Tag Archives: mobile

Thumbnail

Fixed Elements And Overlays In XD: Incredibly Easy And Fun Methods For Your Prototypes




Fixed Elements And Overlays In XD: Incredibly Easy And Fun Methods For Your Prototypes

Manuela Langella



(This article is kindly sponsored by Adobe.) A fixed element is an object you set to a fixed position on the artboard, allowing other items to scroll underneath. This way, you get a realistic simulation of scrolling on desktop and mobile. With the new overlay feature, you can simulate interactions such as lightbox effects and submenus.

How do famous brands use fixed elements and overlays? Well, let’s take a look at some examples to get some inspiration first.


Examples of brands using fixed elements and overlays


From left to right: 1) McDonald’s mobile home 2) A submenu slides up when you click on the hamburger menu. This is an example of an overlay. 3) Netflix’s Italian mobile website home screen. 4) Netflix sets its call to action as a fixed element. When you scroll down, the button stays fixed to the bottom of the screen. 5) Adobe mobile home 6) By clicking on the menu symbol, a submenu comes out as an overlay. (Large preview)

In this tutorial, we will learn how to set a menu bar as a fixed element and how to apply an overlay transition in a prototype, to simulate a menu opening from the click of a button. Both examples will be done in a mobile template, so that we can see our simulation in action directly on our mobile device. I’ve also included an Illustrator file with icons, which you can use to set up your examples quickly.

Let’s get started.

Preparing The Mobile Template

Open Adobe Xd, and choose the “iPhone 6/7/8 Plus” template. Then, go to File → Save As and choose a name to save your file (mine is mobile.xd).




(Large preview)

Let’s create a restaurant app in which people can select what to order from a list of food.

We will create two home layouts. The first one will be a long page, which we will use to see how fixed navigation works. The second will have a full-screen image, and the user will be able to click and open a menu bar that overlays the home screen.

To get started, click on the artboard icon on the left side, and click to the right of your current artboard. This will create a second identical artboard, near the first one.




(Large preview)

Let’s begin to design our elements, starting with the navigation bar. Click on the Rectangle tool (R) and draw a shape 414 pixels wide and 48 pixels tall. Set its color as #DE4F4F.




(Large preview)

I’ve prepared some icons in Illustrator to use in our layout. Just open the Illustrator file I’ve provided, and drag and drop the icons in your library, as shown below:

Large preview

In doing so, your icons will be automatically uploaded to your Adobe XD library, too.

To learn more about how to use libraries in different apps, read my earlier article, in which I go over some examples of how to add icons and elements to a library (in Illustrator, for instance) and then access them by opening that library in other apps (XD, in this case).

Once you have added the icons, open your XD library. You should see the icons in place:




(Large preview)

Drag and drop the icons on your artboard, as shown below. Position them, and make sure they are all about 25 pixels wide.




(Large preview)

Because we need our icons to be white, we have to modify these. We can directly modify them in the library, as demonstrated in my previous tutorial. With that done, we’ll see them updated in XD directly, without having to drag them from the library again.




(Large preview)

Now that the icons we want are in place, let’s create a logo. Let’s call this app “Gusto”. We’ll simply use the Text tool to add it. (I’m using the Leckerli One font here, but feel free to use whichever you like.) Align the logo to the middle of the navigation bar by clicking “Align center (horizontally)” in the right sidebar.




(Large preview)

Group all of the navigation elements together, and call the group “Menu”. To do this, select all elements in the left panel, right-click and choose “Group”.




(Large preview)




(Large preview)

Let’s add a beautiful hero image. I selected one from Pexels. Drag it on your artboard, and resize its height to 380 pixels.




(Large preview)

Now, click on Rectangle tool (R), and draw a rectangle the same size as the hero image, and place it on the image. Set a gradient for the rectangle’s color, using the values shown in the image below.




(Large preview)

(If you’d like more information about gradients, feel free to see my previous tutorial on how to apply them in XD.)

Insert some white text on the hero image and a circle for a button. Place a little circle with a number on the cart icon as well; we will need it later.




(Large preview)

Next, let’s increase the artboard’s height. We have to do that in order to insert new elements and to create the scrolling simulation.

After double-clicking on the artboard, set its height to 1265 pixels. Be sure that “Scrolling” is set to “Vertical” and that the “Viewport Height” is set to 736 pixels. A little blue marker will allow you to set the scrolling boundary towards the bottom of the artboard, as seen below:




(Large preview)

Let’s add in our content: Gusto’s mouthwatering menu. Click on the Rectangle tool (R) to create a rectangle for the picture that we will add.




(Large preview)

Drag and drop a picture directly into the box we just created; the image will automatically fit in it. Click on it once, and drag the little white circle from an angle inwards, in order to round all of the angles. Their values should be around 25, as shown in the picture below. Get rid of the border by unchecking the border value in the right sidebar.

Large preview

Click on the Text tool (T), and write a title on the right side of the image. I chose Lato as the font, at 14 pixels. Feel free to use another font, but maintain the 14-pixel size.




(Large preview)

Grab the Text tool (T) again, and write some lines for the description (Lato, 10 pixels) and for the price (Lato, 16 pixels).




(Large preview)

Take the Rectangle tool (R) and draw a rectangle of 100 by 30 pixels. Color it with the same orange we used on the button for the hero image; add the text “Add to Cart” with the Text tool (T); and add the cart icon from the library. All of these steps are covered in the short video below:

Finally, click on “Repeat Grid” to create a grid for this section. Once that’s done, we can change images and text easily, as shown in the video below:

If you want to learn more about how to create grids, follow my tutorial.

I used the following pictures from Pexels:

  • https://www.pexels.com/photo/close-up-of-food-247685/
  • https://www.pexels.com/photo/food-dinner-pasta-spaghetti-8500/
  • https://www.pexels.com/photo/selective-focus-photography-of-beef-steak-with-sauce-675951/
  • https://www.pexels.com/photo/food-plate-chocolate-dessert-132694/
  • https://www.pexels.com/photo/bread-food-sandwich-wood-62097/

Add some titles, descriptions and buttons.




(Large preview)

Finally, let’s add a rectangle for the footer, with the text “Gusto” in the center. Set the rectangle’s fill color to #211919.




(Large preview)

Yes! We’ve completed the first template design. Let’s set up our second template before we begin prototyping.

For our second mobile layout, just copy and paste the navigation and hero section from the first layout, and size the hero image to be full screen. Then, add a “Try Now” button to it.

In the short video below, I show you how to copy and paste elements into the second artboard, create a new button with the Rectangle tool (R) and write text on it with the Text tool (T).




(Large preview)

Excellent! Let’s move on and create our prototypes.

Setting Fixed Elements

We want to make the top navigation of our layout fixed, making it stick to its position as we scroll the artboard.

Click on your “Menu” group to select it, and select “Fixed Position” in the right sidebar.




(Large preview)

Important: In order for all elements to scroll under the menu, the menu should be on top of all other elements. Simply place the menu folder at the top, in the left sidebar.




(Large preview)

Now, to see your fixed navigation in action, simply click on the “Desktop Preview” button and try scrolling. You should see this:

Large preview

Tremendously simple, isn’t it?

Setting Overlay Elements

To see how overlays work in XD, we first need to create the elements that will be overlaid. When you click an item in the menu, what would you expect to happen? Exactly: A submenu should appear.

Let’s create three different submenus, like the ones in the image below, using the Rectangle tool (R). I chose a rectangle because the menu will overlay the screen, so it will cover not the whole artboard but just a part of it.

Follow the video below to see how I created the three overlay menus. You will see that I used the Rectangle tool (R), Line tool (L) and Text tool (T). We’re using rectangles to create the menu backgrounds because we need an object to overlay the screen. I’ve included the icons in the Adobe Illustrator file.

Below, you’ll see how I use “Repeat Grid” and how I modify elements inside of it.

Here is the final result:




(Large preview)

We will work on the second home layout at this point.

Set the visual mode to “Prototype”, selecting it from the top left of the screen.




(Large preview)

Next, double-click on the little hamburger menu icon, and drag and drop the little blue arrow onto the “Overlay 1” artboard. When the popup window appears, choose “Overlay” and “Slide right”. Then, click the “Desktop Preview” button to see it in action.

Large preview

Let’s do the same thing with the user icon and cart icon. Double-click on the user icon in Prototype mode, and drag and drop the little blue arrow onto the “Overlay 2” artboard. When the popup window appears, choose “Overlay” and “Slide left”. Then, click the “Desktop Preview” button to see it in action.

Large preview

Now, double-click on the cart icon in Prototype mode, and drag and drop the little blue arrow onto the “Overlay 3” artboard. When the popup windows appears, choose “Overlay” and “Slide left”. Click the “Desktop Preview” button again to see it work.

Large preview

We’re done! These great new features are super-easy to learn, and they’ll add a new level of interactivity simulation to your prototypes.

Quick tip: Want to preview the layout on your phone? Just upload your XD file to Creative Cloud, download the XD app for mobile, and open your document.

Here’s what we have learned in this tutorial:

  • set and create mobile layouts and elements,
  • set fixed elements,
  • use overlays to simulate a click-to-open submenu.

Where would you use fixed elements or overlays? Feel free to share your examples in the comments below!

Smashing Editorial
(il, yk)


Excerpt from: 

Fixed Elements And Overlays In XD: Incredibly Easy And Fun Methods For Your Prototypes

Thumbnail

Expert Email Design Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Two

Klaviyo:BOS

Welcome! For those of you just tuning in: Last week I attended Klaviyo: BOS, a two-day summit focused on growth tactics and business strategy for online merchants and ecommerce brands. Session topics ranged from Facebook Messenger bots and segmentation to email design and marketing automation. I took a ton of very squiggly, sometimes illegible notes and thought it would be a shame to keep them on paper, so I sat down and started writing a blog post titled “Expert SEO and CRO Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit.” I was at about 2,000 words when I had to take a break, so here…

The post Expert Email Design Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Two appeared first on The Daily Egg.

See more here:  

Expert Email Design Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Two

Thumbnail

The Importance Of Manual Accessibility Testing




The Importance Of Manual Accessibility Testing

Eric Bailey



Earlier this year, a man drove his car into a lake after following directions from a smartphone app that helps drivers navigate by issuing turn-by-turn directions. Unfortunately, the app’s programming did not include instructions to avoid roads that turn into boat launches.

From the perspective of the app, it did exactly what it was programmed to do, i.e. to find the most optimal route from point A to point B given the information made available to it. From the perspective of the man, it failed him by not taking the real world into account.

The same principle applies for accessibility testing.

Designing For Accessibility And Inclusion

The more inclusive you are to the needs of your users, the more accessible your design is. Let’s take a closer look at the different lenses of accessibility through which you can refine your designs. Read article →

Automated Accessibility Testing

I am going to assume that you’re reading this article because you’re interested in learning how to test your websites and web apps to ensure they’re accessible. If you want to learn more about why accessibility is necessary, the topic has been covered extensively elsewhere.

Automated accessibility testing is a process where you use a series of scripts to test for the presence, or lack of certain conditions in code. These conditions are dictated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), a standard by the W3C that outlines how to make digital experiences accessible.

For example, an automated accessibility test might check to see if the tabindex attribute is present and if its value is greater than 0. The pseudocode would be something like:


A flowchart that asks if the tabindex value is present. If yes, it asks if the tabindex value is greater than 0. If it is greater than zero, it fails. If not, it passes. If no tabindex value is present, it also passes.

Failures can then be collected and used to generate reports that disclose the number, and severity of accessibility issues. Certain automated accessibility products can also integrate as a Continuous Integration or Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) tool, presenting just-in-time warnings to developers when they attempt to add code to a central repository.

These automated programs are incredible resources. Modern websites and web apps are complicated things that involve hundreds of states, thousands of lines of code, and complicated multi-screen interactions. It’d be absurd to expect a human (or a team of humans) to mind all the code controlling every possible permutation of the site, to say nothing of things like regressions, software rot, and A/B tests.

Automation really shines here. It can repeatedly and tirelessly pour over these details with perfect memory, at a rate far faster than any human is capable of.

However…

Automated accessibility tests aren’t a turnkey solution, nor are they a silver bullet. There are some limitations to keep in mind when using them.

Thinking To Think Of Things

One of both the best and worst aspects of the web is that there are many different ways to implement a solution to a problem. While this flexibility has kept the web robust and adaptable and ensured it outlived other competing technologies, it also means that you’ll sometimes see code that is, um, creatively implemented.

The test suite is only as good as what its author thought to check for. A naïve developer might only write tests for the happy path, where everyone writes semantic HTML, fault-tolerant JavaScript, and well-scoped CSS. However, this is the real world. We need to acknowledge that things like tight deadlines, unfamiliarity with the programming language, atypical user input, and sketchy 3rd party scripts exist.

For example, the automated accessibility testing site Tenon.io wisely includes a rule that checks to see if a form element has both a label element and an aria-label associated with it, and if the text strings for both declarations differ. If they do, it will flag it as an issue, as the visible label may be different than what someone would hear if they were navigating using a screen reader.

If you’re not using a testing service that includes this rule, it won’t be reported. The code will still “pass”, but it’s passing by omission, not because it’s actually accessible.

State

Some automated accessibility tests cannot parse the various states of interactive content. Critical parts of the user interface are effectively invisible to automation unless the test is run when the content is in an active, selected, or disabled state.

By interactive content, I mean things that the user has yet to take action on, or aren’t present when the page loads. Unopened modals, collapsed accordions, hidden tab content and carousel slides are all examples.

It takes sophisticated software to automatically test the various states of every component within a single screen, let alone across an entire web app or website. While it is possible to augment testing software with automated accessibility checks, it is very resource-intensive, usually requiring a dedicated team of engineers to set up and maintain.

“Valid” Markup

Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) is a set of attributes that extend HTML to allow it to describe interaction in a way that can be better understood by assistive technologies. For example, the aria-expanded attribute can be toggled by JavaScript to programmatically communicate if a component is in an expanded (true) or collapsed (false) state. This is superior to toggling a CSS class like .is-expanded, where the update in state is only communicated visually.

Just having the presence of ARIA does not guarantee that it will automatically make something accessible. Unfortunately, and in spite of its first rule of use, ARIA is commonly misunderstood, and consequently abused. A lot of off-the-shelf code has this problem, perpetuating the issue.

For example, certain ARIA attributes and values can only be applied to certain elements. If incorrectly applied, assistive technology will ignore or misreport the declaration. Certain roles, known as Abstract Roles, only exist to set up the overall taxonomy and should never be placed in markup.

<button role="command">Save</button>

<!-- Never do this -->

To further complicate the issue, support for ARIA is varied across browsers. While an attribute may be used appropriately, the browser may not communicate the declared role, property, or state to assistive technology.

There is also the scenario where ARIA can be applied to an element and be valid from a technical standpoint, yet be unusable from an assistive technology perspective. For example:

<h1 aria-hidden=“true”>
  Tired of unevenly cooked asparagus? Try this tip from the world’s oldest cookbook.
</h1>

This one Weird Trick.

The aria-hidden declaration will remove the presence of content from assistive technology, yet allow it to be still rendered visibly on the page. It’s a problematic pattern.

Headings — especially first-level headings — are vital in communicating the purpose of a page. If a person is using assistive technology to navigate, the aria-hidden declaration applied to the h1 element will make it difficult for them to quickly determine the page’s purpose. It will force them to navigate around the rest of the page to gain context, an annoying and labor-intensive process.

Some automated accessibility tests may scan the code and not report an error since the syntax itself is valid. The automation has no way of knowing the greater context of the declaration’s use.

This isn’t to say you should completely avoid using ARIA! When authored with care and deliberation, ARIA can fix the gaps in accessibility that sometimes plague complicated interactions; it provides some much-needed context to the people who rely on assistive technology.

Much-Needed Context

As the soggy car demonstrates, computers are awful at understanding the overall situation of the outside world. It’s up to us humans to be the ultimate arbiters in determining if what the computer spits out is useful or not.

Debunking

Before we discuss how to provide appropriate context, there are a few common misunderstandings about accessibility work that need to be addressed:

First, not all screen reader users are blind. In addition to all the points Adrian Roselli outlines in his post, some food for thought: the use of voice assistants is on the rise. When’s the last time you spoke to Siri or Alexa?

Second, accessibility is more than just screen readers. The rules outlined in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines ensure that the largest number of people can read and operate technology, regardless of ability or circumstance.

For example, the rule that stipulates a website or web app needs to be able to work regardless of device orientation benefits everyone. Some people may need to mount their device in a fixed location in a specific orientation, such as in landscape mode on the arm of a wheelchair. Others might want to lie in bed and watch a movie, or better investigate a product photo (pinch and pull zooming will also be helpful to have here).

Third, disabilities can be conditional and can be brought about by your environment. It can be a short-term thing, like rain on your glasses, sleep deprivation, or an allergies-induced migraine. It can also be longer-term, such as a debilitating illness, broken limb, or a depressive episode. Multiple, compounding conditions can (and do) affect individuals.

That all being said, many accessibility fixes that help screen readers work properly also benefit other assistive technologies.

Get Your Feet Wet

Knowing where to begin can be overwhelming. Consider Michiel Bijl’s great advice:

“Before you release a website, tab through it. If you cannot see where you are on the page after each tab; you're not finished yet. #a11y

Tab through a few of the main user flows on your website or web app to determine if all interactive components’ focus states are visually apparent, and if they can be activated via keyboard input. If there’s something you can click or tap on that isn’t getting highlighted when receiving keyboard focus, take note of it. Also pay attention to the order interactive components are highlighted when focused — it should match the reading order of the site.

An obvious focus state and logical tab order go a great way to helping make your site accessible. These two features benefit a wide variety of assistive technology, including, but not limited to, screen readers.

If you need a baseline to compare your testing to, Dave Rupert has an excellent project called A11Y Nutrition Cards, which outlines expected behavior for common interactive components. In addition, Scott O’Hara maintains a project called a11y Styled Form Controls. This project provides examples of components such as switches, checkboxes, and radio buttons that have well-tested and documented support for assistive technology. A clever reader might use one of these resources to help them try out the other!


A screenshot of homepage for the a11y Styled Form Controls website placed over a screenshot of the Nutrition Cards for Accessible Components website.


(Large preview)

The Fourth Myth

With that out of the way, I’m going to share a fourth myth with you: not every assistive technology user is a power user. Like with any other piece of software, there’s a learning curve involved.

In her post about Aaptiv’s redesign, Lisa Zhu discovers that their initial accessibility fix wasn’t intuitive. While their first implementation was “technically” correct, it didn’t line up with how people who rely on VoiceOver actually use their devices. A second solution simplified the interaction to better align with their expectations.

Don’t assume that just because something hypothetically functions that it’s actually usable. Trust your gut: if it feels especially awkward, cumbersome, or tedious to operate for you, chances are it’ll be for others.

Dive Right In

While not every accessibility issue is a screen reader issue, you should still get in the habit of testing your site with one. Not an emulator, simulator, or some other proxy solution.

If you find yourself struggling to operate a complicated interactive component using basic screen reader commands, it’s probably a sign that the component needs to be simplified. Chances are that the simplification will help non-assistive technology users as well. Good design benefits everyone!

The same goes for navigation. If it’s difficult to move around the website or web app, it’s probably a sign that you need to update your heading structure and landmark roles. Both of these features are used by assistive technology to quickly and efficiently navigate.


Two code examples for a sidebar. One uses a div element, while the others uses an aside element. Both have the class of sidebar applied to them, with a subheading of Recent Posts.


Both of these are sidebars, but only one of them is semantically described as such. A computer doesn’t know what a sidebar is, so it’s up to you to tell it.

Another good thing to review is the text content used to describe your links. Hopping from link to link is another common assistive technology navigation technique; some screen readers can even generate a list of all link content on the page:

“Think before you link! Your "helpful" click here links look like this to a screen reader user. ALT = JAWS links list”

Tweet by Neil Milliken

Neil Milliken

When navigating using an ordered list devoid of the surrounding non-link content, avoiding ambiguous terms like “click here” or “more info” can go a long way to ensuring a person can understand the overall meaning of the page. As a bonus, it’ll help alleviate cognitive concerns for everyone, as you are more accurately explaining what a user should expect after activating a link.

How To Test

Each screen reader has a different approach to how it announces content. This is intentional. It’s a balancing act between the product’s features, the operating system it is installed on, the form factor it is available in, and the types of input it can receive.

The Browser Wars taught us the folly of developing for only one browser. Similarly, we should not cater to a single screen reader. It is important to note that many people rely exclusively on a specific screen reader and browser combination — by circumstance, preference, or necessity’making this all the more important. However, there is a caveat: each screen reader works better when used with a specific browser, typically the one that allows it access to the greatest amount of accessibility API information.

All of these screen readers can be used for free, provided you have the hardware. You can also virtualize that hardware, either for free or on the cheap.

Automate

Automated accessibility tests should be your first line of defense. They will help you catch a great deal of nitpicky, easily-preventable errors before they get committed. Repeated errors may also signal problems in template logic, where one upstream tweak can fix multiple pages. Identifying and resolving these issues allows you to spend your valuable manual testing time much more wisely.

It may also be helpful to log accessibility issues in a place where people can collaborate, such as Google Sheets. Quantifying the frequency and severity of errors can lead to good things like updated documentation, opportunities for lunch and learn education, and other healthy changes to organizational workflow.

Much like manual testing with a variety of screen readers, it is recommended that you use a combination of automated tools to prevent gaps.

Windows

The two most popular screen readers on Windows are JAWS and NVDA.

JAWS

JAWS (Job Access With Speech) is the most popular and feature-rich screen reader on the market. It works best with Firefox and Chrome, with concessions for supporting Internet Explorer. Although it is pay software, it can be operated in full in demo mode for 40 minutes at a time (this should be more than sufficient to perform basic testing).

NVDA

NVDA (NonVisual Desktop Access) is free, although a donation is strongly encouraged. It is a feature-rich alternative to JAWS. It works best with Firefox.

Narrator

Windows comes bundled with a built-in screen reader called Narrator. It works well with Edge, but has difficulty interfacing with other browsers.

Apple

macOS

VoiceOver is a powerful screen reader that comes bundled with macOS. Use it in conjunction with Safari, first making sure that full keyboard access is enabled.

iOS

VoiceOver is also included in iOS, and is the most popular mobile screen reader. Much like its desktop counterpart, it works best with Safari. An interesting note here is that according to the 2017 WebAIM screen reader survey, a not-insignificant amount of respondents augment their phone with external hardware keyboards.

Android

Google recently folded TalkBack, their mobile screen reader, into a larger collection of accessibility services called the Android Accessibility Suite. It works best with Mobile Chrome. While many Android apps are notoriously inaccessible, it is still worth testing on this platform. Android’s growing presence in emerging markets, as well as increasing internet use amongst elderly and lower-income demographics, should give pause for consideration.

Popular screen readers
Screen Reader Platform Preferred Browser(s) Manual Launch Quit
JAWS Windows Chrome, Firefox JAWS 2018 Documentation Launch JAWS as you would any other Windows application Insert + F4
NVDA Windows Firefox NVDA 2018.2.1 User Guide Ctrl + Alt + N Insert + Q
Narrator Windows Edge Get started with Narrator Windows key + Control + Enter Windows key + Control + Enter
VoiceOver macOS Safari VoiceOver Getting Started Guide Command + F5 or tap the Touch ID button 3 times Command + F5 or tap the Touch ID button 3 times
Mobile VoiceOver iOS Mobile Safari VoiceOver overview – iPhone User Guide Tell Siri to, “Turn on VoiceOver.” or activate in Settings Tell Siri to, “Turn off VoiceOver.” or deactivate in Settings
Android Accessibility Suite Android Mobile Chrome Get started on Android with TalkBack Press both volume keys for 3 seconds Press both volume keys for 3 seconds

Call The Professionals

If you do not require the use of assistive technology on a frequent basis then you do not fully understand how the people who do interact with the web.

Much like traditional user testing, being too close to the thing you created may cloud your judgment. Empathy exercises are a good way to become aware of the problem space, but you should not use yourself as a litmus test for whether the entire experience is truly accessible. You are not the expert.

If your product serves a huge population of users, if its core base of users trends towards having a higher probability of disability conditions (specialized product, elderly populations, foreign language speakers, etc.), and/or if it is required to be compliant by law, I would strongly encourage allocating a portion of your budget for testing by people with disabilities.

“At what point does your organisation stop supporting a browser in terms of % usage? 18% of the global pop. have an #Accessibility requirement, 2% people have a colour vision deficient. But you consider 2% IE usage support more important? Support everyone be inclusive.”

Mark Wilcock

This isn’t to say you should completely delegate the responsibility to these testers. Much as how automated accessibility testing can detect smaller issues to remove, a first round of basic manual testing helps professional testers focus their efforts on the complicated interactions you need an expert’s opinion on. In addition to optimizing the value of their time, it helps to get you more comfortable triaging. It is also a professional courtesy, plain and simple.

There are a few companies that perform manual testing by people with disabilities:

Designed Experiences

We also need to acknowledge the other large barrier to accessible sites that can’t be automated away: poor user experience.

User experience can make or break a product. Your code can compile perfectly, your time to first paint can be lightning quick, and your Webpack setup can be beyond reproach. All this is irrelevant if the end result is unusable. User experience encompasses all users, including those who navigate with the aid of assistive technology.

If a person cannot operate your website or web app, they’ll abandon it and not think twice. If they are forced to use your site to get a service unavailable by other means, there’s a growing precedent for taking legal action (and rightly so).

As a discipline, user experience can be roughly divided into two parts: how something looks and how it behaves They’re intrinsically interlinked concepts — work on either may affect both. While accessible design is a topic unto itself, there are some big-picture things we can keep in mind when approaching accessible user experiences from a testing perspective:

How It Looks

The WCAG does a great job covering a lot of the basics of good design. Color contrast, font size, user-facing state: a lot of these things can be targeted by automation. What you should pay attention to is all the atomic, difficult to quantify bits that compound to create your designs. Things like the words you choose, the fonts you use to display them, the spacing between things, affordances for interaction, the way you handle your breakpoints, etc.

“A good font should tell you:
the difference between m and rn
the difference between I and l
the difference between O and 0.”

mallory, alice & bob

It’s one of those “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” situations. Smart, accessible defaults can save countless time and money down the line. Lean and mean startups all the way up to multinational conglomerates value efficient use of resources, and this is one of those places where you can really capitalize on that. Put your basic design patterns — say collected in something like a mood board or living style guide — in front of people early and often to see if your designed intent is clear.

How It Behaves

An enticing color palette and collection of thoughtfully-curated stock photography only go so far. Eventually, you’re going to have to synthesize all your design decisions to create something that addresses a need.

Behavior can be as small as a microinteraction, or as large as finding a product and purchasing it. What’s important here is to make sure that all the barriers to a person trying to accomplish the task at hand are removed.

If you’re using personas, don’t create a separate persona for a user with a disability. Instead, blend accessibility considerations into your existing ones. As a persona is an abstracted representation of the types of users you want to cater to, you want to make sure the kinds of conditions they may be experiencing are included. Disability conditions aren’t limited to just physical impairments, either. Things like a metered data plan, non-native language, or anxiety are all worth integrating.

“When looking at your site's analytics, remember that if you don't see many users on lower end phones or from more remote areas, it's not because they aren't a target for your product or service. It is because your mobile experience sucks.
As a developer, it's your job to fix it.”

Estelle Weyl

User testing, ideally simulating conditions as close to what a person would be doing in the real world (including their individual device preferences and presence of assistive technology), is also key. Verifying that people are actually able to make the logical leaps necessary to operate your interface addresses a lot of cognitive concerns, a difficult-to-quantify yet vital thing to accommodate.

We Shape Our Tools, Our Tools Shape Us

Our tool use corresponds to the kind of work we do: Carpenters drive nails with hammers, chefs cook using skillets, surgeons cut with scalpels. It’s a self-reinforcing phenomenon, and it tends to lead to over-categorization.

Sometimes this over-categorization gets in the way of us remembering to consider the real world. A surgeon might have a carpentry hobby; a chef might be a retired veterinarian. It’s important to understand that accessibility is everyone’s responsibility, and there are many paths to making our websites and web apps the best they can be for everyone. To paraphrase Mikey Ilagan, accessibility is a holistic practice, essential to some but useful to all.

Used with discretion, ARIA is a very good tool to have at our disposal. We shouldn’t shy away from using it, provided we understand the how and why behind why they work.

The same goes for automated accessibility tests, as well as GPS apps. They’re great tools to have, just get to know the terrain a little bit first.

Resources

Automated Accessibility Tools

Professional Services

References

Quick Tests

Further Reading

Smashing Editorial
(rb, ra, yk, il)


Read the article: 

The Importance Of Manual Accessibility Testing

Thumbnail

Suffering From Analysis Paralysis? You Should See An Optimization Specialist

crazy egg analysis tips

Have you ever faced down a giant table or spreadsheet of data and thought, “I have no idea what to do with this”? As marketers we’ve all probably had those deer-in-the-headlights moments once or twice, where we’ve floundered to figure out what the hell we’re looking at. Crazy Egg was built on the premise of simplicity and ease of use, for those that I fondly like to call “Google Analytics-averse” – but there’s always room for improvement when it comes to helping folks switch from analysis to action mode. Whether you’re a UX designer, small business owner, SEO expert or…

The post Suffering From Analysis Paralysis? You Should See An Optimization Specialist appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link: 

Suffering From Analysis Paralysis? You Should See An Optimization Specialist

Thumbnail

Website Speed Optimization: Guide to the Best Techniques (2018)

website-speed-optimization-guide

We live in a fast-paced world. People want things as quickly as possible — and they’re unhappy when something takes too long. Website speed optimization takes away one barrier between you and your audience. Think about the last time you encountered a slow-loading website. You might have closed out the browser tab entirely or felt less inclined to patronize the site once it finally loaded. Google understands that consumers want fast access to information, products, and services. Consequently, it rewards websites that load quickly. Let’s take a look at a few ways in which you can use website speed optimization…

The post Website Speed Optimization: Guide to the Best Techniques (2018) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link to article – 

Website Speed Optimization: Guide to the Best Techniques (2018)

Thumbnail

Google Mobile First Index 2018: A Simple Guide to Build your Strategy

what-is-mobile-first-index

Google’s mobile first index has created quite an upheaval in the marketing world — and for good reason. If Google is taking mobile websites more seriously, shouldn’t you? After all, if you want Google to serve up your content to searchers, you need to know how Google crawls and assesses your website. Otherwise, you fall behind the competition. But don’t panic. If you don’t have a mobile website ready to go now, you’re not doomed to haunt the 100th page of the Google SERPs forever. In fact, Google is slowly rolling out this new strategy, roping in more websites as…

The post Google Mobile First Index 2018: A Simple Guide to Build your Strategy appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link to original: 

Google Mobile First Index 2018: A Simple Guide to Build your Strategy

Thumbnail

A Reference Guide For Typography In Mobile Web Design




A Reference Guide For Typography In Mobile Web Design

Suzanna Scacca



With mobile taking a front seat in search, it’s important that websites are designed in a way that prioritize the best experience possible for their users. While Google has brought attention to elements like pop-ups that might disrupt the mobile experience, what about something as seemingly simple as choice of typography?

The answer to the typography question might seem simple enough: what works on desktop should work on mobile so long as it scales well. Right?

While that would definitely make it a lot easier on web designers, that’s not necessarily the case. The problem in making that statement a decisive one is that there haven’t been a lot of studies done on the subject of mobile typography in recent years. So, what I intend to do today is give a brief summary of what it is we know about typography in web design, and then see what UX experts and tests have been able to reveal about using typography for mobile.

Understanding The Basics Of Typography In Modern Web Design

Look, I know typography isn’t the most glamorous of subjects. And, being a web designer, it might not be something you spend too much time thinking about, especially if clients bring their own style guides to you prior to beginning a project.

That said, with mobile-first now here, typography requires additional consideration.

Typography Terminology

Let’s start with the basics: terminology you’ll need to know before digging into mobile typography best practices.

Typography: This term refers to the technique used in styling, formatting, and arranging “printed” (as opposed to handwritten) text.

Typeface: This is the classification system used to label a family of characters. So, this would be something like Arial, Times New Roman, Calibri, Comic Sans, etc.

Typefaces in Office 365


A typical offering of typefaces in word processing applications. (Source: Google Docs) (Large preview)

Font: This drills down further into a website’s typeface. The font details the typeface family, point size, and any special stylizations applied. For instance, 11-point Arial in bold.

3 essential elements to define a font


An example of the three elements that define a font. (Source: Google Docs) (Large preview)

Size: There are two ways in which to refer to the size (or height) of a font: the word processing size in points or the web design size in pixels. For the purposes of talking about mobile web design, we use pixels.

Here is a line-by-line comparison of various font sizes:

An example of font sizes


An example of how the same string of text appears at different sizes. (Source: Google Docs) (Large preview)

As you can see in WordPress, font sizes are important when it comes to establishing hierarchy in header text:

An example of font size choices in WordPress


Header size defaults available with a WordPress theme. (Source: WordPress) (Large preview)

Weight: This is the other part of defining a typeface as a font. Weight refers to any special styles applied to the face to make it appear heavier or lighter. In web design, weight comes into play in header fonts that complement the typically weightless body text.

Here is an example of options you could choose from in the WordPress theme customizer:

An example of font weight choices


Sample font weights available with a WordPress theme. (Source: WordPress) (Large preview)

Kerning: This pertains to the space between two letters. It can be adjusted in order to create a more aesthetically pleasing result while also enhancing readability. You will need a design software like Photoshop to make these types of adjustments.

Tracking: Tracking, or letter-spacing, is often confused with kerning as it too relates to adding space in between letters. However, whereas kerning adjusts spacing between two letters in order to improve appearances, tracking is used to adjust spacing across a line. This is used more for the purposes of fixing density issues while reading.

To give you a sense for how this differs, here’s an example from Mozilla on how to use tracking to change letter-spacing:

Normal tracking example


This is what normal tracking looks like. (Source: Mozilla) (Large preview)

-1px tracking example


This is what (tighter) -1px tracking looks like. (Source: Mozilla) (Large preview)

1px tracking example


This is what (looser) 1px tracking looks like. (Source: Mozilla) (Large preview)

Leading: Leading, or line spacing, is the amount of distance granted between the baselines of text (the bottom line upon which a font rests). Like tracking, this can be adjusted to fix density issues.

If you’ve been using word processing software for a while, you’re already familiar with leading. Single-spaced text. Double-spaced text. Even 1.5-spaced text. That’s leading.

The Role Of Typography In Modern Web Design

As for why we care about typography and each of the defining characteristics of it in modern web design, there’s a good reason for it. While it would be great if a well-written blog post or super convincing sales jargon on a landing page were enough to keep visitors happy, that’s not always the case. The choices you make in terms of typography can have major ramifications on whether or not people even give your site’s copy a read.

These are some of the ways in which typography affects your end users:

Reinforce Branding
Typography is another way in which you create a specific style for your web design. If images all contain clean lines and serious faces, you would want to use an equally buttoned-up typeface.

Set the Mood
It helps establish a mood or emotion. For instance, a more frivolous and light-bodied typeface would signal to users that the brand is fun, young and doesn’t take itself seriously.

Give It a Voice
It conveys a sense of personality and voice. While the actual message in the copy will be able to dictate this well, using a font that reinforces the tone would be a powerful choice.

Encourage Reading
As you can see, there are a number of ways in which you can adjust how type appears on a screen. If you can give it the right sense of speed and ease, you can encourage more users to read through it all.

Allow for Scanning
Scanning or glancing (which I’ll talk about shortly) is becoming more and more common as people engage with the web on their smart devices. Because of this, we need ways to format text to improve scannability and this usually involves lots of headers, pull quotes and in-line lists (bulleted, numbered, etc.).

Improve Accessibility
There is a lot to be done in order to design for accessibility. Your choice of font plays a big part in that, especially as the mobile experience has to rely less on big, bold designs and swatches of color and more on how quickly and well you can get visitors to your message.

Because typography has such a diverse role in the user experience, it’s a matter that needs to be taken seriously when strategizing new designs. So, let’s look at what the experts and tests have to say about handling it for mobile.

Typography For Mobile Web Design: What You Need To Know

Too small, too light, too fancy, too close together… You can run into a lot of problems if you don’t strike the perfect balance with your choice of typography in design. On mobile, however, it’s a bit of a different story.

I don’t want to say that playing it safe and using the system default from Google or Apple is the way to go. After all, you work so hard to develop unique, creative and eye-catching designs for your users. Why would you throw in the towel at this point and just slap Roboto all over your mobile website?

We know what the key elements are in defining and shaping a typeface and we also know how powerful fonts are within the context of a website. So, let’s drill down and see what exactly you need to do to make your typography play well with mobile.

1. Size

In general, the rule of thumb is that font size needs to be 16 pixels for mobile websites. Anything smaller than that could compromise readability for visually impaired readers. Anything too much larger could also make reading more difficult. You want to find that perfect Goldilocks formula and, time and time again, it comes back to 16 pixels.

In general, that rule is a safe one to play by when it comes to the main body text of your mobile website. However, what exactly are you allowed to do for header text? After all, you need to be able to distinguish your main headlines from the rest of the text. Not just for the sake of calling attention to bigger messages, but also for the purposes of increasing scannability of a mobile web page.

The Nielsen Norman Group reported on a study from MIT that covered this exact question. What can you do about text that users only have to glance at? In other words, what sort of sizing can you use for short strings of header text?

Here is what they found:

Short, glanceable strings of text lead to faster reading and greater comprehension when:

  • They are larger in size (specifically, 4mm as opposed to 3mm).
  • They are in all caps.
  • Lettering width is regular (and not condensed).

In sum:

Lowercase lettering required 26% more time for accurate reading than uppercase, and condensed text required 11.2% more time than regular. There were also significant interaction effects between case and size, suggesting that the negative effects of lowercase letters are exacerbated with small font sizes.

I’d be interested to see how the NerdWallet website does, in that case. While I do love the look of this, they have violated a number of these sizing and styling suggestions:

The NerdWallet home page


NerdWallet’s use of all-caps and smaller font sizes on mobile. (Source: NerdWallet) (Large preview)

Having looked at this a few times now, I do think the choice of a smaller-sized font for the all-caps header is an odd choice. My eyes are instantly drawn to the larger, bolder text beneath the main header. So, I think there is something to MIT’s research.

Flywheel Sports, on the other hand, does a great job of exemplifying this point.

The Flywheel Sports home page


Flywheel Sports’ smart font choices for mobile. (Source: Flywheel Sports) (Large preview)

There’s absolutely no doubt where the visitors’ attention needs to go: to the eye-catching header. It’s in all caps, it’s larger than all the other text on the page, and, although the font is incredibly basic, its infusion with a custom handwritten-style type looks really freaking cool here. I think the only thing I would fix here is the contrast between the white and yellow fonts and the blue background.

Just remember: this only applies to the sizing (and styling) of header text. If you want to keep large bodies of text readable, stick to the aforementioned sizing best practices.

2. Color and Contrast

Color, in general, is an important element in web design. There’s a lot you can convey to visitors by choosing the right color palette for designs, images and, yes, your text. But it’s not just the base color of the font that matters, it’s also the contrast between it and the background on which it sits (as evidenced by my note above about Flywheel Sports).

For some users, a white font on top of a busy photo or a lighter background may not pose too much of an issue. But “too much” isn’t really acceptable in web design. There should be no issues users encounter when they read text on a website, especially from an already compromised view of it on mobile.

Which is why color and contrast are top considerations you have to make when styling typography for mobile.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) has clear recommendations regarding how to address color contrast in section 1.4.3. At a minimum, the WCAG suggests that a contrast of 4.5 to 1 should be established between the text and background for optimal readability. There are a few exceptions to the rule:

  • Text sized using 18-point or a bold 14-point only needs a contrast of 3 to 1.
  • Text that doesn’t appear in an active part of the web page doesn’t need to abide by this rule.
  • The contrast of text within a logo can be set at the designer’s discretion.

If you’re unsure of how to establish that ratio between your font’s color and the background upon which it sits, use a color contrast checking tool like WebAIM.

WebAIM color contrast checker


An example of how to use the WebAIM color contrast checker tool. (Source: WebAIM) (Large preview)

The one thing I would ask you to be mindful of, however, is using opacity or other color settings that may compromise the color you’ve chosen. While the HEX color code will check out just fine in the tool, it may not be an accurate representation of how the color actually displays on a mobile device (or any screen, really).

To solve this problem and ensure you have a high enough contrast for your fonts, use a color eyedropper tool built into your browser like the ones for Firefox or Chrome. Simply hover the eyedropper over the color of the background (or font) on your web page, and let it tell you what the actual color code is now.

Here is an example of this in action: Dollar Shave Club.

This website has a rotation of images in the top banner of the home page. The font always remains white, but the background rotates.

Dollar Shave Club grey banner


Dollar Shave Club’s home page banner with a grey background. (Source: Dollar Shave Club) (Large preview)

Dollar Shave Club beige banner


Dollar Shave Club’s home page banner with a beige/taupe background. (Source: Dollar Shave Club) (Large preview)

Dollar Shave Club purple banner


Dollar Shave Club’s home page banner with a purple background. (Source: Dollar Shave Club) (Large preview)

Based on what we know now, the purple is probably the only one that will pass with flying colors. However, for the purposes of showing you how to work through this exercise, here is what the eyedropper tool says about the HEX color codes for each of the backgrounds:

  • Grey: #9a9a9a
  • Beige/taupe: #ffd0a8
  • Purple: #4c2c59.

Here is the contrast between these colors and the white font:

  • Grey: 2.81 to 1
  • Beige/taupe: 1.42 to 1
  • Purple: 11.59 to 1.

Clearly, the grey and beige backgrounds are going to lend themselves to a very poor experience for mobile visitors.

Also, if I had to guess, I’d say that “Try a risk-free Starter Set now.” is only a 10-point font (which is only about 13 pixels). So, the size of the font is also working against the readability factor, not to mention the poor choice of colors used with the lighter backgrounds.

The lesson here is that you should really make some time to think about how color and contrast of typography will work for the benefit of your readers. Without these additional steps, you may unintentionally be preventing visitors from moving forward on your site.

3. Tracking

Plain and simple: tracking in mobile web design needs to be used in order to control density. The standard recommendation is that there be no more than between 30 and 40 characters to a line. Anything more or less could affect readability adversely.

While it does appear that Dove is pushing the boundaries of that 40-character limit, I think this is nicely done.

The Dove home page


Dove’s use of even tracking and (mostly) staying within the 40-character limit. (Source: Dove) (Large preview)

The font is so simple and clean, and the tracking is evenly spaced. You can see that, by keeping the amount of words on a line relegated to the recommended limits, it gives this segment of the page the appearance that it will be easy to read. And that’s exactly what you want your typography choices to do: to welcome visitors to stop for a brief moment, read the non-threatening amount of text, and then go on their way (which, hopefully, is to conversion).

4. Leading

According to the NNG, content that appears above the fold on a 30-inch desktop monitor equates to five swipes on a 4-inch mobile device. Granted, this data is a bit old as most smartphones are now between five and six inches:

Average smartphone screen sizes


Average smartphone screen sizes from 2015 to 2021. (Source: TechCrunch) (Large preview)

Even so, let’s say that equates to three or four good swipes of the smartphone screen to get to the tip of the fold on desktop. That’s a lot of work your mobile visitors have to do to get to the good stuff. It also means that their patience will already be wearing thin by the time they get there. As the NNG pointed out, a mobile session, on average, usually lasts about only 72 seconds. Compare that to desktop at 150 seconds and you can see why this is a big deal.

This means two things for you:

  1. You absolutely need to cut out the excess on mobile. If this means creating a completely separate and shorter set of content for mobile, do it.
  2. Be very careful with leading.

You’ve already taken care to keep optimize your font size and width, which is good. However, too much leading and you could unintentionally be asking users to scroll even more than they might have to. And with every scroll comes the possibility of fatigue, boredom, frustration, or distraction getting in the way.

So, you need to strike a good balance here between using line spacing to enhance readability while also reigning in how much work they need to do to get to the bottom of the page.

The Hill Holliday website isn’t just awesome inspiration on how to get a little “crazy” with mobile typography, but it also has done a fantastic job in using leading to make larger bodies of text easier to read:

The Hill Holliday home page


Hill Holliday uses the perfect ratio of leading between lines and paragraphs. (Source: Hill Holliday) (Large preview)

Different resources will give you different guidelines on how to create spacing for mobile devices. I’ve seen suggestions for anywhere between 120% to 150% of the font’s point size. Since you also need to consider accessibility when designing for mobile, I’m going to suggest you follow WCAG’s guidelines:

  • Spacing between lines needs to be 1.5 (or 150%, whichever ratio works for you).
  • Spacing between paragraphs then needs to be 2.5 (or 250%).

At the end of the day, this is about making smart decisions with the space you’re given to work with. If you only have a minute to hook them, don’t waste it with too much vertical space. And don’t turn them off with too little.

5. Acceptable Fonts

Before I break down what makes for an acceptable font, I want to first look at what Android’s and Apple’s typeface defaults are. I think there’s a lot we can learn just by looking at these choices:

Android
Google uses two typefaces for its platforms (both desktop and mobile): Roboto and Noto. Roboto is the primary default. If a user visits a website in a language that doesn’t accept Roboto, then Noto is the secondary backup.

This is Roboto:

The Roboto character set


A snapshot of the Roboto character set. (Source: Roboto) (Large preview)

It’s also important to note that Roboto has a number of font families to choose from:

The Roboto families


Other options of Roboto fonts to choose from. (Source: Roboto) (Large preview)

As you can see, there are versions of Roboto with condensed kerning, a heavier and serifed face as well as a looser, serif-like option. Overall, though, this is just a really clean and simply stylized typeface. You’re not likely to stir up any real emotions when using this on a website, and it may not convey much of a personality, but it’s a safe, smart choice.

Apple
Apple has its own set of typography guidelines for iOS along with its own system typeface: San Francisco.

The San Francisco font


The San Francisco font for Apple devices. (Source: San Francisco) (Large preview)

For the most part, what you see is what you get with San Francisco. It’s just a basic sans serif font. If you look at Apple’s recommended suggestions on default settings for the font, you’ll also find it doesn’t even recommend using bold stylization or outlandish sizing, leading or tracking rules:

San Francisco default settings


Default settings and suggestions for the San Francisco typeface. (Source: San Francisco) (Large preview)

Like with pretty much everything else Apple does, the typography formula is very basic. And, you know what? It really works. Here it is in action on the Apple website:

The Apple home page


Apple makes use of its own typography best practices. (Source: Apple) (Large preview)

Much like Google’s system typeface, Apple has gone with a simple and classic typeface. While it may not help your site stand out from the competition, it will never do anything to impair the legibility or readability of your text. It also would be a good choice if you want your visuals to leave a greater impact.

My Recommendations

And, so, this now brings me to my own recommendations on what you should use in terms of type for mobile websites. Here’s the verdict:

  1. Don’t be afraid to start with a system default font. They’re going to be your safest choices until you get a handle on how far you can push the limits of mobile typography.
  2. Use only a sans serif or serif font. If your desktop website uses a decorative or handwritten font, ditch it for something more traditional on mobile.

    That said, you don’t have to ignore decorative typefaces altogether. In the examples from Hill Holliday or Flywheel Sports (as shown above), you can see how small touches of custom, non-traditional type can add a little flavor.

  3. Never use more than two typefaces on mobile. There just isn’t enough room for visitors to handle that many options visually.

    Make sure your two typefaces complement one another. Specifically, look for faces that utilize a similar character width. The design of each face may be unique and contrast well with the other, but there should still be some uniformity in what you present to mobile visitors’ eyes.

  4. Avoid typefaces that don’t have a distinct set of characters. For instance, compare how the uppercase “i”, lowercase “l” and the number “1” appear beside one another. Here’s an example of the Myriad Pro typeface from the Typekit website:

    Myriad Pro characters


    Myriad Pro’s typeface in action. (Source: Typekit) (Large preview)

    While the number “1” isn’t too problematic, the uppercase “i” (the first letter in this sequence) and the lowercase “l (the second) are just too similar. This can create some unwanted slowdowns in reading on mobile.

    Also, be sure to review how your font handles the conjunction of “r” and “n” beside one another. Can you differentiate each letter or do they smoosh together as one indistinguishable unit? Mobile visitors don’t have time to stop and figure out what those characters are, so make sure you use a typeface that gives each character its own space.

  5. Use fonts that are compatible across as many devices as possible. Your best bets will be: Arial, Courier New, Georgia, Tahoma, Times New Roman, Trebuchet MS and Verdana.

    Default typefaces on mobile


    A list of system default typefaces for various mobile devices. (Source: tinytype) (Large preview)

    Android-supported typefaces


    Another view of the table that includes some Android-supported typefaces. (Source: tinytype) (Large preview)

    I think the Typeform website is a good example of one that uses a “safe” typeface choice, but doesn’t prevent them from wowing visitors with their message or design.

    The Typeform home page


    Typeform’s striking typeface has nothing to do with the actual font. (Source: Typeform) (Large preview)

    It’s short, to the point, perfectly sized, well-positioned, and overall a solid choice if they’re trying to demonstrate stability and professionalism (which I think they are).

  6. When you’re feeling comfortable with mobile typography and want to branch out a little more, take a look at this list of the best web-safe typefaces from WebsiteSetup. You’ll find here that most of the choices are your basic serif and sans serif types. It’s definitely nothing exciting or earth-shattering, but it will give you some variation to play with if you want to add a little more flavor to your mobile type.

Wrapping Up

I know, I know. Mobile typography is no fun. But web design isn’t always about creating something exciting and cutting edge. Sometimes sticking to practical and safe choices is what will guarantee you the best user experience in the end. And that’s what we’re seeing when it comes to mobile typography.

The reduced amount of real estate and the shorter times-on-site just don’t lend themselves well to the experimental typography choices (or design choices, in general) you can use on desktop. So, moving forward, your approach will have to be more about learning how to reign it in while still creating a strong and consistent look for your website.

Smashing Editorial
(lf, ra, yk, il)


Link: 

A Reference Guide For Typography In Mobile Web Design

Thumbnail

What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions




What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions

Suzanna Scacca



Google’s mobile-first indexing is here. Well, for some websites anyway. For the rest of us, it will be here soon enough, and our websites need to be in tip-top shape if we don’t want search rankings to be adversely affected by the change.

That said, responsive web design is nothing new. We’ve been creating custom mobile user experiences for years now, so most of our websites should be well poised to take this on… right?

Here’s the problem: Research shows that the dominant device through which users access the web, on average, is the smartphone. Granted, this might not be the case for every website, but the data indicates that this is the direction we’re headed in, and so every web designer should be prepared for it.

However, mobile checkout conversions are, to put it bluntly, not good. There are a number of reasons for this, but that doesn’t mean that m-commerce designers should take this lying down.

As more mobile users rely on their smart devices to access the web, websites need to be more adeptly designed to give them the simplified, convenient and secure checkout experience they want. In the following roundup, I’m going to explore some of the impediments to conversion in the mobile checkout and focus on what web designers can do to improve the experience.

Why Are Mobile Checkout Conversions Lagging?

According to the data, prioritizing the mobile experience in our web design strategies is a smart move for everyone involved. With people spending roughly 51% of their time with digital media through mobile devices (as opposed to only 42% on desktop), search engines and websites really do need to align with user trends.

Now, while that statistic paints a positive picture in support of designing websites with a mobile-first approach, other statistics are floating around that might make you wary of it. Here’s why I say that: Monetate’s e-commerce quarterly report issued for Q1 2017 had some really interesting data to show.

In this first table, they break down the percentage of visitors to e-commerce websites using different devices between Q1 2016 and Q1 2017. As you can see, smartphone Internet access has indeed surpassed desktop:

Website Visits by Device Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017
Traditional 49.30% 47.50% 44.28% 42.83% 42.83%
Smartphone 36.46% 39.00% 43.07% 44.89% 44.89%
Other 0.62% 0.39% 0.46% 0.36% 0.36%
Tablet 13.62% 13.11% 12.19% 11.91% 11.91%

Monetate’s findings on which devices are used to access in the Internet. (Source)

In this next data set, we can see that the average conversion rate for e-commerce websites isn’t great. In fact, the number has gone down significantly since the first quarter of 2016.

Conversion Rates Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017
Global 3.10% 2.81% 2.52% 2.94% 2.48%

Monetate’s findings on overall e-commerce global conversion rates (for all devices). (Source)

Even more shocking is the split between device conversion rates:

Conversion Rates by Device Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017
Traditional 4.23% 3.88% 3.66% 4.25% 3.63%
Tablet 1.42% 1.31% 1.17% 1.49% 1.25%
Other 0.69% 0.35% 0.50% 0.35% 0.27%
Smartphone 3.59% 3.44% 3.21% 3.79% 3.14%

Monetate’s findings on the average conversion rates, broken down by device. (Source)

Smartphones consistently receive fewer conversions than desktop, despite being the predominant device through which users access the web.

What’s the problem here? Why are we able to get people to mobile websites, but we lose them at checkout?

In its report from 2017 named “Mobile’s Hierarchy of Needs,” comScore breaks down the top five reasons why mobile checkout conversion rates are so low:

Reasons why m-commerce doesn’t convert


The most common reasons why m-commerce shoppers don’t convert. (Image: comScore) (View large version)

Here is the breakdown for why mobile users don’t convert:

  • 20.2% — security concerns
  • 19.6% — unclear product details
  • 19.6% — inability to open multiple browser tabs to compare
  • 19.3% — difficulty navigating
  • 18.6% — difficulty inputting information.

Those are plausible reasons to move from the smartphone to the desktop to complete a purchase (if they haven’t been completely turned off by the experience by that point, that is).

In sum, we know that consumers want to access the web through their mobile devices. We also know that barriers to conversion are keeping them from staying put. So, how do we deal with this?

10 Ways to Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions In 2018

For most of the websites you’ve designed, you’re not likely to see much of a change in search ranking when Google’s mobile-first indexing becomes official.

Your mobile-friendly designs might be “good enough” to keep your websites at the top of search (to start, anyway), but what happens if visitors don’t stick around to convert? Will Google start penalizing you because your website can’t seal the deal with the majority of visitors? In all honesty, that scenario will only occur in extreme cases, where the mobile checkout is so poorly constructed that bounce rates skyrocket and people stop wanting to visit the website at all.

Let’s say that the drop-off in traffic at checkout doesn’t incur penalties from Google. That’s great… for SEO purposes. But what about for business? Your goal is to get visitors to convert without distraction and without friction. Yet, that seems to be what mobile visitors get.

Going forward, your goal needs to be two-fold:

  • to design websites with Google’s mobile-first mission and guidelines in mind,
  • to keep mobile users on the website until they complete a purchase.

Essentially, this means decreasing the amount of work users have to do and improving the visibility of your security measures. Here is what you can do to more effectively design mobile checkouts for conversions.

1. Keep the Essentials in the Thumb Zone

Research on how users hold their mobile phones is old hat by now. We know that, whether they use the single- or double-handed approach, certain parts of the mobile screen are just inconvenient for mobile users to reach. And when expediency is expected during checkout, this is something you don’t want to mess around with.

For single-handed users, the middle of the screen is the prime playing field:

The thumb zone for single-handed mobile


The good, OK and bad areas for single-handed mobile users. (Image: UX Matters) (View large version)

Although users who cradle their phones for greater stability have a couple options for which fingers to use to interact with the screen, only 28% use their index finger. So, let’s focus on the capabilities of thumb users, which, again, means giving the central part of the screen the most prominence:

The thumb and index finger zone for mobile cradling


The good, OK and bad areas for mobile users that cradle their phones. (Image: UX Matters) (View large version)

Some users hold their phones with two hands. Because the horizontal orientation is more likely to be used for video, this won’t be relevant for mobile checkout. So, pay attention to how much space of that screen is feasibly within reach of the user’s thumb:

The thumb zone for vertical and horizontal


The good, OK and bad areas for two-handed mobile users. (Image: UX Matters) (View large version)

In sum, we can use Smashing Magazine’s breakdown of where to focus content, regardless of left-hand, right-hand or two-handed holding of a smartphone:

Where the ideal thumb zone is on mobile


A summary of where the good, OK and bad zones are on mobile devices. (Image: Smashing Magazine) (View large version)

JCPenney’s website is a good example of how to do this:

JCPenney’s form is in the thumb zone


JCPenney’s contact form starts midway down the page. (Image: JCPenney) (View large version)

While information is included at the top of the checkout page, the input fields don’t start until just below the middle of it — directly in the ideal thumb zone for users of any type. This ensures that visitors holding their phones in any manner and using different fingers to engage with it will have no issue reaching the form fields.

2. Minimize Content to Maximize Speed

We’ve been taught over and over again that minimal design is best for websites. This is especially true in mobile checkout, where an already slow or frustrating experience could easily push a customer over the edge, when all they want to do is be done with the purchase.

To maximize speed during the mobile checkout process, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Only add the essentials to checkout. This is not the time to try to upsell or cross-sell, promote social media or otherwise distract from the action at hand.
  • Keep the checkout free of all images. The only eye-catching visuals that are really acceptable are trustmarks and calls to action (more on these below).
  • Any text included on the page should be instructional or descriptive in nature.
  • Avoid any special stylization of fonts. The less “wow” your checkout page has, the easier it will be for users to get through the process.

Look to Staples’ website as an example of what a highly simple single-page checkout should look like:

The single-page checkout for Staples


Staples has a single-page checkout with a minimal number of fields to fill out. (Image: Staples) (View large version)

As you can see, Staples doesn’t bog down the checkout process with product images, branding, navigation, internal links or anything else that might (1) distract from the task at hand, or (2) suck resources from the server while it attempts to process your customers’ requests.

Not only will this checkout page be easy to get through, but it will load quickly and without issue every time — something customers will remember the next time they need to make a purchase. By keeping your checkout pages light in design, you ensure a speedy experience in all aspects.

3. Put Them at Ease With Trustmarks

A trustmark is any indicator on a website that lets customers know, “Hey, there’s absolutely nothing to worry about here. We’re keeping your information safe!”

The one trustmark that every m-commerce website should have? An SSL certificate. Without one, the address bar will not display the lock sign or the green https domain name — both of which let customers know that the website has extra encryption.

You can use other trustmarks at checkout as well.

Big Chill uses a RapidSSL trust seal


Big Chill includes a RapidSSL trust seal to let customers know its data is encrypted. (Image: Big Chill) (View large version)

While you can use logos from Norton Security, PCI compliance and other security software to let customers know your website is protected, users might also be swayed by recognizable and well-trusted names. When you think about it, this isn’t much different than displaying corporate logos beside customer testimonials or in callouts that boast of your big-name connections. If you can leverage a partnership like the ones mentioned below, you can use the inherent trust there to your benefit.

Take 6pm, which uses a “Login with Amazon” option at checkout:

6pm uses an Amazon trustmark


6pm leverages the Amazon name as a trustmark. (Image: 6pm) (View large version)

This is a smart move for a brand that most definitely does not have the brand-name recognition that a company like Amazon has. By giving customers a convenient option to log in with a brand that’s synonymous with speed, reliability and trust, the company might now become known for those same checkout qualities that Amazon is celebrated for.

Then, there are mobile checkout pages like the one on Sephora:

Sephora’s PayPal trustmark


Sephora uses a trusted payment gateway provider as a trustmark. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

Sephora also uses this technique of leveraging another brand’s good name in order to build trust at checkout time. In this case, however, it presents customers with two clear options: Check out with us right now, or hop over to PayPal, which will take care of you securely. With security being a major concern that keeps mobile customers from converting, this kind of trustmark and payment method is a good move on Sephora’s part.

4. Provide Easier Editing

In general, never take a visitor (on any device) away from whatever they’re doing on your website. There are already enough distractions online; the last thing they need is for you to point them in a direction that keeps them from converting.

At checkout, however, your customers might feel compelled to do this very thing if they decide they want a different color, size or quantity of an item in their shopping cart. Rather than let them backtrack through the website, give them an in-checkout editing option to keep them in place.

Victoria’s Secret does this well:

Victoria’s Secret edit lightbox in checkout


Victoria’s Secret doesn’t force users away from checkout to edit items. (Image: Victoria’s Secret) (View large version)

When they first get to the checkout screen, customers will see a list of items they’re about to purchase. When the large “Edit” button beside each item is clicked, a lightbox (shown above) opens with the product’s variations. It’s basically the original product page, just superimposed on top of the checkout. Users can adjust their options and save their changes without ever having to leave the checkout page.

If you find, in reviewing your website’s analytics, that users occasionally backtrack after hitting the checkout (you can see this in the sales funnel), add this built-in editing feature. By preventing this unnecessary movement backwards, you could save yourself lost conversions from confused or distracted customers.

5. Enable Express Checkout Options

When consumers check out on an e-commerce website through a desktop device, it probably isn’t a big deal if they have to input their user name, email address or payment information each time. Sure, if it can be avoided, they’ll find ways around it (like allowing the website to save their information or using a password manager such as LastPass).

But on mobile, re-entering that information is a pain, especially if contact forms aren’t optimized well (more on that below). So, to ease the log-in and checkout process for mobile users, consider ways in which you can simplify the process:

  • Allow for guest checkout.
  • Allow for one-click expedited checkout.
  • Enable one-click sign-in from a trusted source, like Facebook.
  • Enable payment on a trusted payment provider’s website, like PayPal, Google Wallet or Stripe.

One of the nice things about Sephora‘s already convenient checkout process is that customers can automate the sign-in process going forward with a simple toggle:

Sephora lets customers save sign-in information


Sephora enables return customers to stay signed in, to avoid this during checkout again. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

When mobile customers are feeling the rush and want to get to the next stage of checkout, Sephora’s auto-sign-in feature would definitely come in handy and encourage customers to buy more frequently from the mobile website.

Many mobile websites wait until the bottom of the login page to tell customers what kinds of options they have for checking out. But rather than surprise them late, Victoria’s Secret displays this information in big bold buttons right at the very top:

Victoria’s Secret express checkout options


Victoria’s Secret simplifies and speeds up checkout by giving three attractive options. (Image: Victoria’s Secret) (View large version)

Customers have a choice of signing in with their account, checking out as a guest or going directly to PayPal. They are not surprised to discover later on that their preferred checkout or payment method isn’t offered.

I also really love how Victoria’s Secret has chosen to do this. There’s something nice about the brightly colored “Sign In” button sitting beside the more muted “Check Out as a Guest” button. For one, it adds a hint of Victoria’s Secret brand colors to the checkout, which is always a nice touch. But the way it’s colored the buttons also makes clear what it wants the primary action to be (i.e. to create an account and sign in).

6. Add Breadcrumbs

When you send mobile customers to checkout, the last thing you want is to give them unnecessary distractions. That’s why the website’s standard navigation bar (or hamburger menu) is typically removed from this page.

Nonetheless, the checkout process can be intimidating if customers don’t know what’s ahead. How many forms will they need to fill out? What sort of information is needed? Will they have a chance to review their order before submitting payment details?

If you’ve designed a multi-page checkout, allay your customers’ fears by defining each step with clearly labeled breadcrumb navigation at the top of the page. In addition, this will give your checkout a cleaner design, reducing the number of clicks and scrolling per page.

Hayneedle has a beautiful example of breadcrumb navigation in action:

Hayneedle checkout breadcrumb navigation


Hayneedle’s breadcrumbs are cleanly designed and easy to find. (Image: Hayneedle) (View large version)

You can see that three steps are broken out and clearly labeled. There’s absolutely no question here about what users will encounter in those steps either, which will help put their minds at ease. Three steps seems reasonable enough, and users will have a chance to review the order once more before completing the purchase.

Sephora has an alternative style of “breadcrumbs” in its checkout:

Sephora’s numbered breadcrumbs navigation


Sephora’s numbered breadcrumbs appear as you complete each section. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

Instead of placing each “breadcrumb” at the top of the checkout page, Sephora’s customers can see what the next step is, as well as how many more are to come as they work their way through the form.

This is a good option to take if you’d rather not make the top navigation or the breadcrumbs sticky. Instead, you can prioritize the call to action (CTA), which you might find better motivates the customer to move down the page and complete their purchase.

I think both of these breadcrumbs designs are valid, though. So, it might be worth A/B testing them if you’re unsure of which would lead to more conversions for your visitors.

7. Format the Checkout Form Wisely

Good mobile checkout form design follows a pretty strict formula, which isn’t surprising. While there are ways to bend the rules on desktop in terms of structuring the form, the number of steps per page, the inclusion of images and so on, you really don’t have that kind of flexibility on mobile.

Instead, you will need to be meticulous when building the form:

  • Design each field of the checkout form so that it stretches the full width of the website.
  • Limit the fields to only what’s essential.
  • Clearly label each field outside of and above it.
  • Use at least a 16-point-pixel font.
  • Format each field so that it’s large enough to tap into without zooming.
  • Use a recognizable mark to indicate when something is required (like an asterisk).
  • Always let users know when an error has been made immediately after the information has been inputted in a field.
  • Place the call to action at the very bottom of the form.

Because the checkout form is the most important element that moves customers through the checkout process, you can’t afford to mess around with a tried and true formula. If users can’t seamlessly get from top to bottom, if the fields are too difficult to engage with, or if the functionality of the form itself is riddled with errors, then you might as well kiss your mobile purchases (and maybe your purchases in general) goodbye.

Crutchfield shows how to create form fields that are very user-friendly on mobile:

Large-sized form fields on the Crutchfield checkout


Form fields on the Crutchfield checkout page are large and difficult to miss. (Image: Crutchfield) (View large version)

As you can see, each field is large enough to click on (even with fat fingers). The bold outline around the currently selected field is also a nice touch. For a customer who is multitasking and or distracted by something around them, returning to the checkout form would be much easier with this type of format.

Sephora, again, handles mobile checkout the right way. In this case, I want to draw your attention to the grayed-out “Place Order” button:

Smart use of the Sephora call to action in checkout


Sephora uses the call to action as a guide for customers who haven’t finished the form. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

The button serves as an indicator to customers that they’re not quite ready to submit their purchase information yet, which is great. Even though the form is beautifully designed — everything is well labeled, the fields are large, and the form is logically organized — mobile users could accidentally scroll too far past a field and wouldn’t know it until clicking the call-to-action button.

If you can keep users from receiving that dreaded “missing information” error, you’ll do a better job of holding onto their purchases.

8. Simplify Form Input

Digging a bit deeper into these contact forms, let’s look at how you can simplify the input of data on mobile:

  • Allow customers to user their browser’s autocomplete functionality to fill in forms.
  • Include a tabindex HTML directive to enable customers to tap an arrow up and down through the form. This keeps their thumbs within a comfortable range on the smartphone at all times, instead of constantly reaching up to tap into a new field.
  • Add a checkbox that automatically copies the billing address information over to the shipping fields.
  • Change the keyboard according to what kind of field is being typed in.

One example of this is Bass Pro Shops’ mobile website:

Bass Pro checkout form uses a smart keyboard


Each field in the Bass Pro checkout form provides users with the right keyboard type. (Image: Bass Pro Shops) (View large version)

For starters, the keyboard uses tab functionality (see the up and down arrows just above the keyboard). For customers with short fingers or who are impatient and just want to type away on the keyboard, the tabs help keep their hands in one place, thus speeding up checkout.

Also, when customers tab into a numbers-only field (like for their phone number), the keyboard automatically changes, so they don’t have to switch manually. Again, this is another way to up the convenience of making a purchase on mobile.

Amazon’s mobile checkout includes a quick checkbox that streamlines customers’ submission of billing information:

Amazon streamlines form input with address duplication


Amazon gives customers an easy way to duplicate their shipping address to billing. (Image: Amazon) (View large version)

As we’ve seen with mobile checkout form design, simpler is always better. Obviously, you will always need to collect certain details from customers each time (unless their account has saved that information). Nonetheless, if you can provide a quick toggle or checkbox that enables them to copy data over from one form to another, then do it.

9. Don’t Skimp on the CTA

When designing a desktop checkout, your main concerns with the CTA are things like strategic placement of the button and choosing an eye-catching color to draw attention to it.

On mobile, however, you have to think about size, too — and not just how much space it takes up on the screen. Remember the thumb zone and the various ways in which users hold their phone. Ensure that the button is wide enough so that any user can easily click on it without having to change their hand position.

So, your goal should be to design buttons that (1) sit at the bottom of the mobile checkout page and (2) stretch all the way from left to right, as is the case on Staples’ mobile website:

Staple’s big blue CTA button


Staple’s bright blue CTA sticks out in an otherwise plain checkout. (Image: Staples) (View large version)

No matter who is making the purchase — a left-handed, a right-handed or a two-handed cradler — that button will be easy reach.

Of all the mobile checkout enhancements we’ve covered today, the CTA is the easiest one to address. Make it big, give it a distinctive color, place it at the very bottom of the mobile screen, and make it span the full width. In other words, don’t make customers work hard to take the final step in a purchase.

10. Offer an Alternate Way Out

Finally, give customers an alternate way out.

Let’s say they’re shopping on a mobile website, adding items to their cart, but something isn’t sitting right with them, and they don’t want to make the purchase. You’ve done everything you can to assure them along the way with a clean, easy and secure checkout experience, but they just aren’t confident in making a payment on their phone.

Rather than merely hoping you don’t lose the purchase entirely, give them a chance to save it for later. That way, if they really are interested in buying your product, they can revisit on desktop and pull the trigger. It’s not ideal, because you do want to keep them in place on mobile, but the option is good for customers who just can’t be saved.

As you can see on L.L. Bean’s mobile website, there is an option at checkout to “Move to Wish List”:

L.L. Bean wish list option


L.L. Bean gives customers another chance to move items to their wish list during checkout. (Image: L.L. Bean) (View large version)

What’s nice about this is that L.L. Bean clearly doesn’t want browsing of the wish list or the removal of an item to be a primary action. If “Move to Wish List” were shown as a big bold CTA button, more customers might decide to take this seemingly safer alternative. As it’s designed now, it’s more of a, “Hey, we don’t want you to do anything you’re not comfortable with. This is here just in case.”

While fewer options are generally better in web design, this might be something to explore if your checkout has a high cart abandonment rate on mobile.

Wrapping Up

As more mobile visitors flock to your website, every step leading to conversion — including the checkout phase — needs to be optimized for convenience, speed and security. If your checkout is not adeptly designed to mobile users’ specific needs and expectations, you’re going to find that those conversion rates drop or shift back to desktop — and that’s not the direction you want things to go in, especially if Google is pushing us all towards a mobile-first world.

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, al, il)


See the original post:  

What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions

Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?




Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?

The pop-up has an interesting (and somewhat risqué) origin. Were you aware of this? The creator of the original pop-up ad, Ethan Zuckerman, explained how it came into being:

Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal intercourse. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good.

Basically, the client was dissatisfied with having their ad placed beside an article discussing this less-than-savory subject. Rather than lose the ad revenue or, worse, the client, Zuckerman and his team came up with a solution: The car company’s ad would still run on the website, but this time would pop out into a new window. Thus, the pop-up gave the advertiser an opportunity to share their offer without the risk of sitting next to a competitor or unsuitable blog content.

Origin story aside, does Zuckerman have anything to apologize for? Is the pop-up in its current state such a bad thing for the user experience? With a few simple searches around the web, you might very well begin to believe that.

For instance, a search of the term “pop-up ads” in Answer the Public comes up with this disheartening response:

Answer the Public questions about pop-ups


Users clearly just want pop-ups to go away. (Image: Answer the Public) (View large version)

A search for “I hate pop-ups” on Google results in over 3 million pages and responses like this:

Google search for 'I hate pop-ups'


You can bet that a search for ‘I love pop-ups’ doesn’t have quite the same results. (Image: Google) (View large version)

With the seemingly abundant negative responses to pop-ups, does this mean the pop-up is dead? Google’s 2017 algorithmic update penalizing certain types of mobile pop-ups could very well spell their doom — though I’m not ready to throw in the towel yet.

So, today, I want to see what the research says.

Are mobile pop-ups dying? Or will they simply undergo another adaptation?

If they continue to remain effective, how should designers make use of them, especially in mobile web design?

Finally, are there alternatives web designers can start using now to prepare for Google’s vision of a more mobile-friendly digital world?

Is The Mobile Pop-Up Dead? What The Experts Say

Pop-ups have come a long way since their founding by Zuckerman in the ’90s.

For the most part, pop-ups don’t force users out of the browser, nor do they surprise them with a desktop cluttered with ads once the browser is closed altogether. It’s a neater and more controlled experience overall. And we’ve seen them in a variety of forms, too:

  • full-page interstitials,
  • partial modal pop-ups,
  • top- or bottom-aligned bars,
  • pop-out modules tucked in the corner of the page,
  • push notifications,
  • inline banners found within the actual content of the page.

Pop-ups can also now appear at various points throughout the journey, thanks in part to big data and AI:

  • appearing as soon as the web page loads;
  • appearing once the user scrolls down the page;
  • appearing once the user moves the cursor to the close button in the browser tab;
  • ever-present, sitting off to the side, waiting for engagement.

But this type of pop-up technology doesn’t work all that well with the mobile experience, does it?

Take Macy’s website. Upon entering it, you’ll encounter this pop-up ad within a few seconds:

Example of Macy’s modal pop-up on desktop


Macy’s displays this offer within a few seconds of your arrival on the website. (Image: Macy’s) (View large version)

When you open the website on mobile, however, you won’t find any trace of that pop-up. Instead, you’ll see a small bar built into the space just below the navigation bar:

Macy’s inserts desktop pop-up into mobile on-page content


Macy’s ditches the pop-up on mobile and integrates it in the content. (Image: Macy’s) (View large version)

The offer is similar, but with no request for an email address and no pop-up functionality. This is likely because of the change to Google’s algorithm in 2017.

Which brings me to what the experts say about pop-ups. While most are focused on the life expectancy of pop-ups in general, Google has been leading the charge against mobile pop-ups (sort of) for almost a year now:

Google

Let’s start by looking at Google’s announcement regarding mobile-first indexing. This originally came to light in 2016, but it was just talk at the time. It is now over a year later, and Google has begun rolling out this indexing initiative.

Basically, what it does is change how Google’s bots crawl and index a website. Google no longer views the desktop version of a website as the primary experience for users. Going forward, the mobile website will be the primary version indexed.

With Google users increasingly starting on a mobile device instead of desktop, this move makes sense. It’s also why the algorithm change in 2017 that penalizes certain types of mobile pop-ups was another logical move in Google’s mission to make the web a more mobile-friendly place.

Google diagram of penalty pop-up designs


Google provides examples of the kinds of interstitial pop-ups to avoid. (Image: Google) (View large version)

In laying out the details of this change, Google explained that mobile pop-ups deemed disruptive to the user experience would result in ranking penalties for those websites. These kinds of pop-ups fall into three categories:

  • interstitial pop-ups that cover the entire screen upon entering the website and that require users to “X” out in order see the actual website;
  • pop-ups that cover the entire screen upon entering the website but that require users to know that scrolling past them is the way to bypass the pop-up and see the main content;
  • any pop-up that hides the majority of content on the page behind it.

In other words, Google doesn’t believe that traditional pop-ups have any place on mobile because the limited screen space would make the experience too disruptive. That’s likely the reason why you’re seeing popular websites like Macy’s do away with mobile pop-ups altogether. Though there are some traditional modal pop-ups Google doesn’t mind, it’s probably safer to avoid modals and interstitials on mobile in order to avoid the chance of a penalty.

As you can see, pop-ups for legal requirements are still OK, although most of the time you’re going to see publishers relegate them to small bars, as MailChimp has done here:

Example of an acceptable cookies disclaimer on mobile


MailChimp adheres to Google’s new guidelines in providing a cookies disclaimer. (Image: MailChimp) (View large version)

Nielsen Norman Group

In 2017, Nielsen Norman Group conducted a survey on the most hated advertising techniques. This study encompassed all kinds of website advertising (including video ads, on-page banner ads, etc.), but there was special mention of pop-up ads that make the findings relevant here.

Out of a total score of 7, with 1 being “strongly like” and 7 being “strongly dislike,” respondents gave mobile ads a score of 5.45. Desktop ads weren’t far behind, with 5.09, although the survey results did consistently show that mobile ads were more despised than their desktop counterparts.

Comparison of desktop and mobile ad hatred


Users might despise ads, in general, but they really don’t like them on mobile. (Image: Nielsen Norman Group) (View large version)

Drilling down, Nielsen Norman Group also found modals (i.e. partially covering pop-ups) to be the most hated type of ad that mobile users encounter:

: Chart that shows mobile ad dislike ratings


Oof! Users really don’t like modal pop-ups, do they? (Image: Nielsen Norman Group) (View large version)

Why does Nielsen Norman Group believe this to be the case? Well, there’s the aforementioned real estate issue. Mobile phones just don’t have enough room to accommodate modal pop-ups without overwhelming users. According to the authors, though, there may be another reason:

Additionally, the context of mobile use tends to be “on-the-go” — that is, users are more likely to be distracted by competing stimuli, and the need for efficiency is drastically increased.

Having reviewed Nielsen Norman Group’s research, I do agree that many users will very likely be put off upon encountering a pop-up on a mobile website. That being said, plenty of research provides a valid counter-argument.

While users might be likely to describe their annoyance with pop-ups as high when surveyed about it, some evidence suggests it is short-lived for many of them. As we’ll see in a moment, pop-ups are actually quite effective in driving conversions.

Sumo

Sumo declared in 2018 that pop-ups aren’t dead. While that opinion might be seen as biased, considering it’s in the business of creating and selling list-builder tools such as pop-ups, welcome mats and smart bars, it does have evidence to suggest that pop-ups are still worthwhile if generating leads and conversions is your top priority.

Sumo used data from nearly 2 billion customer pop-ups to make this argument. Sadly, the data doesn’t directly break out anything related to mobile pop-ups and their conversion rates, but I found this particular statistic to be relevant:

Of the top 10% of pop-ups, only 8% had pop-ups appear in the 0-4 second mark. And the majority of those 8% were on pages where the pop-up was expected to appear quickly — as in sending someone to a download page.

In other words, users don’t want to be rushed into seeing your pop-ups — which is one of the major points Google is trying to make with its algorithm update. (Tests conducted by Crazy Egg mirror this point about delaying pop-ups.) Mobile websites that jump the gun and present visitors with a pop-up message before giving them an opportunity to scroll through the website are just creating an unnecessary disruption.

Another point that Sumo stresses is that pop-ups need to be valuable and presented within context. This is especially important on mobile, where you can’t afford to test visitors’ patience with a video pop-up completely unrelated to the blog post they were trying to read beneath it.

In other words, always think about how a pop-up will add value to the experience that you are (partially) blocking.

Justinmind

Justinmind calls modal pop-ups “complicated,” and for good reason. Even though there was nearly an even split between how users felt about pop-ups (21% said they liked them, while 23% said they didn’t), the research shows that pop-ups have proven to be quite helpful in the conversion process.

That being said, what a lot of this comes down to is how a website uses the pop-up. The University of Alberta, for example, was able to get 12% to 15% more email subscribers by using a pop-up on its website. On the other hand, you have Search Engine Land claiming that the main reason people block websites is because of pop-up ads.

Another thing to think about, according to Justinmind, is the mobile UI. It suggests that even if you do everything else right — deliver a valuable and well-timed offer and compromise an unobtrusive amount of space — there’s still the thumb zone to think about.

While it’s great that designers have built the ever-trusty “X” button into the top-right corner of pop-ups, that’s not the easiest stretch for the mobile user’s thumb. If you want to design ads for the mobile UX, consider another placement of that exit button.

30 Lines

Digital marketing agency 30 Lines claims:

Our clients who run targeted lead capture pop-ups on their websites typically convert anywhere from 75-250% more leads from their sites than clients who don’t.

Unlike other experts who have shied away from the subject of mobile pop-ups (because it might end in them admitting defeat), 30 Lines took on the topic head on. And this was the point they sought to make:

  • Google is not saying that mobile pop-ups are all bad.
  • Google, in fact, does want you to generate more conversions on your website — and it acknowledges that pop-ups might play a role in that.
  • It’s simply up to you to determine what will lead to the most unobtrusive experience for your visitors.

30 Lines gives a lot of great tips on how to adhere to Google’s principles without doing away with mobile pop-ups altogether. As we move on to discuss ways in which designers can use mobile pop-ups in the future, I’ll be sure to include them for consideration.

What Do Web Designers Do With Mobile Pop-Ups Now?

I’m not going to lie: This is a tough one, because while it would be so easy to just kill pop-ups on mobile websites altogether — and many consumers would be thrilled with that decision — they do still have incredible value in generating conversions. So, what do we do?

Clearly, this is a complicated matter, because you could equally argue both sides and are left choosing between two evils:

  • Do you want to run mobile pop-ups in the hope of gaining more subscribers (especially considering that mobile users tend to have lower conversion rates to begin with)?
  • Or do you want to put more resources into writing high-converting landing pages and on-page banners to sell and convert mobile visitors?

Do you even know which option mobile visitors would be more receptive to?

Below are questions to think about as you evaluate whether pop-ups make sense for your mobile website now and in the future.

Is It Necessary?

Ask yourself whether a particular message even needs to be in a pop-up format. If it could work just as well integrated in a page, then you might want to skip it entirely (as in the Macy’s example from earlier).

Fast Company uses pop-ups on its mobile website (shown below), but it also integrates its contact forms into on-page banners, like this one:

Example of a subscriber form that could be in a pop-up but isn’t


Fast Company inserts a subscriber form inline with the content. (Image: Fast Company) (View large version)

Different Designs

Create different pop-up designs for desktop and for mobile. So long as the message and offer are still relevant and valuable to mobile users, there’s no reason not to completely start from the ground up when building mobile pop-ups. Just be sure to think about the design, message and trigger rules when reshaping desktop pop-ups for mobile.

Gap is a good example of this. You can see how its offer is displayed on desktop as an on-page banner with expanded details:


Gap desktop pop-up ad


This is how Gap displays this offer on desktop.

Then, on mobile, it is shown as a bottom bar element:

Gap mobile pop-up ad


This is how Gap displays this offer on mobile. (Image: Gap) (View large version)

Go Small

Keep pop-ups small on mobile. In general, it’s recommended they take up no more than 15% of the screen. This means staying away from full-page interstitials, even if you’re trying to sneak them in on a second or third page.

Inc has a small and succinct message for mobile users:

Example of bottom bar pop-up


Inc keeps its pop-up message bold but brief. (Image: Inc) (View large version)

Target Mobile Context

Use mobile-targeted messaging. This means be very light on text, and don’t include images or icons that force the pop-up to be larger than it needs to be. You can also create targeted messages for consumers who use your website for research while out and about or even while shopping in house.

Stick To The Bottom

To play it safe, display pop-ups only at the very bottom of a page. This could mean one of two things. First, you could align the pop-up to the bottom of the mobile screen (this could be a traditional modal pop-up or a hello bar). Here’s an example of how Fast Company does it:

Example of how a modal pop-up works on mobile


Fast Company doesn’t shy away from modals with this mobile pop-up example. (Image: Fast Company) (View large version)

The second option is to open the pop-up once the visitor has scrolled all the way to the bottom of the web page.

Delay

Try not to show a pop-up on the first page a visitor sees. By this, I mean the first page that a user is directed to by search or a referral website (which is not necessarily the home page). Also, don’t forget about timing. In general, try not to load a pop-up within the first four seconds of a visitor arriving on a page.

Intuit does this really well:

Example of delayed mobile pop-up


This Intuit pop-up only appears after you’ve navigated inwards on the website. (Image: Intuit) (View large version)

Visit the first page of the website and you won’t encounter any kind of pop-up messaging. Click through to learn more about pricing, and then you’ll see a relevant and value-adding message pop up at the bottom of the screen.

Easy Exit

If you still want to use a modal pop-up design, make sure it’s easy to exit out of. This means putting an “X” in the bottom-right corner or an exit message beneath the CTA.

Or you could stick with the bottom bar design that many mobile web designers seem to favor right now, like Zumiez:

Example of hello bar pop-up on mobile


A bottom-aligned hello bar pop-up from Zumiez. (Image: Zumiez) (View large version)

The New Yorker also does this:

Example of bottom bar pop-up content on mobile


A bottom-aligned hello bar pop-up from The New Yorker. (Image: The New Yorker) (View large version)

Make It Optional

Create a special CTA or other interactive element on your website that, only when clicked, opens a pop-up. Basically, let mobile users decide whether and when they want to interrupt the on-site experience.

Basic Outfitters does this after you’ve added your first item to the cart:

Example of a user-triggered mobile pop-up


The Basic Outfitters pop-up shows only after the user actively triggers it on the website. (Image: Basic-Outfitters) (View large version)

Consider Alternatives

If you’re nervous about designing a traditional pop-up on your website, fear not. There are alternatives.

Consider push notifications and SMS notifications. They allow you to reach mobile users without having to intrude in the browser or in the mobile device experience without their express permission.

Gated content is another way to collect leads on a mobile website without having to force users into a pop-up to submit their contact information.

Track Preference

You will more likely annoy a mobile user with a repeat pop-up ad than a desktop user. So, if you can use cookies to prevent mobile visitors from being interrupted by the same pop-up message after they’ve dismissed it, that would be ideal.

Remember: You’re not just playing by Google’s rules here. If mobile visitor numbers drop off and Google spots a change in your bounce rate and time-on-site statistics, then your website’s rank will suffer as a result, since Google now prioritizes the mobile website experience over desktop.

The Mobile Pop-Up Doesn’t Need To Die

For now, the best plan is to heed the experts. And what they’re saying is that mobile pop-ups aren’t dying. In fact, they can still play a vital role in signing up more email subscribers and converting more customers from mobile devices. But, as with anything else, you need to play by Google’s rules and always think about how your decisions will affect your users’ experience.

So, use your mobile pop-ups wisely.

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, il, al)


Source:  

Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?

How to Create Ads For More Clicks in 2018

With Facebook making some serious changes in 2018, marketers are beginning to look toward other channels for generating attention. I truly believe we’ll see a shift from Facebook to SEM in the coming months. People will begin investing in SEO, link-building and – of course – AdWords. But PPC has always been a challenge. Competition continues to increase as new startups enter existing spaces. Not to mention the industry Goliath’s expanding their reach into new markets. We recently analyzed 30,000 PPC accounts to see what the highest performers all had in common. While the use of machine learning helped control parameters…

The post How to Create Ads For More Clicks in 2018 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Excerpt from: 

How to Create Ads For More Clicks in 2018