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A Comprehensive Guide To UI Design

(This is a sponsored article.) With the big picture established — mapping user journeys and defining your design’s look and feel — my fifth article in this series of ten articles dives into the details of designing user interface components.
UX, IA, UI: All of these abbreviations can be confusing. In reality, as designers, we’ll often be working across these different specialisms: designing the overall user experience (UX), organizing information logically as we consider information architecture (IA), and considering the granular design of the user interface (UI).


A Comprehensive Guide To UI Design

Are You Marketing Kryptonite? Then Stop Trying to Persuade Without Telling a Story

Paul Smith had his work cut out for him. The associate director of Proctor Gamble’s market research department had just 20 minutes to make a successful pitch to upper management. He needed to secure additional funding for new research techniques. To that end, Smith spent the last three weeks fine-tuning his speech and perfecting his PowerPoint presentation. He couldn’t have done a better job at preparation. On the day of the meeting, company CEO A.G. Lafley entered the room, greeted everybody, and sat down to hear Smith’s speech. But Lafley didn’t look once at the screen displaying Smith’s PowerPoint slides….

The post Are You Marketing Kryptonite? Then Stop Trying to Persuade Without Telling a Story appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Are You Marketing Kryptonite? Then Stop Trying to Persuade Without Telling a Story

How to be a heavy hitter in enterprise e-commerce CRO

Reading Time: 8 minutes

There was a time when simply launching an A/B test was a big deal.

I remember my first test. It was a lead gen form. I completely redesigned it. I learned nothing. And it felt like I was on top of the world.

Today, things are different, especially if you’re a major e-commerce company doing high-volume conversion optimization in a team setting. The demands have shifted; the expectations are far greater. New tools are being created to solve new problems.

So what does it take to own enterprise e-commerce CRO in 2016 compared to before?

Make money during A/B tests

While “always be testing” is a great mantra, I have to ask, “is you ‘always be banking?’”

Most of us have been running tests that inform us first, and make money later. For example, you might run a test where you’ve got a clear winner, but it’s one of 5 other variations, so you’re only benefiting from it 20% of the time during the length of the experiment.

Furthermore, you may have 4 variations that are underperforming versus your Control, so you could even be losing money while you test. Imagine spending an entire year testing in that manner. You’d rarely be fully benefiting from your positive test results!

Of course, as part of a controlled experiment and in order to generate valid insights, it’s important to distribute traffic evenly and fairly between all variations (across multiple days of the week, etc).

But there also comes a time to be opportunistic.

Enter the multi-arm bandit (MAB) approach. MAB is an automated testing mechanism that diverts more traffic to better performing variations. Thresholds can be set to control how much better a variation has to perform before it is favored by the mechanism.

Hold your horses: MAB sounds amazing, but it is not the solution to all of your problems. It’s best reserved for times when the potential revenue gains outweigh the potential insights to be gained or the test has little long-term value.

Say, for example, you’re running a pre-Labor Day promotion and you’ve got a site-wide banner. This banner’s only going to be around for 5-10 days before you switch to the next holiday. So really, you just want to make the most of the opportunity and not think about it again until next year.

A bandit algorithm applied to an A/B test of your banner will help you find the best performer during the period of the experiment, and help generate the most revenue during the testing period.

While you may not be able to infer too many insights from the experiment, you should be able to generate more revenue than had you either not tested at all or gone with a traditional, even split test.

  • BEFORE: Test, analyze results, decide, implement, make money later.
  • TODAY: Test and make money while you’re at it.
  • When to do it: Best used in cases where what you learn is not that useful for the future.
  • When not to do it: Not necessarily the most useful for long-term testing programs.

Track long-term revenue gains

If you’ve been testing over the course of many months and years, accurately tracking and reporting your cumulative gains can become a serious challenge.

You’re most likely testing across different zones of your website – homepage, category page, product detail page, site-wide, checkout, etc. Multiply those zones by the number of viewport ranges you’re specifically testing on.

What do you do, sum up each individual increase and project out over the course of a year? Do you create an equation to calculate the combined effect of all of your tests? Do you avoid trying to report at all?

There isn’t one good solution, but rather a few options that all have their strengths and weaknesses:

The first, and easiest, is using a formula to determine combined results. You’ll want a strong mathematician to help you with this one. Personally, I always have a lingering doubt that none of what is being reported is accurate, even using conservative estimations. And as time goes on, things only get less accurate.

The second is to periodically re-test your original Control from the moment at which you started testing. Say, every 6 months, test your best performing variation against the Control you had 6 months prior. If you’ve been testing across the funnel, test the entire funnel in one experiment.

Yes, it will be difficult. Yes, your developers will hate you. And yes, you will be able to prove the value of your work in a very confident manner.

It’s best to run these sorts of tests with a duplicate of each variation (2 “old” Controls vs 2 best performers) just to add an extra layer of certainty when you look at your results. It goes without saying that you should run these experiments for as long as reasonably possible.

Another option is to always be testing your “original” Control vs your most recent best performer in a side experiment. Take 10% of your total traffic and segment it to a constantly running experiment that pits the original control version of your site against your latest best performer.

It’s an experiment running in the background, not affected by what you are currently testing. It should serve as a constant benchmark to calculate the total effect of all your tests, combined.

Technically, this will be a challenge. You’ll be asking a lot of your developers and your analytics people, and at one point, you may ask yourself if it’s all worth it. But in the end, you will have some awesome reports to show, demonstrating the ridiculous revenue you’ve generated through CRO.
Doubled revenue

  • BEFORE: Individual test gains, cumulated.
  • TODAY: Taking into consideration interaction effects, re-running Control vs combined new variations OR using a model to predict combined effect of tests.
  • When to do it: When you want to better estimate the combined effect of multiple testing wins.
  • When not to do it: When your tests are highly seasonal and can’t be combined OR when it becomes impossible from a technical perspective (hence the importance of doing so in a reasonable time frame—don’t wait 2 years to do it).

Track and distribute cumulative insights

If you do this right, you will learn a ton about your customers and how to increase your revenue in the future. Ideally, you should have a goody-bag of insights to look through whenever you’re in need of inspiration.

So, how do you track insights over time and revalidate them in subsequent experiments? Also, does Jenny in branding know about your latest insights into the importance of your product imagery? How do you get her on board and keep her up to date on a consistent basis?

Both of these challenges deserve attention.

The simplest “system” for tracking insights is via spreadsheet, with columns that codify insights by type, device, and any other useful criteria for browsing and grouping. This proves unscalable when you’re testing at high velocity. That’s where a custom platform comes into play that does the job of tracking and sharing insights.

For example, the team at The Next Web created in internal tool for tracking tests, insights, then easily sharing ideas via Slack. There are other publicly available options, most of which integrate with Optimizely or VWO.

  • BEFORE: Excel sheets, Powerpoint presentations, word of mouth, or nothing at all.
  • TODAY: A shared and tagged database of insights that link back to the experiments that generated them and is updated on the fly. Tools such as Experiment Engine, Effective Experiments, Iridion and Liftmap are all solving some part of this puzzle.
  • When to do it: When you’re learning a lot of valuable things, but having trouble tracking or sharing what you learn. (BTW, if you’re not having this problem, you might be doing something wrong.)
  • When not to do it: When the future is of little importance.

Code implementation-ready variations

High velocity testing doesn’t just mean quickly getting tests out the door; it means being able to implement winners immediately and move on. To make this possible, your test code has to be ready to implement, meaning:

  • Code should be modularized. Your scripts should be modularized into sections functionality and design changes.
  • If you’re doing it right, style changes should be done by applying classes rather than using javascript. All css should be in one file and class names should align with your website, ready to be added when your test is completed.


  • BEFORE: Messy jQuery.
  • TODAY: Modularized experiment code, separated css that aligns with classnames.
  • When to do it: When you wish to make the implementation process as painless as possible.
  • When not to do it: When you just don’t care.

Create FOOC-free variations

If your test variations “flicker” or “flash” as they load, you’re experiencing Flash of Original Content or FOOC. It will affect your results if it goes untreated. Some of the best ways to prevent it are as follows:

  • Place your code snippets as high as possible on the page.
  • Improve site load time in general (regardless of your testing tool).
  • Briefly hide the body or div element being tested.
  • Here are 8 more remedies to fight FOOC.
Don't code your variations like this.
Don’t code your variations like this.
  • BEFORE: FOOC-galore.
  • TODAY: FOOC-free variations abound.
  • When to do it: Always.
  • When not to do it: Never.

Don’t test buttons, test business decisions

Some people think of A/B testing as a way to improve the look of their website, while others use it to test the fundamentals of their business. Take advantage of the tools at your disposal to get to the heart of what makes your business tick.

For example, we tested reducing the product range of one of our clients and discovered that they could save millions on manufacturing and marketing without losing revenue. What are the big lingering questions you could answer through A/B testing?

  • BEFORE: Most of us tested button colors at one point or another.
  • TODAY: Business decisions are being validated through A/B tests.
  • When to do it: When business decisions can be tested online, in a controlled manner.
  • When not to do it: When most factors cannot be controlled for online, during the length of an A/B test.

Use data science to test predictions, not ideas

It is highly likely that you are underutilizing the customer analytics that are available to you. Most of us don’t have the team in place or the time to dig through the data constantly. But this could be costing you dearly in missed opportunities.

If you have access to a data scientist, even on a project-basis, you can uncover insights that will vastly improve the quality of your A/B test hypotheses.

Source: Become a data scientist in 8 steps: the infographic – DataCamp

  • BEFORE: Throwing spaghetti at the wall.
  • TODAY: Predictive analytics can uncover data-driven test hypotheses.
  • When to do it: When you’ve got lots of well-organized analytics data.
  • When not to do it: When you prefer the spaghetti method.

Optimize for volume of tests

There was a time when “always be testing” was enough. These days, it’s about “always be testing in 100 different places at once.” This creates new challenges:

How do you test in multiple parts of the same funnel synchronously without concern for cross pollination?

How do you organize your human resources in a way to get all the work done?

This is the art of being a conversion optimization project manager: knowing how to juggle speed vs value of insights and considering resource availability. At WiderFunnel, we do a few things that help make sure we go as fast as possible without sacrificing insights:

  • We stagger “difficult” experiments with “easy” ones so that production can be completed on “difficult” ones while “easy” ones are running.
  • We integrate with testing tool APIs to quickly generate coding templates, meaning our development doesn’t need to do any manual work before starting to code variations.
  • We use detailed briefs to keep everyone on the same page and reduce gaps in communication.
  • We schedule experiments based on “insight flow” so that earlier experiments help inform subsequent ones.
  • We use algorithms to control for cross-pollination so that multiple tests within the same funnel can be run while being able to segment any cross-pollinated visitors.


  • BEFORE: Running one experiment at a time.
  • TODAY: Running experiments across devices, segments, and funnels.
  • When to do it: When you’ve got the traffic, conversions and the team to make it happen.
  • When not to do it: When there aren’t enough conversions to go around for all of your tests.

Don’t get stuck in the optimization ways of the past. The industry is moving quickly, and the only way to stay ahead of your competitors (who are also testing) is to always be improving your conversion optimization program.

Bring your testing strategies into the modern era by mastering the 8 tactics outlined above. You’re an optimizer, after all―it’s only fitting that you optimize your optimization.

Do you agree with this list? Are there other aspects of modern-era CRO not listed here? Share your thoughts in the comments!

The post How to be a heavy hitter in enterprise e-commerce CRO appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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How to be a heavy hitter in enterprise e-commerce CRO

Lessons Learned From A First-Time Appreneur

There are over 2 million iOS apps and almost as many Android apps in the growing app economy. However, for every Flappy Bird app that gets lucky and goes viral, there are thousands of apps that take time and hard work to launch and persistence to maintain, grow and avoid the app graveyard. While we typically hear about overnight success stories, this article explores the more typical experience of an appreneur, or app entrepreneur.

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Lessons Learned From A First-Time Appreneur

Keynote Animation – How To Prototype UI

Whether it’s playful refresh states, subtle icon movements or complex transitions, beautiful animation is all around us.
Once considered an aesthetic luxury, animation is now used so commonly in modern web and mobile applications that entire websites are dedicated to UI animation patterns.
Further reading on Smashing: UI Animation Guidelines and Examples How To Integrate Motion Design In The UX Workflow Smart Transitions In User Experience Design Designing Navigation On Mobile: Prototyping With Keynote While animations may have great visual appeal, they also make app experiences more intuitive and engaging.

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Keynote Animation – How To Prototype UI

Think Your App Is Beautiful? Not Without User Experience Design

Lately, every app is “beautiful”. If you read tech news, you’ve seen this pageant: Beautiful charts and graphs. Beautifulstories. Beautiful texting. Beautiful notebooks. Beautiful battery information.
Aspiring to beauty in our designs is admirable. But it doesn’t guarantee usability, nor is it a product or marketing strategy. Like “simple” and “easy” before it, “beautiful” says very little about the product. How many people, fed up with PowerPoint, cry out in frustration, “If only it were more beautiful”?


Think Your App Is Beautiful? Not Without User Experience Design

A User In Total Control Is A Designer’s Nightmare

How do you balance the creative control you give to the users, the usability of the product they make with your tool and the flexibility of that tool?
We designers have always had a problem of handing over creative control to the general population — the basic users. There are two reasons for this. The first is obvious: We are the ones who are supposed to know the principles of design and usability.

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A User In Total Control Is A Designer’s Nightmare

Why Transitions Are Important

Life and nature are one big transition. The sun slowly rises to mark a new day and then slowly sets to mark the end of the day and the beginning of night. We are created in the womb and from small cells we grow, are born and gradually age until we die. [Links checked March/16/2017]
Perhaps these natural transitions in life are what make artificial transitions feel… well, right. Sometimes, though, when something jumps from one state to another, it feels OK but doesn’t quite feel right.

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Why Transitions Are Important

Starting Out Organized: Website Content Planning The Right Way

So many articles explain how to design interfaces, design graphics and deal with clients. But one step in the Web development process is often skipped over or forgotten altogether: content planning. Sometimes called information architecture, or IA planning, this step doesn’t find a home easily in many people’s workflow. But rushing on to programming and pushing pixels makes for content that looks shoehorned rather than fully integrated and will only require late-game revisions.

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Starting Out Organized: Website Content Planning The Right Way

10 Things To Consider When Choosing The Perfect CMS

Choosing a content management system can be tricky. Without a clearly defined set of requirements, you will be seduced by fancy functionality that you will never use. What then should you look for in a CMS?
I have written about content management systems before. I have highlighted the their hidden costs, explained the differentiators behind the feature list and even provided advice for CMS users. However, I have never actually asked what features you should look for in a content management system.

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10 Things To Consider When Choosing The Perfect CMS