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Smashing Book 6 Is Here: New Frontiers In Web Design




Smashing Book 6 Is Here: New Frontiers In Web Design

Vitaly Friedman



Imagine you were living in a perfect world. A world where everybody has fast, stable and unthrottled connections, reliable and powerful devices, exquisite screens, and capable, resilient browsers. The screens are diverse in size and pixel density, yet our interfaces adapt to varying conditions swiftly and seamlessly. What a glorious time for all of us — designers, developers, senior Webpack configurators and everybody in-between — to be alive, wouldn’t you agree?

Well, we all know that the reality is slightly more nuanced and complicated than that. That’s why we created Smashing Book 6, our shiny new book that explores uncharted territories and seeks to discover new reliable front-end and UX techniques. And now, after 10 months of work, the book is ready, and it’s shipping. Jump to table of contents and get the book right away.


Smashing Book 6: New Frontiers in Web Design

eBook

$19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. Free for Smashing Members.

Hardcover

$39Get the Print (incl. eBook)

Printed, quality hardcover. Free airmail shipping worldwide.

About The Book

Finding your way through front-end and UX these days is challenging and time-consuming. But frankly, we all just don’t have time to afford betting on a wrong strategy. Smashing Book 6 sheds some light on new challenges and opportunities, but also uncovers new traps and pitfalls in this brave new front-end world of ours.

Our books aren’t concerned with short-living trends, and our new book isn’t an exception. Smashing Book 6 is focused on real challenges and real front-end solutions in the real world: from accessible apps to performance to CSS Grid Layout to advanced service workers to responsive art direction. No chit-chat or theory. Things that worked, in actual projects. Jump to table of contents.


Smashing Book 6


The Smashing Book 6, with 536 pages on real-life challenges and opportunities on the web. Photo by our dear friend Marc Thiele. (Large preview)

In the book, Laura and Marcy explore strategies for maintainable design systems and accessible single-page apps with React, Angular etc. Mike, Rachel and Lyza share insights on using CSS Custom Properties and CSS Grid in production today. Yoav and Lyza take a dive deep into performance patterns and service workers in times of Progressive Web Apps and HTTP/2.


Inner design of the Smashing Book 6.


Inner design of the Smashing Book 6. Designed by one-and-only Chiara Aliotta. Large view.

Ada, Adrian and Greg explore how to design for watches and new form factors, as well as AR/VR/XR, chatbots and conversational UIs. The last chapter will guide you through some practical strategies to break out of generic, predictable, and soulless interfaces — with dozens of examples of responsive art direction. But most importantly: it’s the book dedicated to headaches and solutions in the fragile, inconsistent, fragmented and wonderfully diverse web we find ourselves in today.

Table Of Contents

Want to peek inside? Download a free PDF sample (PDF, ca. 21 MB) with a chapter on bringing personality back to the web by yours truly. Overall, the book contains 10 chapters:

  1. Making Design Systems Work In Real-Life
    by Laura Elizabeth
  2. Accessibility In Times Of Single-Page Applications
    by Marcy Sutton
  3. Production-Ready CSS Grid Layouts
    by Rachel Andrew
  4. Strategic Guide To CSS Custom Properties
    by Mike Riethmueller
  5. Building An Advanced Service Worker
    by Lyza Gardner
  6. Loading Assets On The Web
    by Yoav Weiss
  7. Conversation Interface Design Patterns
    by Adrian Zumbrunnen
  8. Building Chatbots And Designing For Watches
    by Greg Nudelman
  9. Cross Reality And The Web (AR/VR)
    by Ada Rose Cannon
  10. Bringing Personality Back To The Web (free PDF sample, 21MB)
    by Vitaly Friedman
Laura Elizabeth
Marcy Sutton
Rachel Andrew
Mike Riethmuller
Lyza Danger Gardner
Yoav Weiss
Adrian Zumbrunnen
Greg Nudelman
Ada Rose Edwards
Vitaly Friedman
From left to right: Laura Elizabeth, Marcy Sutton, Rachel Andrew, Mike Riethmuller, Lyza D. Gardner, Yoav Weiss, Adrian Zumbrunnen, Greg Nudelman, Ada Rose Edwards, and yours truly.

  • 536 pages. Quality hardcover + eBook (PDF, ePUB, Kindle).
    Published late September 2018.
  • Written by and for designers and front-end developers.
    Designed with love from Italy by Chiara Aliotta.
  • Free airmail worldwide shipping from Germany.
    Check delivery times for your country.
  • If you are a Smashing Member, don’t forget to apply your Membership discount.
  • Good enough? Get the book right away.

Smashing Book 6: Covers of Chapter 1 and Chapter 10

eBook

$19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. Free for Smashing Members.

Hardcover

$39Get the Print (incl. eBook)

Printed, quality hardcover. Free airmail shipping worldwide.

About The Designer

Chiara AliottaThe cover was designed with love from Italy by one-and-only Chiara Aliotta. She founded the design studio Until Sunday and has directed the overall artistic look and feel of different tech companies and not-for-profit organizations around the world. We’re very happy that she gave Smashing Book 6 that special, magical touch.

Behind The Scenes Of The Design Process

We asked Chiara to share some insights into the design process of the cover and the interior design and she was very kind to share some thoughts with us:

“It all started with a few exchanges of emails and a Skype meeting where Vitaly shared his idea of the book and the general content. I had a lot of freedom, which is always exciting and scary at the same time. The only bond (if we want to call it like this) was that the “S” of Smashing Magazine should be the main protagonist of the cover, reinvented and creatively presented as per all the other previous Smashing Books.




The illustration on paper. The cover sketched on paper. Also check the close-up photo. (Large preview)

I worked around few keywords that Vitaly was using to describe the book during our meetings and then developed an idea around classical novels of adventure where the main hero leaves home, encounters great hazards, risks, and then eventually returns wiser and/or richer than he/she was before.

So I thought of Smashing Book 6 as a way to propose this basic and mythic structure under a new light: through the articles of this book, the modern web designer will be experiencing true and deep adventures.

I imagined the “S” as an engine, the starting point of this experience, from where different worlds were creating and expanding. So the cover was the map of these uncharted territories that the book explores.

Every element on the cover has a particular meaning that constructs the S
Every element on the cover has a particular meaning that constructs the S. Large view.

I am a person who judges books by its cover and having read some of the chapters and knowing some of the well-established writers, I wanted to honour its content and their work by creating a gorgeous cover and chapter illustrations.

For this edition of Smashing Book, I imagined a textile cover in deep blue, where the graphic is printed using a very old technique, the hot gold foil stamping.

Together with Markus, part of the Smashing Magazine team and responsible for the publishing of all the Smashing Books, we worked closely to choose the final details of the binding and guarantee an elegant and sophisticated result, adding a touch of glam to the book.




Smashing Book 6 comes wrapped with a little bookmark. Photo by our dear friend Marc Thiele.

As a final touch, I added a paper wrap around the book that invites the readers to “unlock their adventure”, suggesting a physical action: the reader needs to tear off the paper before starting reading the book.
And for this only version, we introduced a customise Smashing Magazine bookmark, also in printed on gold paper. Few more reasons to prefer the paperback version over the digital ones!”

A huge round of applause to Chiara for her wonderful work and sharing the thoughts with us. We were remarkably happy with everything from design to content. But what did readers think? Well, I’m glad that you asked!




Sketches for chapter illustrations. (Large preview)

Feedback and Testimonials

We’ve sent the shiny new book to over 200 people to peek through and read, and we were able to gather some first insights. We’d love to hear your thoughts, too!

“Web design is getting pretty darned complicated. The new book from SmashingMag aims to bring the learning curve down to an accessible level.”

Aaron Walter, InVision

“Just got the new Smashing Book 6 by SmashingMag. What a blast! From CSS Grid Layout, CSS Custom Properties and service workers all the way to the HTTP/2 and conversational interfaces and many more. I recommend it to all the people who build interfaces.”

Mihael Tomić, Osijek, Croatia

“The books published by SmashingMag and team are getting better each time. I was thrilled to be able to preview it… EVERY CHAPTER IS GOOD! Having focused on a11y for much of my career, Marcy Sutton’s chapter is a personal favorite.”

Stephen Hay, Amsterdam, Netherlands


Smashing Book 6, a thank-you page


The Smashing Book 6, with 536 pages on real-life challenges and solutions for the web. Huge thank-you note to the smashing community for supporting the book and out little magazine all these years. (Large preview)

Thank You For Your Support!

We’re very honored and proud to have worked with wonderful people from the industry who shared what they’ve learned in their work. We kindly thank all the hard-working people involved in making this book reality. We kindly thank you for your ongoing support of the book and our little magazine as well. It would be wonderful if you could mention the book by any chance as well in your social circles and perhaps link to this very post.

We’ve also prepared a little media kit .zip with a few photos and illustrations that you could use if you wanted to — just sayin’!

We can’t wait to hear your thoughts about the book! Happy reading, and we hope that you’ll find the book as useful as we do. Just have a cup of coffee (or tea) ready before you start reading, of course, stay smashing and… meow!


Smashing Book 6: New Frontiers in Web Design

eBook

$19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. Free for Smashing Members.

Hardcover

$39Get the Print (incl. eBook)

Printed, quality hardcover. Free airmail shipping worldwide.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, il)


Continued here:  

Smashing Book 6 Is Here: New Frontiers In Web Design

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Introducing “The WebP Manual”




Introducing “The WebP Manual”

Markus Seyfferth



What’s WebP in the first place? Can we actually use it today? And if yes, how exactly? The role of media in performance, specifically images, is of huge concern. Images are powerful. Engaging visuals evoke visceral feelings. They can provide key information and context to articles, or merely add humorous asides. They do anything for us that plain text just can’t by itself.

But when there’s too much imagery, it can be frustrating for users on slow connections, or run afoul of data plan allowances. In the latter scenario, that can cost users real money. This sort of inadvertent trespass can carry real consequences.

In this eBook, you’ll learn all about WebP: what it’s capable of, how it performs, how to convert images to the format in a variety of ways, and most importantly, how to use it. Of course — the eBook is — and always will be, free for all Smashing Members.

84 pages. Written by Jeremy Wagner. Cover Design by Ricardo Gimenes. Available in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats.

Smashing Book 6
$14.90Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle.

$0.00 $14.90 Free for Members →

…along with 12 webinars and 56 other eBooks.

What’s In The eBook

This guide will encourage you to experiment and see what’s possible with WebP:

  • WebP Basics
    WebP images usually use less disk space when compared to other formats at reasonably comparable visual similarity. Depending on your site’s audience and the browsers they use, this is an opportunity to deliver less data-intensive user experiences for a significant segment of your audience.

  • Performance
    We’ll cover how both lossy and lossless WebP compare to JPEGs and PNGs exported by a number of image encoders.

  • Converting Images To WebP (Excerpt)
    This can be done in a myriad of ways, from something as simple as exporting from your preferred design program, by using Cloudinary and similar services, and even in Node.js-based build systems. Here, we’ll cover all avenues.

  • Using WebP Images
    Because WebP isn’t supported in all browsers just yet, you’ll need to learn how to use it that sites and applications gracefully fall back to established formats when WebP support is lacking. Here, we’ll discuss the many ways you can use WebP responsibly, starting by detecting browser support in the Accept request header.

About The Author

Dan Mall
Jeremy Wagner is a performance-obsessed front-end developer, author and speaker living and working in the frozen wastes of Saint Paul, Minnesota. He is also the author of Web Performance in Action, a web developer’s companion guide for creating fast websites. You can find him on Twitter @malchata, or read his blog of ramblings.

Here’s Why This eBook Is For You

The WebP Manual will get you ready for the new image format that is capable to significantly less data-intensive user experiences for a majority of your audience:

  • Learn how lossy and lossless WebP compare to JPEGs and PNGs exported by a number of image encoders.
  • Learn which services and plugins you can use to export or convert images to WebP with your preferred design tool or command line tool.
  • Learn how to can use WebP in production, and how to implement proper fallbacks for browsers that don’t support WebP just yet.
  • Learn how to use the full potential of the WebP format. It will substantially improve loading performance for many of your users, customers, and clients, and it will become one of your favorite tools for making websites as lean as possible.

The eBook is free for Smashing Members (you can cancel anytime, of course).

Smashing Book 6
$14.90Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle.

$0.00 $14.90 Free for Members →

…along with 12 webinars and 56 other eBooks.


Visit link – 

Introducing “The WebP Manual”

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A Complete Guide to High-Converting Lead Magnet

lead magnet ideas

Generating good lead magnet ideas can become a long process. Simply throwing together an e-book or whitepaper just because other businesses do it would be a mistake. High-converting lead magnet ideas offer so much value that your target audience can’t say no. The more you refine your lead magnet, the more qualified your leads become because you’re offering exactly what those leads need at the exact right time. Lead magnets can work for nearly all audiences, including those of B2B and B2C businesses. They’re powerful because they open the door to further communication between the business and the lead. But…

The post A Complete Guide to High-Converting Lead Magnet appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Source article – 

A Complete Guide to High-Converting Lead Magnet

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Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects




Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects

Rachel Andrew



Among the most popular suggestions on Smashing Magazine’s Content User Suggestions board is the need of learning more about the interaction and communication between designers and developers. There are probably several articles worth of very specific things that could be covered here, but I thought I would kick things off with a general post rounding up some experiences on the subject.

Given the wide range of skills held by the line-up at our upcoming SmashingConf Toronto — a fully live, no-slides-allowed event, I decided to solicit some feedback. I’ve wrapped those up with my own experience of 20 years working alongside designers and other developers. I hope you will add your own experiences in the comments.

Some tips work best when you can be in the same room as your team, and others are helpful for the remote worker or freelancer. What shines through all of the advice, however, is the need to respect each other, and the fact that everyone is working to try and create the best outcome for the project.

Working Remotely And Staying Connected

The nomadic lifestyle is not right for everyone, but the only way to know for sure is to try. If you can afford to take the risk, go for it. Javier Cuello shares his experience and insights from his four years of travel and work. Read article →

For many years, my own web development company operated as an outsourced web development provider for design agencies. This involved doing everything from front-end development to implementing e-commerce and custom content management solutions. Our direct client was the designer or design agency who had brought us on board to help with the development aspect of the work, however, in an ideal situation, we would be part of the team working to deliver a great end result to the end client.

Sometimes this relationship worked well. We would feel a valued part of the team, our ideas and experience would count, we would work with the designers to come up with the best solution within budgetary, time, and other constraints.

In many cases, however, no attempt was made to form a team. The design agency would throw a picture of a website as a PDF file over the fence to us, then move on to work on their next project. There was little room for collaboration, and often the designer who had created the files was busy on some other work when we came back with questions.

It was an unsatisfactory way to work for everyone. We would be frustrated because we did not have a chance to help ensure that what was designed was possible to be built in a performant and accessible way, within the time and budget agreed on. The designer of the project would be frustrated: Why were these developers asking so many questions? Can they not just build the website as I have designed? Why are the fonts not the size I wanted?

The Waterfall versus Agile argument might be raised here. The situation where a PDF is thrown over the fence is often cited as an example of how bad a Waterfall approach is. Still, working in a fully Agile way is often not possible for teams made of freelancers or separate parties doing different parts of the work. Therefore, in reading these suggestions, look at them through the lens of the projects you work on. However, try not to completely discount something as unworkable because you can’t use the full process. There are often things we can take without needing to fully adopt one methodology or another.

Setting Up A Project For Success

I came to realize that very often the success of failure of the collaboration started before we even won the project, with the way in which we proposed the working relationship. We had to explain upfront that experience had taught us that the approach of us being handed a PDF, quoting and returning a website did not give the best results.

Projects that were successful had a far more iterative approach. It might not be possible to have us work alongside the designers or in a more Agile way. However, having a number of rounds of design and development with time for feedback from each side went a long way to prevent the frustrations of a method where work was completed by each side independently.

Creating Working Relationships

Having longer-term relationships with an agency, spanning a number of projects worked well. We got to know the designers, learned how they worked, could anticipate their questions and ensure that we answered them upfront. We were able to share development knowledge, the things that made a design easier or harder to implement which would, therefore, have an impact on time and budget. They were able to communicate better with us in order to explain why a certain design element was vital, even if it was going to add complexity.

For many freelance designers and developers, and also for those people who work for a distributed company, communication can become mostly text-based. This can make it particularly hard to build relationships. There might be a lot of communication — by email, in Slack, or through messages on a project management platform such as Basecamp. However, all of these methods leave us without the visual cues we might pick up from in-person meetings. An email we see as to the point may come across to the reader as if we are angry. The quick-fire nature of tools such as Slack might leave us committing in writing something which we would not say to that person while looking into their eyes!

Freelance data scientist Nadieh Bremer will talk to us about visualizing data in Toronto. She has learned that meeting people face to face — or at least having a video call — is important. She told me:

Nadieh Bremer

“As a remote freelancer, I know that to interact well with my clients I really need to have a video call (stress on the video) I need to see their face and facial/body interactions and they need to see mine. For clients that I have within public transport distance, I used to travel there for a first ‘getting to know each other/see if we can do a project’ meeting, which would take loads of time. But I noticed for my clients abroad (that I can’t visit anyway) that a first client call (again, make sure it’s a video-call) works more than good enough.

It’s the perfect way to weed out the clients that need other skills that I can give, those that are looking for a cheap deal, and those where I just felt something wasn’t quite clicking or I’m not enthusiastic about the project after they’ve given me a better explanation. So these days I also ask my clients in the Netherlands, where I live, that might want to do a first meeting to have it online (and once we get on to an actual contract I can come by if it’s beneficial).”

Working In The Open

Working in the open (with the project frequently deployed to a staging server that everyone had access to see), helped to support an iterative approach to development. I found that it was important to support that live version with explanations and notes of what to look at and test and what was still half finished. If I just invited people to look at it without that information we would get lists of fixes to make to unfinished features, which is a waste of time for the person doing the reporting. However, a live staging version, plus notes in a collaboration tool such as Basecamp meant that we could deploy sections and post asking for feedback on specific things. This helped to keep everyone up to date and part of the project even if — as was often the case for designers in an agency — they had a number of other projects to work on.

There are collaboration tools to help designers to share their work too. Asking for recommendations on Twitter gave me suggestions for Zeplin, Invision, Figma, and Adobe XD. Showing work in progress to a developer can help them to catch things that might be tricky before they are signed off by the client. By sharing the goal behind a particular design feature within the team, a way forward can be devised that meets the goal without blowing the budget.


Screenshot of the Zeplin homepage


Zeplin is a collaboration tool for developers and designers

Scope Creep And Change Requests

The thing about working in the open is that people then start to have ideas (which should be a positive thing), however, most timescales and budgets are not infinite! This means you need to learn to deal with scope creep and change requests in a way that maintains a good working relationship.

We would often get requests for things that were trivial to implement with a message saying how sorry they were about this huge change and requests for incredibly time-consuming things with an assumption it would be quick. Someone who is not a specialist has no idea how long anything will take. Why should they? It is important to remember this rather than getting frustrated about the big changes that are being asked for. Have a conversation about the change, explain why it is more complex than it might appear, and try to work out whether this is a vital addition or change, or just a nice idea that someone has had.

If the change is not essential, then it may be enough to log it somewhere as a phase two request, demonstrating that it has been heard and won’t be forgotten. If the big change is still being requested, we would outline the time it would take and give options. This might mean dropping some other feature if a project has a fixed budget and tight deadline. If there was flexibility then we could outline the implications on both costs and end date.

With regard to costs and timescales, we learned early on to pad our project quotes in order that we could absorb some small changes without needing to increase costs or delay completion. This helped with the relationship between the agency and ourselves as they didn’t feel as if they were being constantly nickel and dimed. Small changes were expected as part of the process of development. I also never wrote these up in a quote as contingency, as a client would read that and think they should be able to get the project done without dipping into the contingency. I just added the time to the quote for the overall project. If the project ran smoothly and we didn’t need that time and money, then the client got a smaller bill. No one is ever unhappy about being invoiced for less than they expected!

This approach can work even for people working in-house. Adding some time to your estimates means that you can absorb small changes without needing to extend the timescales. It helps working relationships if you are someone who is able to say yes as often as possible.

This does require that you become adept at estimating timescales. This is a skill you can develop by logging your time to achieve your work, even if you don’t need to log your time for work purposes. While many of the things you design or develop will be unique, and seem impossible to estimate, by consistently logging your time you will generally find that your ballpark estimates become more accurate as you make yourself aware of how long things really take.

Respect

Aaron Draplin will be bringing tales from his career in design to Toronto, and responded with the thought that it comes down to respect for your colleague’s craft:

Aaron Draplin

“It all comes down to respect for your colleague’s craft, and sort of knowing your place and precisely where you fit into the project. When working with a developer, I surrender to them in a creative way, and then, defuse whatever power play they might try to make on me by leading the charges with constructive design advice, lightning-fast email replies and generally keeping the spirit upbeat. It’s an odd offense to play. I’m not down with the adversarial stuff. I’m quick to remind them we are all in the same boat, and, who’s paying their paycheck. And that’s not me. It’s the client. I’ll forever be on their team, you know? We make the stuff for the client. Not just me. Not ‘my team’. We do it together. This simple methodology has always gone a long way for me.”

I love this, it underpins everything that this article discusses. Think back to any working relationship that has gone bad, how many of those involved you feeling as if the other person just didn’t understand your point of view or the things you believe are important? Most reasonable people understand that compromise has to be made, it is when it appears that your point of view is not considered that frustration sets in.

There are sometimes situations where a decision is being made, and your experience tells you it is going to result in a bad outcome for the project, yet you are overruled. On a few occasions, decisions were made that I believed so poor; I asked for the decision and our objection to it be put in writing, in order that we could not be held accountable for any bad outcome in future. This is not something you should feel the need to do often, however, it is quite powerful and sometimes results in the decision being reversed. An example would be of a client who keeps insisting on doing something that would cause an accessibility problem for a section of their potential audience. If explaining the issue does not help, and the client insists on continuing, ask for that decision in writing in order to document your professional advice.

Learning The Language

I recently had the chance to bring my CSS Layout Workshop not to my usual groups of front-end developers but instead to a group of UX designers. Many of the attendees were there not to improve their front-end development skills, but more to understand enough of how modern CSS Layout worked that they could have better conversations with the developers who built their designs. Many of them had also spent years being told that certain things were not possible on the web, but were realizing that the possibilities in CSS were changing through things like CSS Grid. They were learning some CSS not necessarily to become proficient in shipping it to production, but so they could share a common language with developers.

There are often debates on whether “designers should learn to code.” In reality, I think we all need to learn something of the language, skills, and priorities of the other people on our teams. As Aaron reminded us, we are all on the same team, we are making stuff together. Designers should learn something about code just as developers should also learn something of design. This gives us more of a shared language and understanding.

Seb Lee-Delisle, who will speak on the subject of Hack to the Future in Toronto, agrees:

Seb Lee-Delisle

“I have basically made a career out of being both technical and creative so I strongly feel that the more crossover the better. Obviously what I do now is wonderfully free of the constraints of client work but even so, I do think that if you can blur those edges, it’s gonna be good for you. It’s why I speak at design conferences and encourage designers to play with creative coding, and I speak at tech conferences to persuade coders to improve their visual acuity. Also with creative coding. :) It’s good because not only do I get to work across both disciplines, but also I get to annoy both designers and coders in equal measure.”

I have found that introducing designers to browser DevTools (in particular the layout tools in Firefox and also to various code generators on the web) has been helpful. By being able to test ideas out without writing code, helps a designer who isn’t confident in writing code to have better conversations with their developer colleagues. Playing with tools such as gradient generators, clip-path or animation tools can also help designers see what is possible on the web today.


Screenshot of Animista


Animista has demos of different styles of animation

We are also seeing a number of tools that can help people create websites in a more visual way. Developers can sometimes turn their noses up about the code output of such tools, and it’s true they probably won’t be the best choice for the production code of a large project. However, they can be an excellent way for everyone to prototype ideas, without needing to write code. Those prototypes can then be turned into robust, permanent and scalable versions for production.

An important tip for developers is to refrain from commenting on the code quality of prototypes from members of the team who do not ship production code! Stick to what the prototype is showing as opposed to how it has been built.

A Practical Suggestion To Make Things Visual

Eva-Lotta Lamm will be speaking in Toronto about Sketching and perhaps unsurprisingly passed on practical tips for helping conversation by visualizing the problem to support a conversation.

Eva-Lotta Lamm

Creating a shared picture of a problem or a solution is a simple but powerful tool to create understanding and make sure they everybody is talking about the same thing.

Visualizing a problem can reach from quick sketches on a whiteboard to more complex diagrams, like customer journey diagrams or service blueprints.

But even just spatially distributing words on a surface adds a valuable layer of meaning. Something as simple as arranging post-its on a whiteboard in different ways can help us to see relationships, notice patterns, find gaps and spot outliers or anomalies. If we add simple structural elements (like arrows, connectors, frames, and dividers) and some sketches into the mix, the relationships become even more obvious.

Visualising a problem creates context and builds a structural frame that future information, questions, and ideas can be added to in a ‘systematic’ way.

Visuals are great to support a conversation, especially when the conversation is ‘messy’ and several people involved.

When we visualize a conversation, we create an external memory of the content, that is visible to everybody and that can easily be referred back to. We don’t have to hold everything in our mind. This frees up space in everybody’s mind to think and talk about other things without the fear of forgetting something important. Visuals also give us something concrete to hold on to and to follow along while listening to complex or abstract information.

When we have a visual map, we can point to particular pieces of content — a simple but powerful way to make sure everybody is talking about the same thing. And when referring back to something discussed earlier, the map automatically reminds us of the context and the connections to surrounding topics.

When we sketch out a problem, a solution or an idea the way we see it (literally) changes. Every time we express a thought in a different medium, we are forced to shape it in a specific way, which allows us to observe and analyze it from different angles.

Visualising forces us to make decisions about a problem that words alone don’t. We have to decide where to place each element, decide on its shape, size, its boldness, and color. We have to decide what we sketch and what we write. All these decisions require a deeper understanding of the problem and make important questions surface fairly quickly.

All in all, supporting your collaboration by making it more visual works like a catalyst for faster and better understanding.

Working in this way is obviously easier if your team is working in the same room. For distributed teams and freelancers, there are alternatives to communicate in ways other than words, e.g. by making a quick Screencast to demonstrate an issue, or even sketching and photographing a diagram can be incredibly helpful. There are collaborative tools such as Milanote, Mural, and Niice; such tools can help with the process Eva-Lotta described even if people can’t be in the same room.


Screenshot of the Niice website


Niice helps you to collect and discuss ideas

I’m very non-visual and have had to learn how useful these other methods of communication are to the people I work with. I have been guilty on many occasions of forgetting that just because I don’t personally find something useful, it is still helpful to other people. It is certainly a good idea to change how you are trying to communicate an idea if it becomes obvious that you are talking at cross-purposes.

Over To You

As with most things, there are many ways to work together. Even for remote teams, there is a range of tools which can help break down barriers to collaborating in a more visual way. However, no tool is able to fix problems caused by a lack of respect for the work of the rest of the team. A good relationship starts with the ability for all of us to take a step back from our strongly held opinions, listen to our colleagues, and learn to compromise. We can then choose tools and workflows which help to support that understanding that we are all on the same team, all trying to do a great job, and all have important viewpoints and experience to bring to the project.

I would love to hear your own experiences working together in the same room or remotely. What has worked well — or not worked at all! Tools, techniques, and lessons learned are all welcome in the comments. If you would be keen to see tutorials about specific tools or workflows mentioned here, perhaps add a suggestion to our User Suggestions board, too.

Smashing Editorial
(il)


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Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects

How to double your website conversion rate

Take a moment and think about a first meeting with a prospective customer. A good salesman will not try to sell right away. Instead, he will start by asking specific questions and subsequently use the answers provided to give valuable advice. Why does this work? Because in this way, trust is developed between both parties. This trust forms the necessary foundation for a sales transaction to take place further down the road. If a prospect visits your website, you’ll want to apply this principle of building trust in an online environment. Therefore, you typically provide useful content on your site such as articles, white…

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How to double your website conversion rate

Case Study: Getting consecutive +15% winning tests for software vendor, Frontline Solvers

The post Case Study: Getting consecutive +15% winning tests for software vendor, Frontline Solvers appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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Case Study: Getting consecutive +15% winning tests for software vendor, Frontline Solvers

Exploring New Worlds: A Smashing Creativity Challenge

Time flies! Did you know that it has been more than nine years already since we first embarked on our wallpapers adventure? Nine years is a long time, and sometimes we all should break out of our comfort zones and try something new, right?
We’d love to invite you to a little creativity challenge: Get out your pens, paint brushes, camera, or fire up your favorite illustration tool, and design a desktop wallpaper for March 2018.

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Exploring New Worlds: A Smashing Creativity Challenge

Infographic: The Perfect Execution of Conversion Rate Optimization

if CRO is done properly

Today’s infographic is a good primer on what it takes to effectively run a conversion rate optimization campaign. However, one thing that I would like to add to this recipe is documentation. Conversion rate optimization is a science project. You’re dealing with data, hypotheses, results, measurement techniques and sources of error. Sounds like chemistry class right? Proper documentation is extremely helpful for interpreting results, understanding sources of error and providing historical record keeping for future testing. If you’re running conversion rate experiments today, you may have to hand the baton off to someone else when you move on. If you’re…

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Infographic: The Perfect Execution of Conversion Rate Optimization