can You

Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2

One of the upcoming features of JavaScript that I especially like is the support for asynchronous functions. In this article, I would like to show you a very practical example of building a server-side application using Koa 2, a new version of the web framework, which relies heavily on this feature.

Getting Started With Koa 2

First, I’ll recap what async functions are and how they work. Then, I’ll highlight the differences between Koa 1 and Koa 2. After that, I will describe my demo app for Koa 2, covering all aspects of development, including testing (using Mocha, Chai and Supertest) and deployment (using PM2).

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Building A Server-Side Application With Async Functions and Koa 2

The Search For The Holy Grail: How I Ended Up With Element Queries, And How You Can Use Them Today


For some time, we’ve run up against the limits of what CSS can do. Those who build responsive layouts will freely admit the frustrations and shortcomings of CSS that force us to reach for CSS preprocessors, plugins and other tools to help us write the styles that we’re unable to write with CSS alone. Even still, we run into limitations with what current tools help us accomplish.

The Search For The Holy Grail: How I Ended Up With Element Queries, And How You Can Use Them Today

Think for a moment of a physical structure. If you’re building a large edifice with weak material, a lot of external support is required to hold it together, and things have to be overbuilt to stay sturdy. When you’re building a website out of HTML, CSS and JavaScript, this external support might look like frameworks, plugins, preprocessors, transpilers, editing tools, package managers and build processes.

The post The Search For The Holy Grail: How I Ended Up With Element Queries, And How You Can Use Them Today appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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The Search For The Holy Grail: How I Ended Up With Element Queries, And How You Can Use Them Today

A Lean Approach To Product Validation


One of the biggest risks of building a product is to build the wrong thing. You’ll pour months (even years) into building it, only to realize that you just can’t make it a success. At Hanno, we see this happening time and time again. That’s why we’ve put together a Lean Validation Playbook.

A Lean Approach To Product Validation

“Lean” in this case means that you’re moving swiftly to figure out what you’re going to build and how you’re going to build it with as few resources as possible. These resources might include time, money and effort. The lean startup methodology is advocated by Eric Reis, who has massively influenced the way we work through his book The Lean Startup.

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A Lean Approach To Product Validation

An Introduction To Redux


Redux is one of the hottest libraries in front-end development these days. However, many people are confused about what it is and what its benefits are. As the documentation states, Redux is a predictable state container for JavaScript apps. To rephrase that, it’s an application data-flow architecture, rather than a traditional library or a framework like Underscore.js and AngularJS.

An Introduction To Redux

Redux was created by Dan Abramov around June 2015. It was inspired by Facebook’s Flux and functional programming language Elm. Redux got popular very quickly because of its simplicity, small size (only 2 KB) and great documentation. If you want to learn how Redux works internally and dive deep into the library, consider checking out Dan’s free course.

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An Introduction To Redux

Battling BEM (Extended Edition): 10 Common Problems And How To Avoid Them


Whether you’ve just discovered BEM or are an old hand (in web terms anyway!), you probably appreciate what a useful methodology it is. If you don’t know what BEM is, I suggest you read about it on the BEM website before continuing with this post, because I’ll be using terms that assume a basic understanding of this CSS methodology.

Battling BEM (Extended Edition): 10 Common Problems And How To Avoid Them

This article aims to be useful for people who are already BEM enthusiasts and wish to use it more effectively or people who are curious to learn more about it. Now, I’m under no illusion that this is a beautiful way to name things. It’s absolutely not. One of things that put me off of adopting it for such a long time was how eye-gougingly ugly the syntax is. The designer in me didn’t want my sexy markup cluttered with dirty double-underscores and foul double-hyphens.

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Battling BEM (Extended Edition): 10 Common Problems And How To Avoid Them