Tag Archives: navigation

How a Two-Step Opt-In Beat an Exit Popup by 1169% [by Using a Psychology Principle]

I’ve no idea how to actually do the two-step. Apparently it looks a little something like this:

It’s way too complex for me. Fortunately, when it comes to marketing, the two-step opt-in form is much simpler.

What is a Two-Step Opt-In Form?

Well for starters it’s a two-time hyphenated term that’s really annoying to type. Functionally though, instead of including a form on your landing page, blog, or website, you use a link, button, or graphic to launch a popup that contains your form.

Why are Two-Step Opt-In Forms Good For Conversion?

There are two reasons why this approach is good for conversion rates, both of which have an element of behavioural psychology.

  • Foot in the Door (FITD): The FITD technique is an example of compliance psychology. By design, it’s good because the form is launched after a user-driven request. They clicked the link to subscribe with the intent to do exactly that, subscribe (or whatever the form’s conversion goal is). The click demonstrates the reaction to a modest request, creating a level of commitment that makes the visitor more likely to complete the form (the larger request) when it’s presented.
  • Perceived friction: Because there is no visible form, the idea of filling out a form is not really top of mind. This reduces the amount of effort required in your visitor’s mind.

What Does a Two-Step Opt-In Form Look Like?

They look a little like this aetful sketch I did last night.

Let’s try a demo. You can subscribe to follow along with Product Awareness Month here.
Clicking that link uses the two-step concept to launch a popup containing the subscribe form.

Pretty simple, right?

You could also click on any of the images below to do the same thing.

I configured all of these with Unbounce Popups by targeting this blog post URL and using the “On Click” trigger option set to function when an element with the ID #pam-two-step-v1 is clicked.

This trigger option is awesome because you can apply it to any element on your pages. And as you’ve just seen, you can have as many different popups as you like, all attached to different page elements.


You Can Also Use a Sticky Bar for a Two-Step Opt-In Form

The functionality is exactly the same if you want to use a Sticky Bar. Click the image below to show a Sticky Bar with a form, at the top of the page.


How Do Two-Step Opt-In Forms Perform?

Great question! I’m glad you asked.

Throughout Product Awareness Month I’ve sprinkled a few two-step opt-in popup links like this one: Subscribe Now. I’m also using the exact same popup using the exit trigger, so visitors see it when they are leaving the page.

To compare the data, the exit popup obviously gets seen a lot more as it triggers once for everyone. Conversely, the “On Click” popup gets fewer views because it’s a subtle CTA that only appears in a few places.

You can see some initial conversion rates below from the Unbounce dashboard.

Not huge sample sizes just yet (I’ll report on this again at the end of the month), but the difference is staggering.

The “On Click” triggered popup conversion rate is 1169% better than the exit popup.


Convinced yet? I hope so. Now I’d like to challenge you to try your own experiments with popup triggers and the awesome two-step opt-in form.

Sign up for a 30-day trial and build some Popups today. You also get the Sticky Bar and Landing Page products included in your account.

Cheers
Oli

p.s. Come back tomorrow to see a video interview I did with the awesome Head of Marketing at Shopify Plus, Hana Abaza.

Visit site:

How a Two-Step Opt-In Beat an Exit Popup by 1169% [by Using a Psychology Principle]

How a Two-Step Opt-In Compares to an Exit Popup [A Psychology Principle & Conversion Data]

I’ve no idea how to actually do the two-step. Apparently it looks a little something like this:

It’s way too complex for me. Fortunately, when it comes to marketing, the two-step opt-in form is much simpler.

What is a Two-Step Opt-In Form?

Well for starters it’s a two-time hyphenated term that’s really annoying to type. Functionally though, instead of including a form on your landing page, blog, or website, you use a link, button, or graphic to launch a popup that contains your form.

Why are Two-Step Opt-In Forms Good For Conversion?

There are two reasons why this approach is good for conversion rates, both of which have an element of behavioural psychology.

  • Foot in the Door (FITD): The FITD technique is an example of compliance psychology. By design, it’s good because the form is launched after a user-driven request. They clicked the link to subscribe with the intent to do exactly that, subscribe (or whatever the form’s conversion goal is). The click demonstrates the reaction to a modest request, creating a level of commitment that makes the visitor more likely to complete the form (the larger request) when it’s presented.
  • Perceived friction: Because there is no visible form, the idea of filling out a form is not really top of mind. This reduces the amount of effort required in your visitor’s mind.

What Does a Two-Step Opt-In Form Look Like?

They look a little like this artful sketch I did last night.

Let’s try a demo. You can subscribe to follow along with Product Awareness Month by clicking the banner.

Clicking that banner uses the two-step concept to launch a popup containing the subscribe form.

Pretty simple, right?

You could also click on any of the images below to do the same thing.

I configured all of these with Unbounce Popups by targeting this blog post URL and using the “On Click” trigger option set to function when an element with the ID #pam-two-step-v1 is clicked.

This trigger option is awesome because you can apply it to any element on your pages. And as you’ve just seen, you can have as many different popups as you like, all attached to different page elements.


You Can Also Use a Sticky Bar for a Two-Step Opt-In Form

The functionality is exactly the same if you want to use a Sticky Bar. Click the image below to show a Sticky Bar with a form, at the top of the page.


How Do Two-Step Opt-In Forms Perform?

Great question! I’m glad you asked.

Throughout Product Awareness Month I’ve sprinkled a few two-step opt-in popup opportunities like this one:

I’m also using the exact same popup using the exit trigger, so visitors see it when they are leaving the page (to compare performance). 100% of visitors will get the exit popup (once only), and the on-click triggered links are also available to all (just less likely to be seen).

To compare the data, the exit popup obviously gets seen a lot more as it triggers once for everyone. Conversely, the “On Click” popup gets fewer views because it’s a subtle CTA that only appears in a few places.

You can see some initial conversion rates below from the Unbounce dashboard.

I know, I know, not big sample sizes just yet (I’ll report on this again at the end of the month), but the difference is looking impressive.

The “On Click” triggered popup conversion rate is 1,169% better than the exit popup.

There is the argument around conversions is more important than conversion rate, but that doesn’t take into account any negative perception from the exit popup (thousands of people seeing it and not converting) vs. no negative perception from the on click version.


Convinced yet? I hope so. Now I’d like to challenge you to try your own experiments with popup triggers and the awesome two-step opt-in form.

Sign up for a 30-day trial and build some Popups today. You also get the Sticky Bar and Landing Page products included in your account.

Cheers
Oli

p.s. Come back tomorrow to see a video interview I did with the awesome Head of Marketing at Shopify Plus, Hana Abaza.

See the original article here: 

How a Two-Step Opt-In Compares to an Exit Popup [A Psychology Principle & Conversion Data]

Building Accessible Menu Systems

Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared on Inclusive Components. If you’d like to know more about similar inclusive component articles, follow @inclusicomps on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed. By supporting inclusive-components.design on Patreon, you can help to make it the most comprehensive database of robust interface components available.
Classification is hard. Take crabs, for example. Hermit crabs, porcelain crabs, and horseshoe crabs are not — taxonomically speaking — true crabs.

Read article here:

Building Accessible Menu Systems

Your Website’s Menu Is Costing You Conversions and Here’s What To Do About It

compass nav

As a designer, developer, or marketer, it’s your job to develop something unique for your brand’s website. The reason for this is simple: you want to stand out from the generic chatter surrounding your brand in the market, and a unique style will help you do that. But sometimes being adventurous in design can do more harm than good. Case in point: the navigation. In a web usability report from KoMarketing in 2015, roughly half of their survey’s respondents reported using the navigation menu to acquaint themselves with a new website. On the flip side of that, 37% of respondents…

The post Your Website’s Menu Is Costing You Conversions and Here’s What To Do About It appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read this article:

Your Website’s Menu Is Costing You Conversions and Here’s What To Do About It

Low-Hanging Fruits For Enhancing Mobile UX

(This is a sponsored post). Good UX is what separates successful apps from unsuccessful ones. Customers are won and lost every day because of good or bad user experience design. The most important thing to keep in mind when designing a mobile app is to make sure it is both useful and intuitive.
Obviously, if an app is not useful, it will have no practical value for the user, and no one will have any reason to use it.

Jump to original – 

Low-Hanging Fruits For Enhancing Mobile UX

A Brief Overview On Responsive Navigation Patterns

To say that responsive web design has changed our industry would be an understatement at best. We used to ask our clients which resolutions and devices they wanted us to support, but we now know the answer is “as many as possible.” To answer a challenge like this and to handle our increasingly complex world, our industry has exploded with new thinking, patterns and approaches.
In this article, I want to look specifically at the issue of responsive navigation.

Source – 

A Brief Overview On Responsive Navigation Patterns

Web Development Reading List #170: Hamburger Alternatives, Libsodium In PHP And Choosing Profit

As web developers, we need to rely on our knowledge, and choosing solutions we’re already familiar with is often the most convenient approach to solving a problem. However, not only technology is evolving but also our knowledge of how to use it.
For a while, we thought it’s best to use base64 encoding for inlining assets into CSS files, for example, and that loading JavaScript asynchronously will make websites faster.

Read article here – 

Web Development Reading List #170: Hamburger Alternatives, Libsodium In PHP And Choosing Profit

To Use Or Not To Use: Touch Gesture Controls For Mobile Interfaces

Many criticize gestural controls as being unintuitive and unnecessary. Despite this, widespread adoption is underway already, and the UI design world is burning the candle at both ends to develop solutions that are instinctively tactile. The challenges here are those of novelty.
Even though gestural controls have been around since the early 1980s and have enjoyed a level of ubiquity since the early 2000s, designers are still in the beta-testing phase of making gestural controls intuitive for everyday use.

See original:

To Use Or Not To Use: Touch Gesture Controls For Mobile Interfaces

The Thumb Zone: Designing For Mobile Users

If there is one thing that will stand the test of time, it’s thumb placement on mobile devices. This makes consideration of the “thumb zone”, a term coined in Steven Hoober’s research, an important factor in the design and development of mobile interfaces.

The Thumb Zone: Designing For Mobile Users

Have you ever interacted with a mobile website or app that simply didn’t play nice with your thumbs? Perhaps you’ve had to stretch to get to an important menu, or swiping turned into a battle with multiple swiping elements. Mishaps such as these reveal poor consideration of the thumb zone.

The post The Thumb Zone: Designing For Mobile Users appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Original article – 

The Thumb Zone: Designing For Mobile Users

Redesigning SGS’ Seven-Level Navigation System: A Case Study

SGS (formerly Société Générale de Surveillance) is a global service organization and provider of inspection, verification, testing and certification services across 14 industries. SGS’ website (along with 60 localized websites) primarily promotes the organization’s core services, as well as provides access to a multitude of useful services, supplementary content and tools. Our goal was to transform sgs.com from being desktop-only to being responsive.

Redesigning SGS’ Seven-Level Navigation System: A Case Study

This presented a unique set of challenges, especially around the legacy navigation system, which in areas was up to seven levels deep (divided into two parts) and which consisted of some 12,000 individual navigable items.

The post Redesigning SGS’ Seven-Level Navigation System: A Case Study appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Redesigning SGS’ Seven-Level Navigation System: A Case Study