Tag Archives: process

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What is Customer Retention, Importance, Examples & Techniques

customer-retention-introduction

Your best customers don’t just buy one product or use your service once. They come back again and again for more. Customer retention increases your customers’ lifetime value and boosts your revenue. It also helps you build amazing relationships with your customers. You aren’t just another website or store. They trust you with their money because you give them value in exchange. What what does customer retention mean? And how can you achieve customer retention through relationship-building strategies? Let’s explore these concepts in depth and look at a few examples that you can apply to your own business. What is…

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What is Customer Retention, Importance, Examples & Techniques

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Getting Started With Machine Learning




Getting Started With Machine Learning

Alvin Wan



The goal of machine learning is to find patterns in data and use those patterns to make predictions. It can also give us a framework to discuss machine learning problems and solutions — as you’ll see in this article.

First, we will start with definitions and applications for machine learning. Then, we will discuss abstractions in machine learning and use that to frame our discussion: data, models, optimization models, and optimization algorithms. Later on in the article, we will discuss fundamental topics that underlie all machine learning methods and conclude with practical guidance for getting started with using machine learning. By the end, you should have an understanding of how to advance your practice and study of machine learning.

Let’s begin.

So, What Exactly Is Machine Learning?

Machine learning is generically a set of techniques to find patterns in data. Applications range from self-driving cars to personal AI assistants, from translating between French and Taiwanese to translating between voice and text. There are a few common applications of machine learning that already or could potentially permeate your day-to-day.

  1. Detecting anomalies
    Recognize spikes in website traffic or highlight abnormal bank activity.
  2. Recommend similar content
    Find products you may be looking for or even Smashing Magazine articles that are relevant.
  3. Predict the future
    Plan the path of neighboring vehicles or identify and extrapolate market trends for stocks.

The above are few of many applications of machine learning, but most applications tie back to learning the underlying distribution of data. A distribution specifies events and probability of each event. For example:

  • With 50% probability, you buy an item $5 or less.
  • With 25% probability, you buy an item $5-$10.
  • With 24% probability, you buy an item $10-100.
  • With 1% probability, you buy an item > $100.

Using this distribution, we can accomplish all of our tasks above:

  1. Detecting anomalies
    With a $100 purchase, we can confidently call this an anomaly.
  2. Recommend similar content
    A purchase of $3 means we should recommend more items $5 or less.
  3. Predict the future
    Without any prior information, we can predict that the next purchase will be $5 or less.

With a distribution of data, we can accomplish a myriad of tasks. In sum, one goal in machine learning is to learn this distribution.

Even more generically, our goal is to learn a specific function with particular inputs and outputs. We call this function our model. Our input is denoted x. Say our model, which accepts input x, is

f(x) = ax

Here, a is a parameter of our model. Each parameter corresponds to a different instance of our model. In other words, the model where a=2 is different from the model where a=3. In machine learning, our goal is to learn this parameter, changing it until we do “well.” How do we determine which values of a do “well”?

We need to define a way to evaluate our model, for each parameter a. To start, the output of f(x) is our prediction. We will refer to y as our label, meaning the true and desired output. With our predictions and our labels, we can define a loss function. One such loss function is simply the difference between our prediction and our label, |f(x) - y|. Using this loss function, we can then evaluate different parameters for our model. Picking the best parameter for our model is known as training. If we have a few possible parameters, we can simply try each parameter and pick the one with the smallest loss!

However, most problems are not as simple. What happens if there are an infinite number of different parameters? Let’s say all decimal values between 0 and 1? Between 0 and infinity? This brings us to our next topic: abstractions in machine learning. We will discuss different facets of machine learning, to compartmentalize your knowledge into data, models, objectives, and methods of solving objectives. Beyond learning the right parameter, there are plenty of other challenges: how do we break down a problem as complex as controlling a robot? How do we control a self-driving car? What does it mean to train a model that identifies faces? The section below will help you organize answers to these questions.

Abstractions

There are countless topics in machine learning — at various levels of specificity. To better understand where each piece fits in the larger picture, consider the following abstractions for machine learning. These abstractions compartmentalize our discussion of machine learning topics, and knowing them will make it easier for you to frame topics. The following classifications are taken from Professor Jonathan Shewchuck at UC Berkeley:

  1. Application and Data
    Consider the possible inputs and the desired output for the problem.
    Questions: What is your goal? How is your data structured? Are there labels? Is it reasonable for us to extract output from the provided inputs?

    Example: The goal is to classify pictures of handwritten digits. The input is an image of a handwritten number. The output is a number.

  2. Model
    Determine the class of functions under consideration.
    Questions: Are linear functions sufficient? Quadratic functions? Polynomials? What types of patterns are we interested in? Are neural networks appropriate? Logistic regression?

    Example: Linear regression

  3. Optimization Problem
    Formulate a concrete objective in mathematics.
    Questions: How do we define loss? How do we define success? Should we apply additionally penalties to bias our algorithm? Are there imbalances in the data our objective needs to consider?

    Example: Find `x` that minimizes |Ax-b|^2

  4. Optimization Algorithm
    Determine how you will solve the optimization problem.
    Questions: Can we compute a solution by hand? Do we need an iterative algorithm? Can we convert this problem to an equivalent but easier-to-solve objective, and solve that one?

    Example: Take derivative of the function. Set it to zero. Solve for our optimal parameter.

Abstraction 1: Data

In practice, collecting, managing, and packaging data is 90% of the battle. The data contains samples in which each sample is a specific realization of our input. For example, our input may generically be images of dogs. The first sample is specifically a picture of Maxie, my Bernese Mountain dog-chow chow mix at home. The second sample is specifically a picture of Charlie, a young corgi.

While training your model, it is important to handle your data properly. This means separating our data accordingly and not peeking prematurely at any set of data. In general, our data is split into three portions:

  1. Training set
    This is the dataset you train your model on. The model may see this set hundreds of times.
  2. Validation set
    This is the dataset you evaluate your model on, to assess accuracy and tune your model or method accordingly.
  3. Test set
    This is the dataset you evaluate on to assess accuracy, once at the very end. Running on the test set prematurely could mean your model overfits to the test set as well, so run only once. We will discuss the notion of “overfitting” in more detail below.

Abstraction 2: Models

Machine learning methods are split into the following two:

Supervised Learning

In supervised learning, our algorithm has access to labeled data. Still, we explore the following two classes of problems:

  • Classification
    Determine which of k classes C_1, C_2, ... C_k to which each sample belongs, e.g. “Which breed of dog is this?” The dog could be one of "corgi", "bernese mountain dog", "chow chow"...
  • Regression
    Determine a real-valued output (which are often probabilities), e.g. “What is the probability this patient has neuroblastoma (eye cancer)?”
Unsupervised Learning

In unsupervised learning, our algorithm does not have access to labels, and we explore the following classes of problems:

  • Clustering
    Cluster samples into k clusters. We do not have a label for the resulting clusters. “Which DNA sequences are most similar?”
  • Dimensionality reduction
    Reduce the number of “unique” (linearly independent) features we consider. “What are common features of faces?”

Abstraction 3: Optimization Objective

Before discussing optimization objectives and algorithms, we’ll need an example to discuss. Least squares are the canonical example. We will restrict our attention to a specific form of least squares: Let us return to our grade-school problem of fitting a line to some points.

Let’s recall the equation of a line:

y = m * x + b

Assume we have such a line. This is the true underlying model.


 true model


True model. The line that generates our data. (Large preview)

Now, sample points from this line.


true data


True data. Data that is sampled from the true model. (Large preview)

For each point, jiggle it a little bit. In other words, add noise, which is random perturbations. This noise is due to real-world processes.


noise


Noise. Real-world perturbations that affect our data. This may be due to imprecision in measurements, lossy compression, and so on. (Large preview)

This gives us our observed data. We will call these points (x_1, y_1), (x_2, y_2), (x_3, y_3).... This is the training data we are given to train a model on. We do not have access to the underlying line that generated this data (the original green line).


observations


Observations. Our true data with noise and ultimately what we will use to train a model. (Large preview)

Say we have an estimate for the parameters of a line. In this case, the parameters are m and b. This gives us a predicted line, drawn in blue below.


proposed model


Proposed model. The result of training a model on our observations. (Large preview)

We wish to evaluate our blue line, to see how accurate it is. To start, we use m and b to estimate y. We compute a set of ŷ values.

ŷ_i = m * x_i + b

The error for a single predicted ŷ_i and true y_i is simply

(ŷ_i−y_i)^2

Our total error is then the sum of squared differences, across all samples. This yields our loss.

∑(ŷ_i−y_i)^2

Presented visually, this is the vertical distance between our observed points and our predicted line.


observed error


Observed error. The distance between our observed data and our proposed model. (Large preview)

Plugging in ŷ_i from above, we then have the total error in terms of m and b.

∑(m * x_i + b − y_i)^2

Finally, we want to minimize this quantity. This yields our objective function, abstraction 3 from our list of abstractions above.

min_m, b ∑(m * x_i + b−y_i)^2

The above states in mathematics that the goal is to minimize the loss by changing values of m and b. The purpose of this section was to motivate fitting a line of best of fit, a special case of least squares. Additionally, we showed examined the least squares objective. Next, we need to solve this objective.

Abstraction 4: Optimization Algorithm

How do we minimize this? We take the derivative with respect to m`, set to 0 and solve. After solving, we obtain the analytical solution. Solving for an analytical solution was our optimization algorithm, the fourth and final abstraction in our list of abstractions.

Note: The important portion of this section is to inform you that least squares have a closed form solution, meaning that the optimal solution for our problem can be computed, explicitly. To understand why this is significant, we need to examine a problem without a closed-form solution. For example, we could never solve x=logx for a standard base-10 logarithm. Try graphing these two lines, and we see that they never intersect. In which case, we have no closed-form solution. On the other hand, ordinary least squares have a closed-form — which is good news. For any problem reduced to least squares, we can then compute the optimal solution, given our data and assumptions.

Fundamental Topics

Before studying more methods, it is necessary to understand the undercurrents of machine learning. These will govern the initial study of machine learning:

Bias-Variance Tradeoffs

One of machine learning’s most dreaded evils is overfitting in which a model is too closely tailored to the training data. In the limit, the most overfit model will memorize the data. This might mean that if one does well on exam A, one repeats every detail for exam B — down to the duration of an inter-exam restroom trip and whether or not one used the urinal.

A related but less common evil is underfitting, where the model is not sufficiently expressive to capture important information in the data. This could mean that one looks only at homework scores to predict exam scores, ignoring the effects of reading notes, completing practice exams, and more. Our goal is to build a model that generalizes to new examples while making the appropriate distinctions.

Given these two evils, there are a variety of approaches to fighting both. One is modifying your optimization objective to include a term that penalizes model complexity. Another is tuning hyperparameters that govern either your objective or your algorithm, which may correspond to notions such as “training speed” or “momentum.” The bias-variance tradeoff gives us a precise way of defining and handling both overfitting and underfitting.

Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) + Maximum A Posteriori (MAP)

Say we have ice cream flavors A, B, and C. We observe different recipes. Our goal is to predict which flavor each recipe produces.

One way to predict flavors based on recipes is to first estimate the following probability:

P(flavor|recipe)

Given this probability and a new recipe, how can we predict the flavor? Given a recipe, simply consider the probability of each of the flavors A, B, C.

P(flavor=A|recipe) = 0.4
P(flavor=B|recipe) = 0.5
P(flavor=C|recipe) = 0.1

Then, pick the flavor that has the highest probability. Above, flavor B has the highest probability, given our recipe. Thus, we predict flavor B. Restating the above rule in mathematics, we have:

argmax_flavor P(flavor|recipe)  # argmax means take the flavor that corresponds to the max value

However, the only information at our disposal is the reverse: the probability of some recipe given the flavor.

P(recipe|flavor)

For Maximum Likelihood Estimates, we make assumptions and find that the two values are proportional.

P(recipe|flavor) ~ P(flavor|recipe)

Since we’re only interested in the class with maximum probability P(flavor|recipe), we can simply find the class with maximum probability, for a proportional value P(recipe|flavor).

argmax_flavor P(recipe|flavor)

MLE offers the above objective as one way to predict, using the probability of data given the labels.

However, allow me to convince you that it’s reasonable to assume we have (x|y). We can estimate this from observed, real-world data. For example, say we wish to estimate the number of marbles each student in your class carries, based on the number of rubber ducks the student carries.

Each student’s number of rubber ducks is the data x, and the number of marbles she or he has is y. We will use this sample data below.

| x | y |
|---|---|
| 1 | 2 |
| 1 | 1 |
| 1 | 2 |
| 2 | 1 |
| 2 | 2 |
| 1 | 2 |

For every y, we can compute the number of x, given us P(x|y). For the first one, P(x=1|y=1), consider all of the rows where y=1. There are 2, and only one of them has x=1. Therefore, P(x=1|y=1) = 12. We can repeat this for all values of x and y.

P(x=1|y=1) = 1/2
P(x=2|y=1) = 1/2
P(x=1|y=2) = 3/4
P(x=2|y=2) = 1/4

Featurizations, Regularization

Least squares draw lines of best fit for us. Note that least squares can fit the model anytime the model is linear in its inputs x and outputs y.

Say m=1. We have the following equation:

y = x + b

However, what if we had data that doesn’t generally follow a line? Specifically, consider a set of data sampled along a circle. Recall that the equation for a circle is:

x^2 + y^2 = r^2

Can least squares fit this well? As it stands, no. The model is not linear in its inputs x and outputs y. Instead, the model above is quadratic in x and y. However, it turns out that we can use still use least squares, just with a modification. To accomplish this, we featurize our samples.

Consider the following: what if the input to our model was x_ = x^2 and y_ = y^2? Then, our model is trying to learn the following model.

x_ + y_ = r^2

Is this linear in the model’s input x_ and output y_? Yes. Note the subtlety. The current model is still quadratic in x,y but it is linear in x_,y_. This means that least squares can fit the data if we square x^2 and y^2 before training least squares.

More generally, we can take any non-linear featurization to apply least squares to labels that are non-linear in the features. This is a fairly powerful tool, known as featurization.

However, featurizations lead to more complex models. Regularization allows us to penalize model complexity, ensuring that we do not overfit the training data.

Conclusion

In this article, you’ve touched on major topics in the fundamentals of machine learning. Using the abstractions above, you now have a framework to discuss machine learning problems and solutions. Using the fundamental topics above, you now also have quintessential concepts to learn more about, giving you the necessary tools to evaluate risk and other concerns in a machine learning application.

Further Reading

We will continue to explore these topics in depth, both the undercurrents of machine learning and specific methods. In the interim, here are resources to further your study and exploration of machine learning:

Smashing Editorial
(ra, il)


Continue reading here: 

Getting Started With Machine Learning

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Website Speed Optimization: Guide to the Best Techniques (2018)

website-speed-optimization-guide

We live in a fast-paced world. People want things as quickly as possible — and they’re unhappy when something takes too long. Website speed optimization takes away one barrier between you and your audience. Think about the last time you encountered a slow-loading website. You might have closed out the browser tab entirely or felt less inclined to patronize the site once it finally loaded. Google understands that consumers want fast access to information, products, and services. Consequently, it rewards websites that load quickly. Let’s take a look at a few ways in which you can use website speed optimization…

The post Website Speed Optimization: Guide to the Best Techniques (2018) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Website Speed Optimization: Guide to the Best Techniques (2018)

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A Brief Guide About Competitive Analysis




A Brief Guide About Competitive Analysis

Mayur Kshirsagar



In this article, I will introduce the subject of competitive analysis, which is basically a method to determine how well your competitors are performing. My aim is to introduce the subject to those of you who are new to the concept. It should be useful if you are new to product design, UX, interaction or digital design, or if you have experience in these fields but have not performed a competitive analysis before.

No prior knowledge of the topic is needed because I’ll be explaining what the term means and how to perform a competitive analysis as we go. I am assuming some basic knowledge of the design process and UX research, but I’ll provide plenty of practical examples and reference links to help with any terms and concepts you might be unfamiliar with.

Note: If you are a beginner in UX and interaction design, it would be good to know the basics of the design process and to know what is UX research (and the methods used for UX research) before diving into the article’s main topic. Please read the next section carefully because I’ve added reference links to help you get started.

Recommended reading: Standing Out From The Crowd: Improving Your Mobile App With Competitive Analysis

Competitive Analysis, Service Design Cycle, Five-Stages Design Process

If you are a UX designer, then you might be aware of the service design cycle. This cycle contains four stages: discover, explore, test and listen. Each one of these stages has multiple research methods, and competitive analysis is part of the exploration. Susan Farrell has very helpfully distinguished different UX research methods and activities that can be performed for your project. (You can check this detailed segregation in her “UX Research Cheat Sheet”.)

The image below shows the four steps and the most commonly used methods in these steps.




(Large preview)

If you are new to this concept, you might first ask, “What is service design?” Shahrzad Samadzadeh explains it very well in her article, “So, Like, What Is Service Design?.”

Note: You can also learn more about service design in Sarah Gibbons’s article, “Service Design 101.”

Often, UX designers follow the five-stages design process in their projects:

  1. empathize,
  2. define,
  3. ideate,
  4. prototype,
  5. test.

The five-stages design process.


The five-stages design process. (Large preview)

Please don’t confuse the five-stages design process with the service design cycle. Basically, they serve the same purpose in the design thinking process, but are explained in different styles. Here is a brief explanation of what these five stages contain:

  • Empathize
    This stage involves gaining a clear understanding of the problem you are trying to solve from the user’s point of view.
  • Define
    This stage involves defining the correct statement for the problem you are trying to solve, using the knowledge you gained in the first stage.
  • Ideate
    In this stage, you can generate different solution ideas for the problem.
  • Prototype
    Basically, a prototype is an attempt to give your solution some form so that it can be explained to others. For digital products, a prototype could be a wireframe set created using pen and paper or using a tool such as Balsamiq or Sketch, or it could be a visual design prototype created using a tool such as Sketch, Figma, Adobe XD or InVision.
  • Test
    Testing involves validating and evaluating all of your solutions with the users.

You can perform UX research at any stage. Many articles and books are available for you to learn more about this design process. “Five Stages in the Design Thinking Process” by Rikke Dam and Teo Siang is one of my favorite articles on the topic.


The most frequent methods used by UX professionals during the exploration stage of the design life cycle


The most frequent methods used by UX professionals during the exploration stage of the design life cycle. (Nielsen Norman Group, “User Experience Careers” survey report) (Large preview)

According to Nielsen Norman Group’s “User Experience Careers” survey report, 61% of UX professionals prefer to do the competitive analysis for their projects. But what exactly is competitive analysis? In simple language, competitive analysis is nothing but a method to determine how your competitors are performing, what they are offering and how well they are doing it.

Sometimes, competitive analysis is referred as competitive usability evaluation.

Why Should You Do A Competitive Analysis?

There are many reasons to do a competitive analysis, but I think the most important reason is that it helps us to understand the rights and wrongs of our own product or service.

Using competitive analysis, you can make decisions based on knowledge of what is currently working well for your users, rather than based on guesses or intuition. In doing competitive analysis, you can also identify risks in your product or service and use those insights to add value to it.

Recently, I was working on a project in which I did a competitive analysis of a feature (collaborative meeting note-taking) that a client wanted to introduce in their web app. Note-taking is not exactly a new or highly innovative thing, so the biggest challenge I was facing was to make this functionality simpler and easier to handle, because the product I was working on was in the very early stages of development. The feature, in a nutshell, was to create a simple text document where some interactive action items could be added.

Because a ton of apps are out there that allow you to create simple text documents, I decided to do a competitive analysis for this functionality. (I’ll explain this process in more detail later in the section “Five Easy Steps to Do a Competitive Analysis”.)

How To Find The Right Competitors?

Basically, there are two types of competitors: direct and indirect. As a UX designer, your role is to study the designs of these competitors.

Jaime Levy gives very good definitions of direct and indirect competitors in her book UX Strategy. You can learn more about competitive analysis (and types of competitors) in chapter 4 of the book, “Conducting Competitive Research”.


Types of competitors


Types of competitors. (Large preview)

Direct competitors are the ones who offer the same, or a very similar, set of features to your current or future customers, which means they are solving a similar problem to the one you are trying to solve, for a customer base that you are targeting as well.

Indirect competitors are the ones who offers a similar set of features but to a different customer segment; or, they target your exact customer base without offering the exact same set of features, which means indirect competitors are solving the same problem but for a different customer base, or are solving the same problem but offer a different solution.

You can search for these types of competitors online (by doing a simple web search), or you can directly ask your current and potential customers what they are using already. You can also look for your direct and indirect competitors on websites such as Crunchbase and Product Hunt, and you can search for them in the Google Play and the iOS App Store.

Five Easy Steps To Do A Competitive Analysis

You can perform a competitive analysis for your existing or new product using the following five-step process.


5 steps to do a competitive analysis


5 steps to do a competitive analysis. (Large preview)

1. Define And Understand The Goals

Defining and understanding the goal is an integral part of any UX research process. You must define an accurate goal (or set of goals) for your research; otherwise, there is a chance you’ll get the wrong outcome.

Draft all of your goals right before starting your process. When defining your goals, consider the following questions: Why are you doing this competitive analysis? What kind of outcome do you expect? Will this analysis affect UX decisions?

Remember: When setting up goals for any kind of UX research, be as specific as possible.

I mentioned earlier that I recently performed a competitive analysis for a collaborative meeting note-taking feature, to be introduced in the app that I was developing for a client. The goals for my research were very general because innumerable apps all provide this type of functionality, and the product I was working on was in the very early stages of development.

Even though your research goals might be simple, make them as specific as possible, and write them all down. Writing down your goals will help you stay on the right track.

The goals for my analysis were more like questions for which I was trying to find the answers. Here is the list of goals I set for this research:

  • Which apps do users prefer for note-taking? And why do they prefer them?
    Goal: To find out the user’s behavior with these apps, their preferences and their comfort zone.
  • What is the working mechanism of these apps?
    Goal: To find how out competitors’ apps work, so that we can identify their pros and cons.
  • What are the “star” features of these apps?
    Goal: To identify functionalities that we were trying to introduce as well, to see whether they already exist and, if they exist, how exactly they were implemented.
  • How comfortable does a user feel when using these apps?
    Goal: To identify user loyalty and engagement in the apps of our competitors.
  • How does collaborative editing work in these competitive apps?
    Goal: To identify how collaborative-editing functionality works and to study its technical aspects.
  • What is the visual structure and user interface of these apps?
    Goal: To check the visual look and feel of the apps (user interface and interaction).

2. Find The Right Competitors

After setting the goals, go on a search and make a list of both direct and indirect competitors. It’s not necessary to analyze all of the competitors you find. The number is completely up to you. Some people suggest analyzing at least two to four competitors, while others suggest five to ten or more.

Finding the right competitors for my research wasn’t a hard task because I already knew many apps that provided similar features, but I still did a quick search on Google, and the results were a bit surprising — surprising because most of the apps I knew turned out to be more like indirect competitors to the app I was working on; and later, after a bit more searching, I also found the apps that were our direct competitors.

Putting each competitor in the right list is a very important part of competitive analysis because the features and functionality in your competitors’ apps are based on exactly what users of those apps want. Let’s assume you put one indirect competitor, XYZ, under the “direct competitors” list and start doing your analysis. While doing the research, you might find some impressive feature in XYZ’s app and decide to add a similar feature in your own app; then, later it turns out that the feature you added is not useful for the users you are targeting. You might end up wasting a lot of energy, time and money building something that is not at all useful. So, be careful when sorting your competitors.

For my research, the competitors were as follows:

  • Direct competitorsQuip, Cisco Spark Meeting Notes, Workboard, Lucid Meeting, Less Meeting, MeetingSense, Minute-it, etc.
    • All of the apps above provide the same type of functionality, which we were trying to introduce for almost the same type of user base.
  • Indirect competitorsEvernote, Google Keep, Google Docs, Microsoft Word, Microsoft OneNote and other traditional note-taking apps and pen-paper note-taking methods.
    • The user base for all of the above is not exactly different from the user base we were targeting, but most of the users we were targeting were using these apps because they were unaware of the more convenient ways to take meeting notes.

3. Make A Competitive Analysis Matrix

A competitive analysis matrix is not complex, just a simple spreadsheet. You can use Microsoft Excel, Google Sheets, Apple Numbers or any other tool you are comfortable with.

First, divide all competitors you’ve found into two groups (direct and indirect) and put them in a spreadsheet. Jamie Levy suggests making the following columns:

  1. competitor’s name,
  2. URL,
  3. login credentials,
  4. purpose,
  5. year founded.

Example of competitive analysis matrix spreadsheet from UX Strategy, Jaime Levy’s book.


Example of competitive analysis matrix spreadsheet from UX Strategy, Jaime Levy’s book. (Large preview)

I would recommend digging a bit deeper and adding a few more columns, such as for “unique features”, “pros and cons”, etc. It would help to summarize your analysis. It’s not necessary to set your columns exactly as mentioned above. You can modify the columns to your own research goals and needs.

For my analysis, I created only four columns. My competitive analysis matrix looked as follows:

  • Competitor nameIn this column, I put the names of all of the competitors.
  • URLThese are website links or app download links for these competitors.
  • Features/commentsIn this column, I put all of my comments, some ”star” features I needed to focus on, and the pros and cons of the competitor. I color-coded the cells so that later I (or anyone viewing the matrix) could easily identify the difference between them. For example, I used light yellow for features, light purple for comments, green for pros and red for cons.
  • Screenshots/video linksIn this column, I put all of the screenshots and videos related to the features and comments mentioned in the third column. This way, it became very easy and quick to understand what a particular comment or feature was all about.



(Large preview)

4. Write A Summary And An Analysis

Once you are done with the analysis matrix spreadsheet, move on and create a summary of your findings. Be as specific as possible, and try to answer all of your questions while setting up a goal or during the overall process.

This will help you and your team members and stakeholders make the right design and UX decisions. This summary will also help you find new design and UX opportunities in the product you’re building.

In writing the summary and the presentation for the competitive analysis that I did for this collaborative note-taking app, the competitive analysis matrix helped me a lot. I drafted a document with all of the high-level takeaways from this analysis and answered all of the questions that were set as goals. For the presentation, I shared the document with the client, which helped both the client and me to finalize the features, the flows and the end requirements for the product.

5. Presentation

The last step of your competitive analysis is the presentation. It’s not a typical slideshow presentation — rather, just share all of the data and information you collected throughout the process with your teammates, stakeholders and/or clients.

Getting feedback from everywhere you can and being open to this feedback is a very important part of the designer’s workflow. So, share all of your finding with your teammates, stakeholders and clients, and ask for their opinion. You might find some missing points in your analysis or discover something new and exciting from someone’s feedback.

Conclusion

We live in a data-driven world, and we should build products, services and apps based on data, rather than our intuition (or guesswork).

As UX designers, we should go out there and collect as much data as possible before building a real product. This data will help us to create a solid product that users will want to use, rather than a product we want or imagine. These kinds of products are more likely to succeed in the market. Competitive analysis is one of the ways to get this data and to create a user-friendly product.

Finally, no matter what kind of product you are building or research you are conducting, always try to put yourself in the users’ shoes every now and then. This way, you will be able to identify the users’ struggles and ultimately deliver a better solution.

I hope this article has helped you plan and make your first competitive analysis for your next project!

Further Reading

If you want to become a better UX, interaction, visual (UI) or product designer, there are a lot of sources from which you can learn — articles, books, online courses. I often check the following few: Smashing Magazine, InVision blog, Interaction Design Foundation, NN Group and UX Mastery. These websites have a very good collection of articles on the topics of UI and UX design and UX research.

Here are some additional resources:

Smashing Editorial
(mb, ra, al, yk, il)


Excerpt from – 

A Brief Guide About Competitive Analysis

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Best Practices For Mobile Form Design




Best Practices For Mobile Form Design

Nick Babich



(This article is kindly sponsored by Adobe.) Forms are the linchpin of all mobile interactions; it stands between the person and what they’re looking for. Every day, we use forms for essential online activities. Recall the last time you bought a ticket, booked a hotel room or made a purchase online — most probably those interactions contained a step with filling out a form.

Forms are just a means to an end. Users should be able to complete them quickly and without confusion. In this article, you’ll learn practical techniques that will help you design an effective form.

What Makes For An Effective Form

The primary goal with every form is completion. Two factors have a major impact on completion rate:

  • Perception of complexity
    The first thing users do when they see a new form is estimate how much time is required to complete it. Users do this by scanning the form. Perception plays a crucial role in the process of estimation. The more complex a form looks, the more likely users will abandon the process.
  • Interaction cost
    Interaction cost is the sum of efforts — both cognitive and physical — that the users put into interacting with an interface in order to reach their goal. Interaction cost has a direct connection with form usability. The more effort users have to make to complete a form, the less usable the form is. A high interaction cost could be the result of data that is difficult to input, an inability to understand the meaning of some questions, or confusion about error messages.

The Components Of Forms

A typical form has the following five components:

  • Input fields
    These include text fields, password fields, checkboxes, radio buttons, sliders and any other fields designed for user input.
  • Field labels
    These tell users what the corresponding input fields mean.
  • Structure
    This includes the order of fields, the form’s appearance on the page, and the logical connections between different fields.
  • Action buttons
    The form will have at least one call to action (the button that triggers data submission).
  • Feedback
    Feedback notifies the user about the result of an operation. Feedback can be positive (for example, indicating that the form was submitted successfully) or negative (saying something like, “The number you’ve provided is incorrect”).

This article covers many aspects related to structure, input fields, labels, action buttons and validation. Most points mentioned in this article have visual do and don’t examples; all such examples were created using Adobe XD.

Input Fields

When it comes to form design, the most important thing a designer can do is to minimize the need for typing. Reducing input effort is essential. Designers can achieve this goal by focusing on form field design.

Minimize The Total Number Of Fields

Every field you ask users to fill out requires some effort. The more effort is needed to fill out a form, the less likely users will complete the form. That’s why the foundational rule of form design is shorter is better — get rid of all inessential fields.

Baymard Institute analyzed checkout forms and found that a too long or too complicated checkout process is one of the top reasons for abandonment during checkout. The study found that the average checkout contains almost 15 form fields. Most online services could reduce the number of fields displayed by default by 20 to 60%.




Top reasons for abandonment during checkout. (Image: Baymard Institute) (Large preview)

Many designers are familiar with the “less is more” rule; still, they ask additional questions in an attempt to gather more data about their users. It might be tempting to collect more data about your users during the initial signup, but resist that temptation. Think about it this way: With every additional field you add to your form, you increase the chance of losing a prospective user. Is the information you gain from a field worth losing new users? Remember that, as long as you’ve collected a user’s contact information, you can always follow up with a request for more data.

Clearly Distinguish All Optional Fields

Before optimizing optional fields, ask yourself whether you really need to include them in your form. Think about what information you really need, not what you want. Ideally, the number of optional fields in your form should be zero.

If after a brainstorming session, you still want to include a few optional questions in your form, make it clear for users that those fields are optional:

  • Mark optional fields instead of mandatory ones.
    If you ask as little as possible, then the vast majority of fields in your form will be mandatory. Therefore, mark only those fields in the minority. For instance, if five out of six fields are mandatory, then it makes sense to mark only one field as optional.
  • Use the “Optional” label to denote optional fields.
    Avoid using the asterisk (*) to mean “optional.” Not all users will associate the asterisk with optional information, and some users will be confused by the meaning (an asterisk is often used to denote mandatory fields).

Clearly distinguish all optional fields.


Clearly distinguish all optional fields. (Large preview)

Size Fields Accordingly

When possible, use field length as an affordance. The length of an input field should be in proportion to the amount of information expected in the field. The size of the field will act as a visual constraint — the user will know how much text is expected to be entered just by looking at the field. Generally, fields such as ones for area codes and house numbers should be shorter than ones for street addresses.


The size of a field is used as a visual constraint.


The size of a field is used as a visual constraint. (Large preview)

Offer Field Focus

Auto-focus the first input field in your form. Auto-focusing a field gives the user an indication and a starting point, so that they are able to quickly start filling out the form. By doing that, you reduce the interaction cost — saving the user one unnecessary tap.

Make the active input field prominent and focused. The field focus itself should be crystal clear — users should be able to understand at a glance where the focus is. It could be an accented border color or a fade-in of the box.


Amazon puts strong visual focus on the input field.


Amazon puts strong visual focus on the input field. (Large preview)

Don’t Ask Users To Repeat Their Email Address

The reason why an extra field for the email address is so popular among product developers is apparent: Every company wants to minimize the risk of hard bounces (non-deliverables caused by invalid email addresses). Unfortunately, following this approach doesn’t guarantee that you’ll get a valid address. Users often copy and paste their address from one field to another.


Avoid asking users to retype their email address.


Avoid asking users to retype their email address. (Large preview)

Provide “Show Password” Option

Duplicating the password input field is another common mistake among product designers. Designers follow this approach because they believe it will prevent users from mistyping a password. In reality, a second field for a password not only increases interaction cost, but also doesn’t guarantee that users will proceed without mistakes. Because users don’t see what they’ve entered in the field, they can make the same mistake twice (in both fields) and will face a problem when they try to log in using a password. As Jakob Nielsen summarized:

Usability suffers when users type in passwords and the only feedback they get is a row of bullets. Typically, masking passwords doesn’t even increase security, but it does cost you business due to login failures.

Instead of duplicating the password field, provide an option that allows users to view the password they have chosen to create. Have an icon or checkbox that unmasks the password when clicked. A password preview can be an opportunity for users to check their data before sending.


Show password' option


Not being able to see what you’re typing is a huge issue. Providing a ‘Show password’ option next to the password field will help to solve this problem. (Large preview)

Don’t Slice Data Fields

Do not slice fields when asking for a full name, phone number or date of birth. Sliced fields force the user to make additional taps to move to the next field. For fields that require some formatting (such as phone numbers or a date of birth), it’s also better to have a single field paired with clear formatting rules as its placeholder.


“Full name” field


Avoid splitting input fields; don’t make people jump between fields. Instead of asking for a first name and last name in two separate fields, have a single ‘Full name’ field. (Large preview)

Avoid Dropdown Menus

Luke Wroblewski famously said that dropdowns should be the UI of last resort. Dropdowns are especially bad for mobile because collapsed elements make the process of data input harder on a small screen: Placing options in a dropdown requires two taps and hides the options.

If you’re using a dropdown for selection of options, consider replacing it with radio buttons. They will make all options glanceable and also reduce the interaction cost — users can tap on the item and select at once.




(Large preview)

Use Placeholders And Masked Input

Formatting uncertainty is one of the most significant problems of form design. This problem has a direct connection with form abandonment — when users are uncertain of the format in which they should provide data, they can quickly abandon the form. There are a few things you can do to make the format clear.

Placeholder Text

The text in an input field can tell users what content is expected. Placeholder text is not required for simple fields such as “Full name”, but it can be extremely valuable for fields that require data in a specific format. For example, if you design search functionality for tracking a parcel, it would be good to provide a sample tracking number as a placeholder for the tracking-number field.




(Large preview)

It’s vital that your form should have a clear visual distinction between the placeholder text and the actual value entered by the user. In other words, placeholder text shouldn’t look like a preset value. Without clear visual distinction, users might think that the fields with placeholders already have values.

Masked Input

Field masking is a technique that helps users format inputted text. Many designers confuse field masking with placeholder text — they are not the same thing. Unlike placeholders, which are basically static text, masks automatically format the data provided by the user. In the example below, the parentheses, spaces and dashes appear on the screen automatically as a phone number is entered.

Masked input also makes it easy for users to validate information. When a phone number is displayed in chunks, it makes it easier to find and correct a typo.

Masked input for a phone number. (Image: Josh Morony)

Provide Matching Keyboard

Mobile users appreciate apps and websites that provide an appropriate keyboard for the field. This feature prevents them from doing additional actions. For example, when users need to enter a credit card number, your app should only display the dialpad. It’s essential to implement keyboard matching consistently throughout the app (all forms in your app should have this feature).

Set HTML input types to show the correct keypad. Seven input types are relevant to form design:

  • input type="text" displays the mobile device’s normal keyboard.
  • input type="email" displays the normal keyboard and ‘@’ and ‘.com’.
  • input type="tel" displays the numeric 0 to 9 keypad.
  • input type="number" displays a keyboard with numbers and symbols.
  • input type="date" displays the mobile device’s date selector.
  • input type="datetime" displays the mobile device’s date and time selector.
  • input type="month" displays the mobile device’s month and year selector.



When users tap into a field with credit card number, they should see a numerical dialpad — all numbers, no letters. (Large preview)

Use A Slider When Asking For A Specific Range

Many forms ask users to provide a range of values (for example, a price range, distance range, etc.). Instead of using two separate fields, “from” and “to”, for that purpose, use a slider to allow users to specify the range with a thumb interaction.


Sliders are good for touch interfaces because they allow users to specify a range without typing.


Sliders are good for touch interfaces because they allow users to specify a range without typing. (Large preview)

Clearly Explain Why You’re Asking For Sensitive Information

People are increasingly concerned about privacy and information security. When users see a request for information they consider as private, they might think, “Hm, why do they need this?” If your form asks users for sensitive information, make sure to explain why you need it. You can do that by adding support text below relevant fields. As a rule of thumb, the explanation text shouldn’t exceed 100 characters.


A request for a phone number in a booking form might confuse users. Explain why you are asking for it.


A request for a phone number in a booking form might confuse users. Explain why you are asking for it. (Large preview)

Be Careful With Static Defaults

Unlike smart defaults, which are calculated by the system based on the information the system has about users, static defaults are preset values in forms that are the same for all users. Avoid static defaults unless you believe a significant portion of your users (say, 95%) would select those values — particularly for required fields. Why? Because you’re likely to introduce errors — people scan forms quickly, and they won’t spend extra time parsing all of the questions; instead, they’ll simply skip the field, assuming it already has a value.

Protect User Data

Jef Raskin once said, “The system should treat all user input as sacred.” This is absolutely true for forms. It’s great when you start filling in a web form and then accidentally refresh the page but the data remains in the fields. Tools such as Garlic.js help you to persist a form’s values locally until the form is submitted. This way, users won’t lose any precious data if they accidentally close the tab or browser.

Automate Actions

If you want to make the process of data input as smooth as possible, it’s not enough to minimize the number of input fields — you should also pay attention to the user effort required for the data input. Typing has a high interaction cost — it’s error-prone and time-consuming, even with a physical keyboard. But when it comes to mobile screens, it becomes even more critical. More typing increases the user’s chance of making errors. Strive to prevent unnecessary typing, because it will improve user satisfaction and decrease error rates.

Here are a few things you can do to achieve this goal:

Autocomplete

Most users experience autocompletion when typing a question in Google’s search box. Google provides users with a list of suggestions related to what the user has typed in the field. The same mechanism can be applied to form design. For example, a form could autocomplete an email address.

This form suggests the email host and saves users from typing a complete address. (Image: GitHub)
Autocapitalize

Autocapitalizing makes the first letter a capital automatically. This feature is excellent for fields like names and street addresses, but avoid it for password fields.

Autocorrect

Autocorrection modifies words that appear to be misspelled. Turn this feature off for unique fields, such as names, addresses, etc.

Auto-filling of personal details

Typing an address is often the most cumbersome part of any online signup form. Make this task easier by using the browser function to fill the field based on previously entered values. According to Google’s research, auto-filling helps people fill out forms 30% faster.

Address prefill. Image: Google

Use The Mobile Device’s Native Features To Simplify Data Input

Modern mobile devices are sophisticated devices that have a ton of amazing capabilities. Designers can use a device’s native features (such as camera or geolocation) to streamline the task of inputting data.

Below are just a few tips on how to make use of sensors and device hardware.

Location Services

It’s possible to preselect the user’s country based on their geolocation data. But sometimes prefilling a full address can be problematic due to accuracy issues. Google’s Places API can help solve this problem. It uses both geolocation and address prefilling to provide accurate suggestions based on the user’s exact location.

Address lookup using Google Places API. (Image: Chromatic HQ) (Large preview)

Using location services, it’s also possible to provide smart defaults. For example, for a “Find a flight” form, it’s possible to prefill the “From” field with the nearest airport to the user based on the user’s geolocation.

Biometric Authorization

The biggest problem of using a text password today is that most people forget passwords. 82% of people can’t remember their passwords, and 5 to 10% of sessions require users to reset a password. Password recovery is a big deal in e-commerce. 75% of users wouldn’t complete a purchase if they had to attempt to recover their password while checking out.

The future of passwords is no passwords. Even today, mobile developers can take advantage of biometric technologies. Users shouldn’t need to type a password; they should be able to use biometric readers for authentication — signing in using a fingerprint or face scanning.


eBay took advantage of the biometrics functionality on smartphones. Users can use their thumbprint to login into their eBay account.


eBay took advantage of the biometrics functionality on smartphones. Users can use their thumbprint to login into their eBay account. (Large preview)

Camera

If your form asks users to provide credit card details or information from their driver’s license, it’s possible to simplify the process of data input by using the camera as a scanner. Provide an option to take a photo of the card and fill out all details automatically.

Let users scan their identity card, instead of having to fill out their credit card information manually. (Image: blinkid)

But remember that no matter how good your app fills out the fields, it’s essential to leave them available for editing. Users should be able to modify the fields whenever they want.

Voice

Voice-controlled devices, such as Apple HomePod, Google Home and Amazon Echo, are actively encroaching on the market. The number of people who prefer to use voice for common operations has grown significantly. According to ComScore, 50% of all searches will be voice searches by 2020.




How people in the US use smart speakers (according to comScore) (Large preview)

As users get more comfortable and confident using voice commands, they will become an expected feature of mobile interactions. Voice input provides a lot of advantages for mobile users — it’s especially valuable in situations when users can’t focus on a screen, for example, while driving a car.

When designing a form, you can provide voice input as an alternative method of data input.




Google Translate provides an option to enter the text for translation using voice. (Large preview)

Field Labels

Write Clear And Concise Labels

The label is the text that tells users what data is expected from them in a particular input field. Writing clear labels is one of the best ways to make a form more accessible. Labels should help the user understand what information is required at a glance.

Avoid using complete sentences to explain. A label is not help text. Write succinct and crisp labels (a word or two), so that users can quickly scan your form.

Place The Label And Input Close Together

Put each label close to the input field, because the eye will visually know they’re tied together.


A label and its field should be visually grouped, so that users can understand which label belongs to which field.


A label and its field should be visually grouped, so that users can understand which label belongs to which field. (Large preview)

Don’t Use Disappearing Placeholder Text As Labels

While inline labels look good and save valuable screen estate, these benefits are far outweighed by the significant usability drawbacks, the most critical of which is the loss of context. When users start entering text in a field, the placeholder text disappears and forces people to recall this information. While it might not be a problem for simple two-field forms, it could be a big deal for forms that have a lot of fields (say, 7 to 10). It would be tough for users to recall all field labels after inputting data. Not surprisingly, user testing continually shows that placeholders in form fields often hurt usability more than help.


Don’t use placeholder text that disappears when the user interacts with the field.


Don’t use placeholder text that disappears when the user interacts with the field. (Large preview)

There’s a simple solution to the problem of disappearing placeholders: the floating (or adaptive) label. After the user taps on the field with the label placeholder, the label doesn’t disappear, it moves up to the top of the field and makes room for the user to enter their data.

Floating labels assure the user that they’ve filled out the fields correctly. (Image: Matt D. Smith)

Top-Align Labels

Putting field labels above the fields in a form improves the way users scan the form. Using eye-tracking technology for this, Google showed that users need fewer fixations, less fixation time and fewer saccades before submitting a form.

Another important advantage of top-aligned labels is that they provide more space for labels. Long labels and localized versions will fit more easily in the layout. The latter is especially suitable for small mobile screens. You can have form fields extend the full width of the screen, making them large enough to display the user’s entire input.




(Large preview)

Sentence Case Vs. Title Case

There are two general ways to capitalize words:

  • Title case: Capitalize every word. “This Is Title Case.”
  • Sentence case: Capitalize the first word. “This is sentence case.”

Using sentence case for labels has one advantage over title case: It is slightly easier (and, thus, faster) to read. While the difference for short labels is negligible (there’s not much difference between “Full Name” and “Full name”), for longer labels, sentence case is better. Now You Know How Difficult It Is to Read Long Text in Title Case.

Avoid Using Caps For Labels

All-caps text  —  meaning text with all of the letters cap­i­tal­ized  —  is OK in contexts that don’t involve substantive reading (such as acronyms and logos), but avoid all caps otherwise. As mentioned by Miles Tinker in his work Legibility of Print, all-capital print dramatically slows the speed of scanning and reading compared to lowercase type.


All-capitalized letters


All-capitalized letters are hard to scan and read. (Large preview)

Layout

You know by now that users scan web pages, rather than read them. The same goes for filling out forms. That’s why designers should design a form that is easy to scan. Allowing for efficient, effective scanning is crucial to making the process of the filling out a form as quick as possible.

Use A Single-Column Layout

A study by CXL Institute found that single-column forms are faster to complete than multi-column forms. In that study, test participants were able to complete a single-column form an average of 15.4 seconds faster than a multi-column form.

Multiple columns disrupt a user’s vertical momentum; with multiple columns, the eyes start zigzagging. This dramatically increases the number of eye fixations and, as a result, the completion time. Moreover, multiple-column forms might raise unnecessary questions in the user, like “Where should I begin?” and “Are questions in the right column equal in importance to questions in the left one?”

In a one-column design, the eyes move in a natural direction, from top to bottom, one line at a time. This helps to set a clear path for the user. One column is excellent for mobile because the screens are longer vertically, and vertical scrolling is a natural motion for mobile users.

There are some exceptions to this rule. It’s possible to place short and logically related fields on the same row (such as for the city and area code).




If a form has horizontally adjacent fields, the user has to scan the form following a Z pattern. When the eyes start zigzagging, it slows the speed of comprehension and increases completion time. (Large preview)




(Large preview)

Create A Flow With Your Questions

The way you ask questions also matters. Questions should be asked logically from the user’s perspective, not according to the application or database’s logic, because it will help to create a sense of conversation with the user. For example, if you design a checkout form and asks for details such as full name, phone number and credit card, the first question should be for the full name. Changing the order (for example, starting with a phone number instead of a name) leads to discomfort. In real-world conversations, it would be unusual to ask for someone’s phone number before asking their name.

Defer In-Depth Questions To The End

When it comes to designing a flow for questions you want to ask, think about prioritization. Follow the rule “easy before difficult” and place in-depth or personal questions last. This eases users into the process; they will be more likely to answer complex and more intrusive questions once they’ve established a rapport. This has a scientific basis: Robert Cialdini’s principle of consistency stipulates that when someone takes a small action or step towards something, they feel more compelled to finish.

Group Related Fields Together

One of the principles of Gestalt psychology, the principle of proximity, states that related elements should be near each other. This principle can be applied to the order of questions in a form. The more related questions are, the closer they should be to each other.

Designers can group related fields into sections. If your form has more than six questions, group related questions into logical sections. Don’t forget to provide a good amount of white space between sections to distinguish them visually.




Generally, if your form has more than six questions, it’s better to group related questions into logical sections. Put things together that make sense together. (Large preview)

Make A Long Form Look Simpler

How do you design a form that asks users a lot of questions? Of course, you could put all of the questions on one screen. But this hinder your completion rate. If users don’t have enough motivation to complete a form, the form’s complexity could scare them away. The first impression plays a vital role. Generally, the longer or more complicated a form seems, the less likely users will be to start filling in the blanks.

Minimize the number of fields visible at one time. This creates the perception that the form is shorter than it really is.

There are two techniques to do this.

Progressive Disclosure

Progressive disclosure is all about giving users the right thing at the right time. The goal is to find the right stuff to put on the small screen at the right time:

  • Initially, show users only a few of the most important options.
  • Reveal parts of your form as the user interacts with it.
Using progressive disclosure to reduce cognitive load and keep the user focused on a task. (Image: Ramotion)
Chunking

Chunking entails breaking a long form into steps. It’s possible to increase the completion rate by splitting a form into a few steps. Chunking can also help users process, understand and remember information. When designing multi-step forms, always inform users of their progress with a completeness meter.




Progress tracker for e-commerce form. (Image: Murat Mutlu) (Large preview)

Designers can use either a progress tracker (as shown in the example above) or a “Step # out of #” indicator both to tell how many steps there are total and to show how far along the user is at the moment. The latter approach could be great for mobile forms because step indication doesn’t take up much space.

Action Buttons

A button is an interactive element that direct users to take an action.

Make Action Buttons Descriptive

A button’s label should explain what the button does; users should be able to understand what happens after a tap just by looking at the button. Avoid generic labels such as “Submit” and “Send”, using instead labels that describe the action.




Label should help users finish the sentence, ‘I want to…’ For example, if it’s a form to create an account, the call to action could be ‘Create an account’. (Large preview)

Don’t Use Clear Or Reset Buttons

Clear or reset buttons allow users to erase their data in a form. These buttons almost never help users and often hurt them. The risk of deleting all of the information a user has entered outweighs the small benefit of having to start again. If a user fills in a form and accidentally hits the wrong button, there’s a good chance they won’t start over.

Use Different Styles For Primary And Secondary Buttons

Avoid secondary actions if possible. But if your form has two calls to action (for example, an e-commerce form that has “Apply discount” and “Submit order”) buttons, ensure a clear visual distinction between the primary and secondary actions. Visually prioritize the primary action by adding more visual weight to the button. This will prevent users from tapping on the wrong button.




Ensure a clear visual distinction between primary and secondary buttons. (Large preview)

Design Finger-Friendly Touch Targets

Tiny touch targets create a horrible user experience because they make it challenging for users to interact with interactive objects. It’s vital to design finger-friendly touch targets: bigger input fields and buttons.

The image below shows that the width of the average adult finger is about 11 mm.




People often blame themselves for having “fat fingers”. But even baby fingers are wider than most touch targets. (Image: Microsoft) (Large preview)

According to material design guidelines, touch targets should be at least 48 × 48 DP. A touch target of this size results in a physical size of about 9 mm, regardless of screen size. It might be appropriate to use larger touch targets to accommodate a wider spectrum of users.

Not only is target size important, but sufficient space between touch targets matters, too. The main reason to maintain a safe distance between touch targets is to prevent users from touching the wrong button and invoking the wrong action. The distance between buttons becomes extremely important when binary choices such as “Agree” and “Disagree” are located right next to each other. Material design guidelines recommend separating touch targets with 8 DP of space or more, which will create balanced information density and usability.




(Large preview)

Disable Buttons After Tap

Forms actions commonly require some time to be processed. For example, data calculation might be required after a submission. It’s essential not only to provide feedback when an action is in progress, but also to disable the submit button to prevent users from accidentally tapping the button again. This is especially important for e-commerce websites and apps. By disabling the button, you not only prevent duplicate submissions, which can happen by accident, but you also provide a valuable acknowledgment to users (users will know that the system has received their submission).

This form disables the button after submission. (Image: Michaël Villar)

Assistance And Support

Provide Success State

Upon successful completion of a form, it’s critical to notify users about that. It’s possible to provide this information in the context of an existing form (for example, showing a green checkmark above the refreshed form) or to direct users to a new page that communicates that their submission has been successful.

Example of success state. (Image: João Oliveira Simões)

Errors And Validation

Users will make mistakes. It’s inevitable. It’s essential to design a user interface that supports users in those moments of failures.

While the topic of errors and validation deserves its own article, it’s still worth mentioning a few things that should be done to improve the user experience of mobile forms.

Use Input Constraints for Each Field

Prevention is better than a cure. If you’re a seasoned designer, you should be familiar with the most common cases that can lead to an error state (error-prone conditions). For example, it’s usually hard to correctly fill out a form on the first attempt, or to properly sync data when the mobile device has a poor network connection. Take these cases into account to minimize the possibility of errors. In other words, it’s better to prevent users from making errors in the first place by utilizing constraints and offering suggestions.

For instance, if you design a form that allows people to search for a hotel reservation, you should prevent users from selecting check-in dates that are in the past. As shown in the Booking.com example below, you can simply use a date selector that allows users only to choose today’s date or a date in the future. Such a selector would force users to pick a date range that fits.




You can significantly decrease the number of mistakes or incorrectly inputted data by putting constraints on what can be inputted in the field. The date picker in Booking.com’s app displays a full monthly calendar but makes past dates unavailable for selection. (Large preview)

Don’t Make Data Validation Rules Too Strict

While there might be cases where it’s essential to use strict validation rules, in most cases, strict validation is a sign of lazy programming. Showing errors on the screen when the user provides data in a slightly different format than expected creates unnecessary friction. And this would have a negative impact on conversions.

It’s very common for a few variations of an answer to a question to be possible; for example, when a form asks users to provide information about their state, and a user responds by typing their state’s abbreviation instead of the full name (for example, CA instead of California). The form should accept both formats, and it’s the developer job to convert the data into a consistent format.

Clear Error Message

When you write error messages, focus on minimizing the frustration users feel when they face a problem in interacting with a form. Here are a few rules on writing effective error messages:

  • Never blame the user.
    The way you deliver an error message can have a tremendous impact on how users perceive it. An error message like, “You’ve entered a wrong number” puts all of the blame on the user; as a result, the user might get frustrated and abandon the app. Write copy that sounds neutral or positive. A neutral message sounds like, “That number is incorrect.”
  • Avoid vague or general error messages.
    Messages like “Something went wrong. Please, try again later” don’t say much to users. Users will wonder what exactly went wrong. Always try to explain the root cause of a problem. Make sure users know how to fix errors.
  • Make error messages human-readable.
    Error messages like “User input error: 0x100999” are cryptic and scary. Write like a human, not like a robot. Use human language, and explain what exactly the user or system did wrong, and what exactly the user should do to fix the problem.
Display Errors Inline

When it comes to displaying error messages, designers opt for one of two locations: at the top of the form or inline. The first option can make for a bad experience. Javier Bargas-Avila and Glenn Oberholzer conducted research on online form validation and discovered that displaying all error messages at the top of the form puts a high cognitive load on user memory. Users need to spend extra time matching error messages with the fields that require attention.




Avoid displaying errors at the top of the form. (Image: John Lewis) (Large preview)

It’s much better to position error messages inline. First, this placement corresponds with the user’s natural top-to-bottom reading flow. Secondly, the errors will appear in the context of the user’s input.


eBay uses inline validation.


eBay uses inline validation. (Large preview)

Use Dynamic Validation

The time at which you choose to display an error message is vital. Seeing an error message only after pressing the submit button might frustrate users. Don’t wait until users finish the form; provide feedback as data is being entered.

Use inline validation with real-time feedback. This validation instantly tells people whether the information they’ve typed is compatible with the form’s requirements. In 2009, Luke Wroblewski tested inline validation against post-submission validation and found the following results for the inline version:

  • 22% increase in success rate,
  • 22% decrease in errors made,
  • 31% increase in satisfaction rating,
  • 42% decrease in completion times,
  • 47% decrease in the number of eye fixations.

But inline validation should be implemented carefully:

  • Avoid showing inline validation on focus.
    In this case, as soon as the user taps a field, they see an error message. The error appears even when the field is completely empty. When an error message is shown on focus, it might look like the form is yelling at the user before they’ve even started filling it out.
  • Don’t validate after each character typed.
    This approach not only increases the number of unnecessary validation attempts, but it also frustrates users (because users will likely see error messages before they have completed the field). Ideally, inline validation messages should appear around 500 to 1000 milliseconds after the user has stopped typing or after they’ve moved to the next field. This rule has a few exceptions: It’s helpful to validate inline as the user is typing when creating a password (to check whether the password meets complexity requirements), when creating a user name (to check whether a name is available) and when typing a message with a character limit.
Reward early, punish late is a solid validation  approach. (Image: Mihael Konjević)

Accessibility

Users of all abilities should be able to access and enjoy digital products. Designers should strive to incorporate accessibility needs as much as they can when building a product. Here are a few things you can do to make your forms more accessible.

Ensure The Form Has Proper Contrast

Your users will likely interact with your form outdoors. Ensure that it is easy to use both in sun glare and in low-light environments. Check the contrast ratio of fields and labels in your form. The W3C recommends the following contrast ratios for body text:

  • Small text should have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1 against its background.
  • Large text (at 14-point bold, 18-point regular and up) should have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1 against its background.

Measuring color contrast can seem overwhelming. Fortunately, some tools make the process simple. One of them is Web AIM Color Contrast Checker, which helps designers to measure contrast levels.

Do Not Rely On Color Alone To Communicate Status

Color blindness (or color vision deficiency) affects approximately 1 in 12 men (8%) and 1 in 200 women in the world. While there are many types of color blindness, the most common two are protanomaly, or reduced sensitivity to red light, and deuteranomaly, or reduced sensitivity to green light. When displaying validation errors or success messages, don’t rely on color alone to communicate the status (i.e. by making input fields green or red). As the W3C guidelines state, color shouldn’t be used as the only visual means of conveying information, indicating an action, prompting a response or distinguishing a visual element. Designers should use color to highlight or complement what is already visible. Support colorblind people by providing additional visual cues that help them understand the user interface.


Use icons and supportive text to show which fields are invalid. This will help colorblind people fix the problems.


Use icons and supportive text to show which fields are invalid. This will help colorblind people fix the problems. (Large preview)

Allow Users To Control Font Size

Allow users to increase font size to improve readability. Mobile devices and browsers include features to enable users to adjust the font size system-wide. Also, make sure that your form has allotted enough space for large font sizes.


WhatsApp provides an option to change the font size in the app’s settings


WhatsApp provides an option to change the font size in the app’s settings. (Large preview)

Test Your Design Decisions

All points mentioned above can be considered as industry best practices. But just because something is called a “best practice” doesn’t mean it is always the optimal solution for your form. Apps and websites largely depend on the context in which they are used. Thus, it’s always essential to test your design decisions; make sure that the process of filling out a form is smooth, that the flow is not disrupted and that users can solve any problems they face along the way. Conduct usability testing sessions on a regular basis, collect all valuable data about user interactions, and learn from it.

Conclusion

Users can be hesitant to fill out forms. So, our goal as designers is to make the process of filling out a form as easy as possible. When designing a form, strive to create fast and frictionless interactions. Sometimes a minor change — such as properly writing an error message — can significantly increase the form’s usability.

his article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

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Excerpt from: 

Best Practices For Mobile Form Design

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Making Distributed Product Teams Work More Efficiently With monday.com




Making Distributed Product Teams Work More Efficiently With monday.com

Nick Babich



(This is a sponsored article.) The way that product teams work is changing: The software industry is quickly moving to remote work. In the US alone, 43% of employed Americans have spent at least some time working remotely, and that number has steadily increased in recent years. Many successful digital products on the market today were designed and developed by a distributed team. Such teams don’t have an office in the traditional sense. Everyone chooses to work from where they like, both geographically and functionally (in a coworking space, coffee shop, home office, etc.).

While a distributed product team might sound tempting to you, creating an effective design process on such a team requires a lot of effort. Collaboration and communication are two of the most significant challenges distributed teams face. Managing a distributed team requires an understanding of how the individuals on your team operate, as well as requires a digital toolset that makes the team’s operations as efficient as possible. That’s why investing in the right remote tools and technology is so critical for product managers.

If you’re a team manager who is looking to establish a robust design process for a distributed team, then this article for you. You’ll find seven of the most common challenges distributed product teams should overcome and learn how a team-management tool called monday.com (formerly dapulse) can help them with that.

1. Build A Shared Understanding Of A Project’s Goals

When it comes to organizing a work process on a remote team, one of the key goals is to keep the whole team on the same page. Management needs to set goals and make sure everyone on the team understands and accepts them. Building understanding is especially important on remote teams because interaction tend to be more sporadic. Ensure that everyone on the team knows the following:

  • What are the project’s overall goals? When a team clearly understand’s the product strategy (what they want to build and why), that understanding motivates engagement.

  • What is expected of them, and how do they fit in the bigger picture? People want to know their role in the process. Even though every team member will be deep in the details when working on a project, understanding the big picture will help them to focus on what’s really important.

  • What are other people involved in the project doing? Each team member should have visibility on what the other team members are working on.

The more everyone knows, the better they can work as a team.

Visualize The Product Development Process

Helping everyone on the team know what is expected of them and when is possible using monday.com’s feature named the “timeline.” The timeline makes tasks more visual — team members will be able to see when each task is scheduled for, how long it will take and how it fits in the entire project. The tool enables you to see not only what tasks your team members are working on, but also how those tasks are distributed over time. It is great for when some activities depend on others (for example, developers are waiting on mockups from designers).


The timeline enables team members to see a high-level roadmap.


The timeline enables team members to see a high-level roadmap. (Large preview)

2. Manage The Team’s Workload

As anyone who has ever worked on a remote team will tell you, remote working is quite different from working face to face. Many project managers find it hard to manage the team’s workload.

Most product teams use project-tracking software to plan and estimate their work. Usually, a team will prepare all of the work in a task list, in which each task has a text description and a time estimate. The biggest downside of this approach is that it’s not very representative. For example, Kanban boards, used by many product teams today, are not very representative — it’s almost impossible from a glance at the board to understand the order in which tasks should be completed, especially when they have dependencies.


Using a Kanban board might make it hard to see how tasks should be distributed in time.


Using a Kanban board might make it hard to see how tasks should be distributed in time. (Image source) (Large preview)

Track Everything Your Team Is Working On

Interaction cost (i.e. the cognitive or physical effort required to complete an action) plays a vital role in the user experience of a product. The more effort required to complete an operation, the less usable the interface becomes for the end user. If the project manager has to switch to different products to see the team’s progress, that will create unnecessary friction and hinder the team from working efficiently.

monday.com assembles and displays progress data in a logical and understandable way. The tool has a feature called a board. The board is where all team members can track everything the team is working on. The main advantage of the board is that it enables product managers to monitor the team’s progress in real time and instantly see who is working on what and see where things stand.


monday.com gives you a clear sense of what needs to get done and who is responsible for what. The board provides in-depth insight into a project and its tasks.


monday.com gives you a clear sense of what needs to get done and who is responsible for what. The board provides in-depth insight into a project and its tasks. (Large preview)

Communicate Current Status

Each team needs a mechanism that makes it easy to understand what’s going on at a glance.

One way to solve this problem is to use color coding for different elements. Color coding speeds up visual search because it allows users to quickly filter a particular object (or objects) by knowing the color associated with it. monday.com uses color coding to indicate the current status of a task. For example, it’s easy to see where things have gotten stuck just by looking at the board and finding all tasks colored in red.


Status updates can be color coded.


Status updates can be color coded. (Large preview)

Create, Modify And Assign Tasks In A Few Clicks

Adding tasks in a project-management tool doesn’t sound very exciting. Generally, the more time it takes, the less happy the product manager will be.

monday.com simplifies the process of data input. Managers can quickly add rows to the board — monday.com calls them pulses. Pulses can be tasks, projects, missions, to-do items, etc. Creating a pulse requires just a few clicks.


Monday.com simplifies the process of data input. Managers can quickly add rows to the board — Monday.com calls them pulses. Pulses can be tasks, projects, missions, to-do items, etc. Creating a pulse requires just a few clicks.


(Large preview)

After you create a pulse, simply assign it to a team member.


Assign teammates to particular tasks or projects.


Assign teammates to particular tasks or projects. (Large preview)

Tailor The Platform To Your Needs

There’s no such thing as a universal design process. Every project is different and requires its own design process. A product-management tool should be very adaptive to change; the product team should be able to customize the process according to their needs, without having to put much effort into customization.

monday.com is extremely customizable and lets the user configure almost any option. You can customize monday.com to manage any workflow or process, to address any challenge and to manage basically anything.

When it comes to creating a board, you don’t need to start from scratch. A multitude of templates allow you to start quickly. For example, the “Team Tasks” template would be very useful for product teams.


Finding the right template for your activity is really simple because all templates are visualized.


Finding the right template for your activity is really simple because all templates are visualized. (Large preview)

After selecting a template for your needs, you can customize it by manipulating different sections. Product teams often need to combine task into groups, whereby each group represents a milestone (for example, “Release 1”, “Release 2”, etc.). Doing this in monday.com is relatively simple. As a board owner, you can have as many groups as you want.


Easy to organize tasks. You can have as many groups as you want.


Easy to organize tasks. You can have as many groups as you want. (Large preview)

But it doesn’t stop there. You can use the checklist feature to break down tasks even further. For example, each task can be broken down into smaller to-do steps. This feature is handy when a few activities need to get done before the task can be completed — for example, if a product specification needs to be approved by a few designers before it can be handed over to the development team. The checklist sits within a pulse, in the “Updates” section, and can help create a structure for each pulse.

The checklist sits within a pulse, in the “Updates” section. This feature can help create a structure for each pulse.
The checklist sits within a pulse, in the “Updates” section. This feature can help create a structure for each pulse. (Large preview)

Plan The Team’s Workload Visually

Designers, developers and managers often work with compressed timeframes and simultaneous projects. A team must be able to respond quickly to feedback on their product from stakeholders and users. Following the build-measure-learn cycle, a product team should be really flexible; it should be ready to implement feedback from testing sessions and adjust the design process according to the new information. The same level of flexibility should be in all products the team uses.

Using monday.com’s timeline, it’s possible to make corrections and improve the team’s efficiency. The visual editor makes the process of managing tasks easy. The product manager can see where each project is at each point, and can see and focus on areas of struggle, quickly and effectively.

The timeline makes it possible to see each team member’s capacity over a set period of time (say, the next few weeks), seeing where they have room to take on more work and where they need to delegate tasks to others.

Change the time range in the timeline. The time range is updated in real time.
Change the time range in the timeline. The time range is updated in real time. (Large preview)

3. Create Effective Internal Communications

Communication plays a critical role in the design process. When it comes to product design, it’s essential for all team members to be on the same page. Unlike colocated teams, a distributed team won’t have an opportunity to arrange regular face-to-face meetings. When you take out face-to-face interaction, you can’t expect things to just work the same way. Poorly established communication patterns can lead to some team members feeling like they’re working in a vacuum.

Tools matter more in remote work because they are the foundation for communication. The goal is to make sure everyone on the team feels connected.

Centralize All Communication

In today’s world, we communicate with a variety of tools: from traditional email to online messengers such as Skype, WhatsApp, Slack and Facebook Messenger. Having to switch from a task-management tool to another tool for communication can be stressful. Worse, some information can get lost during the transition (for example, an email inbox can fill up to the point that a team member can overlook a critical email).

Product teams can use monday.com as a single communication platform for their workplace. And it would be a much better solution because it allows for communication in the context of each task. With monday.com, you no longer need to use email for internal communication. When a team member clicks on a pulse on any board, a box opens to the right of the screen, showing the “updates”. Simply mention a person’s username (“@johndoe”), and send your message. The great thing is that the chat thread stays with that task, so finding a conversation after a while is relatively easy.

Cut Down On Meetings And Optimize Required Meetings

Meetings are an essential part of the communication process. When it comes to reviewing plans and brainstorming on design decisions, there’s no substitute for a meeting. But for a distributed team, the number of potential hours available for real-time meetings can be limited, so it’s essential to make the best use of that time. A distributed team should continually try to reduce their number of meetings and maximize the effectiveness of the time that team members have together.

Take a weekly kickoff meeting as an example. This meeting happens on a Monday, and team members come together to discuss plans for the week. For many teams, such meetings are rarely productive. Quite often, the information shared in a weekly kickoff meeting becomes outdated shortly after the meeting, and team members need to reprioritize tasks.

monday.com saves the team vast amounts of time in meetings. Instead of discussing the plan for the week, the product manager can break down complex tasks into weekly achievable goals. This will help team members plan the week based on what they need to get done.


Create a weekly task board.


Create a weekly task board. (Large preview)

Share Valuable Resources With The Entire Team, Not Individual Members

Imagine you’ve found a really valuable resource and want to share it with your peers. You tweet about it and send a link to a group chat. You get feedback like, “Awesome resource! Thanks!” from some people in the chat. Shortly after, most of your peers forget about the resource, especially if they can’t use it in the work they’re doing right now. Sad, right? We can do better.

Instead of sending a link to a group chat, share all resources you find on a separate board. monday.com has a template named “Design Inspiration & Resources”. The great thing about this approach is that it’ll be much easier for team members to find a particular resource when they actually need it.


Instead of sending a link to a group chat, share all resources you find on a separate board.


(Large preview)

Organize Better Planning And Brainstorming Sessions

Task prioritization is a typical activity in agile project management. Team members get together, discuss tasks and vote on what to implement in the next sprint.

monday.com incorporates voting. Team members can use the voting column when they want to decide on something together as a team. Simply add a voting column to a board, and team members will be able to cast their vote in one click.


Vote for ideas during brainstorming and planning sessions.


Vote for ideas during brainstorming and planning sessions. (Large preview)

Notify Team Members In Real Time

Fear of missing out (FOMO) is a common problem on distributed teams. When working remotely, team members might be afraid to miss an important piece of information. As a result, they spend a lot of time in communication tools, checking mail and messengers. This can get really distracting. Team members should spend less time in communication tools and more time in tools they use to design (tools for prototyping and development). It’s all too easy to waste the day reading messages and replying.

A communication tool should serve vital information just when team members need it; it should have an effective mechanism of notification. monday.com notifies users via desktop and mobile in real time. The platform has an app for iOS and Android. The app allows team members to stay connected on their phone or tablet and to respond quickly from anywhere. It’s also possible to customize notification rules. For example, you can manage which activity triggers an email.


Mention people or entire teams.


(Large preview)

Create A Work Schedule For Your Team

If your team is distributed across the globe and you need to arrange a meeting, you have to be sure that it won’t happen at awkward hours (such as in the middle of the night). It would be great to see the team members’ working hours.

The work schedule board is a cornerstone of your business operations. Team members in each time zone can commit to the times that work for them. This helps product managers schedule meetings at times that work for everybody.


The work schedule board shows when team members will be online and available for chat.


The work schedule board shows when team members will be online and available for chat. (Large preview)

4. Involve Users In The Design Process

Most commercially successful products were created with a strong focus on the target audience. Designers know that if they want to release a successful product, they need to introduce real users to the design process. User involvement is most efficient and influential in the early stages of product development, because the cost of making changes increases as the system develops. Generally, the earlier you create a strong feedback loop, the better the final product will be.

Share Designs With Users And Gather A Valuable Feedback

The feedback that a product team gets from users is extremely valuable. It can validate that the design team is moving in the right direction.

On monday.com, users can create a board and choose whom to share it with. For example, if you are working with a client, you can set up a board for their project and invite them to work as a guest. The board could include key features you want to work on. As soon as you share the board, the client will get a notification and then can open the board, review the plan and request modifications.

5. Find All Required Information Easily

Documentation is another challenge. Distributed teams don’t have a physically shared space where they can share product documentation. Information might be stored in many different places: email, cloud drives, local computers, etc. It could lead to team members missing an important piece of information and being unaware of it. This leads to fragmented knowledge.

Centralize All Documents

Having all documents in one place is critical to success. monday.com syncs all information in a single accessible hub. All team members can store all relevant discussions in a searchable database. The platform provides an option to upload different types of files simply by dragging and dropping. The next time a designer needs to share a product’s specifications, all they need to do is upload a file to the platform.


Upload all assets by dragging and dropping.


Upload all assets by dragging and dropping. (Large preview)

Search Anything And Everything

Anyone who has ever worked with a knowledge base will tell you how critical search functionality is. Without proper search, your chance of finding information decreases significantly.

monday.com allows you to quickly find anything your team has ever worked on, including images, updates, projects and assignments. Your work becomes a rich knowledge base.


monday.com allows you to quickly find anything your team has ever worked on, including images, updates, projects and assignments. Your work becomes a rich knowledge base.


(Large preview)

For example, when you need to find the latest version of a product’s specification, all you need to do is click the search box, select the “Files” tab and enter the project’s name as a search query.


When you need to find the latest version of a product’s specification, all you need to do is click the search box, select the ‘Files’ tab and enter the project’s name as a search query.


(Large preview)

6. Make The Collaboration Tool A Natural Part Of The Team

The platform you choose for team management should feel like second nature. Technology should work for you and your team, not the other way around.

Minimize The Time Required To Learn A Tool

When you introduce a new tool in the design process, one goal should be to have total agreement to work using this tool. This agreement is not always easy to come by because team members are usually skeptical about the next “magical tool that will solve all of their problems”. What’s worse is that they have to spend extra time learning how to use it. Nobody wants to learn new software.

One of the most significant advantages of monday.com is its intuitiveness. Regardless of whether you’ve used a similar app before, monday.com can be picked up with no training. Team members will be able to understand how to use the tool without preparation.


monday.com provides basic onboarding to help users get started.


monday.com provides basic onboarding to help users get started. (Large preview)

Scalable

When companies select a collaboration tool, they often think of it as an investment. They want a tool that will scale with the business.

monday.com is suitable for any sized team, from two freelancers working together to thousands collaborating across the globe. The tool scales with you, from simplicity to complexity, with total ease. Also, as your business expands, monday.com makes it painless to shift to a premium version (Standard, Pro or Enterprise) and get more of the platform’s premium features.

Integrate The Platform With Existing Tools

A task-management tool is essential for any team hoping for good results. But the team’s toolbox also needs to support the design process (for prototyping and development) and the collection of design artifacts (for example, on Google Drive or Dropbox). It’s essential that the team-management tool integrates seamlessly with other tools the team uses.

When it comes to integration, monday.com does a lot to be part of the established software ecosystem. It can connect to Dropbox, Zapier, Google Drive and other sharing tools. As a team member, you can attach a mockup file to your updates, sharing it in the context of the tasks it relates to.

monday.com also comes with an open API architecture, which lets developers build their own integrations.


Monday also comes with an open API architecture, which lets developers build their own integrations.


(Large preview)

7. Keep The Team Motivated

Having the right atmosphere is extremely important. Team leaders should not only be in tune with each person on the team, but should continually look for ways to increase engagement.

Celebrate Successes With Team Members

It’s natural for people to seek acknowledgment. The need for social approval drives us to look for confirmation from people we know (parents, friends, colleagues). When someone recognizes our results by saying something as simple as “Great job!”, we feel motivated to work towards our goals. It’s essential for team players to get acknowledged, especially when working remotely.

monday.com has a few features that help create a sense of acknowledgment. The first one is the thumb-up feature, which is basically a positive reaction to an activity. Most people are familiar with this from social networks. People are used to measuring the effect of a post by the number of likes they get. monday.com allows you to give a thumb up to your teammates’ work.


Monday has a few features that help create a sense of acknowledgment.


(Large preview)

Another nice feature are the animated GIFs. You can liven up comments with GIFs. monday.com lets you pick from thousands of GIFs when responding to teammates, which will add a bit of personality to your comments.

You can liven up comments with GIFs. Monday lets you pick from thousands of GIFs when responding to teammates, which will add a bit of personality to your comments.
(Large preview)

Last but not least, monday.com has a confetti feature. As soon as a designer completes their last “in progress” task on a board, they will see an animated confetti effect. This subtle detail adds a bit of delight and motivates team members to have an all-green board.

Monday has a confetti feature
(Large preview)

Conclusion

Establishing an effective process on a distributed team is hard. What works for a colocated team won’t necessarily work for a distributed team, and what works for one distributed team won’t necessarily work for another.

Build a remote-friendly work culture by focusing on following priorities:

  • Prioritize transparency.
    Keep important information accessible to everyone.

  • Stay on top of the team’s activity.
    Understand what every member of your team is doing and where the team is in the process at a glance.

  • Build an effective communication system.
    The foundation of distributed teams is communication. Create a healthy system of meetings and habits to keep people communicating.

  • Lower the barrier to entry.
    Choose a team-collaboration tool that will be the least painful for everyone to get on board with. It should be a reference point that brings everything together.

Smashing Editorial
(ms, ra, il, al)


Continue reading here:

Making Distributed Product Teams Work More Efficiently With monday.com

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Better Collaboration By Bringing Designers Into The Code Review Process




Better Collaboration By Bringing Designers Into The Code Review Process

Ida Aalen



Smooth collaboration between developers and designers is something everyone aspires to, but it’s notoriously difficult. But with today’s advanced web, it’s difficult — if not impossible — to build a truly great product without collaborating across disciplines. Because of the range of technologies required to build a product, the product can only truly succeed when all disciplines — developers and designers, content creators, and user experience strategists — are deeply involved from the early stages of the project. When this happens, all ends of what it takes to build a product come naturally together into a unified whole, and a thus great product.

Because of this, no one is really promoting waterfall processes anymore. Nevertheless, involving other people early on, especially people from other disciplines, can feel scary. In the worst case scenario, it leads to “design by committee.”

Moreover, both designers and content strategists often have backgrounds in fields in which a sole creative genius is still the ideal. Having someone else proof your work can feel like a threat to your creativity.

So how can you involve people early on so that you’re avoiding the waterfall, but also making sure that you’re not setting yourself up for design by committee? I found my answer when learning about code reviews.

The Aha! Moment

In July 2017, I founded Confrere together with two developers, and we quickly hired our first engineer (I’m not a developer myself, I’m more of a UX or content designer). Our collaboration was running surprisingly smoothly, so much so that at our retrospectives, the recurring theme was that we all felt that we were “doing it right.”


Three people are smiling and sitting next to each other around a computer. From left to right, they are Dag-Inge (CTO), Ida (CPO) and Ingvild (Sr. Engineer).


Dag-Inge (CTO), myself (CPO) and Ingvild (Sr. Engineer). (Large preview)

I sat down with my colleagues to try to pinpoint what exactly it was that we were “doing right” so that we could try to preserve that feeling even as our company grew and our team expanded. We came to the realization that we all appreciated that the whole team was involved early on and that we were being honest and clear in our feedback to each other. Our CTO Dag-Inge added: “It works because we’re doing it as peers. You’re not being berated and just getting a list of faults”.

The word “peer” is what gave me the aha moment. I realized that those of us working within UX, design, and content have a lot to learn from developers when it comes to collaboration.

Peer reviewing in the form of code reviews is essential to how software gets built. To me, code reviews offer inspiration for improving collaboration within our own fields, but also a model for collaborating across fields and disciplines.

If you’re already familiar with code reviews, feel free to skip the next section.

What Is A Code Review?

A code review can be done in various ways. Today, the most typical form of code review happens in the way of so-called pull requests (using a technology called git). As illustrated below, the pull requests let other people on the team know that a developer has completed code that they wish to merge with the main code base. It also allows the team to review the code: they give feedback on the code before it gets merged, in case it needs improvement.

Pull requests have clearly defined roles: there is an author and a reviewer(s).


Ingvild and Dag-Inge is setting next to each other and smiling. An arrow indicated that Ingvild has sent code to Dag-Inge.


Ingvild (the author) requests a review from Dag-Inge (the reviewer). (Large preview)

As an example, let’s say our senior engineer Ingvild has made a change to Confrere’s sign-up flow. Before it is merged into the main code base and gets shipped, she (the author) creates a pull request to request a review from our CTO Dag-Inge (the reviewer). He won’t make any changes to her code, only add his comments.


Ingvild and Dag-Inge is setting next to each other. An arrow indicates that Dag-Inge has sent comments on code back to Ingvild.


Dag-Inge comments on Ingvild’s code. (Large preview)

It’s up to Ingvild how she wants to act on the feedback she received in the review. She’ll update her pull request with the changes she sees fit.


Ingvild and Dag-Inge are sitting next to each other. An arrow indicates that Ingvild is sending back her code to Dag-Inge, having looked through the code he commented on.


Ingvild updates her code with the changes she sees fit in light of Dag-Inge’s comments. (Large preview)

When the reviewer(s) approve the pull request, Ingvild can then merge her changes with the main code base.


Ingvild and Dag-Inge are sitting next to each other. A thumbs-up is displayed on the code review Dag-Inge has sent to Ingvild. And arrow indicates she pushes this code to the main repository.


After Dag-Inge gives the thumbs up, Ingvild can push the fix to production. (Large preview)

Why Bother Doing Code Review?

If you’ve never done code review, the process above might sound bureaucratic. If you have doubts, here’s a ton of blog posts and academic research about the advantages of code review.

Code reviews set the tone for the entire company that everything we do should be open to scrutiny from others, and that such scrutiny should be a welcome part of your workflow rather than viewed as threatening.

Bruce Johnson, co-founder of Full Story

Code review reduces risk. Having someone proof your work, and also knowing someone will proof your work, helps weed out
 errors and
 heightens quality. In addition, it ensures consistency and helps every team member familiarize with more of the code base.

When done right, code review also builds a culture for collaboration and openness. Trying to understand and critique other people’s work is an excellent way to learn, and so is getting honest feedback on your work.

Always having at least two people look over the code also curtails ideas of “my” code 
and “your” code.
 It’s our code.

Considering these advantages, a review shouldn’t just be for code.

Review Principles For All Disciplines, Not Just Code

With reviews, there is always one author and one or more reviewers. That means you can involve people early on without falling into design by committee.

First, I have to mention two important factors which will affect your team’s ability to do beneficial reviews. You don’t necessarily have to have mastered them, but as a minimum, you should aspire to the following:

  • You and your colleagues respect each other and each other’s disciplines.
  • You’re sufficiently self-assured in your own role so that you feel like you can both give and receive criticism (this is also connected to the team’s psychological safety).

Even if we’re not reviewing code, there’s a lot to learn from existing best practices for code reviews.

Within our team, we try to adhere to the following principles when doing reviews:

  1. Critique the work, 
not the author.
  2. Be critical, but remain 
affable and curious.
  3. Differentiate between a) Suggestions b) Requirements, c) Points that need discussion or clarification.
  4. Move discussions from
 text to face-to-face. (Video counts)
  5. Don’t forget to 
praise the good parts! What’s clever, creative, solid, original, funny, nice, and so on?

These principles weren’t actually written down until after we discussed why our collaboration was working so well. We all felt we were allowed to and expected to ask questions and suggest improvements already, and that our motivations were always about building something great together, and not about criticising another person.

Because we were being clear about what kind of feedback we were giving, and also remembered to praise each other’s good work, doing reviews was a positive force rather than a demotivating one.

An Example

To give you an idea of how our team uses review across disciplines and throughout a process, let’s look at how the different members of our team switched between the roles of author and reviewer when we created our sign-up flow.

Step 1: Requirements gathering

Author: Ida (UX)

Reviewers: Svein (strategy), Dag-Inge (engineering), Ingvild (engineering).


A whiteboard is showing rough sketches of a sign-up form. A man (Svein) and a woman (Ingvild) are smiling and discussing.


The team gathered around the whiteboard. Svein (CEO) to the left, Ingvild (Sr. Eng), to the right. (Large preview)

Whiteboard sessions can be exhausting if there’s no structure to them. To maintain productivity and creativity, we use the author/reviewer structure, even for something as seemingly basic as brainstorming on a whiteboard. In this case, in which we were coming up with the requirements for our sign-up flow, I got to be the author, and the rest of the team gave their feedback and acted as reviewers. Because they also knew they’d be able to review what I came up with in step 2 (plenty more opportunity for adjustments, suggestions, and improvements), we worked swiftly and were able to agree upon the requirements in under 2 hours.

Step 2: Mockup with microcopy

Author: Ida (UX)

Reviewers: Ingvild (engineering), Eivind (design), Svein (strategy).


A screenshot of a Google Doc mocking up a sign-up form with comments from team members Ingvild and Ida.


By mocking up in Google docs, it’s easy for people from all disciplines to provide feedback early on. (Large preview)

As an author, I created a mockup of the sign-up flow with microcopy. Did the sign-up flow make sense, from both the user and engineering perspective? And how could we improve the flow from a design and frontend perspective? At this stage, it was essential to work in a format in which it would be easy for all disciplines to give feedback (we opted for Google Docs, but it could also have been done with a tool like InvisionApp).

Step 3: Implementing the sign-up flow

Author: Ingvild (engineering)

Reviewer: Ida (UX) and Dag-Inge (engineering).

We had agreed upon the flow, the input fields, and the microcopy, and so it was up to Ingvild to implement it. Thanks to Surge, we can automatically create preview URLs of the changes so that people who can’t read code are able to give feedback at this stage as well.

Step 4: User testing

Author: Ida (UX)

Reviewer: The users.


Two women (Ida and a user) sitting next to eachother in front of a laptop.


Ida doing user testing on a small budget. (Large preview)

Yes, we consider user testing a form of review. We brought our newly built sign-up flow face-to-face with actual users. This step gave us a ton of insight, and the most significant changes in our sign-up flow came as a result.

Step 5: Design

Author: Eivind (design)

Reviewers: Ingvild (engineering) and Ida (UX).


A screenshot from Slack. Eivind, the designer, has posted a screenshot, and Ida replies with enthusiasm.


The first version of the sign-up flow was based on existing design components. In this stage, Eivind developed some new components to help improve the design. (Large preview)

When design suddenly shows up here in step 5, it might look a lot like a waterfall process. However, our designer Eivind had already been involved as a reviewer since step 2. He gave a bunch of useful feedback at that stage and was also able to start thinking about how we could improve the design of the sign-up flow beyond the existing modules in our design system. At this step, Eivind could also help solve some of the issues that we identified in the user testing.

Step 6: Implementation

Author: Ingvild (engineering)

Reviewer: Eivind (design), Ida (UX) and Dag-Inge (engineering).

And then we’re back to implementing.

Why review works

In summary, there’s always just one author, thus avoiding design by committee. By involving a range of disciplines as reviewers early on, we avoid having a waterfall process.

People can flag their concerns early and also start thinking about how they can contribute later on. The clearly defined roles keep the process on track.

Regular Review Walkthroughs

Taking inspiration from code walkthroughs, we also do regular review walkthroughs with different foci, guided by the following principles:

  • The walkthrough is done together.
  • One person is in charge of reviewing and documenting.
  • The idea is to identify issues, not necessarily to solve them.
  • Choose a format that gives as much context as possible, so that it’s easy to act upon the findings later (e.g. InvisionApp for visual reviews, Google Docs for text, and so on).

We’ve done review walkthroughs for things such as accessibility audits, reviewing feature requests, auditing the implementation of the design, and doing heuristic usability evaluations.

When we do our quarterly accessibility reviews, our accessibility consultant Joakim first goes through the interface and documents and prioritizes the issues he’s found in a shared Google Sheet. Joakim then walks us through the most important issues he’s identified.

Meeting face-to-face (or at least on video) to go through the issues helps create an environment for learning rather than a feeling of being supervised or micromanaged.


Three people in a sofa gathered around a laptop. They’re discussing and smiling.


Accessibility review: Joakim (right) walks Ingvild and Dag-Inge through the accessibility issues he found in his audit. (Large preview)

If you find yourself always being tied up with something that’s due for release, or fixing whatever is at the top of your inbox, reviews can help remedy that. If you set aside regular half days for reviewing work you’ve already done, you can identify issues before they become urgent. It can also help you refocus and make sure you’re priorities are keeping along the right lines. Your team should maybe not begin building that new feature before you’re confident that the existing features are living up to your standards.

User Testing Is A Form Of Review

An important motivation for code reviews is to reduce risk. By doing it every single time you introduce a change or add something new to your product, and not just when you suspect something is maybe not up to par, you diminish the chance of shipping bugs or subpar features. I believe we should look at user testing from the same perspective.

You see, if you want to reduce the risk of shipping with major usability issues, user testing has to be part of your process. Just having your UX designers review the interface isn’t enough. Several studies have found that even usability experts fail in identifying every actual usability problems. On average, 1 in 3 issues identified by experts were false alarms — they weren’t issues for users in practice. But worse, 1 in 2 issues that users did in fact have, were overlooked by the experts.

Skipping user testing is just as big a risk as skipping code review.

Does Review Mean Death To Creativity?

People working within design, user experience, and content often have educational backgrounds from art schools or maybe literature, in which the sole creator or creative artistic genius is hailed as the ideal. If you go back in history, this used to be the case for developers as well. Over time, this has changed by necessity as web development has grown more complex.

If you cling to the idea of creativity coming from somewhere deep within yourself, the idea of review might feel threatening or scary. Someone meddling in your half-finished work? Ouch. But if you think about creativity as something that can spring from many sources, including dialogue, collaboration, or any form of inspiration (whether from the outside or from someplace within you), then a review is only an asset and an opportunity.

As long as we’re building something for the web, there’s no way around collaborating with other people, be it within our own field or others. And a good idea will survive review.

Let’s create something great together.

Smashing Editorial
(rb, ra, yk, il)


Original article: 

Better Collaboration By Bringing Designers Into The Code Review Process

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