Tag Archives: pdf

Infographic: The Perfect Execution of Conversion Rate Optimization

if CRO is done properly

Today’s infographic is a good primer on what it takes to effectively run a conversion rate optimization campaign. However, one thing that I would like to add to this recipe is documentation. Conversion rate optimization is a science project. You’re dealing with data, hypotheses, results, measurement techniques and sources of error. Sounds like chemistry class right? Proper documentation is extremely helpful for interpreting results, understanding sources of error and providing historical record keeping for future testing. If you’re running conversion rate experiments today, you may have to hand the baton off to someone else when you move on. If you’re…

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Infographic: The Perfect Execution of Conversion Rate Optimization

Level-Up Email Campaigns With Customer Journey Mapping

I became a huge fan of customer journey mapping (CJM) the first time I was introduced to it. And after a few years of mapping, tweaking and presenting maps, my team and I started looking for other more exotic uses of this technique. The law of the instrument at its best, I suppose. Well, seek and ye shall find.
Customer journey mapping is a visualization technique that helps marketing specialists, user experience designers, and product and business owners see the journey people take when interacting with products and services.

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Level-Up Email Campaigns With Customer Journey Mapping

Free Icon Set: Happy 4th Of July (20 Icons, PNG, EPS, AI, SVG)

Every once in a while, we publish freebies related to different occasions and themes. Today, we’d like to share an icon set dedicated to a well-known upcoming American holiday. Some of you may already be working on the usual flyers or brochures, so we thought we’d help you out with a set of colorful icons to spice up your designs a bit differently this year. Thank us later!
Designed by the creative folks at Vecteezy, this freebie contains 20 illustrations of some lovely things that shouldn’t be left out on this particular holiday.

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Free Icon Set: Happy 4th Of July (20 Icons, PNG, EPS, AI, SVG)

[Case Study] Ecwid sees 21% lift in paid plan upgrades in one month

Reading Time: 2 minutes

What would you do with 21% more sales this month?

I bet you’d walk into your next meeting with your boss with an extra spring in your step, right?

Well, when you implement a strategic marketing optimization program, results like this are not only possible, they are probable.

In this new case study, you’ll discover how e-commerce software supplier, Ecwid, ran one experiment for four weeks, and saw a 21% increase in paid upgrades.

Get the full Ecwid case study now!

Download a PDF version of the Ecwid case study, featuring experiment details, supplementary takeaways and insights, and a testimonial from Ecwid’s Sr. Director, Digital Marketing.



By entering your email, you’ll receive bi-weekly WiderFunnel Blog updates and other resources to help you become an optimization champion.

A little bit about Ecwid

Ecwid provides easy-to-use online store setup, management, and payment solutions. The company was founded in 2009, with the goal of enabling business-owners to add online stores to their existing websites, quickly and without hassle.

The company has a freemium business model: Users can sign up for free, and unlock more features as they upgrade to paid packages.

Ecwid’s partnership with WiderFunnel

In November 2016, Ecwid partnered with WiderFunnel with two primary goals:

  1. To increase initial signups for their free plan through marketing optimization, and
  2. To increase the rate of paid upgrades, through platform optimization

This case study focuses on a particular experiment cycle that ran on Ecwid’s step-by-step onboarding wizard.

The methodology

Last Winter, the WiderFunnel Strategy team did an initial LIFT Analysis of the onboarding wizard, and identified several potential barriers to conversion. (Both in terms of completing steps to setup a new store, and in terms of upgrading to a paid plan.)

The lead WiderFunnel Strategist for Ecwid, Dennis Pavlina, decided to create an A/B cluster test to 1) address the major barriers simultaneously, and 2) to get major lift for Ecwid, quickly.

The overarching goal was to make the onboarding process smoother. The WiderFunnel and Ecwid optimization teams hoped that enhancing the initial user experience, and exposing users to the wide range of Ecwid’s features, would result in more users upgrading to paid plans.

Dennis Pavlina

Ecwid’s two objectives ended up coming together in this test. We thought that if more new users interacted with the wizard and were shown the whole ‘Ecwid world’ with all the integrations and potential it has, they would be more open to upgrading. People needed to be able to see its potential before they would want to pay for it.

Dennis Pavlina, Optimization Strategist, WiderFunnel

The Results

This experiment ran for four weeks, at which point the variation was determined to be the winner with 98% confidence. The variation resulted in a 21.3% increase in successful paid account upgrades for Ecwid.

Read the full case study for:

  • The details on the initial barriers to conversion
  • How this test was structured
  • Which secondary metrics we tracked, and
  • The supplementary takeaways and customer insights that came from this test

The post [Case Study] Ecwid sees 21% lift in paid plan upgrades in one month appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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[Case Study] Ecwid sees 21% lift in paid plan upgrades in one month

Web Development Reading List #181: Mass Deployments, Prepack, And Accessible Smart Cities

In a world between building accessible interfaces, optimizing the experiences for users, and big businesses profiting from this, we need to find a way to use our knowledge meaningfully. When we read that even the engineers who built it don’t know how their autonomous car algorithm works or that the biggest library of books that mankind ever saw is in the hand of one single company and not accessible to anyone, we might lose our faith in what we do as developers.

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Web Development Reading List #181: Mass Deployments, Prepack, And Accessible Smart Cities

Web Development Reading List #178: On CAA, Pong.js, And Meaningful Work

Looking at recent discussions, I feel that more and more people are starting to think about ethically and morally correct work. Many of us keep asking themselves if their work is meaningful or if it matters at all. But in a well-functioning society, we need a variety of things to live a good life. The people writing novels that delight us are just as important as those who fight for our civil rights.

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Web Development Reading List #178: On CAA, Pong.js, And Meaningful Work

Lessons Learned From 2,345,864 Exit Overlay Visitors

sup

Back in 2015, Unbounce launched its first ever exit overlay on this very blog.

Did it send our signup rate skyrocketing 4,000%? Nope.

Did it turn our blog into a conversion factory for new leads? Not even close — our initial conversion rate was barely over 1.25%.

But what it did do was start us down the path of exploring the best ways to use this technology; of furthering our goals by finding ways to offer visitors relevant, valuable content through overlays.

Overlays are modal lightboxes that launch within a webpage and focus attention on a single offer. Still fuzzy on what an overlay is? Click here.

In this post, we’ll break down all the wins, losses and “holy smokes!” moments from our first 2,345,864 exit overlay viewers.

Psst: Towards the end of these experiments, Unbounce launched Convertables, and with it a whole toolbox of advanced triggers and targeting options for overlays.

Goals, tools and testing conditions

Our goal for this project was simple: Get more people to consume more Unbounce content — whether it be blog posts, ebooks, videos, you name it.

We invest a lot in our content, and we want it read by as many marketers as possible. All our research — everything we know about that elusive thing called conversion, exists in our content.

Our content also allows readers to find out whether Unbounce is a tool that can help them. We want more customers, but only if they can truly benefit from our product. Those who experience ‘lightbulb’ moments when reading our content definitely fit the bill.

As for tools, the first four experiments were conducted using Rooster (an exit-intent tool purchased by Unbounce in June 2015). It was a far less sophisticated version of what is now Unbounce Convertables, which we used in the final experiment.

Testing conditions were as follows:

  1. All overlays were triggered on exit; meaning they launched only when abandoning visitors were detected.
  1. For the first three experiments, we compared sequential periods to measure results. For the final two, we ran makeshift A/B tests.
  1. When comparing sequential periods, testing conditions were isolated by excluding new blog posts from showing any overlays.
  1. A “conversion” was defined as either a completed form (lead gen overlay) or a click (clickthrough overlay).
  1. All experiments were conducted between January 2015 and November 2016.

Experiment #1: Content Offer vs. Generic Signup

Our first exit overlay had a simple goal: Get more blog subscribers. It looked like this.

blog-subscriber-overlay

It was viewed by 558,488 unique visitors over 170 days, 1.27% of which converted to new blog subscribers. Decent start, but not good enough.

To improve the conversion rate, we posed the following.

HYPOTHESIS
Because online marketing offers typically convert better when a specific, tangible offer is made (versus a generic signup), we expect that by offering a free ebook to abandoning visitors, we will improve our conversion rate beyond the current 1.27% baseline.

Whereas the original overlay asked visitors to subscribe to the blog for “tips”, the challenger overlay offered visitors The 23 Principles of Attention-Driven Design.

add-overlay

After 96 days and over 260,000 visitors, we had enough conversions to call this experiment a success. The overlay converted at 2.65%, and captured 7,126 new blog subscribers.

overlay-experiment-1-results

Since we didn’t A/B test these overlays, our results were merely observations. Seasonality is one of many factors that can sway the numbers.

We couldn’t take it as gospel, but we were seeing double the subscribers we had previously.

Observations

  • Offering tangible resources (versus non-specific promises, like a blog signup) can positively affect conversion rates.

Stay in the loop and get all the juicy test results from our upcoming overlay experiments

Learn from our overlay wins, losses and everything in between.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Experiment #2: Four-field vs. Single-field Overlays

Data people always spoil the party.

The early success of our first experiment caught the attention of Judi, our resident marketing automation whiz, who wisely reminded us that collecting only an email address on a large-scale campaign was a missed opportunity.

For us to fully leverage this campaign, we needed to find out more about the individuals (and organizations) who were consuming our content.

Translation: We needed to add three more form fields to the overlay.

overlay-experiment-2

Since filling out forms is a universal bummer, we safely assumed our conversion rate would take a dive.

But something else happened that we didn’t predict. Notice a difference (besides the form fields) between the two overlays above? Yup, the new version was larger: 900x700px vs. 750x450px.

Adding three form fields made our original 750x450px design feel too cramped, so we arbitrarily increased the size — never thinking there may be consequences. More on that later.

Anyways, we launched the new version, and as expected the results sucked.

overlay-experiment-2-results
Things weren’t looking good after 30 days.

For business reasons, we decided to end the test after 30 days, even though we didn’t run the challenger overlay for an equal time period (96 days).

Overall, the conversion rate for the 30-day period was 48% lower than the previous 96-day period. I knew it was for good reason: Building our data warehouse is important. Still, a small part of me died that day.

Then it got worse.

It occurred to us that for a 30-day period, that sample size of viewers for the new overlay (53,460) looked awfully small.

A closer inspection revealed that our previous overlay averaged 2,792 views per day, while this new version was averaging 1,782. So basically our 48% conversion drop was served a la carte with a 36% plunge in overall views. Fun!

But why?

It turns out increasing the size of the overlay wasn’t so harmless. The size was too large for many people’s browser windows, so the overlay only fired two out of every three visits, even when targeting rules matched.

We conceded, and redesigned the overlay in 800x500px format.

overlay-experiment-redesign

Daily views rose back to their normal numbers, and our new baseline conversion rate of 1.25% remained basically unchanged.

loads-vs-views

Large gap between “loads” and “views” on June 4th; narrower gap on June 5th.

Observations

  • Increasing the number of form fields in overlays can cause friction that reduces conversion rates.
  • Overlay sizes exceeding 800×500 can be too large for some browsers and reduce load:view ratio (and overall impressions).

Experiment #3: One Overlay vs. 10 Overlays

It seemed like such a great idea at the time…

Why not get hyper relevant and build a different exit overlay to each of our blog categories?

With our new baseline conversion rate reduced to 1.25%, we needed an improvement that would help us overcome “form friction” and get us back to that healthy 2%+ range we enjoyed before.

So with little supporting data, we hypothesized that increasing “relevance” was the magic bullet we needed. It works on landing pages why not overlays?

HYPOTHESIS  
Since “relevance” is key to driving conversions, we expect that by running a unique exit overlay on each of our blog categories — whereby the free resource is specific to the category — we will improve our conversion rate beyond the current 1.25% baseline.

blog-categories

We divide our blog into categories according to the marketing topic they cover (e.g., landing pages, copywriting, design, UX, conversion optimization). Each post is tagged by category.

So to increase relevance, we created a total of 10 exit overlays (each offering a different resource) and assigned each overlay to one or two categories, like this:

category-specific-overlays

Creating all the new overlays would take some time (approximately three hours), but since we already had a deep backlog of resources on all things online marketing, finding a relevant ebook, course or video to offer in each category wasn’t difficult.

And since our URLs contain category tags (e.g., all posts on “design” start with root domain unbounce.com/design), making sure the right overlay ran on the right post was easy.

unbounce-targeting

URL Targeting rule for our Design category; the “include” rule automatically excludes the overlay from running in other categories.

But there was a problem: We’d established a strict rule that our readers would only ever see one exit overlay… no matter how many blog categories they browsed. It’s part of our philosophy on using overlays in a way that respects the user experience.

When we were just using one overlay, that was easy — a simple “Frequency” setting was all we needed.

unbounce-frequency

…but not so easy with 10 overlays running on the same blog.

We needed a way to exclude anyone who saw one overlay from seeing any of the other nine.

Cookies were the obvious answer, so we asked our developers to build a temporary solution that could:

  • Pass a cookie from an overlay to the visitor’s browser
  • Exclude that cookie in our targeting settings

They obliged.

unbounce-advanced-targeting

We used “incognito mode” to repeatedly test the functionality, and after that we were go for launch.

Then this happened.

rooster-dashboard
Ignore the layout… the Convertables dashboard is much prettier now :)

After 10 days of data, our conversion rate was a combined 1.36%, 8.8% higher than the baseline. It eventually crept its way to 1.42% after an additional 250,000 views. Still nowhere near what we’d hoped.

So what went wrong?

We surmised that just because an offer is “relevant” doesn’t mean it’s compelling. Admittedly, not all of the 10 resources were on par with The 23 Principles of Attention-Driven Design, the ebook we originally offered in all categories.

That said, this experiment provided an unexpected benefit: we could now see our conversion rates by category instead of just one big number for the whole blog. This would serve us well on future tests.

Observations

  • Just because an offer is relevant doesn’t mean it’s good.
  • Conversion rates vary considerably between categories.

Experiment #4: Resource vs. Resource

“Just because it’s relevant doesn’t mean it’s good.”

This lesson inspired a simple objective for our next task: Improve the offers in our underperforming categories.

We decided to test new offers across five categories that had low conversion rates and high traffic volume:

  1. A/B Testing and CRO (0.57%)
  2. Email (1.24%)
  3. Lead Gen and Content Marketing (0.55%)
Note: We used the same overlay for the A/B Testing and CRO categories, as well as the Lead Gen and Content Marketing Categories.

Hypothesis
Since we believe the resources we’re offering in the categories of A/B testing, CRO, Email, Lead Gen and Content Marketing are less compelling than resources we offer in other categories, we expect to see increased conversion rates when we test new resources in these categories.

With previous studies mentioned in this post, we compared sequential periods. For this one, we took things a step further and jury-rigged an A/B testing system together using Visual Website Optimizer and two Unbounce accounts.

And after finding what we believed to be more compelling resources to offer, the new test was launched.

topic-experiment

We saw slightly improved results in the A/B Testing and CRO categories, although not significant. For the Email category, we saw a large drop-off.

In the Lead Gen and Content Marketing categories however, there was a dramatic uptick in conversions and the results were statistically significant. Progress!

Observations

  • Not all content is created equal; some resources are more desirable to our audience.

Experiment #5: Clickthrough vs. Lead Gen Overlays

Although progress was made in our previous test, we still hadn’t solved the problem from our second experiment.

While having the four fields made each conversion more valuable to us, it still reduced our conversion rate a relative 48% (from 2.65% to 1.25% back in experiment #2).

We’d now worked our way up to a baseline of 1.75%, but still needed a strategy for reducing form friction.

The answer lay in a new tactic for using overlays that we dubbed traffic shaping.

Traffic Shaping: Using clickthrough overlays to incentivize visitors to move from low-converting to high-converting pages.

Here’s a quick illustration:

traffic-shaping-diagram

Converting to this format would require us to:

  1. Redesign our exit overlays
  2. Build a dedicated landing page for each overlay
  3. Collect leads via the landing pages

Basically, we’d be using the overlays as a bridge to move readers from “ungated” content (a blog post) to “gated” content (a free video that required a form submission to view). Kinda like playing ‘form field hot potato’ in a modern day version of Pipe Dream.

Hypothesis
Because “form friction” reduces conversions, we expect that removing form fields from our overlays will increase engagement (enough to offset the drop off we expect from adding an extra step). To do this, we will redesign our overlays to clickthrough (no fields), create a dedicated landing page for each overlay and add the four-field form to the landing page. We’ll measure results in Unbounce.

By this point, we were using Unbounce to build the entire campaign. The overlays were built in Convertables, and the landing pages were created with the Unbounce landing page builder.

We decided to test this out in our A/B Testing and CRO as well as Lead Gen and Content Marketing categories.

clickthrough-overlays

After filling out the form, visitors would either be given a secure link for download (PDF) or taken to a resource page where their video would play.

Again, for this to be successful the conversion rate on the overlays would need to increase enough to offset the drop off we expected by adding the extra landing page step.

These were our results after 21 days.

clickthrough-overlays-results

Not surprisingly, engagement with the overlays increased significantly. I stress the word “engagement” and not “conversion,” because our goal had changed from a form submission to a clickthrough.

In order to see a conversion increase, we needed to factor in the percentage of visitors who would drop off once they reached the landing page.

A quick check in Unbounce showed us landing page drop-off rates of 57.7% (A/B Testing/CRO) and 25.33% (Lead Gen/Content Marketing). Time for some grade 6 math…

clickthrough-overlays-results-2

Even with significant drop-off in the landing page step, overall net leads still increased.

Our next step would be applying the same format to all blog categories, and then measuring overall results.

Onward!

All observations

  • Offering specific, tangible resources (vs. non-specific promises) can positively affect conversion rates.
  • Increasing the number of form fields in overlays can cause friction that reduces conversion rates.
  • Overlay sizes exceeding 800×500 can be too large for some browsers and reduce load:view ratio (and overall impressions).
  • Just because an offer is relevant doesn’t mean it’s good
  • Conversion rates vary considerably between blog categories
  • Not all content is created equal; some resources are more desirable to our audience.
  • “Form friction” can vary significantly depending on where your form fields appear.

Stay tuned…

We’re continuing to test new triggers and targeting options for overlays, and we want to tell you all about it.

So what’s in store for next time?

  1. The Trigger Test — What happens when test our “on exit” trigger against a 15-second time delay?
  2. The Referral Test — What happens when we show different overlays to users from different traffic sources (e.g., social vs. organic)?
  3. New v.s. Returning Visitors — Do returning blog visitors convert better than first-time visitors?

Stay in the loop and get all the juicy test results from our upcoming overlay experiments

Learn from our overlay wins, losses and everything in between.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

More: 

Lessons Learned From 2,345,864 Exit Overlay Visitors

Web Development Reading List #174: The Bricks We Lay, Remynification, And 0-RTT

We’re all designers. Whether we do a layout, a product design or write code to design a product technically doesn’t matter here. What does matter though, is that we always take the context of a project into consideration. Because as someone shaping a project so that it is appealing to the clients and works in the best way possible for the target audience, we have a pretty big responsibility.

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Web Development Reading List #174: The Bricks We Lay, Remynification, And 0-RTT

Using Social Media For User Research

Social media is one of the dominant forms of interactions on the Internet. Leading platforms such as Facebook and Twitter count hundreds of millions of users each month. In this article, I will show you how social media is a rich vein of data for user researchers. I will argue that it would be an oversight for an organization to treat social media as nothing more than an opportunity for customer service enquiries, help requests and brand advocacy.

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Using Social Media For User Research

Winter- And Holiday-Inspired Icon Sets [Christmas Freebies]

Christmas is just around the corner, and what better way to celebrate than with some free goodies? We sifted through the web (and our archives) to find holiday-themed icon sets for you that’ll give your creative projects some holiday flair. Perfect for Christmas cards, gift tags, last-minute wrapping paper, or whatever else you can think of.
All icons can be downloaded for free, but please consult their licenses or contact the creators before using them in commercial projects.

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Winter- And Holiday-Inspired Icon Sets [Christmas Freebies]