Tag Archives: order

Enter The Dragon (Drop): Accessible List Reordering

Over the years of being a web developer with a focus on accessibility, I have mostly dealt with widely-adopted, standardized UI components, well supported by assistive technologies (AT). For these types of widgets, there are concise ARIA authoring practices as well as great tools like axe-core that can be used to test web components for accessibility issues. Creating less common widgets, especially those that have no widely-adopted conventions for user interaction can be very tricky.

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Enter The Dragon (Drop): Accessible List Reordering

What is Correlation?

what is correlation

Correlation: The existence of a relationship between two or more variables or factors where dependence between them occurs in a way that cannot be attributed to chance alone. If an experiment or study is designed to determine which factors might influence other factors of interest, you are testing the correlation between these factors. For example, you may have noticed that men prefer diet cola and women prefer mineral water. Proving this type of correlation allows you to establish a predictive relationship for future behavior. The concept of correlation was first attributed to Sir Charles Galton, a cousin of Charles Darwin,…

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What is Correlation?

How To Accept Bitcoin on Your Website

how to put bitcoin on your website

Bitcoin is the most disruptive technology of our age. These powerful words, written by Dominic Frisby, author of “Bitcoin: the Future of Money?”, are more agreed upon and understood each passing year. And the actual creator of Bitcoin, an unknown genius who goes by the moniker Satoshi Nakamoto, is regarded as the most disruptive entrepreneur of our generation in this Virgin Entrepreneur article. Frisby continues: “This internet money system which involves neither banks nor government will do to finance what email did to the postal service and what the internet did to publishing.” These strong sentiments are actually more true…

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How To Accept Bitcoin on Your Website

Science Has Spoken: Here’s Why Your Instagram Posts Don’t Get Engagement

You post image after image on Instagram, but can’t seem to get more than 25 or 30 Likes on each. Your comments are as inactive as a car broken down on the side of the road. You’ve tried every “hack” in the book, but nothing seems to work. Don’t give up hope just yet. A lot of marketers look for the “secret” to get floods of engagement. Well, the secret has less to do with a specific Instagram filter or tactic, and more about understanding how we see and process visual information. Figuring out what attracts a person’s eye to…

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Science Has Spoken: Here’s Why Your Instagram Posts Don’t Get Engagement

Infographic: A Roadmap for a Trustworthy E-Commerce Website

Today’s infographic does a great job of laying out everything you need to have on your e-commerce website to provide the best experience for your online customers. Before we get to the infographic, I’m going to share a hack that I personally employed back in the early 2000s. And no – it’s not outdated :). As you probably know, live chat can be a powerful tool for online sales. Especially if you’re a smaller operation. Now, back in the early 2000s, instead of live chat software, we had instant messaging platforms. It’s basically the same thing except that the client…

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Infographic: A Roadmap for a Trustworthy E-Commerce Website

Glossary: Multivariate Testing

Multivariate Testing

A type of hypothesis testing where multiple variables are tested simultaneously to determine how the variables and combinations of variables influence the output. If several different variables (factors) are believed to influence the results or output of a test, multivariate testing can be used to test all of these factors at once.  Using an organized matrix which includes each potential combination of factors, the effects of each factor on the result can be determined. Also known as Design of Experiments (DOE), the first multivariate testing was performed in 1754 by Scottish physician James Lind as a means of identifying (or…

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Glossary: Multivariate Testing

How to Optimize the Post-Purchase Experience for Higher Conversions & More Profit


Give yourself a pat on the back. It’s time to celebrate, right? After all your hard work you’ve finally got the sale or sign up you’ve been searching for. You’ve used your audience data to optimize your landing page design, finesse your language, and ensure everything on the page is as perfectly personalized as possible. So here’s to a job well done. But, and I’m gonna rain on your parade here. Your job is far from over. Sure, you’ve managed to get the sale, but that’s not the end of your job. It’s the end of the purchase journey, and…

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How to Optimize the Post-Purchase Experience for Higher Conversions & More Profit

The New Layout Standard For The Web: CSS Grid, Flexbox And Box Alignment

Layout on the web is hard. The reason it is so hard is that the layout methods we’ve relied on ever since using CSS for layout became possible were not really designed for complex layout. While we were able to achieve quite a lot in a fixed-width world with hacks such as faux columns, these methods fell apart with responsive design.
Thankfully, we have hope, in the form of flexbox — which many readers will already be using — CSS Grid Layout and the box alignment module.

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The New Layout Standard For The Web: CSS Grid, Flexbox And Box Alignment

Beyond Optimization: Email A/B Tests That Will Improve Your Entire Business

Those email metrics may provide you with more insight than you thought. Image via Shutterstock.

The components of an A/B test are pretty straightforward: change some stuff, compare key metrics, deploy winner, repeat.

So when you start an A/B test on your email, this is the sort of process you fall back on. You brainstorm a couple of alternate subject lines, test them on a small segment and send the winner to everyone else. This is a great way of making sure you’re sending the better of two ideas, but does it really mean you’re sending better email?

Instead, today we’re going to focus on the benefits of A/B testing for the future. That means turning your results into actionable guidance for feature planning, branding, sales and retention strategies.

Maximizing is not always optimizing.

Feature planning

It can be really tough figuring out which features need the most attention, not to mention prioritizing improvements your top users would be most excited for. Email can help!

A simple email teasing upcoming improvements to X or Y feature can give you valuable insights for your next product planning session on what changes actually pique a user’s interest.

Similarly, you can test something like, “What would you like to see added to feature X” vs “…feature Y.” Even if you get little to no feedback, the comparative open rates can tell you a lot about which features people want to see updated.

This can be especially insightful for startups, because setting the wrong priorities for your development team can hamstring your growth. In cases like this where the stakes are higher, it may be more powerful to subtly present options and observe responses than to straight up ask.

The problem with asking users what they want directly. Image via Frankiac.

Product branding

What if you’re getting ready to launch a new feature or plan an event, but you’re torn on what to call it. Simply run a test with a sneak peak email to your most engaged users and see what gets their attention.

This one may feel a bit weird, because branding of your product and features can feel really personal, but it’s also really important, so why leave it to your gut when you can test?

You don’t even have to build out a fancy announcement email, because you’re just looking for opens, indicating that initial spark of interest. The body can be a simple, plain text save the date or a link to a survey or something.

Subject line cheat sheet

For the rest of your emails…

Write a click-worthy subject line every time with our Subject Line Cheat Sheet.
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Sales materials development

Good email testing can also translate to benefits for your sales team. Imagine their eyes lighting up when you pass them a document illustrating how your highest value customers engage with different phrasings of your core features.

There are a couple of interesting ways to execute on this, but I think the most practical is to build an onboarding email with links to your features, and then test headlines for each section (bonus points if you randomize the order to satisfy the statisticians in the house).

You could also stretch this across multiple emails in your onboarding drip campaign, or send a one-off “What’s new” update.

Life is about decisions. Image source.


Now that you’ve figured out which features resonate most with your high-touch users, it’s time to figure out what gets people hooked on your product or service in the first place.

There are a ton of ways to accomplish this in the traditional on-site manner, but how does email fit into the picture?

The most obvious option here is to use the information you gleaned to craft a killer onboarding campaign that introduces new users to the most beloved features first. That strategy, however, is really focused on top-of-funnel retention. Today, I want to take a look at the other end: churn prevention.

There are, of course, some users that were never a good fit to begin with and will churn regardless. But for those that just never got the hang of things, the most common move is to hit them with a “Hail Mary email” — one last-ditch effort to win them back.

A lot of times this comes in the form of a direct note from someone asking what they could have done better, but why not use that space to run some tests? Not just to squeeze out a few more opens on a low-converting email, but to see what actually gets people’s attention. Then you can take the stuff that works, and work it into your onboarding campaign to keep people from ever getting to the Hail Mary state.

Saying goodbye is hard. Image source.


These are, of course, not the only ways that you can incorporate your learnings from tests into other aspects of your marketing, but it’s a great start if you don’t have a process like this in place.

The structure you build out to track and share the results from tests like these can be tremendously helpful for the whole team — not just in the ways I’ve outlined above, but also in just keeping everyone on the same page and in line with what your customers want to hear.

Have anything to add? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

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Beyond Optimization: Email A/B Tests That Will Improve Your Entire Business

ProcessWire CMS – A Beginner’s Guide

Systems for managing content are more often than not rather opinionated. For example, most of them expect a certain rigid content structure for inputting data and then have a specific engraved way of accessing and outputting that data, whether or not it makes sense. Additionally, they rarely offer effective tools to break out of the predefined trails if a case requires it.
ProcessWire is a content management system (CMS) distributed under the Mozilla Public License version 2.

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ProcessWire CMS – A Beginner’s Guide