Tag Archives: list

Hybrid Apps And React Native: A Time To Transition?

Accomplished musicians often talk about how, at certain moments in their careers, they had to unlearn old habits in order to progress. This process often causes them to regress in performance while they adjust to an ultimately better method.

Hybrid Apps And React Native: A Time To Transition?

Once the new approach is integrated, they are able to reach new heights that would not have been possible with their previous techniques.

The post Hybrid Apps And React Native: A Time To Transition? appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

This article:  

Hybrid Apps And React Native: A Time To Transition?

The Traditional Sales Funnel is Broken (And How Smart Businesses Nurture their Leads)

broken sales funnel

Paid Ads > Webinar > Email Nurture > Push for the Sale Traffic Generation > Lead Magnet > Nurture > Grab the Sale Exit Intent > Lead Capture > Reengagement Series > SELL Funnels. Everywhere I turn in the world of internet marketing all I see is advice on how to create the most basic yet aggressive sales funnel. We’re told to push users toward the end goal. An end goal which is collecting their email address or increasing sales. And often, there’s little or no talk about how to progress from the funnel’s end goal. And that presents a…

The post The Traditional Sales Funnel is Broken (And How Smart Businesses Nurture their Leads) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Source: 

The Traditional Sales Funnel is Broken (And How Smart Businesses Nurture their Leads)

12 Eye-Opening Video Marketing Stats to Help Boost Your Landing Page Conversions

12 video marketing stats

Video marketing has been on the rise for more than a decade now. Consumers are getting more and more used to consuming video content wherever they go, be it on Facebook or on a product page. Which may make one think: Isn’t video content expected by now? Shouldn’t we produce a video every chance we get? However, the real question is: Will videos be a conversion ignitor or a conversion killer? Let’s find out! First, Some Tempting Stats… There are plenty of case studies and reports claiming that using a video on a landing page is a great idea for…

The post 12 Eye-Opening Video Marketing Stats to Help Boost Your Landing Page Conversions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link: 

12 Eye-Opening Video Marketing Stats to Help Boost Your Landing Page Conversions

Design and UX Trends to Boost Conversions in 2017 [INFOGRAPHIC]

As more of our interactions — both business and personal — migrate online, intuitive design and user experience have never been more important.

The fast pace at which the digital world is changing means there’s always a new trend on the up and up promising to skyrocket our results.

Last year we saw the rise of mobile-first design, full-width hero images and user-driven storytelling. This year we’re seeing a big push toward hyper-personalization, bots and even (shameless plug) targeted overlays.

Ultimately, though, we marketers are most interested in trends that make the most impact where it truly counts… conversions.

The brilliant folks at The Deep End Design have whittled down the ever-growing list of design and UX trends to bring you only the most promising ones.

Of course, as with all trends, we don’t truly know their worth until we can test them out for ourselves. So don’t take this list as gospel. Rather, use it as a jumping off point when planning initiatives for the upcoming quarter and beyond.

design ux trends 2017 blog

Embed this infographic on your site

Read more: 

Design and UX Trends to Boost Conversions in 2017 [INFOGRAPHIC]

7 Eye-Catching Email Subject Lines to Catapult Your Open Rates

email-subject-lines-post-650
“OMG, that email subject line totally reached out and grabbed me!” Image source.
Psst: This post was originally published in 2013, but we recently gave it a refresh during our two-week publishing hiatus. Since launching the Unbounce Marketing Blog, this post has become one of our top-performing posts of all time. We hope you enjoy the read.

The first thing I do when I wake up is grab my phone and check my email. I go through and delete all the unimportant emails so that when I get into the office, a fresh inbox awaits.

However, when I see a subject that catches my eye, I typically read that email right away. That’s the power of email. Social networks come and go, but email marketing has been and still is a great way to connect with, engage and convert your audience.

But how do we cut through the noise and the huge amount of SPAM that hits your prospects’ inboxes every day? Let’s explore seven powerful email subject lines that you can use to better engage with your list.

1. Your AMAZING photos

I used the subject line above in a cold recruitment email and received a 70% open rate along with a 25% conversion rate.

Because it was a cold email, I made sure to tell the recipient where I came across their photos in the body of the email, followed by a quick introduction to the company.

This subject line shows that flattery is a great way to get your recipient’s attention. However, you want to make sure that you are not baiting your recipients with this subject line and then trying to sell your services.

I like to use flattery when I’m either recruiting someone or trying to interview an influential person for my podcast.

Key lessons:

  • Use flattery to your advantage.
  • Do NOT bait and switch. For example, do not use the subject line “Your AMAZING website” and then try to sell your SEO services.
  • Flattery is best used for recruiting someone or to land an influential person for your podcast, blog or web show.
Subject line cheat sheet

Worried your subject line is less than stellar?

Download our FREE Cheat Sheet to learn how to identify bad subject lines… and how to fix them.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

2. Were we boring you?

email-subject-lines-post-2-650
Were we boring you? Image source.

This was a subject line used by Sperry Van Ness. At the time, they were receiving an average open rate of 30%, which is above industry standards. However, the company felt that it was mostly the same people who were opening the emails.

So, in an attempt to clean their list, the company drafted an email with the subject line, “Were we boring you?

The opening paragraph included a message about how many of the subscribers were not opening the newsletter.

Sperry Van Ness then asked subscribers if they wanted to stay on the list or if there was anything that the company could do to better communicate their message.

The open rate skyrocketed to over 50% and they surprisingly did not receive as many unsubscribes as they originally thought.

In fact, people actually apologized for not being more involved.

Key lessons:

  • Try using a subject that is completely unexpected.
  • Using a question in your subject lines is a great way to get someone’s attention.
  • Don’t be afraid of being different.

3. How I grew the KISSmetrics Blog from 0 to 350,000 readers a month

Neil Patel is a master of writing catchy blog headlines, and if you’re an email subscriber to his blog, the headlines also become the subject lines of his emails.

In fact, email marketing is how he built his first business. In his blog post, he goes into great detail on how you can use email marketing to launch your first business. It’s a must read.

The reason why I love this subject line is that it tells a hero’s journey. We all start out as someone looking to build an audience. We don’t have any readers, any listeners or any viewers.

The subject line also implies that Neil will provide tactical action items that we can use to grow our respective audience.

Key lessons:

  • Use a subject line that relates to your audience’s current state of business.
  • Inspire them with real numbers and show them how you did it so they can do it themselves.

4. App business kit (60.34% opt-in rate)

I recently saw this subject line used by Trey Smith of GameAcademy promoting his free app business kit. Trey used this subject line as a follow-up email from the previous day.

The 60.34% opt-in rate immediately caught my attention.

Within the email, Trey explains that he A/B tested five different landing pages and that the one included in the email converted at a whooping rate of 60.34%. Makes you want to click on the landing page doesn’t it?

He also goes on to state that it’s one of the highest conversions he’s ever seen.

Lastly, he talks a bit more about the free app business kit and ends with a call to action to download the kit (which I did from the first email he sent).

This is a great subject line to use when you’re following up on those who haven’t registered for your webinar, downloaded an ebook or signed up for a course.

You don’t necessarily need to be A/B testing your pages. You can also share the amazing results you’ve seen from the previous email.

Key lessons:

  • Use mind-blowing stats in your subject lines to build intrigue.
  • Stats in subject lines are great to send reminders to those who have not engaged with your product or service.

5. Pat’s super secret way to find content to write about

Pat Flynn of SmartPassiveIncome uses the above subject line in his first auto-responder email, and he provides AMAZING content within this email. Pat knows that to build a loyal audience you have to give them your best stuff at the very start on the relationship.

And since his audience is primarily comprised of bloggers and online marketers, he understands that at times we all go through dry spells of coming up with great content to write about.

That is why Pat shares his super secret tip a day after you sign up for his email. He knows once you read this content that he has your attention for the full span of the auto-responder series.

Key lessons:

  • Share your best content in the beginning of your auto-responder series.
  • Use “secret” to attract attention, but use it carefully as not to disappoint your readers.

6. Would you like to unsubscribe?

I know what you’re thinking, the money is in the email list! Why in the world would I ask anyone to unsubscribe?

Well it’s simple. We want people who want to hear from us.

We often get email addresses from lead generation sources such as conferences and webinars. And while these leads may have been interested in the initial offering, they may not be interested in hearing from us ever again.

What we’ve found is that these people will most likely unsubscribe the next time you send any type of email, so we make it easy for them by sending an email dedicated to unsubscribing.

By doing this, we scrub our list from those who will likely never engage with us and also earn the trust of those who open the email and didn’t unsubscribe.

As an example, think of Jiro Ono, an 85-year-old sushi master and owner of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a Michelin three-star restaurant. He is also famously featured in the documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

He attracts sushi lovers from all around the world who call months in advance and pay top dollar for a coveted seat at his 10-seat restaurant.

However, there’s a twist. Customers must eat whatever Jiro is serving that day and are not allowed to add anything to the sushi, which means no soy sauce and no wasabi.

He treats sushi as an art and spends hours and hours crafting the perfect piece. While he could easily expand his space and triple his revenues, he wants to make sure he attracts the right customers, so if you’re looking for a bento box Sukiyabashi Jiro is probably not the right place for you.

Key lessons:

  • Scrub your lead list of those who will likely never engage with you.
  • Don’t be afraid to be bold, it will earn trust with those who stay on.

7. Steve, where are you?

I used the subject line above to send a final reminder email for a webinar. It’s the very last email in a sequence of four emails I send promoting a webinar.

With this email I was able to achieve a 43% open rate and a 15% click-through rate. To give you a little perspective, the industry averages are 24% and 4% respectively (according to Mailchimp).

This subject line uses the psychological trigger (or internet slang) called FOMO (fear of missing out). It’s the feeling that one gets when you stray away from your normal social routine.

FOMO is emblematic of the social age, made popular by sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

When we scroll through photos and status updates, the worry that tugs at our minds is set off by the fear of regret, according to Dan Ariely, author of “Predictably Irrational” and a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University. He says we become afraid that we’ve made the wrong decision about how to spend our time.

While the subject line will gain your recipient’s attention, you must make sure your content is also worth the attention.

Key lessons:

  1. Personalize the subject line with the recipient’s first name to amplify the fear of missing out.
  2. Provide valuable subject matter within the body of the email.

Even with the proliferation of social networks, email marketing is still a powerful tool. The problem is crafting the right subject line to cut through the noise and get your readers’ attention.

Use the subject lines above as a template or as an inspiration to craft your own.

What successful subject lines have you used in the past? Of the list above, which one is your favorite and why? Share your comments below.

Continue reading here: 

7 Eye-Catching Email Subject Lines to Catapult Your Open Rates

Larry Kim’s Approach to Personalizing PPC Campaigns [WEBINAR]

Ever receive an email with a broken merge field in the subject line?

“Hey !FIRSTNAME, I done goofed.”

It’s the ultimate personalization fail.

The marketer attempts to appeal to the prospect with a touch of personalization but accidentally reveals the secret to his magic trick. It’s jarring to say the least…

v6dFs83

The same goes for neglecting to personalize your pay-per-click campaigns.

If you’re not careful, your generic PPC ads could be creating jarring experiences for prospects. And a poor experience = a poor conversion rate.

74-percent-customers-hubspot-stat

The good news is that personalizing your PPC campaigns is easier than it’s ever been, thanks to a slew of recently released AdWords features. And in our latest webinar, Larry Kim of WordStream shared five of his favorite PPC personalization tactics — magic tricks that won’t make you pull your hare out.

Watch the full webinar here, or read on for a sneak preview of the tip Larry called “the most interesting AdWords feature in the last 10 years.”

A Customer Match made in heaven

As Larry explained in the webinar, we’re living in the golden era of personalized PPC marketing. For the first time in the history of advertising, you can target ads based on identity.

What is this witchcraft, you ask?

A little AdWords feature called Customer Match, which lets you upload a list of customer email addresses that you grab from from your email automation platform Then, when prospects are signed into Google Search, YouTube or Gmail (which according to Larry is about 50% of the time), you can serve them up an ad that relates to the list they were in.

Have a list of prospects who you opted into an offer for a PPC ebook?

Upload that list into AdWords and serve them up an ad about a related offering, already knowing that they’re into learning about PPC.

The magic of identity-based targeting

Customer Match works so well because you’re not blanket messaging strangers — you’re targeting people who are already familiar with your brand.

But Larry explained that the real magic happens when you couple Customer Match with more advanced email marketing segmentation.

Most marketers already use email marketing to reach out to specific lists of people who correspond with different stages of their marketing funnel: leads, recurring customers, recent purchasers, expired warranties…

ecommerce-audience-email-segmentations

Larry suggested taking those same email segmentations and uploading them into Google Adwords as separate audiences.

From there, he explained, you can leverage existing segmentations and offers by sending complementary, hyper-targeted paid advertisements.

The result is usually pretty incredible. Check out this example from one of Larry’s customers, where they were using different targeting mechanisms for the same keywords:

roi-targeting-only-customer-match

The Customer Match campaign (“Email” in the first column) is generating a $9.43 ROI — significantly higher ROI than any other of the targeting mechanisms.

And it’s not only about the return on ad spend. Larry has found that Customer Match can result in conversion rates triple that of a generically targeted campaign:

conversion-rate-of-non-targeted-campaign

Not too shabby, right?

…So what’s the catch?

Thinking this seems too good to be true? Well yeah, there is a catch.

Larry explained that your conversion volume is going to be low — you are cherry-picking your leads, after all.

lower-conversion-volume-for-customer-match

So to be clear, Larry isn’t advocating that you shut off your primary drivers of conversion volume in favor of this type of cherry-picking. But he is recommending that you experiment with capturing these rare and beautiful clicks.

And if you thirst for more…

giphy (1)

Take it a step further with Similar Audiences

Google has this other really snazzy feature called Similar Audiences which can help you expand your reach by leveraging the success of Customer Match.

In a nutshell, Google looks at the behavior, demographics and search patterns of your Customer Match audiences and finds similar people for you to reach out to. It’s an easy way to go after a larger audience of people without having to say goodbye to those sweet CPCs and conversion rates.

Go forth and personalize

Customer Match is really only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to personalizing your PPC campaigns.

There’s so much more you can be doing to make your prospects feel like you get where they’re coming from and that you’ve got a custom-tailored solution for their problems.

…In fact, Customer Audiences were one of five tips that Larry shared on the webinar.

If you want to get real up-close-and-personal with prospects, you’ll want to hear the rest of what Larry had to say on the webinar. You can watch the recording here:

unbounce-blog-cta-webinar-recording-larry-kim-FINAL

(Psst. For a tutorial on using Customer Match in your PPC Campaigns check out the AdWords support article here.)

Read the article: 

Larry Kim’s Approach to Personalizing PPC Campaigns [WEBINAR]

The 12 Best Marketing Podcasts to Subscribe to in 2016

macbook and headphones
Image by Viktor Hanacek via picjumbo.

So, the haze of the holidays is slowly wearing off, and you’re looking over the list of resolutions you made half-sober the night after your office Christmas party.

If being a better marketer is on that list, then we have a quick and easy way to expand your marketing  knowledge — for free! I’m talking marketing podcasts. The genius of these marketing podcasts is that they blend the actionable advice you need to be better at your job, along with some slick production and enjoyable banter.

Even better? You can listen to them anywhere. Is shedding the obligatory holiday 15 (like the freshman 15, only shortbread-induced) on your resolution list? Listen to them as you’re hitting the elliptical, like our content strategist, Dan. Or, if you’re like me, you can put one on while you cook (something that’s on the top of my resolution list).

So, without further ado, here are the best marketing podcasts as picked by Unbounce (in no particular order).

1. Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee podcast cover art

If you want to know what the latest news is in the marketing world, Marketing Over Coffee is the podcast for you. It’s a weekly discussion of what’s new in marketing, hosted by John Wall and Christopher Penn. It’s one of the few marketing podcasts out there that is news-based rather than topic-based (most of the time). Plus, episodes are under half an hour, so pop one on during your morning commute to start your day off informed and inspired.

2. Louder Than Words

Louder than Words cover art

Louder Than Words is a podcast that wants you to be more successful at your craft. Focusing on creative leaders, the show tries to get to the bottom of what has made each interviewee successful in the creative space. Host John Bonini has a casual way of introducing all of the interviews, and talks to a diverse group of individuals making a substantial impact — from designers to writers to entrepreneurs.

3. Call to Action

Call to Action cover art

This podcast was born from a minimum viable product (MVP) project and has since become a staple in the Unbounce marketing mix. You can expect actionable interviews with leading authors in the marketing blogosphere that dissect what truly makes a good marketer, and a successful marketing campaign (if we do say so ourselves!).

4. Copyblogger FM (formerly The Lede)

Copyblogger cover art

The pros over at Copyblogger recently expanded their podcast selection this year, creating a fleet of podcasts with The Lede being their longest running production. Join hosts Demian Farnworth and Jerod Morris as they talk (and joke) about what’s going on in the copywriting (and marketing) world. Expect to have your burning marketing questions answered!

5. Growth Byte

Growth Byte podcast cover art

This is probably the shortest podcast you could put in your arsenal. If you’re running out the door and don’t have time to listen to a 30-minute show, Growth Byte will give you the “best startup growth content online” and summarize it for you in two- to three-minute clips.

6. HBR IdeaCast

HBR podcast cover art

When you think of the Harvard Business Review, the first thing that comes to mind probably isn’t podcasting, but it’s actually on the cutting edge of media production. Host Sarah Green Carmichael sounds like your favorite NPR hosts, and she doesn’t beat around the bush — she goes straight into the interview. Expect experts ranging from professors to CEOs… even Katie Couric. As you can imagine, episode topics will center on many topics including marketing, aerospace and design. Look for their condensed episodes in the HBR print issue each month.

7. StartUp

StartUp podcast cover art

The flagship podcast of Gimlet Media, StartUp provides an incredibly transparent look into what it’s really like starting a business. Host and Gimlet Media CEO Alex Blumberg is no podcast novice, with roots in the This American Life family — and he doesn’t disappoint with StartUp. The first season chronicles the founding of Gimlet Media, from incorporation to funding to its first employee disagreement. The second season features a new startup, but with the same delightful style you’ve come to love.

8. #AskGaryVee

AskGaryVee podcast cover art

This one is a little bit different in both content and format. The brainchild of self-described marketing hustler Gary Vaynerchuck, #AskGaryVee is a podcast that’s not actually a podcast. Rather, it’s a YouTube show that has been repurposed into a podcast, which is pretty clever. Gary spends 15 to 30 minutes intensely answering your most burning marketing questions. Have a question you need answered? Simply tweet him with #AskGaryVee and you may be on the next show!

9. On The Media

On the Media podcast cover art

Coming at you from WNYC, On The Media is a podcast on the next level. Since 2001, it has been one of NPR’s fastest growing programs, heard on more than 300 public radio stations. You can expect creative interview transitions as the podcast “casts an incisive eye on fluctuations in the marketplace of ideas.” If you’ve gotten a little bit bored of marketing-only podcasts, listen to this one as a breath of fresh air, and then dive right back in.

10. Social Media Marketing Happy Hour

Social Media Marketing Happy Hour cover art

Aimed at entrepreneurs of all types, this 15-minute podcast (usually) comes out five days a week and will give you the inside info on how to leverage social media marketing sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more from the social experts at Happy Hour Hangouts. If you like professionally produced, banter-style podcasts, give this one a listen. Plus, it’s hosted by women!

11. Traction

Traction podcast cover art

Traction podcast provides an inside look into the nitty-gritty details of launching a startup… you know, the things that get glossed over in the media when you read about those other successful startups. Hosted by Jay Acunzo from NextView Ventures, this podcast boasts expertly produced interviews from founders, startup execs, media members and investors.

12. Freakonomics

Freakonomics podcast cover art

Although not technically a marketing podcast, the Freakonomics podcast is filled with delightful stories that take a lot of data into account. Hosted by Stephen Dubner, with co-author Steve Levitt as a regular guest, it’s produced in partnership with WNYC so you can expect a high-quality product that will entertain, concern and baffle you (sometimes all at once!).

You can find all of the podcasts that are on our list of best marketing podcasts in the iTunes store. Do you have any other marketing podcasts that you absolutely can’t live without? Let us know in the comments.


Originally from:

The 12 Best Marketing Podcasts to Subscribe to in 2016

Upcoming Web Design Conferences (January–June 2016)


2016 will introduce new conferences and be host to most of your favorite conferences from the past years. IoT will probably be as prominent as wearables. And the budding virtual reality topic may very well become a hot topic with the release of two major VR headsets in the last quarter of 2015 and the first of 2016.

JS Remote Conf

The list is quite lengthy, so let’s dive in. Ah — just before we get started: as you might or might not know, we also run a few practical conferences every year. Coming up next: SmashingConf Oxford on March 15–16 and SmashingConf San Francisco on April 5–6. Just sayin’!

The post Upcoming Web Design Conferences (January–June 2016) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

View this article:

Upcoming Web Design Conferences (January–June 2016)

How To Write Inspiring Job Descriptions For UX


To attract motivated designers and user researchers, keep your eye on the why. What’s the why? It’s the underlying purpose that brings you and your employees together. Why the why? Because if you focus only on what you need, then you run the risk of filtering down merely to an adequate match for the list of skills needed for defined tasks.

Writing Inspiring Job Descriptions For UX

However, if you lead with why a candidate would want to work with you each day, then you might just attract the best fit for executing your company’s mission. I’ve written job listings for a half-dozen organizations over the years and for all manner of user experience roles. When I wrote my first job description, I took other listings from my company as a base, looked around for some examples from other companies and ended up with what I see in hindsight as being the usual run-of-the-mill hodgepodge of bullet points.

The post How To Write Inspiring Job Descriptions For UX appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Read the article:

How To Write Inspiring Job Descriptions For UX

101 Elements Of A Complete eCommerce Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons
  • The Payment methods

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold! Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’. There are 101 elements to put together on a product page to complete that experience. If you are one of the lazy lot like most, there’s a quick checklist to save at the bottom of this page.

To know how these elements work, stay with us..

Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door. The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracha!”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy, the store manager, the staff member, the options, the distractions, the freebies, the branding, the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, inspired by the answer to one of he most asked questions in Quora in the eCommerce category,we haven’t added any timers but be quck to download it.

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

The post 101 Elements Of A Complete eCommerce Product Page (With Downloadable PDF) appeared first on VWO Blog.

See more here – 

101 Elements Of A Complete eCommerce Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)