Tag Archives: opera

Web Development Reading List: Announcing Changes, A Design Kit, DNA Malware, And Why Meaning Is An Advantage

You might have noticed it already: in the past few weeks you might have missed Anselm’s Web Development Reading List issues here on SmashingMag. No worries, from now on, we’ll switch to collecting the most important news of each month in one handy, monthly summary for you. If you’d like to continue reading Anselm’s weekly reading list (and we encourage you to!), you can still do so via email, on wdrl.

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Web Development Reading List: Announcing Changes, A Design Kit, DNA Malware, And Why Meaning Is An Advantage

It’s Time To Start Using CSS Custom Properties

Today, CSS preprocessors are a standard for web development. One of the main advantages of preprocessors is that they enable you to use variables. This helps you to avoid copying and pasting code, and it simplifies development and refactoring.

It's Time To Start Using CSS Custom Properties

We use preprocessors to store colors, font preferences, layout details — mostly everything we use in CSS. But preprocessor variables have some limitations.

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It’s Time To Start Using CSS Custom Properties

Styling Web Components Using A Shared Style Sheet

Web components are an amazing new feature of the web, allowing developers to define their own custom HTML elements. When combined with a style guide, web components can create a component API, which allows developers to stop copying and pasting code snippets and instead just use a DOM element.

Styling Web Components Using A Shared Style Sheet

By using the shadow DOM, we can encapsulate the web component and not have to worry about specificity wars with any other style sheet on the page. However, web components and style guides currently seem to be at odds with each other.

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Styling Web Components Using A Shared Style Sheet

The Building Blocks Of Progressive Web Apps

The common wisdom for most companies that set out to build an app is to build a native Android or iOS app, as well as a supporting website. Although there are some good reasons for that, not enough people know about the major advantages of web apps. Web apps can replace all of the functions of native apps and websites at once. They are coming more and more to the fore these days, but still not enough people are familiar with them or adopting them.

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The Building Blocks Of Progressive Web Apps

A Beginner’s Guide To Progressive Web Apps

Progressive web apps could be the next big thing for the mobile web. Originally proposed by Google in 2015, they have already attracted a lot of attention because of the relative ease of development and the almost instant wins for the application’s user experience.

A Beginner's Guide To Progressive Web Apps

A progressive web application takes advantage of the latest technologies to combine the best of web and mobile apps. Think of it as a website built using web technologies but that acts and feels like an app. Recent advancements in the browser and in the availability of service workers and in the Cache and Push APIs have enabled web developers to allow users to install web apps to their home screen, receive push notifications and even work offline.

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A Beginner’s Guide To Progressive Web Apps

Web Development Reading List #146: Peermaps, Passive Event Listener Note, And A Shift Of Focus

So, what do we have this week? Well, it’s quite a lot actually. For example, there’s now a deal that might make Opera’s browser a Chinese business, leaving all privacy and security efforts that have recently been made in the browser uncertain.

“HTTPoxy,

If you want to dive into learning ECMAScript 6, Wes Bos has published a huge series of ES6 screencasts this week that are absolutely worth the money. Besides, there are a few other recommendations for you to read this week. Let’s get started.

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Web Development Reading List #146: Peermaps, Passive Event Listener Note, And A Shift Of Focus

How To Use ES6 Arguments And Parameters

ECMAScript 6 (or ECMAScript 2015) is the newest version of the ECMAScript standard and has remarkably improved parameter handling in JavaScript. We can now use rest parameters, default values and destructuring, among other new features.
In this tutorial, we will explore arguments and parameters in detail and see how ECMAScript 6 has upgraded them.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Writing Next Generation Reusable JavaScript Modules in ECMAScript 6 ECMAScript 6 (ES6): What’s New In The Next Version Of JavaScript: What’s New In The Next Version Of JavaScript’“) Making A Complete Polyfill For The HTML5 Details Element Generating SVG With React Arguments Versus Parameters Arguments and parameters are often referred to interchangeably.

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How To Use ES6 Arguments And Parameters

Web Development Reading List #136: Design Usability, Meaningful CSS And Project Include

The past week showed yet again how fractured opinions in our industry can be and that to some problems there’s definitely more than just one answer, or we still have to figure out what the proper way is in the end. This is why talking about technical problems matters, and this should certainly be done from time to time with your colleagues.
We all know that by sharing and talking to other people, our jobs get more interesting.

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Web Development Reading List #136: Design Usability, Meaningful CSS And Project Include

Web Development Reading List #130: Opera Mini, Workflow Fragility And Happy Work

What a week! Some people were debating over our npm workflows and security attacks (and sadly not just virtual social engineering ones but real ones in Brussels), we’ve also seen some great new articles that feature the better parts of our community and society. I’m happy to share them with you over this longer Easter-weekend. Cheers!
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Fight The System: Battling Bureaucracy How To Spark A UX Revolution Hold A Kickoff Meeting Before Diving Into The Design Why You Should Include Your Developer In The Design Process News iOS9.

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Web Development Reading List #130: Opera Mini, Workflow Fragility And Happy Work

Web Development Reading List #129: CSRF, Modern Tooling And The UX Of Web Fonts

Every week I learn so many new things about front-end development. By building various kinds of projects, by talking to other developers, by reading new articles. Of course, it can be overwhelming, but to me this is the best part of the job. By sharing and talking to other people, my job gets more interesting.
For example, this week I learned how to build malicious links with target=”_blank”, I learned how CSRF works, and how important it is that an icon clearly indicates what it is thought for — the latter after I implemented the icons and only found some of them helpful as I saw the fallback/title text for them.

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Web Development Reading List #129: CSRF, Modern Tooling And The UX Of Web Fonts