Tag Archives: patterns

How To Make And Maintain Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2

The benefits of UI design systems are now well known. They lead to more cohesive, consistent user experiences. They speed up your team’s workflow, allowing you to launch more stuff while saving huge amounts of time and money in the process. They establish a common vocabulary between disciplines, resulting in a more collaborative and constructive workflow.
They make browser, device, performance, and accessibility testing easier. And they serve as a solid foundation to build upon over time, helping your organization to more easily adapt to the ever-shifting web landscape.

This article is from: 

How To Make And Maintain Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2

A Better Architecture For iOS Apps: A Deep Look At The Model-View-Controller Pattern


If you’ve ever written an iOS app beyond a trivial “Hello world” app with just one screen and a few views, then you might have noticed that a lot of code seems to “naturally” go into view controllers.

A Better Architecture For iOS Apps: A Deep Look At The Model-View-Controller Pattern

Because view controllers in iOS carry many responsibilities and are closely related to the app screens, a lot of code ends up being written in them because it’s just easier and faster that way.

The post A Better Architecture For iOS Apps: A Deep Look At The Model-View-Controller Pattern appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Read article here:  

A Better Architecture For iOS Apps: A Deep Look At The Model-View-Controller Pattern

Rethinking Mobile Tutorials: Which Patterns Really Work?

Pattern libraries are a great source of inspiration and education for designers. But common practice doesn’t always equal best practice. In this post, we’ll look at why many common tutorial patterns are ineffective and how you can leverage game design principles to increase user engagement.
After the release of the first edition of Mobile Design Pattern Gallery, Intuit asked me to speak with its mobile team. I spoke at a high level about the value of patterns across industries (fashion, architecture, software and others) and how they are a useful teaching tool.

Source – 

Rethinking Mobile Tutorials: Which Patterns Really Work?

Boost Your Mobile E-Commerce Sales With Mobile Design Patterns

People are increasingly using their smartphones as a replacement for desktop computers, even for activities such as shopping and purchasing. And as more people move away from the desktop and onto mobile-optimized websites to shop for products and services, website creators can use established design patterns to help kickstart a mobile e-commerce project.
Having a good mobile e-commerce experience matters a lot. In fact, recent research has found that people are 67% more likely to make a purchase if a website they’ve reached on their phone is smartphone-friendly.

Source:

Boost Your Mobile E-Commerce Sales With Mobile Design Patterns

Design Patterns: When Breaking The Rules Is OK

We’d like to believe that we use established design patterns for common elements on the Web. We know what buttons should look like, how they should behave and how to design the Web forms that rely on those buttons.
And yet, broken forms, buttons that look nothing like buttons, confusing navigation elements and more are rampant on the Web. It’s a boulevard of broken patterns out there.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Taking Pattern Libraries To The Next Level An Exploration Of Carousel Usage On Mobile E-Commerce Websites An In-Depth Overview Of Living Style Guide Tools Boost Your Mobile E-Commerce Sales With Mobile Design Patterns This got me thinking about the history and purpose of design patterns and when they should and should not be used.

Link to original:

Design Patterns: When Breaking The Rules Is OK

How To Use Textures In Web Design

Texture is becoming integral to design. It’s gone beyond being a trend — it’s now a simple and effective way to add depth to a website. Wielding the power of texture is a great responsibility. It increases the effectiveness of websites and is a quality tool in the arsenal of designers. It can guide the user’s eye and emphasize the importance of key elements.
However, texture has long been synonymous with “dirty” or “grungy” design.

Taken from: 

How To Use Textures In Web Design