Tag Archives: netherlands

How Twitter Can Bring You Top Talent

Using Twitter For Talent

Usually, when we talk about how social-media savvy companies use Twitter, we talk about doing smart and non-intrusive marketing; we talk about really getting into conversations with customers, and we talk about providing customer support using this particular social media channel. However, it has been some time since companies have started utilizing Twitter for something else – human resources. More precisely, there are companies out there which use Twitter to find and recruit top talent in their industry. Why Twitter? There is a list of reasons as to why Twitter is a fantastic recruitment tool, sometimes even giving LinkedIn a…

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How Twitter Can Bring You Top Talent

Improve Your Billing Form’s UX In One Day

The checkout page is the last page a user visits before finally decide to complete a purchase on your website. It’s where window shoppers turn into paying customers. If you want to leave a good impression, you should provide optimal usability of the billing form and improve it wherever it is possible to.

Improve Your Billing Form’s UX In One Day

In less than one day, you can add some simple and useful features to your project to make your billing form user-friendly and easy to fill in. A demo with all the functions covered below is available. You can find its code in the GitHub repository.

The post Improve Your Billing Form’s UX In One Day appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Improve Your Billing Form’s UX In One Day

Connecting Children With Nature Through Smart Toy Design


Did you know that by the time a teen in the US reaches 16 years of age, they are spending less than seven hours a week in nature, and these trends are worldwide. Parents are as concerned about their children not having time outdoors as they are about bullying, obesity and education. But they are unsure about what to do.

Connecting Children With Nature Through Smart Toy Design

Parents have increased concerns for their children’s safety. They are less willing to let their children play outdoors without direct supervision. As a result, children spend most of their free time in organized sports, music and arts activities. This results in less time for unstructured play than in previous generations. Richard Louv, writer and nature-time advocate, describes this condition as a “nature deficit disorder.”

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Connecting Children With Nature Through Smart Toy Design

Breaking Out Of The Box: Design Inspiration (June 2016)

There’s no doubt that simple design is hard, since it requires much more thought and inspiration. It’s about understanding exactly what your users need. Colors play a major role, and today I’d like to show you a couple of illustrations that may motivate you to try out some new color combinations and techniques.
Take a look at the following photographs, posters and book covers that have been created with some really inspiring shades and color palettes, and some even show how to cleverly use negative space.

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Breaking Out Of The Box: Design Inspiration (June 2016)

How To Improve Conversions By Localizing An App: A Case Study On “Paper”

When your design looks beautiful and polished, how do you know if it performs well? While it is easy to predict the appeal of a clean and simple UI, design that converts is always a shot in the dark for marketers and designers.
We worked with the team at FiftyThree to test their app store landing page before they launched ads in China. After tweaking background color, graphics, screenshot order, and localization, we achieved a 33% increase in app page conversion.

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How To Improve Conversions By Localizing An App: A Case Study On “Paper”

Why Static Website Generators Are The Next Big Thing


At StaticGen, our open-source directory of static website generators, we’ve kept track of more than a hundred generators for more than a year now, and we’ve seen both the volume and popularity of these projects take off incredibly on GitHub during that time, going from just 50 to more than 100 generators and a total of more than 100,000 stars for static website generator repositories.

Why Static Website Generators Are The Next Big Thing

Influential design-focused companies such as Nest and MailChimp now use static website generators for their primary websites. Vox Media has built a whole publishing system around Middleman. Carrot, a large New York agency and part of the Vice empire, builds websites for some of the world’s largest brands with its own open-source generator, Roots. And several of Google’s properties, such as “A Year In Search” and Web Fundamentals, are static.

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Why Static Website Generators Are The Next Big Thing

Upsell and Cross-sell: All You Need To Know

“Buy me those chocolates.”

The kid said sternly, pointing his stubby finger at a big jar of sweets on the shop counter as they waited to check out.

The counter guy grinned. I smiled. The mother winced.

She just got cross-selled.

In 2006, Amazon reported that cross-selling and upselling contributed as much as 35% of their revenue.

Product recommendations are responsible for an average of 10-30% of eCommerce site revenues according to Forrester Research analyst Sucharita Mulpuru.

There’s no reason why upselling and cross selling shouldn’t work for you. In this post we look at:

What is Upselling and Cross-selling?

Upselling and cross-selling are cousins of well, selling.

Buy a cow from me and I’ll offer you a better one for 50 bucks more: the better cow is an upsell.

What is Upselling?

Buy a cow from me and I’ll throw in a haystack for 5 bucks: the haystack is a cross sell.

What is cross-sell?

Upselling is a strategy to sell a superior, more expensive version of a product that the customer already owns (or is buying). A superior version is:

  • a higher, better model of the product or
  • same product with value-add features that raises the perceived value of the offering

How Macy's Upsell

Upselling is the reason why we have a 54” television instead of the 48” we planned for; the reason why we go for 7 day European Sojourns instead of 5 day simple French Affairs. It’s also the reason why we have unused annual contracts thinning away under silverfish attacks.

Cross-selling is a strategy to sell related products to the one a customer already owns (or is buying). Such products generally belong to different product categories, but will be complementary in nature. Like the hay-stack for the cow, or batteries for a wall-clock.

Cross-selling is a battle ready strategy. Here’s how McD does it: McDonald’s keep their apple pie dispensers right behind the cashier, in full view of customers. A year ago, the head of the U.S. division for McDonald’s Corp., Jeff Stratton, said in an interview that he felt moving the dispensers to the back kitchen area would probably cut apple pie orders by half.

Upsell and cross-sell are the reasons we buy things ‘just in case’.

There is one more popular selling technique known as bundling. Bundling is the offspring of cross sell and upsell. You bundle together the main product and other auxiliary products for a higher price than what the single product is sold for.

What is Bundling in eCommerce?

By bundling together the camera and two very related (even essential) products, Flipkart makes a compelling offer. Notice how there are multiple combos available.

Bundling in Action - Flipkart

Bundling is also quite often used along with a discount to increase the perceived value of the offering. Here’s more on the benefits of bundling.

Pure Bundle or Mixed Bundle?

Pure Bundling is when products are made available only in bundles and cannot be bought individually. Mixed bundling is when both options (individual buy and bundle buy) are made available.

Vineet Kumar from HBS and Timothy Derdenger at Carnegie Mellon University teamed up together and studied bundling as used by Nintendo in their video game market. Revenues fell almost 20% when Nintendo switched from mixed bundling to pure bundling. In the gaming market, prices fall each day, so customers looking to buy just that one thing will choose to wait until it becomes available, likely at a cheaper price.

Similarly, a study on the effect of bundling in consumer goods market, revealed that bundling is a great way to entice high value customers of competitors to switch over. But it does not significantly help category sales; and in some ways even discourages it because different category products are bundled together.

So should you use pure bundling or mixed bundling?

The safest option is to use mixed bundling: offer products individually and as bundle

But why settle for safe when you can A/B test it?

Here’s a way you can use bundling: Specify a minimum order amount to qualify for free shipping. Customers who are looking to buy only one item are likely to switch to the bundle in order to raise order value and qualify for free shipping.

Amazon does all of this brilliantly.

How Amazon Does Upsell, Cross-sell and Bundling

Why Is Upsell and Cross-Sell Important for eCommerce?

Upselling and cross-selling is often (and mistakenly) seen as unethical practices to squeeze more out of the customer.

They’d say, ‘the wincing mother in your opening paragraph is proof that customers hate being cross-sold to’.

I disagree, as will any white-hat marketer.

The Mother Who Winced (way better than ‘the wincing mother’) wasn’t the target customer there. The kid was. The kid found value, and he demanded it. The mother didn’t (add dental insurance to the mix), and she winced.

This dilemma of whether upselling/cross-selling is ethical or not, has its roots in the means and ends discussion. The end goal of any business is more profit. It is the means that make all the difference.

Cross-selling and upselling can be used unethically, in a pushy sort of way, to try and make the customer shell out more. But such tactics don’t last long and is often to the peril of such businesses. More on this under the heading “The Fine Line Between A Friend and A Creep”

As a strategy, however, upselling and cross-selling should be used to ‘help customers win’ as illustrated beautifully in this video by Jeffrey Gittomer. Looked at it that way, upselling and cross-selling become more of friendly suggestions and a helping hand to make the ‘right’ purchase.

Remind Bob to buy some batteries along with his new wall-clock

Jack might be looking for something more powerful than an i5 processor, show him the i7, too.

So how does upselling help you?

#1 Increases Customer Retention

If you leave aside impulse buys, customers buy products/services to solve a problem. They are aware of the problem, but might not be aware of the best solution to the problem.

I don’t belong to the Steve Jobs bandwagon, but he got it right when he said ‘people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.’ Upselling or cross-selling done right helps the customer find more value than he was expecting. You become his best friend.

Best friends return and drive 43% of your revenues.

#2 Increases Average Order Value and Life-time Value

Romance your repeat customers. Do it like Jerry Maguire. And they will show you the money.

Show Me The Money

Should You Upsell or Cross-Sell in eCommerce?

Despite the many ways upsell and cross-sell are similar, there’s a clear winner in terms of numbers.

According to Predictive Intent, upsell can work upto 20 times better than cross-sell.

A little over 4% of all customers who were faced with an upsell bought it while less than 0.5% of customers took bait when shown a cross-sell.

But when it comes to the checkout page, cross-sell kills it with 3% conversions.

PRWD head of usability, Paul Rouke explains why cross-sell works best on checkout pages

Why Cross-Sell Works For Checkout Page

What and How Should You UpSell?

The data from Predictive Intent’s study show that a mere 4% of customers convert on average through upselling. It’s not much, you might think.

4% of customers will buy a better product if offered, and are ready to pay a premium for that.

They aren’t looking for ‘just enough’. They will not shy away from going the extra mile to make sure the product (solution to a problem) is just right.

One of the commonest ways to upsell is to suggest the next higher model. But when it’s just 4% that you are targeting, the margin for error is as thick as the edge of a blade.

To make the most of these unicorns, here are some suggestions on how to upsell:

  • Promote your most reviewed or most sold products
  • Give more prominent space for the upsell, display testimonials for the upsell
  • Make sure the upsells are not more than 25% costlier than the original product
  • Make add-on features like insurance pre-selected and ask customers to deselect if not required
  • If you have customer personas in place, use those to make relevant suggestions
  • Make suggestions relevant by giving context: why should I buy that instead of this?

What do I mean by that?

Don’t just shove a front-loader washing machine in my face when I’m looking at a top-loader; tell me why it’s meant for me: I’m the discerning heavy user, who likes taking extra care of clothes and save more on electricity.

And always, always, make sure you suggest products from the same category. Don’t ask me to buy a 17 inch laptop when I’m shopping for a macbook air. They don’t satisfy the same needs.

Let’s not forget cross-sell either.

Cross-sell gets up to 3% conversions when used on the check-out page.

Use cross-sell techniques more on the check-out page to tap into impulse buying:

  • Cross-sell products should be at least 60% cheaper than the product added to cart
  • Go for products that are easily forgotten: filters for lenses, earphones for mobile phones, Lighter for a gas stove and of course, scrub for cows.. the possibilities are endless

Here’s how removing cross-sell options from the product page increased order by 5.6%.

If you are manually pushing upsell/cross-sell suggestions, it would be worthwhile to automate the system. Products should be categorized and related products should be tagged so as to enable automation.

Now comes the interesting part.

Why Does Upsell/Cross-Sell Work and How Can You Ace It?

Upsell and cross-sell works when you are able to ease the decision making process of a customer.

In 2006, a study by Bain showed that reducing complexity and narrowing choices can boost revenues by 5-40% and cut costs by 10-35%.

Upsell Smart By Narrowing Choices

Too many choices can be paralyzing. Professor Iyengar and her research assistants conducted an study on the effect of choices in the California Gourmet market. They set up booths of Wilkin and Sons Jams — one offered an assortment of 24 jams while the other had on display 6 jam varieties.

60% of the visitors stopped by the larger booth while only 40% flocked to the one with lower number of choices.

But 30% of visitors that sampled at the small booth made a buy while only 3% of the 60% visitors to the larger booth went on to make a purchase.

Our ability to make a decision reduces as number of choices increases.

Actionable Tip: Don’t bombard your customers with many choices. If they’ve already said no to an upsell product do not push for it. Think of upsell as a gentle suggestion, not an aggressive sales tactic.

Bundle To Reduce Decision Complexity

Every action the user has to take makes the decision making more complex. Think of ways to reduce the number of actions in a buying decision. We’ve a limited amount of energy to be spent on decision making.

Bundling brings together related products that are of relevance to a customer. Buying them individually involves more decision making, and more steps. Whereas through bundling, in one a customer is able to buy multiple products together.

It’s also important to understand how we make decisions. How rational are we at decision making?

Turns out, not so much.

Customers Make Irrational Decisions

Dan Ariely does a brilliant break down of the irrationality of decision making and explains how we are not always in control of the decisions we make.

Let’s talk organ donations. Bear with me, thank Dan later.

The graph below shows the percentage of people of different countries that agreed for organ donation.

Irrationality of Decision Making - Dan Ariely

It seems the people represented in Gold don’t seem to care about others all that much, while the ones in blue care infinitely. Is that a cultural difference at play here?

But these guys are neighbours: Sweden and Denmark , Netherlands and Belgium, Germany and France. So what’s happening here.

They were presented two widely different consent forms.

Difference in the opt-in forms used

In the countries on the left, people were presented with an ‘opt-in’ form. People had to check the box to opt-in for the organ donation program.

In the countries on the right, people were presented with an ‘opt-out’ form, which meant unless they unchecked the box, they would be opted-in by default.

Surprisingly, people everywhere behaved the same way. They did not take any action and let the default choice be.

Dan Ariely explains our behavior was based on the complexity of the decision.

  • We don’t have complete information on the subject
  • We can’t differentiate sufficiently between the two options
  • We can’t decide
  • We do nothing

Buridan’s Ass: An ass that is equally hungry and thirsty is placed precisely midway between a stack of hay and a pail of water. It will die of both hunger and thirst since it cannot make any rational decision to choose one over the other.

Actionable Tip: So in your purchase funnel, make those little extra features checked by default, and give customers the option to deselect. Make it clearly visible, and never attempt to do it on the sly.

Unsure customers will go with the default selection.

Use Price Anchoring: The Surprising Power of Dummy Choices

A few years back The Economist ran an ad that looked like this

Price Anchoring in The Economist Ad

You get a web-only subscription for $59, a print-only subscription for $125 or both, again, for $125! Needless to say, the print-only option is a dummy choice. Who in their right minds would ever choose an inferior option when the price is the same?

Dan took the ad and took it to a 100 MIT students to see what they would choose.

Price Anchoring At Play - with the dummy choice

An overwhelming majority chose what seemed the ‘best’ option – both print and web subscription at $125. 16% chose the web-only subscription. Nobody chose the print-only subscription at $125.

Dan then took off the middle choice — the print-only one. And ran the test again on 100 people. This is how the opt-in rates looked now.

No Price Anchoring - without the dummy choice

Surprisingly, the majority (68%) people chose the cheaper option when the dummy choice was removed. The print and web subscription that saw 84% subscription in the presence of the dummy choice now got a significantly low 32% subscription rate.

An inferior choice makes a similar but superior choice look better even when other options are cheaper.

Actionable Tip: consider a customer looking at a top-tier entry level DSLR. Show him a mid-level DSLR without add-ons for a marginally higher price and the same mid-level DSLR with add-ons at the same higher price.

Upsell it with the proper communication — how does the mid-level DSLR help the customer win? — and you have a good probability of making the upsell.

The Fine Line Between Being A Friend and A Creep

In 2009, Graham Charlton at eConsultancy tore apart VistaPrint’s and GoDaddy’s checkout process in this post. GoDaddy’s process at the time contained almost 10 steps from selecting a domain name to finally completing the order – most of which were forced cross-sell attempts.

VistaPrint seems to have taken the critique well, and in a post published 5 years later, eConsultancy looks at how VistaPrint revamped their checkout process, making it much more pleasant and much less in-your-face in the process.

Take a look at how removing cross-sell options from product page increased conversions

Here’s what you shouldn’t do:

  1. Suggesting upsells and cross-sells before a customer picks a product
  2. Bombarding customers with many cross-sell and upsell products
  3. Sly tactics like hiding pre-selected add-ons in the hope customers don’t notice it

If there’s one thing that is your takeaway from this post, it has to be this:

Upsell and cross-sell techniques should be used as strategies to help customers make better decisions, faster.

The post Upsell and Cross-sell: All You Need To Know appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Upsell and Cross-sell: All You Need To Know

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Three Award Winning A/B Test Cases You Should Know About

(This is a guest post, authored by Danny de Vries, Senior CRO Consultant with Traffic4U)

Every year, Conversion Optimizers around the world vie for the annual WhichTestWon Online Testing Awards, which are awarded by an independent organization situated in the USA. Anyone can enter the competition by submitting their A/B and multivariate test cases which are then reviewed and judged on multiple factors. The most interesting and inspiring cases are then eligible to win either a Gold, Silver or Bronze badge across a range of categories.

This year, twelve out of the thirty test case winners of the 6th annual international WhichTestWon Online Testing Awards are Dutch. With one golden award, two silver awards and an honorable mention, Traffic4u emerged as one of the strong pillars of the Dutch Optimization prowess. This blog covers our three award winning A/B test cases, starting with the golden award winner.

De Hypothekers Associatie: Users Need Guidance

The test case of De Hypothekers Associatie, the biggest independent mortgage consultancy service in the Netherlands, received a golden award in the category ‘Form Elements’. As a consultancy firm, they rely on advising clients about mortgages and other related financial decisions. However, before contacting a consultancy, users typically want to understand for themselves what their financial possibilities are regarding mortgages and buying of properties. So, a user who’s just begun exploring options is unlikely to contact De Hypothekers Associatie or check for an appointment.

Case Situation

In order to empower users to research the possibilities regarding mortgages, De Hypothekers Associatie created several pages on which users could calculate their maximum mortgage loan, monthly mortgage payments, etc. The experiment included the control page shown below, on which users could calculate their mortgage loan:

Translated Version Control

Hypothesis

Previous A/B tests on the website of De Hypotheker Associatie clearly showed the need for guidance on the website, which was the result of testing call-to-action buttons. For instance, a button that said ‘Next step’ significantly outperformed other CTAs with copy like ‘Contact us’ and ‘Advise me’. This result implied two things:

  • Users want information in small digestible chunks
  • Users like to explore what lies ahead instead of being plainly told what the next step is

The follow-up action was to apply this insight to the calculation page, as the lack of guidance could potentially result in fewer mortgage appointments and paying clients.

The hypothesis was that users need to be guided through the process of calculating the maximum loan amount they could receive. The test variation of the “Loan calculation page” included a clear step-by-step flow guiding users through the calculation process. This was in stark contrast with the control situation that had a more simplistic flow. It was assumed that guiding users through the calculation process would lead to more calculations and hence, more appointments for the consultancy. The screenshot of the variant can be found below.

De Hypotheker Associatie - Variation for A/B test

Results

Guiding customers through the loan-calculation process resulted in a significant uplift of more than 18% in terms of number of loan calculations on that particular page. Furthermore, the number of mortgage appointments also increased by more than 18%.

Why Do Users Need Guidance?

It goes without saying that mortgages are boring and complex. But it becomes a necessity when you are (or want to be) a home owner. Also, taking out a mortgage is a high stakes financial decision that isn’t typically made in a day without sufficient information. Because of this, people need advice on where to begin, what steps to undertake, what the possibilities are and what options suit their situation best. The test results show that including clear guidance on the steps to follow can result in a statistically significant uplift in conversion.

Fietsvoordeelshop: Display Customer Savings Prominently

In the category ‘Copy Test’, the A/B test of Fietsvoordeelshop received a Silver Award. Fietsvoordeelshop is one of the leading bike web-shops in the Netherlands offering an assortment of bikes from top brands for discounted prices.

Case Situation

The website lacked a prominently visible indication of the actual discount users would get on the different products. Discounts were displayed in an orange text right next to the big orange CTA button.

Control Image - for A/B Test

Hypothesis

It was hypothesized that Fietsvoordeelshop was losing potential sales by not showing customer savings very effectively. We expected an increase in click-through-rate to the shopping cart by making the savings prominently visible. The discount, which was shown in orange text Uw voordeel: €550,00, was changed to a more visible green badge that contrasted with the orange CTA button (here’s more on the importance of contrast in design). See the variant below:

Variation Image - for A/B Test

Results

Results showed that the variation outperformed the control with 26.3% statistically significant uplift in Shopping Cart entries. So it’s one thing to offer discounts on products, but unless the benefit clearly stands out, users are likely to miss it and never convert.

Follow-through and Stay Consistent

Although we found an increase in click-throughs to the shopping cart, we didn’t see this effect (or somewhat similar) in the checkout steps following the shopping cart entry. The reason for this could be that the discount badge was only shown on the pages before ‘add to shopping cart’ and not on the subsequent check out pages. In order to sustain the positive influence, it might be a good idea to retain the badge all the way through the checkout. However, it has to be tested if repeatedly showing the savings during the final steps in the checkout process leads to an increase in actual sales.

Omoda: Icons Perform Better (on mobile devices)

The second Silver Award Winning test case belongs to the Dutch shoe retailer Omoda. It came in second in the category ‘Images & Icons’. Omoda is one of the top shoe retailers in The Netherlands offering a range of shoes from world-class brands for women, men and kids. The case serves to show how important it is to segment your test results. Read more about visitor segmentation and how it can help increase website conversions.

Case Situation

Each of the Omoda product pages feature their unique selling points. While these were placed near the call-to-action Plaats in shopping bag and were definitely visible, we believed they weren’t visible enough. The Reasons?

  • The USPs appeared in a bulleted list, but it blended too well with other text on the page and did not command attention.
  • The page also included a big black area for customer service elements. Because the page was largely white, the black areas would get more attention, distracting users from the primary goal of the page – viewing shoe details and adding the product to the shopping bag.

Below is an image of the control version:

Omoda Control for Multivariate Test

Hypothesis

The hypothesis was that addressing both these issues to make the USPs more visible would lead to an increase in sales. We created a Multivariate test which allowed us to test both assumptions – USPs aren’t visible enough and the black area is too distracting. All variations are shown below:

Combination 2

Omoda - Combination 2 for Multivariate Test Combination 2: changing the black color to a more neutral grey and moving the customer review rating to the top of the box

Combination 3

Omoda Combination 3 for Multivariate Test Combination 3: using icons and black text instead of grey text to let the USPs stand out better

Combination 4

Omoda Combination 4 for Multivariate Test Combination 4: using elements from combination-2 and combination-3

Results

Overall results for this test told us that the hypothesis should be rejected; there was no convincing proof that any combination would perform significantly better or worse than the control situation. But, through segmentation we found that the hypothesis did work positively on mobile devices and resulted in a whopping 13.6% uplift in sales. Initially, the overall results seemed inconclusive because of a 5.2% drop in sales on desktop and tablet devices.

Users Behave Differently on Different Devices

The results of this test show the device-dependency of hypotheses and the effectiveness of using icons to make USPs stand out better. On the basis of this test, we recommend that you always segment test results to observe the effect of the hypothesis through different dimensions and not make blind decisions.

In the light of previous A/B tests, we believe that the reason why icons perform better on mobile is because desktop and tablet users are more likely to click on the prominent USPs — like terms of payment or delivery — in order to see more details. But, since the USPs aren’t clickable, desktop users would not able to get any additional information. This could irk potential buyers and get them to bounce away. On a mobile device however, with less screen real-estate and the device being less suited to opening multiple tabs, users are less likely to search for additional information.

Understand What Drives Your Visitors And Keep Testing

The above cases have one thing in common. No, it’s not the awards. The commonality is that in each of these cases, we were able to successfully ‘assume’ what drove website visitors. Research using data and/or user feedback told us that a certain effect was occurring. We put this understanding in the required perspective (depending on the type of website and/or product, device, seasonality, user flow etc.) and made certain assumptions about the possible causes for these effects. Then we used A/B and multivariate testing to check if our assumptions were correct. Testing, in fact, is all about learning from your website visitors.

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Three Award Winning A/B Test Cases You Should Know About

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Eliminating One Click + Design Improvement = 33.4% Increase in Conversion Rate

The Company

Dachfenster-rollo.de is an online business dealing in window blinds and skylight curtains and is based out of the Netherlands. It is the exclusive importer and distributor of Bloc products in the country. They also offer customized blinds for all types of windows.

To improve the conversion rate of their website, they hired ClickValue — an online digital marketing agency.

The Test

ClickValue did a series of tests on the Dachfenster-rollo website. In this case study I’ll take you through the details of the test that was set-up on one of the most important pages of the website — the page where visitors were required to select the brand of the blind. Originally on this page, visitors had to click on a downward arrow that opened a drop-down list. They could then select one of the available brands and proceed to a different page to choose other specifications such as size, material and type of blind they required. This is how it looked like:

ab_testing_control

To push more people into the conversion funnel from this page, ClickValue decided to test it against two variations. This test was performed on close to 2000 visitors for a duration of over 50 days with an objective to find out a statistically significant winner out of the three variations.

In the first variation, they replaced the drop down list with names of all brands listed upfront in orange color. This was done with an objective of eliminating the need to click on the drop down list to find the list of available brands. This is how it looked like:

ab_testing_v1

In the second variation, they went a step further and made the list in the form of a series of buttons with the names of brands labelled on them. They also did away with the orange that was used in control and the first variation. Instead, the second variation had a list of big buttons in green color. This is how it looked like:

ab_testing_v2

The goal that they were tracking in this test was the final purchase i.e. conversion of visitors into customers.

The Result

After exactly 53 days of waiting for a statistically significant winner to emerge, the second variation won and increased the conversions by 33.4%.

Both the variations performed better than the original. The first variation also, at 86% confidence, increased the conversion rate by 18.1%.

The key here was making all the information available to visitors upfront and thus reducing the steps required to reach the conversion goal. In the first variation all available brands were shown upfront thus a click was eliminated. The second variation was able to optimize the purchase process further by clearly showing all items in the form of clickable buttons.

Let’s Talk

Good design is the key to optimization. In this case, making the information visually easy to consume made all the difference in the conversion rate. What do you think about this case study? I’ll be happy to talk to you in the comments section below.

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Eliminating One Click + Design Improvement = 33.4% Increase in Conversion Rate

How To Conduct Website Localization – Don’t Get Lost In Translation

A common mistake with localized websites is considering the translated content to be just another version of the pages in the original language. Translation isn’t everything. Of course, for the user it’s all about the content: Is the content relevant and understandable and in line with the user’s cultural context?
As pointed out in Entrepreneur: “According to research firm IDC, web users are four times more likely to purchase from a company that communicates in their own language.

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How To Conduct Website Localization – Don’t Get Lost In Translation