Tag Archives: policy

9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples – Plus 21 New Unbounce Templates

alt : https://unbounce.com/photos/sticky-bar-condoms.mp4https://unbounce.com/photos/sticky-bar-condoms.mp4

Sticky Bars are the less intrusive cousin of the noble Popup. They appear at the top or bottom of the page (and sometimes the sides) when a visitor arrives, leaves, scrolls down or up, stays on the page for a certain time period or clicks a link or button. They have a million useful use cases, some of which you may not have considered.

In today’s Product Awareness Month post, I’ll be sharing:

  • 9 Sticky Bar Examples From Out in the Wild: These are examples the team has found on other folks websites, and a couple of our own.
  • 21 New Unbounce Sticky Bar Templates: Check out our latest designs that you can use today.

To get things started, here’s an example that I’ll talk about later in the new templates section. Click to show a Sticky Bar with a countdown timer.

I’d love to see your Sticky Bars too, so drop me a link in the comments, please.

9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples to Inspire Your Next Campaign

Discounts and newsletter subscriptions are valid, common and effective use cases, but I want to explore different types of interaction design, or campaign concepts that can compliment what you’re already using them for.

#1 Maybe Later

If you’ve been following along with Product Awareness Month (PAM), you’ll have seen the “Maybe Later” concept. This is where an entrance popup morphs into a persistent Sticky Bar when your visitors click the middle “Maybe Later” button instead of yes or no.

You can see a live demo of how it works here. A popup will appear when you arrive. Click “Maybe Later”, then refresh the page and a Sticky Bar will appear, and can be configured to show up site-wide until you convert or say “No Thanks”.


#2 Sticky Bar to Popup

This concept is the exact opposite of “Maybe Later”, and it uses a concept known as a two-step opt-in. Instead of showing a form on the Sticky Bar, it just shows a button to express interest.

Click-Through Sticky Bar

When you click the Sticky Bar CTA it launches a popup to collect the email address. This two-stage concept can increase conversions because the first click establishes intent and a level of commitment to continue – while not showing a scary form right away. I’ll be discussing the two-step opt-in in a future post.

Lead Gen Popup


#3 Sticky Video Widget

You’ve seen these on many blogs I’m sure. It’s really cool functionality for increasing engagement in your videos. You can see a demo here. And instructions on how to implement it can be found in the Unbounce community here.


#4 E-commerce Product Reminder

This example is really cool. As you scroll down a product page on an e-commerce site, an “Add to Cart” Sticky Bar appears when you scroll past the main hero image.


#5 E-commerce Checkout Discount Nudge

This Sticky Bar sticks with you for every step in the photo creation and checkout process. Clearly, they are comfortable with the coupon being applied to the sale because it’s an incredibly competitive business niche and let’s face it when you see a coupon code field you go searching for one. So why not just offer it straight up.

For the record, trying to buy canvas prints to deliver to family in the UK is a freakin’ nightmare. I had to try 8 different sites before one of them would allow me to put a Canadian address in the billing info fields. They are losing a TON of money by not realizing that customers can be in other places.


#6 On-Click Side Slide

On-click Sticky Bars and Popups are the best kind when it comes to a permission-based interaction. You make something interesting and ask people to click on it. In this example, there is an element on the left side of the page which slides in from the side when clicked.

Unbouncer Noah Matsell created a similar thing in Unbounce (see demo here). It doesn’t actually use a Sticky Bar. Instead it’s just a box with text in it. I love how it works. Try it out, and think about all the cool stuff you could stick in a sidebar.


#7 EU Cookie Policy

European Union laws around privacy are some of the toughest in the world, and for the last few years, the EU Cookie Privacy Law required that all EU businesses, as well as international businesses serving EU customers, show a privacy statement with a clickable acknowledgment interaction. I’m not a lawyer so I don’t know all the ins and outs, but needless to say, it’s a great use case that you may not even know that your web team or legal team actually needs.

Coming up in May is the new GDPR legislation which will usurp this law, but offer its own needs and requirements, so stay tuned for more on that, and how you should be dealing with it. In fact, I did a quick poll on Twitter to see what people thought about the cookie law and got an interesting mix of responses. Don’t be in the “Haven’t dealt with it yet” camp when it comes to GDPR. That could get you dinged.

We released a new Cookie Bar template below that you can use until you deal with the new legislation.

#8 Microsite Navigation

Another example from earlier in Product Awareness Month. You can use a Sticky Bar as the connective global navigation that turns a group of landing pages into a microsite.

A really simple way to create a multi-page marketing campaign experience.

#9 Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Net Promoter Score surveys are a method of measuring how your customers feel about your product or service. Based on a scale from 0-10 and the question “How likely are you to recommend company name to a friend?”

Co-founder Carter Gilchrist made this NPS demo to show how it works:


Follow our Product Awareness Month journey >> click here to launch a popup with a subscribe form (it uses our on-click trigger feature).


21 New Unbounce Sticky Bar Templates You Can Use Today

We just released a whole bunch of new Sticky Bar and Popup templates which you can see inside the Unbounce app screenshot below. I chose a few of them to showcase below based on some of the examples I discussed above.


Sticky Bar Template #1: Countdown Timer

Countdown timers are great for creating a sense of urgency, and can have a positive influence on conversions as a result.


Click to show this Sticky Bar at the bottom | at the top.


Sticky Bar Template #2: Location Redirect

If you have multiple websites or online stores, you can use Location Targeting (Unbounce supports city, region, country, and continent) to let people know there is a local version they might want to switch to.


Sticky Bar Template #3: Product Release

Announce product releases on your website to drive people to the features page of the new product.


Sticky Bar Template #4: Cookie Privacy Law

As I mentioned earlier, this is big for companies in Europe, and also businesses who have European customers. On May 25, 2018 this law will be usurped by the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).


Sticky Bar Template #5: Product Beta Access

Build an email list for an upcoming beta release.


Sticky Bar Template #6: Product Hunt Launch

Product Hunt can be a great place to launch new products. To be successful you need to get upvotes and you can use a Sticky Bar to send people there from your website.

Check Out Our Sticky Bar Live Demo

We built a cool tool that shows what Sticky Bars and Popups look like on your site. Simply enter your URL here to preview. It even grabs your brand colors and in this case, Amanda from Orbit Media makes a cameo appearance.

Cheers
Oli Gardner

p.s. You should check out The Landing Page Analyzer. Why? Because – hyperbole alert – it’s the single greatest tool in the history of the world when it comes to grading your landing pages.

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9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples – Plus 21 New Unbounce Templates

Meet XRespond Testing Tool: Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler

The way people consume information is constantly evolving. As web designers and developers, we keep up with all of the different screen shapes and sizes, learning to create beautiful, flexible software. Yet most of the available tools still don’t reflect the nature and diversity of the platform we’re building for: the browser.
When I was making my first responsive website in 2012, I quickly realized how inefficient and time-consuming the constant browser window resizing was.

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Meet XRespond Testing Tool: Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler

Marketing Machines: Is Machine Learning Helping Marketers or Making Us Obsolete?

Hollywood paints a grim picture of a future populated by intelligent machines. Terminator, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Matrix and countless other films show us that machines are angry, they’re evil and — if given the opportunity — they will not hesitate to overthrow the human race.

Films like these serve as cautionary tales about what could happen if machines gain consciousness (or some semblance of). But in order for that to happen humans need to teach machines to think for themselves. This may sound like science fiction but it’s an actual discipline known as machine learning.

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The machines are coming. But fear not — they could help you become a better marketer. Image via Shutterstock.

Still in its infancy, machine learning systems are being applied to everything from filtering spam emails, to suggesting the next series to binge-watch and even matching up folks looking for love.

For digital marketers, machine learning may be especially helpful in getting products or services in front of the right prospects, rather than blanket-marketing to everyone and adding to the constant noise that is modern advertising. Machine learning will also be key to predicting customer churn and attribution: two thorns in many digital marketers’ sides.

Despite machine learning’s positive impact on the digital marketing field, there are questions about job security and ethics that cannot be swept under the rug. Will marketing become so automated that professional marketers become obsolete? Is there potential for machine learning systems to do harm, whether by targeting vulnerable prospects or manipulating people’s emotions?

These aren’t just rhetorical questions. They get to the heart of what the future of marketing will look like — and what role marketers will play in it.

What is Machine Learning?

Machine learning is a complicated subject, involving advanced math, code and overwhelming amounts of data. Luckily, Tommy Levi, Director of Data Science at Unbounce, has a PhD in Theoretical Physics. He distills machine learning down to its simplest definition:

You can think of machine learning as using a computer or mathematics to make predictions or see patterns in data. At the end of the day, you’re really just trying to either predict something or see patterns, and then you’re just using the fact that a computer is really fast at calculating.

You may not know it, but you likely interact with machine learning systems on a daily basis. Have you ever been sucked into a Netflix wormhole prompted by recommended titles? Or used Facebook’s facial recognition tool when uploading and tagging an image? These are both examples of machine learning in action. They use the data you input (by rating shows, tagging friends, etc.) to produce better and more accurate suggestions over time.

Other examples of machine learning include spell check, spam filtering… even internet dating — yes, machine learning has made its way into the love lives of many, matching up singles using complicated algorithms that take into consideration personality traits and interests.


Machine learning may be helpful in getting products or services in front of the right prospects.
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How Machine Learning Works

While it may seem like witchcraft to the layperson, running in the background of every machine learning system we encounter is a human-built machine that would have gone through countless iterations to develop.

Facebook’s facial recognition tool, which can recognize your face with 98% accuracy, took several years of research and development to produce what is regarded as cutting-edge machine learning.

So how exactly does machine learning work? Spoiler alert: it’s complicated. So without going into too much detail, here’s an introduction to machine learning, starting with the two basic techniques.

Supervised learning

Supervised learning systems rely upon humans to label the incoming data — at least to begin with — in order for the systems to better predict how to classify future input data.

Gmail’s spam filter is a great example of this. When you label incoming mail as either spam or not spam, you’re not only cleaning up your inbox, you’re also training Gmail’s filter (a machine learning system) to identify what you consider to be spam (or not spam) in the future.

Unsupervised learning

Unsupervised learning systems use unlabeled incoming data, which is then organized into clusters based on similarities and differences in the data. Whereas supervised learning relies upon environmental feedback, unsupervised learning has no environmental feedback. Instead, data scientists will often use a reward/punishment system to indicate success or failure.

According to Tommy, this type of machine learning can be likened to the relationship between a parent and a young child. When a child does something positive they’re rewarded. Likewise, when “[a machine] gets it right — like it makes a good prediction — you kind of give it a little pat on the back and you say good job.”

Like any child (or person for that matter), the system ends up trying to maximize the positive reinforcement, thus getting better and better at predicting.

The Power of Machine Learning

A lot of what machine learning can do is yet to be explored, but the main benefit is its ability to wade through and sort data far more quickly and efficiently than any human could, no matter how clever.

Tommy is currently experimenting with an unsupervised learning system that clusters landing pages with similar features. Whereas one person could go through a few hundred pages in a day, this model can run through 300,000 pages in 20 minutes.

How do your landing page conversion rates compare against your industry competitors?

We analyzed the behavior of 74,551,421 visitors to 64,284 lead generation landing pages. Now we want to share average industry conversion rates with you in the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report.
By entering your email you’ll receive other resources to help you improve your conversion rates.

The advantage is not just speed, it’s also retention and pattern recognition. Tommy explains:

To go through that many pages and see those patterns and hold it all in memory and be able to balance that — that’s where the power is.

For some marketers, this raises a troubling question: If machine learning systems solve problems by finding patterns that we can’t see, does this mean that marketers should be worried about job security?

The answer is more nuanced than a simple yes or no.

Machine Learning and the Digital Marketer

As data becomes the foundation for more and more marketing decisions, digital marketers have been tasked with sorting through an unprecedented amount of data.

This process usually involves hours of digging through analytics, collecting data points from marketing campaigns that span several months. And while focusing on data analysis and post-mortems is incredibly valuable, doing so takes a significant amount of time and resources away from future marketing initiatives.

As advancements in technology scale exponentially, the divide between teams that do and those that don’t will become more apparent. Those that don’t evolve will stumble and those that embrace data will grow — this is where machine learning can help.


Marketers that don’t embrace data will fumble. Those that do will grow — ML can help.
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That being said, machine learning isn’t something digital marketers can implement themselves after reading a quick tutorial. It’s more comparable to having a Ferrari in your driveway when you don’t know how to drive standard… or maybe you can’t even drive at all.

Until the day when implementing a machine learning system is just a YouTube video away, digital marketers could benefit from keeping a close eye on the companies that are incorporating machine learning into their products, and assessing whether they can help with their department’s pain points.

So how are marketers currently implementing machine learning to make decisions based on data rather than gut instinct? There are many niches in marketing that are becoming more automated. Here are a few that stand out.

Lead scoring and machine learning

Lead scoring is a system that allows marketers to gauge whether a prospect is a qualified lead and thus worth pursuing. Once marketing and sales teams agree on the definition of a “qualified lead,” they can begin assigning values to different qualified lead indicators, such as job title, company size and even interaction with specific content.

These indicators paint a more holistic picture of a lead’s level of interest, beyond just a form submission typically associated with lead generation content like ebooks. And automating lead scoring takes the pressure off marketers having to qualify prospects via long forms, freeing them up to work on other marketing initiatives.

Once the leads have reached the “qualified” threshold, sales associates can then focus their efforts on those prospects — ultimately spending their time and money where it matters most.

Content marketing and copywriting

Machine learning models can analyze data points beyond just numbers — including words on your website, landing page or PPC ads. Machine learning systems can find patterns in language and detect words that elicit the most clicks or engagement.

Is emotional copywriting on your landing page effective in your industry?

We used machine learning to help create the Unbounce Conversion Benchmark Report, which shares insights on how different aspects of page copy correspond to conversion rates across 10 industries.
By entering your email you’ll receive other resources to help you improve your conversion rates.

But can a machine write persuasive copy? Maybe, actually.

A New York-based startup called Persado offers a “cognitive content platform” that uses math, data, natural language processing, emotional language data and machine learning systems to serve the best copy and images to spur prospects into action. It does this by analyzing all the language data each client has ever interacted with and serving future prospects with the best possible words or phrases. An A/B test could never achieve this at the same scale.

Think this is a joke? With over $65 million in venture capital and a reported average conversion rate uplift of 49.5% across 4,000 campaigns, Persado’s business model is no laughing matter.

Still, there is no replacement for a supremely personalized piece of content delivered straight to your client’s inbox — an honest call to action from one human to another.

Recently Unbounce’s Director of Campaign Strategy, Corey Dilley, sent an email to our customers. It had no sales pitch, no call to action button. It was just Corey reaching out and saying, “Hey.”

corey-dilley-marketing-email-1

Corey’s email had an open rate of 41.42%, and he received around 80 personal responses. Not bad for an email written by a human!

Sometimes it’s actions — like clicks and conversions — you want to elicit from customers. Other times the goal is to build rapport. In some cases we should let the machines do the work, but it’s up to the humans to keep the content, well, human.


There is no replacement for personalized content and an honest ask from one human to another.
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Machine learning for churn prediction

In the SaaS industry, churn is a measure of the percentage of customers who cancel their recurring revenue subscriptions. According to Tommy, churn tells a story about “how your customers behave and feel. It’s giving a voice to the customers that we don’t have time or the ability to talk to.”

Self-reporting methods such as polls and surveys are another good way to give a voice to these customers. But they’re not always scalable — large data sets can be hard for humans to analyze and derive meaning from.

Self-reporting methods can also skew your results. Tommy explains:

The problem with things like surveys and popups is that they’re only going to tell you what you’ve asked about, and the type of people that answer surveys are already a biased set.

Machine learning systems, on the other hand, can digest a larger number of data points, and with far less bias. Ideally the data is going to reveal what marketing efforts are working, thus leading to reduced churn and helping to move customers down the funnel.

This is highly relevant for SaaS companies, whose customers often sign up for trials before purchasing the product. Once someone starts a trial, the marketing department will start sending them content in order to nurture them into adopting the service and become engaged.

Churn models can help a marketing team determine which pieces of content lead to negative or positive encounters — information that can inform and guide the optimization process.

Ethical Implications of Machine Learning in Marketing

We hinted at the ethical implications of machine learning in marketing, but it deserves its own discussion (heck, it deserves its own book). The truth is, machine learning systems have the potential to cause legitimate harm.

According to Carl Schmidt, Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer at Unbounce:

Where we are really going to run into ethical issues is with extreme personalization. We’re going to teach machines how to be the ultimate salespeople, and they’re not going to care about whether you have a compulsive personality… They’re just going to care about success.

This could mean targeting someone in rehab with alcohol ads, or someone with a gambling problem with a trip to Las Vegas. The machine learning system will make the correlation, based on the person’s internet activity, and it’s going to exploit that.

Another dilemma we run into is with marketing aimed at affecting people’s emotions. Sure copywriters often tap into emotions in order to get a desired response, but there’s a fine line between making people feel things and emotional manipulation, as Facebook discovered in an infamous experiment.

If you aren’t familiar with the experiment, here’s the abridged version: Facebook researchers adapted word count software to manipulate the News Feeds of 689,003 users to determine whether their emotional state could be altered if they saw fewer positive posts or fewer negative posts in their feeds.

Posts were deemed either positive or negative if they contained at least one positive or negative word. Because researchers never saw the status updates (the machine learning system did the filtering) technically it fell within Facebook’s Data Use Policy.

However, public reaction to the Facebook experiment was generally pretty scathing. While some came to the defense of Facebook, many criticized the company for breaching ethical guidelines for informed consent.

In the end, Facebook admitted they could have done better. And one good thing did come out of the experiment: It now serves as a benchmark for when machine learning goes too far, and as a reminder for marketers to continually gut-check themselves.

For Carl, it comes down to intent:

If I’m Facebook, I might be worried that if we don’t do anything about the pacing and style of content, and we’re inadvertently presenting content that could be reacted to negatively, especially to vulnerable people, then we would want to actively understand that mechanism and do something about it.

While we may not yet have a concrete code of conduct around machine learning, moving forward with good intentions and a commitment to do no harm is a good place to start.

The Human Side of Machine Learning

Ethical issues aside, the rise of machines often implies the fall of humans. But it doesn’t have to be one or the other.

“You want machines to do the mundane stuff and the humans to do the creative stuff,” Carl says. He continues:

Computers are still not creative. They can’t think on their own, and they generally can’t delight you very much. We are going to get to a point where you could probably generate highly personal onboarding content by a machine. But it [will have] no soul.

That’s where the human aspect comes in. With creativity and wordsmithing. With live customer support. Heck, it takes some pretty creative data people to come up with an algorithm that recognizes faces with 98% accuracy.

Imagine a world where rather than getting 15 spam emails a day, you get just one with exactly the content you would otherwise be searching for — content written by a human, but served to you by a machine learning system.

While pop culture may say otherwise, the future of marketing isn’t about humans (or rather, marketers) versus machines. It’s about marketers using machines to get amazing results — for their customers and their company.

Machine learning systems may have an edge when it comes to data sorting, but they’re missing many of the things that make exceptional marketing experiences: empathy, compassion and a true understanding of the human experience.

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in The Split, a digital magazine by Unbounce.

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Marketing Machines: Is Machine Learning Helping Marketers or Making Us Obsolete?

Web Development Reading List #168: Preload With Webpack, A Guide To Security Headers, And Service Worker Fallacies

With great power comes great responsibility. This week I found some resources that got me thinking: Service Workers that download 16MB of data on the user’s first visit? A Bluetooth API in the browser? Private browser windows that aren’t so private at all?
We have a lot of methods and strategies to fix these kinds of things. We can give the browser smarter hints, put security headers and HTTPS in place, serve web fonts locally, and build safer network protocols.

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Web Development Reading List #168: Preload With Webpack, A Guide To Security Headers, And Service Worker Fallacies

The 7 Best Ways to Unlock Your ‘Not Provided’ Keywords in Google Analytics

7 best ways to unlock your not provided keywords

Everyone loves a good intrigue. We like to think there is a hidden agenda behind regular, day to day events. This is particularly true in the case with SEOs, many of whom worry that Google is constantly scheming to control the SERPs. Case in point: the ‘Not Provided’ debate, raging since 2013. For the conspiracy theorist in you, the advent of Google Analytics ‘Not Provided’ keywords has likely lead you to assume that the wonder twins are gearing up for a Dr. Evil-esque scheme to destroy the world of online marketing. After all, over the past two years, there has…

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The 7 Best Ways to Unlock Your ‘Not Provided’ Keywords in Google Analytics

How to Build a Compelling One-Page Story for Your Landing Page

periscope-fi

We are in the middle of a cultural shift. This evolving change is highly visible in the current state of communication. As attention spans continue to shorten, the significance of the novel and long-form is giving way to the 140-character tweet, the ephemeral 10-second Snapchat (with an optional caption) and listicles. While all these forms may have their detractors, their impact is still undeniable. Web design has responded to the pressure of shorter attention spans with placing a higher emphasis on the landing page. When today’s web-savvy visitor lands on your homepage, you have mere seconds before their mind generates…

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How to Build a Compelling One-Page Story for Your Landing Page

The Crazy Egg Guide to YouTube Advertising

crazy egg guide to YouTube advertising

With over one billion users, it’s fair to say that your target market can be found on YouTube. While you can use organic methods to reach your target audience on the platform, you might not have the time or patience to do so. As a result, you might be interested in how you can use YouTube Ads, to shortcut the process of engaging with potential customers while they’re using YouTube. In this guide, we’re going to examine the steps that you need to take if you want to get great results from running some YouTube Ads of your own. We’ll…

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The Crazy Egg Guide to YouTube Advertising

Why is Apple’s Marketing Just So Darn Good?

apple-hasnt-tweeted-yet

Apple may go head to head with other manufacturers like Samsung to gain consumer attention, but Apple has never had a race-to-the-bottom price war. They don’t try to compete on price, and they don’t have to. Steve Jobs and his team excelled at manufacturing and marketing consumer products that consumers love. Apple’s marketing is so effective, in fact, that it has become a benchmark for other companies who want to achieve the same global popularity, revenue growth and staying power. Regardless of your industry, product or service, there are a few things to be learned from Apple’s marketing. Apple’s Marketing…

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Why is Apple’s Marketing Just So Darn Good?

How Google Works – The Animated Infographic

how google works

So how does Google work? Have you always wanted to know? Well, you’re in luck, Google decided to disclose their “secret sauce” on April 1, 2002, by announcing “Pigeon Rank.” “PigeonRank’s success relies primarily on the superior trainability of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) and its unique capacity to recognize objects regardless of spatial orientation. The common gray pigeon can easily distinguish among items displaying only the minutest differences, an ability that enables it to select relevant web sites from among thousands of similar pages.” Sounds pretty unbelievable right? That’s because it is. If you’ll notice the date mentioned above,…

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How Google Works – The Animated Infographic

How to Blend Google Analytics & Crazy Egg for Conversion Boosting Glory

conversion boosting glory

Most A/B test and conversion optimization ideas have their beginnings in web analytics reports. And there are countless types of reports that can provide inspiration for meaningful A/B testing. But still, it is extremely hard to come up with a successful test hypothesis using only quantitative data. Why? Because it simply doesn’t tell you the whole story. To cite Avinash Kaushik: Web analytics will show you where your website is leaking money. But you need qualitative research to find out why it does so. This is where data from Crazy Egg heatmaps and scroll map reports comes in handy. It…

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How to Blend Google Analytics & Crazy Egg for Conversion Boosting Glory

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