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Using SSE Instead Of WebSockets For Unidirectional Data Flow Over HTTP/2

When building a web application, one must consider what kind of delivery mechanism they are going to use. Let’s say we have a cross-platform application that works with real-time data; a stock market application providing ability to buy or sell stock in real time. This application is composed of widgets that bring different value to the different users.
When it comes to data delivery from the server to the client, we are limited to two general approaches: client pull or server push.

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Using SSE Instead Of WebSockets For Unidirectional Data Flow Over HTTP/2

Mobile App With Facial Recognition Feature: How To Make It Real

Imagine an application that can, in real time, analyze a user’s emotional response while they’re interacting with an app or website. Or imagine a home device that recognizes you and tunes in to your favorite TV channel.
Yes, today’s article is all about facial recognition technology. We’re going to share our first experience of dealing with this technology and the findings we’ve made.
Why Is Facial Recognition On The Rise?

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Mobile App With Facial Recognition Feature: How To Make It Real

Now You See Me: How To Defer, Lazy-Load And Act With IntersectionObserver

Once upon a time, there lived a web developer who successfully convinced his customers that sites should not look the same in all browsers, cared about accessibility, and was an early adopter of CSS grids. But deep down in his heart it was performance that was his true passion: He constantly optimized, minified, monitored, and even employed psychological tricks in his projects.
Then, one day, he learned about lazy-loading images and other assets that are not immediately visible to users and are not essential for rendering meaningful content on the screen.

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Now You See Me: How To Defer, Lazy-Load And Act With IntersectionObserver

The Daily Egg Year-End Roundup: Best Posts of 2017

best Crazy Egg posts of 2017

It’s time to highlight the top five posts of the year. It wasn’t easy to choose only five, and by limiting our choice to only five, we had to eliminate hundreds of wonderful posts. We feel, however, that these top five are the most hard-hitting, useful, or knowledge-packed posts that will retain value well beyond this year. And without further ado, the winners are: 1. Learn from the Best: an Interview with Digital Marketing Legend Larry Kim Our interview with Larry Kim, as well as the accompanying video webinar, “10 CRO Truth Bombs That Will Change the Way You Think”,…

The post The Daily Egg Year-End Roundup: Best Posts of 2017 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Daily Egg Year-End Roundup: Best Posts of 2017

The Five Most Important Visual Elements Required for a Successful Company Blog

As a marketer, you cannot neglect the power of content. Sharing valuable information with your audience help you build trust with your audience and develop a strong and influential brand. We know that 61% of US online consumers are making purchases based on recommendations they read on blogs. Therefore, why wouldn’t you do the same thing? Why not set up a blog for your own company or the company you represent? I am not going into the technical details of setting up a company blog or how to make it web-ready for today’s environment, nor will I discuss the content…

The post The Five Most Important Visual Elements Required for a Successful Company Blog appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Five Most Important Visual Elements Required for a Successful Company Blog

4 Ways to Use Typefaces on Your Landing Page to Elevate Your Brand

There’s a reason you can recognize an Apple ad right away. Same with Nike and Airbnb. A big part of that is because of imagery, copy, and layout, but typefaces play a huge role as well.

Although the ROI of having a strong brand is harder to measure than, say, clear button copy, it’s telling that some of the most respected companies in the world have strong design cultures and distinct aesthetics.

Brand recognition via typefaces and design

Examples of Apple and Nike’s on-brand design aesthetics.

When designing landing pages, you need them to be on-brand, pixel for pixel. Great design is often a tell-tale sign of more sophisticated marketing (and can give you an easier time getting conversions as it can help convey that you’re well established). One of the most obvious elements that need complete design versatility on your landing pages is your typeface.

This is why Unbounce launched built-in Google fonts in September of this year. Now there are 840+ fonts to choose from for all your text and button needs, straight from the text editor’s properties panel:

New Google Fonts in the Unbounce builder

For some inspiration on how to best use this newfound world of hundreds of fonts, we’re passing the mic to some of our in-house designers at Unbounce. See what they have to say about everything from the best fonts for creating a visual hierarchy to how your text can communicate emotion. Plus see what types of fonts they’re excited to use in their upcoming design work in the builder.

Break the rules where possible

Cesar Martinez, Senior Art Director here at Unbounce, hears a lot of talk about rules. But they’re not the be-all-and-end-all. As he tells us:

“Often when discussing typography with my peers, I hear about all sorts of design principles, some of which I’ve always challenged myself to learn almost as commandments. I realized that is very easy to fall into a vortex of overused principles of visual communication that can potentially damage your integrity (or what some call originality) as a brand.

When designing landing pages that need to feel especially branded or out of the box, try breaking these rules every now and then
(then A/B test to see what works and doesn’t). For example, you could use more than two typefaces in one paragraph, break the kerning on your headers, use a big bold-ass serif on a semi-black background and see how it looks with a thin handmade brushed calligraphic font as the subheader…I know it sounds crazy, but this can lead to unexpected results and it’s something I’m really looking forward to doing with the builder’s new built-in Google fonts.”

Some of Cesar’s favorite out-of-the-box examples of typography?

“I love what ILOVEDUST does when it comes to typography. I also recommend reading Pretty Ugly2 as an introspection of “bad” typography applications that succeed in the way they communicate a visual idea.”

Which font is Cesar most excited to use in the builder? A few: Roboto, Playfair, and Abril Fatface.

Try Roboto, Playfair and more in your next landing page design. See how to create a landing page in Unbounce and experiment with typefaces in a free 30 day trial.

Use fewer fonts to clarify information hierarchy

Denise Villanueva, a Product Designer, created our Unbounce Academy with clear and consistent hierarchy in mind.

“Good typography is the most straightforward way to create a clear content hierarchy. That, above anything else, should be the main criteria of choosing typefaces for your brand.”

Denise provided some specific pointers to help you achieve sound content hierarchy on your landing pages:

Denise

“When in doubt, using one font family in 2–3 weights (or two font families in 1-2 weights) will work the vast majority of the time. Using more than three typefaces can be distracting and chaotic — avoid doing it.”

As an example, Unbounce’s Fitspo template features the Raleway font (in all caps for headers and sentence case for regular body copy) and a clear, attention-grabbing header with supporting sections that guide you further down the page. Think of it as presenting your information in clearly defined levels that are easy to read.

Unbounce's Fitspo landing page template

Create a new landing page fast with the Fitspo template — or browse through other stunning designs you can use today.

Give someone all the feels with typographic details

For Denis Suhopoljac, our Principal User Experience Designer, using the right typography can evoke feelings in your audience:

Denis Suhopoljac

“Typefaces are all about composition, harmony, and mood rolled into one. By matching the right typography traits with voice, style and tone of a brand, you can enhance the wit, humor, or seriousness of a piece of copy. When it’s done right, typography makes your copy (and your entire brand experience) legible, readable, and appealing.”

Typefaces can convey emotion

Different fonts convey different types of emotions via text — what do these typefaces make you think of? Professionalism? Reliability? Playfulness? Timelessness?

Try incorporating typeface as part of your message

To Ainara Sáinz, our Interactive Designer, good typography can do double duty and save you from having to use other supporting imagery.

Ainara Sainz“If typography is done well, you don’t always need extra elements like images, backgrounds or even colors to reinforce the message. And sometimes, the execution is so flawless that the audience might not even need to know how to read to understand and feel the message behind it. Like Ji Lee’s Word as Image project—just… wow.”

Image via Ji Lee’s Word as Image project.

Your landing pages can make use of stunning fonts too

Having solid branding does wonders for a brand’s credibility, and our customers have been telling us that they want to get in on the action. Get into the builder today to explore the 840+ new typeface options available, and find your favourite pairings for your next landing page.

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4 Ways to Use Typefaces on Your Landing Page to Elevate Your Brand

How Just One Ecommerce Popup Offer Helped Canvas Factory Generate 1.1 Million in Revenue

Canvas Factory's Popup Success

When you hear ‘website popup’ in a marketing context, my bet is—as a discerning marketer—you all but cringe. Surely these boxes that jump up in the middle of a screen are for low-level marketers. They’re scammy, make you lose your train of thought, nobody likes them,…you’d never use ‘em.

But can you really hate popups if they’re found to drive results?

As heated as the debate can get, Richard Lazazzera, an ecommerce entrepreneur and Content Strategist at Shopify has a fair point in this reply to a comment on his blog post:

Image via the Shopify blog.

And drive sales they can.

By experimenting with popup overlays, Auckland-based Canvas Factory (an ecommerce shop providing high-quality canvas prints) has found a ton of success engaging prospects at exactly the right time.

Using just one popup that appears across several of their domains, Canvas Factory discovered the targeting that worked best for them, and—most importantly—brought in 1.1 million USD in revenue(!) via their offer.

In today’s post, we’ll share Canvas Factory’s story, along with some lessons learned, so that—if you’re tempted—you too can convert more site visitors.

Canvas Factory’s approach to ecommerce popups

Similar to many ecommerce brands, Canvas Factory wanted to convert more of the visitors leaving their site empty handed. They’d realized some prospects only needed a moderate incentive to get over any purchase anxiety, so they had started offering a small discount via a coupon.

Eventually they wondered if the coupon would perform even better if delivered via a popup at the right moment.

Experimenting, they created this popup overlay in Unbounce for their site:

One of Canvas Factory’s domains outfitted with their popup.

They duplicated this one design eight times for running across different domains on certain URLs. The copy was the same for each, offering $10 off someone’s first order in exchange for an email, and only appeared as someone was actively trying to leave the site, once per visitor.

The main difference was location. The brand ran four of these overlays across their product pages on their Australian and New Zealand domains, while another four appeared on the Canvas Factory blog across the same domains.

How’d the experiment go?

The Unbounce popup overlay has now been running from November 2016 to present and in comparing the period before using the popups to promote this same coupon code to now:

  • Canvas Factory has seen a 6% to 9% increase in use of the coupon, and
  • Subscription to their mailing list has grown by over 14.3%.

Now the brand’s marketers can do a better job actively nurturing prospects claiming the coupon, and re-marketing to successful first-time customers.

But in terms of the bottom line? Managing Director Tim Daley says it best:
Tim from Canvas Factory

“Unbounce played a key part in Canvas Factory’s conversion rate optimization activity for our subscriber campaign. This has contributed to over $1.1 million dollars in purchases.”

$1.1 million the brand may not have otherwise seen had they not tried the overlay? If that’s not making you reconsider whether or not your personal distaste for popups should stop you from trying one out, I’m not sure what will.

That said…

How’d the brand track success?

Tim tells us the coupon use was measured by integrating Unbounce popup overlays with their mail platform and their payment gateway CS-Cart:

“This [integration] allows us, per country level, to collect new subscribers, partition [them] to relevant country and then track their individual and group purchase application of the coupon acquired through the popup.”

Ultimately the integration lets Canvas Factory see:

  • How many customers are using coupons + how many discounts are being used total
  • Total revenue before and after coupons are applied
  • Average order value before and after coupons are applied
  • What kind of customers the brand’s attracting with coupons

All very useful factors in understanding how long a campaign like this is feasible for, and experimenting with different discounts.

Want to push your lead data collected via landing pages, sticky bars, and popup overlays through to your mail platforms and other tools? See our Integrations Powered by Zapier and all the connections available right in Unbounce.

It’s all about location: A lesson on why popups in the wrong place are a big mistake

Your gut feeling that popups can be scammy? It’s not far off. If used incorrectly at the wrong time or on the wrong URL of your site, they certainly can be. We’ve all seen these types of popups and they’re maddening.

In Canvas Factory’s case, it wasn’t as simple as create the popup, set it and forget it. In running their Unbounce popup overlay in several locations, they’ve learned placement and timing is critical.

In Tim’s case, he discovered that the blog wasn’t the proper placement for this particular offer, it was simply too soon in the buyer journey to be offering someone a discount. With posts on the brand’s blog aimed to help you take better photos of your kids and other photography tips, this level of awareness doesn’t really align with wanting to purchase right away.

Overall, Canvas Factory’s blog popup conversion rate was 0.18% versus the up to 11% conversion rate they’d seen on product pages where the purchase intent was likely higher.

As outlined above, aim to align your offers with buyer intent.

The lesson:

If you choose the right place for your offer (pricing pages and high commitment URLs in Canvas Factory’s case), you’ll see results because you offered a timely and relevant incentive. In the wrong place, however, you simply won’t see the results you want, and worse, you’ll irritate and annoy your visitors.

Get actionable tips on where to place your popups, and which types of messages perform best in our Best Practice Guide.

So you shouldn’t use popups on your blog?

No—Canvas Factory’s unique experience isn’t to say that popups on your blog won’t work, because they definitely can. You just have to choose the right kind of offer and perfect targeting. Because your blog readers may not be product aware yet, you need to align your offer with the level of awareness readers do have about your company (i.e. they might be open to a free in-depth ebook about the exact topic they’re already reading about).

You might also try directing your blog traffic to an even higher-converting area of your site.

Here’s a super relevant clickthrough popup Seer’s Wil Reynolds uses to offer up more relevant content on his site:

By proactively serving up what prospects might want next, Seer becomes more trustworthy and keeps people engaged on their site longer (which is a great sign in Google’s eyes). You can make traffic shaping like this the goal of some of your popups in locations where a higher-commitment ask doesn’t make sense.

Try an Experiment Yourself

Overall, popups can definitely be annoying when used aggressively or poorly (there’s no arguing that) but, as we’ve seen with Canvas Factory, proper targeting and relevant offers can make all the difference to both marketers and site visitors who can be receptive to proper incentives at the right time.

If you’ve got a great campaign or offer running, a well-timed and targeted popup could ensure all the right people see it and that you don’t leave opportunities on the table.

Try an Ecommerce popup from Unbounce today

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How Just One Ecommerce Popup Offer Helped Canvas Factory Generate 1.1 Million in Revenue

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

When first learning how to use Grid Layout, you might begin by addressing positions on the grid by their line number. This requires that you keep track of where various lines are on the grid, and also be aware of the fact the line numbers reverse if your site is displayed for a right-to-left language.

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Built on top of this system of lines, however, are methods that enable the naming of lines and even grid areas. Using these methods enables easier placement of items by name rather than number, but also brings additional possibilities when creating systems for layout. In this article, I’ll take an in-depth look at the various ways to name lines and areas in CSS Grid Layout, and some of the interesting possibilities this creates.

The post Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

How To Make Use Of Weekly Design Meetings

How do you keep a team engaged? How do you make sure the team gets up to date with everything that’s being released? How often do the team members talk to each other face to face? Do they have enough support to finish their tasks or to pursue their growth?
These are questions that popped in my head once a design team started to grow quickly in front of my eyes.

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How To Make Use Of Weekly Design Meetings

Structured Approach To Testing Increased This Insurance Provider’s Conversions By 30%

CORGI HomePlan provides boiler and home cover insurance in Great Britain. It offers various insurance policies and an annual boiler service. Its main value proposition is that it promises “peace of mind” to customers. It guarantees that if anything goes wrong, it’ll be fixed quickly and won’t cost anything extra over the monthly payments.

Problem

CORGI’s core selling points were not being communicated clearly throughout the website. Insurance is a hyper-competitive industry and most customers compare other providers before taking a decision. After analyzing its data, CORGI saw that there was an opportunity to improve conversions and reduce drop-offs at major points throughout the user journey. To help solve that problem, CORGI hired Worship Digital, a conversion optimization agency.

Observations

Lee Preston, a conversion optimization consultant at Worship Digital, analyzed CORGI’s existing Google Analytics data, conducted user testing and heuristic analysis, and used VWO to run surveys and scrollmaps. After conducting qualitative and quantitative analysis, Lee found that:

  • Users were skeptical of CORGI’s competition, believing they were not transparent enough. Part of CORGI’s value proposition is that it doesn’t have any hidden fees so conveying this to users could help convince them to buy.
  • On analyzing the scrollmap results, it was found that only around a third of mobile users scrolled down enough to see the value proposition at the bottom of the product pages.
  • They ran surveys for users and asked, “Did you look elsewhere before visiting this site? (If so, where?)” More than 70% of respondents had looked elsewhere.
  • They ran another survey and asked users what they care about most; 18% of users said “fast service” while another 12% said “reliability”.

This is how CORGI’s home page originally looked:

corgi_original

Hypothesis

After compiling all these observations, Lee and his team distilled it down to one hypothesis:

CORGI’s core features were not being communicated properly. Displaying these more clearly on the home page, throughout the comparison journey, and the checkout could encourage more users to sign up rather than opting for a competitor.

Lee adds, “Throughout our user research with CORGI, we found that visitors weren’t fully exposed to the key selling points of the service. This information was available on different pages on the site, but was not present on the pages comprising the main conversion journey.”

Test

Worship Digital first decided to put this hypothesis to test on the home page.

“We hypothesized that adding a USP bar below the header would mean 100% of visitors would be exposed to these anxiety-reducing features, therefore, improving motivation and increasing the user conversion rate,” Lee said.

This is how the variation looked.

corgi_variation

Results

The variation performed better than the control across all devices and majority of user types. The variation increased the conversions by 30.9%.

“We were very happy that this A/B test validated our research-driven hypothesis. We loved how we didn’t have to buy some other tool for running heatmaps and scrollmaps for our visitor behavior experiment,” Lee added.

Next Steps

Conversion optimization is a continuous process at CORGI. Lee has been constantly running new experiments and gathering deep understanding about the insurance provider’s visitors. For the next phase of testing, he plans to:

  • Improve the usability of the product comparing feature.
  • Identify and fix leaks during the checkout process.
  • Make complex product pages easier to digest.

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The post Structured Approach To Testing Increased This Insurance Provider’s Conversions By 30% appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Structured Approach To Testing Increased This Insurance Provider’s Conversions By 30%