Tag Archives: network

Designing Ethics: Shifting Ethical Understanding In Design

The influence of design is expanding beyond the realms of typography and objects and into healthcare, public policy, education, financial services, and more. Designers working in these emerging design fields are responsible for projects that have significant and fundamental impact on the quality of people’s lives with clear ethical implications.
In healthcare, for example, designers are responsible for creating everything from the industrial designer’s medical device that keeps a heart beating to the service designer’s physical layout of an operating room.

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Designing Ethics: Shifting Ethical Understanding In Design

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Editor’s Note: Our dear friend Anselm Hannemann summarizes what happened in the web community in the past few weeks in one handy list, so that you can catch up on everything new and important. Enjoy!
Welcome back to our monthly reading list. Before we dive right into all the amazing content I stumbled upon — admittedly, this one is going to be quite a long update — I want to make a personal announcement.

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Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM

Some people hate writing documentation, and others just hate writing. I happen to love writing; otherwise, you wouldn’t be reading this. It helps that I love writing because, as a design consultant offering professional guidance, writing is a big part of what I do. But I hate, hate, hate word processors.

Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM

When writing technical web documentation (read: pattern libraries), word processors are not just disobedient, but inappropriate. Ideally, I want a mode of writing that allows me to include the components I’m documenting inline, and this isn’t possible unless the documentation itself is made of HTML, CSS and JavaScript. In this article, I’ll be sharing a method for easily including code demos in Markdown, with the help of shortcodes and shadow DOM encapsulation.

The post Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Documenting Components In Markdown With Shadow DOM

The Crazy Egg Guide to Reddit Content Marketing

Reddit Content Marketing Guide

Possibly the largest group of self-contained communities on the Internet, it can be seen as a microcosm of the Internet in itself. It has its own lingo, its own inside jokes, its own history. Its special class of geeky, socially inept, smug, arrogant, yet revered users are called “neckbeards”, while everyone else are just called “Redditors”. It’s possibly the Internet’s greatest spawning ground of memes — only the dirtier, more underground imageboard “4chan” has as much influence in the subculture-sphere. It is, in fact, one of the most popular and heavily trafficked (not to mention plain old fun) websites in…

The post The Crazy Egg Guide to Reddit Content Marketing appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Crazy Egg Guide to Reddit Content Marketing

Web Development Reading List #177: Getting Started With Components, CT-Header, And New Regular Expressions

From time to time, we need to take some time off, and actually, I’m glad that this reading list is a bit shorter as the ones you’re used to. Because one thing that really stuck with me this week was Eric Karjaluoto’s article.
In his article, he states that, “Taking pride in how busy we are is one of the worst ideas we ever had.” So, how about reading just a few articles this week for a change and then take a complete weekend off to recharge your battery?

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Web Development Reading List #177: Getting Started With Components, CT-Header, And New Regular Expressions

PPC Landing Page Magic: Secrets Revealed [GIFOGRAPHIC]

This marketing infographic is part of KlientBoost’s 25-part Marketing Advent Calendar. Sign up here to receive a new gifographic once a day in your inbox.

As a kid who was fascinated with the magic store, it’s kind of surprising that I still don’t know how magicians do certain tricks. But it’s probably because as an adult, I’ve spent most of my time trying to master one magic trick:

Making more money appear — both for my PPC agency and for our clients.

How do we do it?

A large part of the magic comes from the landing pages our CRO team designs and tests. And today I want to reveal all the tricks that go into a high-converting landing page to make you the David Copperfield of PPC landing page testing.

(Keep reading below the gifographic for more explanation.)

ezgif-com-878a1ae317

Geographic specificity: Get more local love

When your PPC campaigns and landing page work together on a geographic level, you unleash serious conversion potential.

To help illustrate, imagine these two scenarios:

  1. A nationwide PPC campaign that goes to a nationwide landing page
  2. A city-specific PPC campaign that goes to a city-specific landing page

Which one do you think will perform better?

I think the second would — and we have 100+ clients that would agree. By becoming more granular with your PPC campaigns, you’re able to make the visitor believe that you’re local (even if you’re not).

Take this example of using geographic-specific area code phone numbers on landing pages versus a generic 800 number:

conversion-rate-for-generic-vs-local-numbers
This table shows conversion rates for landing pages displaying generic 800 phone number versus landing pages with a local number. Image source.

And phone numbers are only a start. Test geographically-specific PPC ad copy, landing page headlines and even visuals.

We use Unbounce’s Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) to help us easily launch dynamic landing pages and prevent traffic dilution that slows down statistical significance.

Which brings us to our next trick…

Dynamic text replacement: Less work, more fun

Dynamic text replacement allows you to swap out the text on your landing page with keywords from your PPC campaigns.

By making small adjustments to your PPC campaign URLs, you can make one landing page specific to hundreds of keywords you’re bidding on, resulting in a landing page that show exactly what visitors searched for:

dynamic-text-replacement-example-url
With DTR, you can turn one landing page into 100 landing pages.

Here’s an example of an outdoors company using DTR to “magically” create super-relevant landing pages.

If the user searched for “hiking backpack,” this is the landing page they’ll see:

dtr-examlpe-hiking-backpack

And if they searched for “trekking backpack”?

dtr-example-trekking-backpack

Boom.

Notice how nothing changed but the text on those two pages?

Read a full explanation of this “magic trick” here.

Multi-step landing pages

You’ve heard how reducing the amount of form fields will help improve your conversion rates, right?

few-form-fields-quotes

But what if I told you that there’s a way to add more fields (thereby better qualifying prospects) while still improving conversion rates?

That’s some true David Copperfield s*** right there.

giphy
I know that’s not David Copperfield. Just trying to see if you’re awake. GIF source.

Multi-step landing pages can help you achieve just this by asking for a little information upfront, then progressively asking for more and more. Dr. Robert Cialdini, author of Influence: The Power of Persuasasion, explains that this technique works because of a principle he calls Commitment and Consistency:

ciadini-quote-commitment-consistency

On our own landing pages, we start by asking questions that are easy to answer, and then progressively get more personal.

We’ve found that these “micro conversions” make it more likely for the prospect to then later fill out more personal details such as their name and contact information:

multi-step-landing-page-threat
We’ve built all our lead gen efforts around multi-step landing pages. Image source.

Call to action temperature testing

A common mistake a lot of our clients make prior to working with us is that they use the same call to action for all their PPC traffic: search, social, video and display.

This is problematic because different types of PPC traffic have different levels of intent.

For example, people seeing your ads through the Search Network can be people really close to converting (depending on keyword intent), but the Display Network typically has visitors who are a few steps behind. (I wrote about this on the Unbounce blog before.)

klientboost-ppc-thermometer
We have found that display leads are typically colder than leads acquired through the search network.

If a certain PPC channel isn’t converting for you, sometimes switching up the offer — and the call to action — can make all the difference.

We’ve found that the offers on the left work well for cold leads, whereas the offers on the right work better for warm leads:

klientboost-match-ppc-channel-temperature
We made this to use internally at KlientBoost.

As with most PPC tactics, this requires a bit of testing. And don’t forget to have a means of nurturing cold leads down the funnel.

Local visuals: Make ‘em feel at home

Remember how you can improve conversion rates by changing phone numbers and headlines to appear more local to the visitor’s location?

You can also do that with your hero shot and other visuals you’re using on your landing page.

We ran a test for a roofing company who advertised in several states. Because we were able to split up the PPC traffic based on geography, we were able to funnel all visitors to a dedicated landing with visuals that matched the local feel:

local-visuals-a-b-test

The result?

Conversion rates increased by 22%.

It seems so simple, yet it’s a bit of work to set up.

But the payoff is immense.

Hidden fields sales tracking

This very moment, you’re likely bidding on multi intent keywords that may bring you conversions (leads, demos, or trials), but will never turn into sales.

But with hidden fields sales tracking like Google’s ValueTrack parameters, you’re able to create hidden fields on your landing page to capture lead information, along with other nifty data, like:

  • The keyword they typed in
  • The device they were using
  • The landing page URL they converted on
  • The geographic location they were in

With your CRM lead entry that now has all that additional bulleted info, you’re able to go back to your PPC accounts and learn not just what keyword gave you the lead, but what keyword gave you the sale in other words, which of your keywords have the highest closing rate.

With that information, you’ll find that you’re able to afford higher CPAs for certain conversions compared to others, and this will ultimately help you get higher volumes of the right type of conversions.

How’d you do that?

PPC landing page testing can be complex, but these few tricks above are what help us double the performance for our clients.

These tips will help you customize your landing pages, resulting in better marketing experiences that convert better.

So you can pull more rabbits conversions out of your hat PPC campaigns.

Embed this gifographic on your site (copy and paste the code).

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PPC Landing Page Magic: Secrets Revealed [GIFOGRAPHIC]

True Lies Of Optimistic User Interfaces

Three user interfaces (UIs) go to a pub. The first one orders a drink, then several more. A couple of hours later, it asks for the bill and leaves the pub drunk. The second UI orders a drink, pays for it up front, orders another drink, pays for it and so on, and in a couple of hours leaves the pub drunk. The third UI exits the pub already drunk immediately after going in — it knows how the pubs work and is efficient enough not to lose time.

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True Lies Of Optimistic User Interfaces

Web Development Reading List #140: CSS-Only Dropdowns, Toggles And HTML Sliders

In times where Facebook announces to track all web users whenever it can, it feels weird to work on disaster management tools. You may now ask why, but if you consider what data you work with in such a project, you’re likely to be monitored because of a lot of keywords in there. And that’s what bothers me most: That people who want to do good need to fear that they’re under complete surveillance.

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Web Development Reading List #140: CSS-Only Dropdowns, Toggles And HTML Sliders

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How VWO Affects your Site Speed

A recent post published on the ConversionXL blog highlighted a study conducted to find out how different A/B testing tools affect site speed. VWO was among the tools compared and we feel the results of the study are not an accurate reflection of our technology.

In this post, we are going to highlight some aspects of the study that had a large impact on the results and also elaborate on how the VWO code affects your page load time.

Sub-optimal Test Configuration with ‘DOM Ready’ Event Conditions

In the research conducted by OrangeValley, the test campaign was configured with sub-optimal settings within VWO. This means that rather than using the recommended WYSIWYG Visual Editor to change background image and text, a custom JavaScript code was used to make the changes. In addition, the code was configured to fire after the page had loaded (in JavaScript this is called a ‘DOM ready’ event). This impacted the result in two ways:

  1. The inclusion of the ‘DOM ready’ event made the VWO code wait for the entire page to load before it could display the changes made in the variation. The web page used in the study had a page load time of around 2.7 seconds.
    Here’s a snapshot of the campaign code from VWO settings (while the code waits for ‘DOM ready’):Sub-optimal way, waiting for DOM ready
    Here’s another snapshot of the campaign code (using the optimal way, without ‘DOM ready’): Optimal way, without waiting for DOM ready
    Executing after the DOM ready event will invariably increase the experienced loading time. Here’s the general case for it.
  2. To counter flicker and ensure a smooth loading experience for visitors, VWO hides all the relevant elements before they start loading on the page and only unhides them once the VWO code has swapped them with the variation changes. All this happens within a span of 110 milliseconds on average. If the campaign had been configured using the optimal manner, the flicker effect would have automatically been taken care of by our SmartCode.

Asynchronous v/s Synchronous Code

As clearly noted in the blog post, “Most A/B testing software create an additional step in loading and rendering a web page”. This happens because many A/B testing tools use synchronous code. VWO, with its asynchronous SmartCode is an exception to this.

With its unique asynchronous code, VWO ensures there is no delay in the load time of the page. VWO’s asynchronous code does not block the rendering of parts of the page and does not impact the page load time.

Asynchronous V/S synchronous Code Comparison

What is asynchronous code and why does VWO recommend it?

Simply put, asynchronous means that the code will contact VWO’s servers in the background, download and process the test package while the rest of your page continues to load and render in the browser normally.

With synchronous code, the browser has to wait for the package to download and then process it before loading the rest of the page. If for any reason the tracking code can’t contact its servers then the browser will wait, usually for 30 to 60 seconds, until the request times out. If your tracking code is in the tag, then your entire page won’t load and your visitor will be stuck with a blank page. Asynchronous code does not have this critical problem. If for any reason, the asynchronous VWO SmartCode can’t contact our servers your page will still download and render properly.

Private and Dynamic Content Delivery Network (CDN)

VWO has invested years of engineering effort to ensure that we build the best-in-class technology and infrastructure for our customers. An important part of this is setting up our own private CDN which uses Bare Metal Servers from IBM SoftLayer’s state-of-the-art global data centers. This ensures that we always have a server close to your visitor’s location and there is minimum latency, reducing critical download time.

VWO CDN Map

VWO’s CDN is also dynamic which caches not just the static code required to run tests but also generates dynamic test variation data. This has an edge over regular CDNs since they only cache static data. By dynamically generating test packages only the relevant variation data is sent to each visitor depending on the URL they are on.

Small Size of VWO’s Test Packages

Another factor that significantly impacts page load time is the size of test packages, which determines how long it will take for the browser to download it. VWO ensures small package sizes through two methods: by intelligently understanding and recording only the precise changes that you make to your page, and individually packaging tests for a visitor to deliver only the relevant content for the URL they are on.

Let us suppose you edit the HTML of your product page template to make two changes; increase the font-size of your text and insert a ‘recommended’ icon. VWO compares your changes to the original code and detects the precise edits – the change made to the CSS property “font-size” and the insertion of a new graphic. Other systems will save the entire block of code which will also convert the dynamic content into static content and will end up showing the same description across all product pages.

Small size of VWO’s test packages

VWO’s CDN is custom built for optimal A/B testing performance. It unbundles the payload to make smaller packages for each individual test and URL. Some A/B testing tools bundle all the data for all tests running on a domain into one large package. We’ve seen package sizes of up to 3MB when a website is running many tests, which obviously increases page load time. VWO, on the other hand, only sends the data required for the test running on a particular URL to make a small, tidy payload which downloads quickly. This is especially advantageous when you’re a power-testing team running multiple tests on different parts of your domain.

VWO - Small size of test files

Having said all this, we are confident that VWO’s best-in-class technology coupled with optimal campaign settings will ensure that your website never slows down. We would also like to invite OrangeValley to work with us on setting up their campaign correctly so that they can present a true comparison of all the tools in their study.

As always, if you still have any doubts or clarifications to seek in this regard, please feel free to reach out to me directly at sparsh@wingify.com.

Happy Optimizing!

The post How VWO Affects your Site Speed appeared first on VWO Blog.

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How VWO Affects your Site Speed

How To Optimize Mobile Performance

You can’t underestimate the importance of consistent, high-quality web design across devices of all shapes and sizes. Responsive web design is the way forward — but it’s often linked to performance issues. This is critical when 64% of smartphone users unforgivingly expect websites to load in under four seconds, yet average page weights continue to rise.
The best designs balance aesthetics and performance by working with mobile in mind from the start.

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How To Optimize Mobile Performance