Tag Archives: passwords

Web Development Reading List #129: CSRF, Modern Tooling And The UX Of Web Fonts

Every week I learn so many new things about front-end development. By building various kinds of projects, by talking to other developers, by reading new articles. Of course, it can be overwhelming, but to me this is the best part of the job. By sharing and talking to other people, my job gets more interesting.
For example, this week I learned how to build malicious links with target=”_blank”, I learned how CSRF works, and how important it is that an icon clearly indicates what it is thought for — the latter after I implemented the icons and only found some of them helpful as I saw the fallback/title text for them.

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Web Development Reading List #129: CSRF, Modern Tooling And The UX Of Web Fonts

Web Dev. Reading List #125

It’s Friday again, and I found some interesting articles for you to read over the upcoming weekend. In projects, developer, manager and product leaders still try to put pressure on the people who work on a task. Somehow they feel relieved, more secure if they do that. On the other hand, the people experiencing the pressure of urgency are struggling massively with it.
The fallacy here is that while the ones spreading the pressure feel better, the people experiencing it usually do a worse job than without the pressure.

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Web Dev. Reading List #125

Why Passphrases Are More User-Friendly Than Passwords


A user’s account on a website is like a house. The password is the key, and logging in is like walking through the front door. When a user can’t remember their password, it’s like losing their keys. When a user’s account is hacked, it’s like their house is getting broken into.

Why Passphrases Are More User-Friendly Than Passwords

Nearly half of Americans (47%) have had their account hacked in the last year alone. Are web designers and developers taking enough measures to prevent these problems? Or do we need to rethink passwords?

The post Why Passphrases Are More User-Friendly Than Passwords appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Why Passphrases Are More User-Friendly Than Passwords

Stop Wasting Users’ Time

Our users are precious about their time and we must stop wasting it. On each project ask two questions: “Am I saving myself time at the expense of the user?” and “How can I save the user time here?” What is the single most precious commodity in Western society? Money? Status? I would argue it is time.
We are protective of our time, and with good reason. There are so many demands on it.

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Stop Wasting Users’ Time

50 Useful Coding Techniques (CSS Layouts, Visual Effects and Forms)

Although CSS is generally considered a simple and straightforward language, sometimes it requires creativity, skill and a bit of experimentation. The good news is that designers and developers worldwide often face similar problems and choose to share their insights and workarounds with the wider community.
This is where we come in. We are always looking to collect such articles for our posts so that we can deliver the most useful and relevant content to our readers.

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50 Useful Coding Techniques (CSS Layouts, Visual Effects and Forms)

10 Steps To Protect The Admin Area In WordPress

The administration area of a Web application is a favorite target of hackers and thus particularly well protected. The same goes for WordPress: when creating a blog, the system creates an administrative user with a perfectly secure password and blocks public access to the settings area with a log-in page. This is the cornerstone of its protection. Let’s dig deeper!
This article focuses on defending the administration area of WordPress, meaning all those pages in the wp-admin folder (or http://www.

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10 Steps To Protect The Admin Area In WordPress