Tag Archives: miscellaneous

Thumbnail

How De Nieuwe Zaak Improved Productivity Using The VWO API

About De Nieuwe Zaak

De Nieuwe Zaak is a leading full-service digital agency based in Zwolle, Netherlands. With a team of over 90 experts, they provide innovative, high-quality digital commerce solutions for retailers, wholesalers, and brands alike.

They have been using VWO since 2012 to conduct A/B tests and optimize websites for many of their clients. Being such an extensive VWO user, they are constantly investigating how they can make use of the platform to make their processes more efficient and produce faster results.

De Nieuwe Zaak recently started using the VWO Application Programming Interface (API), which has drastically improved the productivity of their development teams with regard to building A/B test campaigns by using VWO. They recently published a blog post sharing their experience using VWO and the API; you can read it here.

Challenges Before Using VWO API

De Nieuwe Zaak has more than 12 years of experience in implementing and creating web applications. In these years, they have standardized their development process.

For them, setting up A/B tests is a collaboration between CRO & UX consultants and developers. The CRO & UX consultant analyzes the user research data and comes up with a hypothesis for an A/B test, and developers write the code for it.

Front-end developers work in their own Integrated Development Environment (IDE), such as Visual Studio, Sublime, or Webstorm, as these editors provide excellent support for writing code in HTML, SCSS, and JavaScript. After a piece of code is complete, it is stored in a version management system such as GIT and Bitbucket so that it is never lost.

Before the front-end developers at De Nieuwe Zaak started using the VWO API, they used to write the code for the test variations on the VWO code editor. However, they wanted to be able to write code in the IDE familiar to them for improved efficiency.

How VWO API Helped Improve Productivity

Developers at De Nieuwe Zaak used the VWO API to visualize tests in dashboards, analyze test results, and implement code changes in their campaigns. Here is how the process worked:

For any API to work, 2 applications are required. With one being VWO, developers at De Nieuwe Zaak wrote a small NodeJS application that now runs on their computers with the help of extensive documentation provided by VWO.

The NodeJS application communicates with VWO by using an automated task runner called GruntJS and an asynchronous request initiated by the browser, also known as an Ajax call.

With the first version of the VWO API, front-end developers at De Nieuwe Zaak were able to retrieve the JavaScript and CSS code pieces from their version management system, and then push the changes to VWO. Further, they could accommodate using SCSS instead of CSS, which is easier to manage and write code in. Below is a schematic representation of the process:

Summary of Benefits

De Nieuwe Zaak is one of the first VWO customers worldwide that started using the VWO API. In addition to improving their efficiency and reducing the overall time spent from scratch till the end for implementing a test, the development team at De Nieuwe Zaak has been able to:

  • Improve code quality by using SCSS, instead of plain CSS.
  • Write code in an environment familiar to them.
  • Ensure safety of their code by using version management.
  • Create and extend the API link to further accommodate their use cases.
  • Follow their existing processes and frameworks to develop websites.

The VWO API is very extensive and is very well documented. At De Nieuwe Zaak, we use the API for visualizing reports in dashboards and implementing test. Particularly, the process of implementing tests with the API made the implementation more sustainable.

– Pascal Alferink, Developer at De Nieuwe Zaak

The post How De Nieuwe Zaak Improved Productivity Using The VWO API appeared first on Blog.

View post – 

How De Nieuwe Zaak Improved Productivity Using The VWO API

Thumbnail

Results From Our Latest A/B Test: Here’s The New VWO Logo!

Over the past 8 years, we’ve made some key (and some minor) changes to the look and feel of our brand. Around this time last year, we revamped our website for the launch of VWO Conversion Optimization Platform™.

As an organization that thrives on a culture of experimentation, we are always looking into data to discover insights for optimization. By turning our opinions into hypotheses, we test changes for almost everything which could have a significant impact on the business, and then derive the next logical step. Based on this simple framework, we recently made a minor change to the VWO logo. Before we delve further into the hypothesis behind this change, look at the logo in its full glory:

The Hypothesis: Making The Letters V, W, and O Prominent Will Improve Readability

In the beginning, our product was called Visual Website Optimizer. However, over the years, people (including us) fondly started abbreviating it to VWO. This is what the VWO logo looked like during this gradual change:

More recently, we dropped the accompanying text “Visual Website Optimizer” completely, and also started referring to our product as just “VWO.”

With this change, we realized that it would be hard for someone unfamiliar with our brand to read or understand our logo. We hypothesized that if the letters “V,” “W,” and “O” were made distinguishable, the brand name VWO would stand out more clearly.

The Test: Conducting an A/B/C Test to Choose a Winner

After the hypothesis was finalized, our design team created a new variation of the logo, per the new specification. Next, we decided to test the hypothesis by conducting extensive user testing through 5-second tests on UsabilityHub.

Five-second tests are a method of usability testing, where the participants are shown a visual for only 5 seconds, and then asked questions corresponding to it.

For our tests, we selected a sample of participants from across the globe, with varying demographics, location, and other attributes. They were showed the 3 variations of the logo—the existing one, the proposed one, and the one with VWO written as well-spaced plain text. Next, we asked the participants the question “What do you read?” to which they had to type in a response.

For the proposed logo, we got 90% of them answering “VWO”, as opposed to only 66% for the existing one. For the variation with VWO written as well-spaced text, the response was around 96%.

The Result: Reinforced Belief in the Potential of Testing

As an obvious next step, we decided to make this minor update to our logo which can now be seen to be live across all our digital properties. We’re proud of the fact that the basic tenets of experimentation continue to give direction to our efforts.

If it wasn’t for validating our initial, seemingly insignificant hypothesis, VWO wouldn’t have got a brand new identity. We strive to uphold this culture in our organization for the years to come.

What do you think of our new logo? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

The post Results From Our Latest A/B Test: Here’s The New VWO Logo! appeared first on Blog.

Continued: 

Results From Our Latest A/B Test: Here’s The New VWO Logo!

Thumbnail

CMOs are Becoming CROs: How to Integrate Marketing and Sales to Actually Drive Revenue

Note: This is a guest article written by David Zheng, the Founder of GrowthWit and WiseMerchant and the Head of Growth at BuildFire.Any and all opinions expressed in the post are David’s.

Marketing and sales teams have a reputation for rivalry.

Although they work toward the same outcome, each has a different approach.

As Chip Doyle once pointed out, marketing wants to tell you what to buy, while sales want to hear why you’re buying it (so they can sell you more).

Marketing requires a one-way communication, while sales require a two-way conversation.

But technology and buyer habits are changing all of that. Marketing is no longer a one-way communication, and both teams are relying more heavily on the other to truly understand what the customer wants. Now every task is a Sales and marketing collaboration.

This also means that roles are changing. Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) and Chief Revenue Officers (CROs) must find a way to play nice.

How the Relationship between CMO and CRO Is Changing

In the past, CROs were mostly responsible for driving profitability and sustainability. It was the job of the sales team to ensure financial success for the organization.

That typically meant putting people on phones to answer customer questions.

The CMO, on the other hand, was responsible for making sure that people knew about the organization—to gain awareness and find new potential markets for the sales team.

They both have the same ultimate goal, but each takes a different path to get there.

sales and marketing alignment activities flow chart
But the Internet changed all of that.

Where once the salesperson was the most trusted source of information about a given product or service, now shoppers have limitless access to information—product data, customer reviews, and so on.

One search gives them all the answers they need.

Customers also have a myriad of touchpoints with any given company. From social media to email outreach to an online contact form, they no longer have to call only one person to get what they need.

This has shifted the role of the CMO to the forefront.

In today’s digital market, it’s about finding ways to not only make people aware of the brand but also trust the brand’s message in the same way they earlier trusted the salesperson over the phone.

Of course, that doesn’t mean that the CRO is obsolete. Far from it, sales will always matter.

It simply means that the lines between the CRO/CMO are blurring together in a new way.

sales and marketing alignment for communication with customer

Following some of the Sales and marketing alignment best practices, both parties are now responsible for the financial well-being and reputation of the company. If one fails, the other fails too.

It’s more important than ever that these roles find ways to integrate so that both teams produce real, measurable results.

With that in mind, here are 5 best practices for sales and marketing to help them collaborate to drive revenue.

1. Sharing Sales and Marketing Data for Customer Research

Both marketing and sales use targeted buyer personas to inform their strategies.

According to the Data-Driven Marketing Survey by Teradata, 50% of marketers agree that data is the most underutilized asset in their organizations; but less than 10% use the data in a systematic way.

Salespeople have a leg up when it comes to data, as they’re often the first to develop buyer personas to understand their customers better.

But that data isn’t always accessible to the marketing department.

sales and marketing quality data report January 2017

Marketing teams also need these buyer personas to update its strategies.

The team may need to know whether the customer is a Millennial or a Gen X-er (social media or email?), their income level (affordable or luxury?), and any other behavioral drivers (mobile or desktop?) that might drive their purchasing decisions.

Who knows this data better than anyone else? Salespeople.

The sales team has insights into customer’s goals, mindset, and expectations, and potential obstacles to purchasing.

Marketing needs to have this data to create content and advertising that actually works.

Sales and Marketing Persona comic

To build an effective partnership, sales will need to share the following information with marketing:

  • Sales data:
    • Which products are selling well?
    • Which products are faltering?
  • Customer lifetime value:
    • How low or high are retention rates?
    • How long does the average customer stick around?
  • Internal performance metrics:
    • How fast is the turnaround for a product or service?
    • Are there any obvious bottlenecks?

In turn, marketing should share the following data with the sales team:

  • Traffic and engagement:
    • How many visitors are coming to the site? How many are engaging? Where are they coming from?
  • Email marketing: What are the open and click-through rates for each email campaign?
  • Clicks and conversions: What is the conversion rate of sales landing pages? What are the shopping cart abandonment rates?

With each party measuring these metrics, each can proactively adjust its strategies to achieve better results.

Lead flow for sales and marketing alignment

Marketing can see how its ad campaigns affect the lifetime value, or whether the promises are creating more demand than the team can keep up with (causing bottlenecks), for example.

Sales can see whether there is a significant gap in the sales process (too many people are leaving the website without buying!) or whether or not email is still the best outreach source for certain customer segments.

2. Using Sales CRM Data to Inform Marketing Strategies

Timing is critical in sales.

The sales team has a sense of its current month’s forecast (or even the next month’s) when it comes to the revenue. Part of the job of the CRO is to answer the “when” of the sales cycle.

When is the best time to promote a specific product or launch an outreach campaign? When should marketing initiatives be kicked off? When should sales expect to see results?

best time for sales team to contact customers

The marketing team is the “how” and “what.”

How should that product be promoted based on the sales cycle? Is it a seasonal product or available year-round? How will people be made aware of changes to the product? What is the desired outcome?

Sales should have a good idea of when the best time is to launch a new initiative, according to the purchasing data.

Marketing should know what that initiative should be and to whom it should be targeted, as well as the specifics of the time of the day and week (based on engagement metrics).

sales and marketing emails optimized for the best day of the week

Without both teams working in harmony, it’s possible to launch a revolutionary marketing campaign that doesn’t sell any products at a measurable level.

Here’s an example:

Say you have a 25% conversion rate for every step of the sales funnel. If your monthly sales target for the next quarter is $1 million and your average sales are around $10,000, you need around 100 conversions every month to achieve this goal.

But for some months, sales are slower than others.

Let’s assume that January and February are much slower sales months compared to June and July.

By using this information, the marketing team can determine what offer to include for customers during those months (discounts on orders over a certain price point, for example) in their campaigns.

But this means that the sales team needs a reliable way of identifying these trends, like a sales pipeline CRM, and give the marketing team access to this information.

sales pipeline

Sales should know where leads are coming from when the customers are more willing to buy, and what entices the customers the most so that the marketing team knows how to send out the right offer at the right time.

3. Adjusting Ad Campaigns by Using Sales Data

Advertising is one of the main drivers in sales, and one of the main tasks in marketing.

One of the challenges with advertising is that it’s easy for a company to spend more money compared to earn money.

It’s always a risk. You could drop millions on an ad campaign only to see a moderate sales increase. But this risk gap can be closed when sales and marketing work together to produce a certain outcome.

Take PPC advertising, for example.

For a marketer, a successful pay-per-click (PPC) advertising campaign might be the one that just drives engagement.

successful adwords campaign for driving more engagement

If someone clicks a Google PPC ad, goes to the home page, and then clicks through the website, that’s a success.

To that end, marketers may try to use specific keywords to improve website traffic or engagement.

But the sales team cares about one area—sales.

It doesn’t matter if website traffic improves but no qualified leads come from it. They might care if an ad had a high cost-per-click (CPC), and was essentially “ineffective” in producing a real, paying customer.

Sales is looking for revenue, not just metrics.

channel wise breakdown of ROI for marketing

So what does this mean for a partnership between sales and marketing? It means that both have to work together to create the most effective campaigns.

Marketers need to understand the Lead Scoring System (and subsequently, the sales CRM system) so that when they spend money on PPC ads, they know which targeted personas will be most likely to convert.

Both parties need to understand how the marketing funnel works and how it can be combined with the sales funnel to create something new.

new sales and marketing alignment funnelA top-of-the-funnel marketing “lead” (like a website visitor) may not ever turn into a customer, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t important for sales.

The marketing team needs to know how to measure successful campaigns based on sales data, not on just its own metrics.

4. Improving Brand Identity (and Sales) with Marketing

Not everything that impacts sales is measurable.

A study by Harvard Business Journal found that CEOs tend to favor sales over marketing because sales outcomes are often more “tangible.”

As a CEO puts it, “Why should I invest in more marketing when I can get better results by hiring more salespeople?”

Because of this mindset, many marketing teams are underfunded, and, as a result, underperforming.

suggested percentage of revenue that needs to be spent on marketing.

This is a problem because there are many immeasurable entities that can impact your bottom line.

Brand identity, for example, is not measurable by any metric, yet a brand’s reputation can be a key driver of that brand’s equity.

This is also known as the “halo effect,” or a situation when a customer buys from a brand based on its positive reputation, whether or not the product is truly inspirational.

In other words, the value of a brand can be measured by its marketing.

When Apple began marketing the iPod back in 2005, they put millions into advertising. You may remember the campaign.

marketing of apple ipod comic

Even though iPod (and iTunes) sales made up only 39% of Apple’s overall profits that year, by the end of their marketing campaign, they were hailed as a technology leader and revolutionaries.

As a result, its fiscal year sales in 2006 increased 38% and their profits rose by 384%.

It has since leveraged their reputation as tech innovators to create more and better products, making it one of the biggest companies in the world.

And it doesn’t even sell the iPod anymore.

sales of apple ipod year on year

This goes to show that when the marketing team is properly supported, they can produce results worthy of the sales department.

5. Improving Sales Outreach with Marketing Analytics

One of the biggest contention points between sales and marketing is measuring outcomes.

For marketers, a “good” outcome for an email outreach campaign is high click-through and open rates. However, sales don’t care about click-through rates. It cares about sales.

It might be better to measure your outreach campaign multidimensionally.

measuring content marketing valueOn the other hand, you won’t necessarily get sales if no one opens and clicks through the email.

This is where marketing and sales must come together to identify what a successful outreach campaign looks like.

The marketing team should introduce key analytic tools to the sales team.

While the marketing team can also forward crucial data or statistics, at some point, it inevitably will become an issue of “teaching a man to fish.”

Teaching helps as an economical resource

If the marketing team moves ahead based on important information, the sales team might accidentally ignore crucial statistics that can improve its sales strategy, just because they don’t fully understand it.

This can lead to miscommunication and a negative impact on sales.

If the sales team understands how to use the same tools that marketers use; however, it can create a seamless conversation between the two departments and reduce the odds of an essential piece of data being overlooked.

right marketing or sales tool for your job

Even beyond analytics, sales and marketing teams should a discuss other ways to use technology effectively.

For example, if the marketing team intends to produce content for potential customers on LinkedIn, then the sales team should guide it on best practices for targeted leads on that platform.

Marketing can also assist sales in some of its follow-up endeavors.

If the sales team becomes overwhelmed following up on cold email outreach, for example, the sales team can use a tool like Gmass to automate the process and eliminate the burden on the salesperson.

follow up email tools for sales.

This frees up the sales team to focus on metrics that matter rather than chasing down leads.

But if the sales team doesn’t understand how to use Gmail, they might not be automating their follow-up effectively and miss important sales opportunities in the process.

When marketing and sales work together with the same tools, they can maximize efficiency and move customers through the sales funnel as painlessly as possible.

Conclusion

Even though both the teams have notoriously been rivals in the past, it’s time for sales and marketing team to work together.

This process should be made easier with the addition of technologies that improve the marketing/sales relationships (automation tools like Gmass, or analytic tools like Google Analytics).

It’s important for the two teams to remember that when one succeeds, the other succeeds, even if they approach a problem from different angles.

When marketing is successful at getting traffic or open rates, for example, or improving brand reputation, sales will increase.

When sales are successful at closing leads and measuring their data, marketing will be more effective.

When the CMO and the CRO work together, everybody wins.

The post CMOs are Becoming CROs: How to Integrate Marketing and Sales to Actually Drive Revenue appeared first on Blog.

More here:  

CMOs are Becoming CROs: How to Integrate Marketing and Sales to Actually Drive Revenue

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons
  • The Payment methods

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold! Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’. There are 101 elements to put together on a product page to complete that experience. If you are one of the lazy lot like most, there’s a quick checklist to save at the bottom of this page.

To know how these elements work, stay with us..

Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door. The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracha!”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy, the store manager, the staff member, the options, the distractions, the freebies, the branding, the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, we haven’t added any timers.

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

The post 101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF) appeared first on VWO Blog.

This article is from: 

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

Upsell and Cross-sell: Strategies To Boost eCommerce Revenue

“Buy me those chocolates.”

The kid said sternly, pointing his stubby finger at a big jar of sweets on the shop counter as they waited to check out.

The counter guy grinned. I smiled. The mother winced.

She just got cross-selled.

In 2006, Amazon reported that cross-selling and upselling contributed as much as 35% of their revenue.

Product recommendations are responsible for an average of 10-30% of eCommerce site revenues according to Forrester Research analyst Sucharita Mulpuru.

There’s no reason why upselling and cross selling shouldn’t work for you. In this post we look at:

What is Upselling and Cross-selling?

Upselling and cross-selling are cousins of well, selling.

Buy a cow from me and I’ll offer you a better one for 50 bucks more: the better cow is an upsell.

What is Upselling?

Buy a cow from me and I’ll throw in a haystack for 5 bucks: the haystack is a cross sell.

What is cross-sell?

Upselling is a strategy to sell a superior, more expensive version of a product that the customer already owns (or is buying). A superior version is:

  • a higher, better model of the product or
  • same product with value-add features that raises the perceived value of the offering

How Macy's Upsell

Upselling is the reason why we have a 54” television instead of the 48” we planned for; the reason why we go for 7 day European Sojourns instead of 5 day simple French Affairs. It’s also the reason why we have unused annual contracts thinning away under silverfish attacks.

Cross-selling is a strategy to sell related products to the one a customer already owns (or is buying). Such products generally belong to different product categories, but will be complementary in nature. Like the hay-stack for the cow, or batteries for a wall-clock.

Cross-selling is a battle ready strategy. Here’s how McD does it: McDonald’s keep their apple pie dispensers right behind the cashier, in full view of customers. A year ago, the head of the U.S. division for McDonald’s Corp., Jeff Stratton, said in an interview that he felt moving the dispensers to the back kitchen area would probably cut apple pie orders by half.

Upsell and cross-sell are the reasons we buy things ‘just in case’.

There is one more popular selling technique known as bundling. Bundling is the offspring of cross sell and upsell. You bundle together the main product and other auxiliary products for a higher price than what the single product is sold for.

What is Bundling in eCommerce?

By bundling together the camera and two very related (even essential) products, Flipkart makes a compelling offer. Notice how there are multiple combos available.

Bundling in Action - Flipkart

Bundling is also quite often used along with a discount to increase the perceived value of the offering. Here’s more on the benefits of bundling.

Pure Bundle or Mixed Bundle?

Pure Bundling is when products are made available only in bundles and cannot be bought individually. Mixed bundling is when both options (individual buy and bundle buy) are made available.

Vineet Kumar from HBS and Timothy Derdenger at Carnegie Mellon University teamed up together and studied bundling as used by Nintendo in their video game market. Revenues fell almost 20% when Nintendo switched from mixed bundling to pure bundling. In the gaming market, prices fall each day, so customers looking to buy just that one thing will choose to wait until it becomes available, likely at a cheaper price.

Similarly, a study on the effect of bundling in consumer goods market, revealed that bundling is a great way to entice high value customers of competitors to switch over. But it does not significantly help category sales; and in some ways even discourages it because different category products are bundled together.

So should you use pure bundling or mixed bundling?

The safest option is to use mixed bundling: offer products individually and as bundle

But why settle for safe when you can A/B test it?

Here’s a way you can use bundling: Specify a minimum order amount to qualify for free shipping. Customers who are looking to buy only one item are likely to switch to the bundle in order to raise order value and qualify for free shipping.

Amazon does all of this brilliantly.

How Amazon Does Upsell, Cross-sell and Bundling

Why Is Upsell and Cross-Sell Important for eCommerce?

Upselling and cross-selling is often (and mistakenly) seen as unethical practices to squeeze more out of the customer.

They’d say, ‘the wincing mother in your opening paragraph is proof that customers hate being cross-sold to’.

I disagree, as will any white-hat marketer.

The Mother Who Winced (way better than ‘the wincing mother’) wasn’t the target customer there. The kid was. The kid found value, and he demanded it. The mother didn’t (add dental insurance to the mix), and she winced.

This dilemma of whether upselling/cross-selling is ethical or not, has its roots in the means and ends discussion. The end goal of any business is more profit. It is the means that make all the difference.

Cross-selling and upselling can be used unethically, in a pushy sort of way, to try and make the customer shell out more. But such tactics don’t last long and is often to the peril of such businesses. More on this under the heading “The Fine Line Between A Friend and A Creep”

As a strategy, however, upselling and cross-selling should be used to ‘help customers win’ as illustrated beautifully in this video by Jeffrey Gittomer. Looked at it that way, upselling and cross-selling become more of friendly suggestions and a helping hand to make the ‘right’ purchase.

Remind Bob to buy some batteries along with his new wall-clock

Jack might be looking for something more powerful than an i5 processor, show him the i7, too.

So how does upselling help you?

#1 Increases Customer Retention

If you leave aside impulse buys, customers buy products/services to solve a problem. They are aware of the problem, but might not be aware of the best solution to the problem.

I don’t belong to the Steve Jobs bandwagon, but he got it right when he said ‘people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.’ Upselling or cross-selling done right helps the customer find more value than he was expecting. You become his best friend.

Best friends return and drive 43% of your revenues.

#2 Increases Average Order Value and Life-time Value

Romance your repeat customers. Do it like Jerry Maguire. And they will show you the money.

Show Me The Money

Should You Upsell or Cross-Sell in eCommerce?

Despite the many ways upsell and cross-sell are similar, there’s a clear winner in terms of numbers.

According to Predictive Intent, upsell can work upto 20 times better than cross-sell.

A little over 4% of all customers who were faced with an upsell bought it while less than 0.5% of customers took bait when shown a cross-sell.

But when it comes to the checkout page, cross-sell kills it with 3% conversions.

PRWD head of usability, Paul Rouke explains why cross-sell works best on checkout pages

Why Cross-Sell Works For Checkout Page

What and How Should You UpSell?

The data from Predictive Intent’s study show that a mere 4% of customers convert on average through upselling. It’s not much, you might think.

4% of customers will buy a better product if offered, and are ready to pay a premium for that.

They aren’t looking for ‘just enough’. They will not shy away from going the extra mile to make sure the product (solution to a problem) is just right.

One of the commonest ways to upsell is to suggest the next higher model. But when it’s just 4% that you are targeting, the margin for error is as thick as the edge of a blade.

To make the most of these unicorns, here are some suggestions on how to upsell:

  • Promote your most reviewed or most sold products
  • Give more prominent space for the upsell, display testimonials for the upsell
  • Make sure the upsells are not more than 25% costlier than the original product
  • Make add-on features like insurance pre-selected and ask customers to deselect if not required
  • If you have customer personas in place, use those to make relevant suggestions
  • Make suggestions relevant by giving context: why should I buy that instead of this?

What do I mean by that?

Don’t just shove a front-loader washing machine in my face when I’m looking at a top-loader; tell me why it’s meant for me: I’m the discerning heavy user, who likes taking extra care of clothes and saving more on electricity.

And always, always, make sure you suggest products from the same category. Don’t ask me to buy a 17 inch laptop when I’m shopping for a macbook air. They don’t satisfy the same needs.

Let’s not forget cross-sell either.

Cross-sell gets up to 3% conversions when used on the check-out page.

Use cross-sell techniques more on the check-out page to tap into impulse buying:

  • Cross-sell products should be at least 60% cheaper than the product added to cart
  • Go for products that are easily forgotten: filters for lenses, earphones for mobile phones, Lighter for a gas stove and of course, scrub for cows.. the possibilities are endless

Here’s how removing cross-sell options from the product page increased order by 5.6%.

If you are manually pushing upsell/cross-sell suggestions, it would be worthwhile to automate the system. Products should be categorized and related products should be tagged so as to enable automation.

Now comes the interesting part.

Why Does Upsell/Cross-Sell Work and How Can You Ace It?

Upsell and cross-sell works when you are able to ease the decision making process of a customer.

In 2006, a study by Bain showed that reducing complexity and narrowing choices can boost revenues by 5-40% and cut costs by 10-35%.

Upsell Smart By Narrowing Choices

Too many choices can be paralyzing. Professor Iyengar and her research assistants conducted a study on the effect of choices in the California Gourmet market. They set up booths of Wilkin and Sons Jams — one offered an assortment of 24 jams while the other had on display 6 jam varieties.

60% of the visitors stopped by the larger booth while only 40% flocked to the one with lower number of choices.

But 30% of visitors that sampled at the small booth made a buy while only 3% of the 60% visitors to the larger booth went on to make a purchase.

Our ability to make a decision reduces as number of choices increases.

Actionable Tip: Don’t bombard your customers with many choices. If they’ve already said no to an upsell product do not push for it. Think of upsell as a gentle suggestion, not an aggressive sales tactic.

Bundle To Reduce Decision Complexity

Every action the user has to take makes the decision making more complex. Think of ways to reduce the number of actions in a buying decision. We’ve a limited amount of energy to be spent on decision making.

Bundling brings together related products that are of relevance to a customer. Buying them individually involves more decision making, and more steps. Whereas through bundling, in one a customer is able to buy multiple products together.

It’s also important to understand how we make decisions. How rational are we at decision making?

Turns out, not so much.

Customers Make Irrational Decisions

Dan Ariely does a brilliant break down of the irrationality of decision making and explains how we are not always in control of the decisions we make.

Let’s talk organ donations. Bear with me, thank Dan later.

The graph below shows the percentage of people of different countries that agreed for organ donation.

Irrationality of Decision Making - Dan Ariely

It seems the people represented in Gold don’t seem to care about others all that much, while the ones in blue care infinitely. Is that a cultural difference at play here?

But these guys are neighbours: Sweden and Denmark , Netherlands and Belgium, Germany and France. So what’s happening here.

They were presented two widely different consent forms.

Difference in the opt-in forms used

In the countries on the left, people were presented with an ‘opt-in’ form. People had to check the box to opt-in for the organ donation program.

In the countries on the right, people were presented with an ‘opt-out’ form, which meant unless they unchecked the box, they would be opted-in by default.

Surprisingly, people everywhere behaved the same way. They did not take any action and let the default choice be.

Dan Ariely explains our behavior was based on the complexity of the decision.

  • We don’t have complete information on the subject
  • We can’t differentiate sufficiently between the two options
  • We can’t decide
  • We do nothing

Buridan’s Ass: An ass that is equally hungry and thirsty is placed precisely midway between a stack of hay and a pail of water. It will die of both hunger and thirst since it cannot make any rational decision to choose one over the other.

Actionable Tip: So in your purchase funnel, make those little extra features checked by default, and give customers the option to deselect. Make it clearly visible, and never attempt to do it on the sly.

Unsure customers will go with the default selection.

Use Price Anchoring: The Surprising Power of Dummy Choices

A few years back The Economist ran an ad that looked like this

Price Anchoring in The Economist Ad

You get a web-only subscription for $59, a print-only subscription for $125 or both, again, for $125! Needless to say, the print-only option is a dummy choice. Who in their right minds would ever choose an inferior option when the price is the same?

Dan took the ad and took it to a 100 MIT students to see what they would choose.

Price Anchoring At Play - with the dummy choice

An overwhelming majority chose what seemed the ‘best’ option – both print and web subscription at $125. 16% chose the web-only subscription. Nobody chose the print-only subscription at $125.

Dan then took off the middle choice — the print-only one. And ran the test again on 100 people. This is how the opt-in rates looked now.

No Price Anchoring - without the dummy choice

Surprisingly, the majority (68%) people chose the cheaper option when the dummy choice was removed. The print and web subscription that saw 84% subscription in the presence of the dummy choice now got a significantly low 32% subscription rate.

An inferior choice makes a similar but superior choice look better even when other options are cheaper.

Actionable Tip: consider a customer looking at a top-tier entry level DSLR. Show him a mid-level DSLR without add-ons for a marginally higher price and the same mid-level DSLR with add-ons at the same higher price.

Upsell it with the proper communication — how does the mid-level DSLR help the customer win? — and you have a good probability of making the upsell.

The Fine Line Between Being A Friend and A Creep

In 2009, Graham Charlton at eConsultancy tore apart VistaPrint’s and GoDaddy’s checkout process in this post. GoDaddy’s process at the time contained almost 10 steps from selecting a domain name to finally completing the order – most of which were forced cross-sell attempts.

VistaPrint seems to have taken the critique well, and in a post published 5 years later, eConsultancy looks at how VistaPrint revamped their checkout process, making it much more pleasant and much less in-your-face in the process.

Here’s what you shouldn’t do:

  1. Suggest upsells and cross-sells before a customer picks a product
  2. Bombard customers with many cross-sell and upsell products
  3. Sly tactics like hiding pre-selected add-ons in the hope customers don’t notice it

If there’s one thing that is your takeaway from this post, it has to be this:

Upsell and cross-sell techniques should be used as strategies to help customers make better decisions, faster.

The post Upsell and Cross-sell: Strategies To Boost eCommerce Revenue appeared first on VWO Blog.

Original source:  

Upsell and Cross-sell: Strategies To Boost eCommerce Revenue