Tag Archives: product

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The Most Effective Ecommerce Lead Generation Tips and Strategies

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I have some bad news for you. It might hurt. Everything you’ve read about lead generation strategies might not apply to your business. Why? Because ecommerce lead generation is different. If you run a business outside the ecommerce family, feel free to check out another Crazy Egg article that applies to your company. For those of you in the ecommerce market, though, we need to set a few things straight. I’m going to share with you my best tips for effective ecommerce lead generation, and you might notice that they’re not the same as the tactics you might use for,…

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The Most Effective Ecommerce Lead Generation Tips and Strategies

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The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions

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The ultimate end goal for every single visitor to your website is to turn them into a customer or a recurring visitor. The problem is that turning visitors into regulars can be tricky. Really tricky. There is, however, an easier way to convert visitors without wasting your time or theirs—and it comes in an unexpected form. Pop-up form, to be exact. Simply by using well placed popup forms, you can boost your email subscription rate by 317% or more. With this in mind, we’re going to take a look at our top seven pop-up recommendations and discover how they’ll help…

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The Top 7 Popup Forms to Skyrocket Your Conversions

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Moving the needle: Strategic metric setting for your experimentation program

Once you have your metrics and KPIs set, you’ll want to devise a system for tracking and sharing your results….Read blog postabout:Moving the needle: Strategic metric setting for your experimentation program

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Moving the needle: Strategic metric setting for your experimentation program

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Landing Page Optimization: Best Practices, Tips and Tools (2018)

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Landing page optimization doesn’t happen overnight. That’s why marketers get frustrated — and often give up. If you want better landing pages, focus on collecting data. You should design your landing pages based on what you already know about your audience, but don’t stop there — make sure you collect even more information as more people visit your website. Converting that data into informed decisions about your marketing funnel can produce more leads and sales. Today, I’m going to teach you my best landing page optimization tips and tricks so you can attract more prospects and convert more customers. If…

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Landing Page Optimization: Best Practices, Tips and Tools (2018)

Sketching With Confidence, Clarity And Imagination

Full-day workshop • June 28th Being able to sketch is like speaking an additional language that enables you to structure and express your thoughts and ideas more clearly, quickly and in a engaging way. For anyone working in UX, design, marketing and product development in general, sketching is a valuable technique to feel comfortable with.
Thinking through complex problems on your own, spontaneously pitching an idea at the whiteboard, bringing a user scenario to life in a storyboard or creating sketchnotes during a research interview: the ability to sketch is as versatile and useful as the ability to write.

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Sketching With Confidence, Clarity And Imagination

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Once Upon A Time: Using Story Structure For Better Engagement




Once Upon A Time: Using Story Structure For Better Engagement

John Rhea



Stories form the connective tissue of our lives. They’re our experiences, our memories, and our entertainment. They have rhythms and structures that keep us engaged. In this article, we’ll look at how those same rhythms and structures can help us enrich and enhance the user experience.

In his seminal work Hero With A Thousand Faces, Joseph Campbell identified a structure that rings true across a wide variety of stories. He called this “The Hero’s Journey,” but his book explaining it was 300+ pages so we’ll use a simplified version of Campbell’s work or a jazzified version of the plot structure you probably learned about in elementary school:


The Hero’s journey begins in the ordinary world. An inciting incident happens to draw the hero into the story. The hero prepares to face the ordeal/climax. The hero actually faces the ordeal. Then the hero must return to the ordinary world and finally there is resolution to the story.


Once upon a time… a hero went on a journey.

The ordinary world/exposition is where our hero/protagonist/person/thing/main character starts. It’s the every day, the safe, the boring, the life the hero already knows.

The inciting incident is the event or thing that pulls or (more often) pushes the hero into the story. It’s what gets them involved in the story whether they want to be or not.

In the rising action/preparation phase, the hero prepares (sometimes unknowingly) for the ordeal/climax which is when they go up against the villain (and prevail!).

After the hero prevails against the villain, they must return to their ordinary world and bring back the new knowledge and/or mythical object they got from/for defeating the villain.

Finally, in the Resolution, we tie up all the loose ends and throw a dance party.

We can apply this same structure to the experience of the user or — as I like to call it — the “user journey.”

  • Ordinary World
    Where the user starts (their every day).
  • Inciting Incident
    They have a problem they need solved.
  • Rising Action
    They’ve found your product/service/website and they think it might work to solve their problem, but they need to decide that this is the product/service/website will solve their problem. So in this step they gather facts and figures and feelings to determine if this thing will work. It could be deciding if the type of video game news covered on this site is the kind of news they want to consume or deciding whether this type of pen will solve their writing needs or whether the graphic design prowess of this agency can make their new website super awesome.
  • The Ordeal
    The fight to make a decision about purchasing that pen or adding that news site to your regularly checked sites or contacting that agency for a quote.
  • The Road Back
    Decision made, the road back is about moving forward with that purchase, regular reading, or requesting the quote.
  • Resolution
    Where they apply your product/service/website to their problem and it is mightily solved.

If we consider this structure as we look at user interactions, there are lots of ways we can put ourselves in the user’s shoes and optimize their experience, providing support (and sometimes a good shove) exactly when they need it.

Here are some techniques. Some apply to just one part of the User Journey while some apply to several parts at once:

Journey With Your Users

Stories take time. Movies aren’t done in two minutes; they take two hours to watch and absorb. They are a journey.

If you always only ever shout “BUY! BUY! BUY!” you may make a few quick sales, but you won’t encourage long-term loyalty. Journey with your users, and they’ll count on you when they have a problem you can solve.

InVision’s newsletter journeys with you. In this recent newsletter, they sent an article about Questlove and what we can learn from him concerning creativity. If you click through, other than the URL, the word “InVision” does not appear on the page. They’re not pushing the sale, but providing relevant, interesting content to the main audience of people who use their products. I haven’t yet been in the market for their services, but if/when I am, there won’t be much of an Ordeal or fight for approval. They’ve proven their worth as a traveling companion. They’re someone I can count on.


InVision provides great, usable content that addresses customer interests and needs without shoving their products in your face.


InVision is on a quest to have you love them.

Journeying with your users can take many forms, only one of which is content marketing. You could also build training programs that help them move from beginner to expert in using your app or site. You could add high touch parts to your sales process or specific technical support that will help you come alongside your user and their needs. In contexts of quick visits to a website you might use visuals or wording that’s down-to-earth, warm, welcoming, and feels personable to your main audience. You want to show the user they can count on you when they have a problem.

Give ‘Em A Shove

Users need an inciting incident to push them into the user journey, often more than one push. They have a lot going on in their lives. Maybe they’re working on a big project or are on vacation or their kid played frisbee with their laptop. They may have lost or never opened your first email. So don’t hesitate to send them a follow-up. Show them the difference between life without your product or service and life with it. Heroes are pushed into a story because their old life, their ordinary world, is no longer tenable given the knowledge or circumstances they now have.

Nick Stephenson helps authors sell more books (and uses the hero’s journey to think through his websites and marketing). Last fall he sent out a friendly reminder about a webinar he was doing. He gets straight to the point reminding us about his webinar, but provides value by giving us a way to ask questions and voice concerns. He also lets us know that this is a limited time offer, if we want the new life his webinar can bring we’ve got to step into the story before it’s too late.


Nick Stephenson follows up with content and value to help his audience not miss out on opportunities.


Didn’t want you to miss out if your cat barfed on your keyboard and deleted my last email.

Give your users more than one opportunity to buy your product. That doesn’t mean shove it down their throat every chance you get, but follow up and follow through will do wonders for your bottom line and help you continue to build trust. Many heroes need a push to get them into the story. Your users may need a shove or well-placed follow up email or blaring call to action too.

Give Out Magic Swords

By now you know your users will face an ordeal. So why not pass out magic swords, tools that will help them slay the ordeal easily?

Whenever I have tried to use Amazon’s Web Services, I’ve always been overwhelmed by the choices and the number of steps needed to get something to work. A one button solution it is not.

But on their homepage, they hand me a magic sword to help me slay my dragon of fear.


AWS touts how easy it is to get up and running.


The horror-stories-of-hard are false. You can do this.

They use a 1-2-3 graphic to emphasize ease. With the gradient, they also subtly show the change from where you started (1) to where you’ll end (3) just like what a character does in a story. My discussion above could make this ring hollow, but I believe they do two things that prevent that.

First, number two offers lots of 10-minute tutorials for “multiple use cases” There seems to be meat there, not a fluffy tutorial that won’t apply to your situation. Ten minutes isn’t long, but can show something substantially and “multiple use cases” hints that one of these may well apply to your situation.

Second, number three is not “You’ll be done.” It’s “Start building with AWS.” You’ll be up and running in as easy as 1, 2, 3. At step 3 you’ll be ready to bring your awesome to their platform. The building is what I know and can pwn. Get me past the crazy setup and I’m good.

Find out what your user’s ordeal is. Is it that a competitor has a lower price? Or they’re scared of the time and expertise it’ll take to get your solution to work? Whatever it is, develop resources that will help them say Yes to you. If the price is a factor, provide information on the value they get or how you take care of all the work or show them it will cost them more, in the long run, to go with a different solution.

No One is Average

So many stories are about someone specific because we can identify with them. Ever sat through a movie with a bland, “everyman” character? Not if you could help it and definitely not a second time. If you sell to the average person, you’ll be selling to no one. No one believes themselves to be average.

Coke’s recent “Share a Coke” campaign used this brilliantly. First, they printed a wide variety of names on their products. This could have backfired.


For Coke’s Share a Coke campaign they printed the names of many different people on their bottles.


You got friends? We got their name on our product. Buy it or be a terrible friend. Your choice. (Photo by Mike Mozart from Funny YouTube, USA)

My name isn’t Natasha, Sandy or Maurice. But it wasn’t “Buy a Coke,” it was “Share a Coke.” And I know a Natasha, a Sandy, and a Maurice. I could buy it for those friends for the novelty of it or buy my name if I found it ( “John” is so uncommon in the U.S. it’s hard to find anything that has my name on it besides unidentified men and commodes.)

So often we target an average user to broaden the appeal for a product/service/website, and to an extent, this is a good thing, but when we get overly broad, we risk interesting no one.

You Ain’t The Protagonist

You are not the protagonist of your website. You are a guide, a map, a directional sign. You are Obi-Wan Kenobi on Luke’s journey to understand the force. That’s because the story of your product is not your story, this isn’t the Clone Wars (I disavow Episodes I-III), it’s your user’s story, it’s A New Hope. Your users are the ones who should take the journey. First, they had a big hairy problem. They found your product or service that solved that big hairy problem. There was much rejoicing, but if you want them to buy you aren’t the hero that saves the day, you’re the teacher who enables them to save their day. (I am indebted to Donald Miller and his excellent “Story Brand” podcast for driving this point home for me.)

Zaxby’s focuses on how they’ll help you with messages like “Cure your craving” and “Bring some FLAVOR to your next Event!” The emphasis on “flavor” and “your” is borne out in the design and helps to communicate what they do and how they will help you solve your problem. But “you”, the user, is the hero, because you’re the one bringing it to the event. You will get the high fives from colleagues for bringing the flavor. Zaxby’s helps you get that victory.


Zaxby’s focuses all of their language on how their chicken helps you.


With Zaxby’s chicken YOU’re unstoppable.

Furthermore, we’re all self-centered, some more than others, and frankly, users don’t care about you unless it helps them. They only care about the awards you’ve won if it helps them get the best product or service they can. They are not independently happy for you.

At a recent marketers event I attended, the social media managers for a hospital said one of their most shared articles was a piece about the number of their doctors who were considered the top doctors in the region by an independent ranking. People rarely shared the hospital’s successes before, but they shared this article like crazy. I believe it’s because the user could say, “I’m so great at choosing doctors. I picked one of the best in the region!” Rather than “look at the hospital” users were saying “look at me!” Whenever you can make your success their success you’ll continue your success.

Celebrate Their Win

Similar to above, their success is your success. Celebrate their success and they’ll thank you for it.

Putting together any email campaign is arduous. There are a thousand things to do and it takes time and effort to get them right. Once I’ve completed that arduous journey, I never want to see another email again. But MailChimp turns that around. They have this tiny animation where their monkey mascot, Freddie, gives you the rock on sign. It’s short, delightful, and ignorable if you want to. And that little celebration animation energizes me to grab the giant email ball of horrors and run for the end zone yet again. Exactly what Mailchimp wants me to do.


Mailchimp celebrates your completed mail campaign with a rock on sign.


Gosh, creating that email campaign made me want to curl into the fetal position and weep, but now I almost want to make another one.

So celebrate your user’s victories as if they were your own. When they succeed at using your product or get through your tutorial or you deliver their website, throw a dance party and make them feel awesome.

The Purchase Is Not The Finish Line

The end of one story is often the beginning of another. If we get the client to buy and then drop off the face of the Earth that client won’t be back. I’ve seen this with a lot of web agencies that excel in the sales game, but when the real work of building the website happens, they pass you off to an unresponsive project manager.

Squarespace handles this transition well with a “We got you” email. You click purchase, and they send you an email detailing their 24/7 support and fast response times. You also get the smiling faces of five people who may or may not, have or still work there. And it doesn’t matter if they work there or never did. This email tells the user “We’ve got you, we understand, and we will make sure you succeed.”


Squarespace doesn’t leave you once they’ve gotten you to buy. They send you an email showing off their 24/7 support and how they’re going to make you awesome.


We’ve got your back, person-who-listened-to-a-podcast-recently and wanted to start a website.

This harkens all the way back to journeying with your user. Would you want to travel with the guy who leaves as soon as you got him past the hard part? No, stick with your users and they’ll stick with you.

The Resolution

We are storytelling animals. Story structure resonates with the rhythms of our lives. It provides a framework for looking at user experience and can help you understand their point of view at different points in the process. It also helps you tweak it such that it’s a satisfying experience for you and your users.

You got to the end of this article. Allow me to celebrate your success with a dance party.

Celebrating your conquest of this article with a gif dance party.
Let the embarrassing dancing commence!
Smashing Editorial
(cc, ra, il)


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Once Upon A Time: Using Story Structure For Better Engagement

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The Best Customer Acquisition Techniques You Need to Start Testing

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Customer acquisition is all about convincing people to buy your products or service. That’s it. But it’s more complicated than you might think. You have to understand your customers’ buyers journeys and how they make the decision to buy (or to not buy). You might have heard that old adage about how much less expensive it is to retain customers than to acquire them. In fact, it’s about five times less expensive. That statistic sounds powerful, but it leaves an important element out of the equation. To retain customers, you first must acquire them. If you already have 10 million…

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3 Best Ways to Increase Conversions Through Influencer Content

The power of a word of mouth is incredible and it should never be underestimated. People refer other users’ recommendations way too often to neglect them. That is where the power of influencer content comes into play. Due to the massive reach and engagement, the opinion of a thought leader helps build brand awareness and increase conversion rates for your brand. The outcome however will depend on how well you formulate your influencer marketing. Working with the niche influencers is not only a good way to promote your product, but also to create quality content. Focus on long-term benefits, and…

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3 Best Ways to Increase Conversions Through Influencer Content

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Making Market Forces Work for You: A Q&A With Product Positioning Pro April Dunford

There are only a few instances when I wish I could travel back in time. One is when I’m reading the kid’s menu. One is when I stumble upon Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure on TBS. And one is after I’ve launched a new product or campaign.

You and I may share that last one.

Though we typically know the T’s are crossed and I’s are dotted, it’s the pesky unknowns us marketers wrestle with before a new product launch that keep us up at night. Things like: Is the product’s name right? Is the copy clear, but boring? Clever, but convoluted? Is the value as obvious as it should be?

Beyond messaging, most often, it comes down to whether your product’s positioning is right from the start; whether you set the product up in the right conditions and market category in the first place.

We all know the market is more saturated than ever. But what if, instead of fighting it, we used that momentum to our advantage?

April Dunford is the Founder of Rocket Launch Marketing, the former VP of Marketing for a series of high-growth startups and previous executive at big-wig companies like IBM and Nortel. She’s also a speaker, author and in-demand consultant specializing in product positioning. Advising companies on go-to-market strategy and messaging, she ensures they’re going after the right category and communicating their offering in a way that grabs prospects’ attention and makes its value crystal clear.

Basically, April knows her stuff. And she’ll be bringing her smarts to the CTAConf stage in August! But we have the patience of a toddler waiting for an iPad to charge, so we peppered her with some burning questions in anticipation of her talk. She was the top-rated speaker at last year’s conference, so we know this year’s gonna be good. You can enjoy a little time traveling to 2017 via the clip below:


Check out our Q&A with April below and keep your eyes peeled for the exclusive-to-everyone-who-reads-this-post discount code to see her in person.

First thing’s first: What exactly is product positioning and how does it differ from brand positioning?

April: You might say “Positioning” has its own positioning problem! It’s such a misunderstood concept. For some folks it’s mainly a messaging exercise, while others associate it very closely with branding. But positioning is much, much broader than either of those things.

Product positioning describes the specific market you intend to win and why you are uniquely qualified to win it. It’s the underpinning of your go-to-market strategy and impacts everything from marketing to sales, to customer success and the product itself.

What’s the first thing a client asks when you sit down with them?

April: Most CEOs don’t know it’s a product positioning problem they have. They know their customers have a hard time understanding what their product is all about and why they should care. That confusion results in long sales cycles, low close rates and poor marketing campaign performance.

A lot of the work I do is centered around teaching folks how to create context for their products by focusing on making value obvious to customers. Positioning as a concept isn’t new but, until now, we’ve all been pretty terrible at actually doing the work it requires. I teach companies a process for finding and delivering the best position for their products.

What’s the most common mistake you’ve seen businesses make with their go-to-market strategy?

April: Hands down, the most common mistake I see is companies trying to market to a set of customers that is much too broad. The reasoning is that, by going after a massive market, it will be easier to claim a small piece of it.

In reality, the opposite is true. Broad targeting puts your offering in direct competition with established market leaders that can both out-market and out-sell you. Beyond that, it leads to diluted messaging that waters down your best features and differentiators.

The easier—and far more effective thing to do—is target a smaller slice of customers who are highly suited to your product’s key features and the distinct value they can deliver.

Customers who most acutely feel the pain you address will be the most excited about your solution to that pain. They’ll pay you more, close faster and love your product so much they’ll end up marketing it for you. (Editor’s note: AKA the Holy Grail of marketing.)

Once you’ve established yourself with these highly suitable customers, you can build on your strengths and start to expand your targets to larger markets.

Can you tell us about the most challenging product positioning case you’ve worked on?

April: At IBM, I led the launch of a family of products that demanded an entirely new market category built from scratch. We had to convince customers, experts and analysts that certain market forces existed and would inevitably redraw the lines around existing market categories. On top of that, I had to convince them that IBM was the only company capable of drawing those lines.

There was also a catch: The products we had in that family weren’t particularly innovative on their own, at least not at the beginning. So the story itself hinged on convincing people that all of this revolutionary change was going to be sparked by the innovative combination of some pretty ho-hum products.

We managed to pull it off through sheer guts, a sprinkling of good luck and the deep marketing talent of my team at the time. But mainly, guts.

Your upcoming talk at CTAConf is about how to turn “marketing headwinds into tailwinds.” What do you mean by that?

April: In any market category, you’ll encounter extremely powerful forces that can either work for you or against you.

We often position our products in markets with strong competitors who are already perceived as leaders. Like swimming upstream, or fighting headwinds, we have to work extra hard to win in that environment.

Luckily, most products can be positioned in many different markets that offer greater chances of success. We just have to find ones where that inherent force is pushing us forward, like a tailwind, instead of pushing back on us.

In my talk, I’m going to outline exactly how you can use existing market forces to your advantage and grow revenue faster.

Want to hear this talk at CTAConf 2018? Get 10% off all Early Bird tickets ($80 off for General Attendees) by using the code “AprilCTAConf2018” at checkout.

What should marketers consider, before anything else, when launching a new product?

April: The success of a launch depends on how well you understand three things:

  1. The problem your product solves and the competition it faces.
  2. The true value your product delivers for customers.
  3. Which types of customers care the most about that value and, most importantly, why?

If you’ve got these down, you’ll know exactly who you need to reach, the channels you need to use to reach those people and the value proposition you need to communicate.

What should marketers be doing differently now in terms of product positioning vs. five years ago?

April: We should start doing it! Most companies don’t deliberately position their product. They assume a default positioning based on how they first thought about it.

For example, say you’ve built a new email client. But after you got it into the market, you got some feedback, added or removed features and continued to iterate on it. Now you may have a solution that’s best positioned as a “group chat” or “social network” or “team collaboration tool” instead of focusing on email capabilities.

The market frame of reference you choose will completely change the way customers perceive your product and their expectations around pricing, features, support and your competitors.

Because the markets are more crowded, more competitive and shifting faster than they ever have before, we can’t get away with ignoring product positioning if we want our products to be successful.

Get every actionable detail of April’s positioning framework and go-to-market guide in her upcoming talk at Call to Action Conference, this August 27-29. Use the code “AprilCTAConf2018” at checkout for 10% off single, group and customer rates (that’s on top of the Early Bird discount, ending May 31st)! Want more reasons to go? Click here for a bunch of ‘em.

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Making Market Forces Work for You: A Q&A With Product Positioning Pro April Dunford

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Building Mobile Apps Using React Native And WordPress




Building Mobile Apps Using React Native And WordPress

Muhammad Muhsin



As web developers, you might have thought that mobile app development calls for a fresh learning curve with another programming language. Perhaps Java and Swift need to be added to your skill set to hit the ground running with both iOS and Android, and that might bog you down.

But this article has you in for a surprise! We will look at building an e-commerce application for iOS and Android using the WooCommerce platform as our backend. This would be an ideal starting point for anyone willing to get into native cross-platform development.

A Brief History Of Cross-Platform Development

It’s 2011, and we see the beginning of hybrid mobile app development. Frameworks like Apache Cordova, PhoneGap, and Ionic Framework slowly emerge. Everything looks good, and web developers are eagerly coding away mobile apps with their existing knowledge.

However, mobile apps still looked like mobile versions of websites. No native designs like Android’s material design or iOS’s flat look. Navigation worked similar to the web and transitions were not buttery smooth. Users were not satisfied with apps built using the hybrid approach and dreamt of the native experience.

Fast forward to March 2015, and React Native appears on the scene. Developers are able to build truly native cross-platform applications using React, a favorite JavaScript library for many developers. They are now easily able to learn a small library on top of what they know with JavaScript. With this knowledge, developers are now targeting the web, iOS and Android.

Furthermore, changes done to the code during development are loaded onto the testing devices almost instantly! This used to take several minutes when we had native development through other approaches. Developers are able to enjoy the instant feedback they used to love with web development.

React developers are more than happy to be able to use existing patterns they have followed into a new platform altogether. In fact, they are targeting two more platforms with what they already know very well.

This is all good for front-end development. But what choices do we have for back-end technology? Do we still have to learn a new language or framework?

The WordPress REST API

In late 2016, WordPress released the much awaited REST API to its core, and opened the doors for solutions with decoupled backends.

So, if you already have a WordPress and WooCommerce website and wish to retain exactly the same offerings and user profiles across your website and native app, this article is for you!

Assumptions Made In This Article

I will walk you through using your WordPress skill to build a mobile app with a WooCommerce store using React Native. The article assumes:

  • You are familiar with the different WordPress APIs, at least at a beginner level.
  • You are familiar with the basics of React.
  • You have a WordPress development server ready. I use Ubuntu with Apache.
  • You have an Android or an iOS device to test with Expo.

What We Will Build In This Tutorial

The project we are going to build through this article is a fashion store app. The app will have the following functionalities:

  • Shop page listing all products,
  • Single product page with details of the selected item,
  • ‘Add to cart’ feature,
  • ‘Show items in cart’ feature,
  • ‘Remove item from cart’ feature.

This article aims to inspire you to use this project as a starting point to build complex mobile apps using React Native.

Note: For the full application, you can visit my project on Github and clone it.

Getting Started With Our Project

We will begin building the app as per the official React Native documentation. Having installed Node on your development environment, open up the command prompt and type in the following command to install the Create React Native App globally.

npm install -g create-react-native-app

Next, we can create our project

create-react-native-app react-native-woocommerce-store

This will create a new React Native project which we can test with Expo.

Next, we will need to install the Expo app on our mobile device which we want to test. It is available for both iOS and Android.

On having installed the Expo app, we can run npm start on our development machine.

cd react-native-woocommerce-store

npm start


Starting a React Native project through the command line via Expo. (Large preview)

After that, you can scan the QR code through the Expo app or enter the given URL in the app’s search bar. This will run the basic ‘Hello World’ app in the mobile. We can now edit App.js to make instant changes to the app running on the phone.

Alternatively, you can run the app on an emulator. But for brevity and accuracy, we will cover running it on an actual device.

Next, let’s install all the required packages for the app using this command:

npm install -s axios react-native-htmlview react-navigation react-redux redux redux-thunk

Setting Up A WordPress Site

Since this article is about creating a React Native app, we will not go into details about creating a WordPress site. Please refer to this article on how to install WordPress on Ubuntu. As WooCommerce REST API requires HTTPS, please make sure it is set up using Let’s Encrypt. Please refer to this article for a how-to guide.

We are not creating a WordPress installation on localhost since we will be running the app on a mobile device, and also since HTTPS is needed.

Once WordPress and HTTPS are successfully set up, we can install the WooCommerce plugin on the site.


Installing the WooCommerce plugin to our WordPress installation. (Large preview)

After installing and activating the plugin, continue with the WooCommerce store setup by following the wizard. After the wizard is complete, click on ‘Return to dashboard.’

You will be greeted by another prompt.


Adding example products to WooCommerce. (Large preview)

Click on ‘Let’s go‘ to ‘Add example products’. This will save us the time to create our own products to display in the app.

Constants File

To load our store’s products from the WooCommerce REST API, we need the relevant keys in place inside our app. For this purpose, we can have a constans.js file.

First create a folder called ‘src’ and create subfolders inside as follows:


Create the file ‘Constants.js’ within the constans folder. (Large preview)

Now, let’s generate the keys for WooCommerce. In the WordPress dashboard, navigate to WooCommerce → Settings → API → Keys/Apps and click on ‘Add Key.’

Next create a Read Only key with name React Native. Copy over the Consumer Key and Consumer Secret to the constants.js file as follows:

const Constants = 
   URL: 
wc: 'https://woocommerce-store.on-its-way.com/wp-json/wc/v2/'
   ,
   Keys: 
ConsumerKey: 'CONSUMER_KEY_HERE',
ConsumerSecret: 'CONSUMER_SECRET_HERE'
   
}
export default Constants;

Starting With React Navigation

React Navigation is a community solution to navigating between the different screens and is a standalone library. It allows developers to set up the screens of the React Native app with just a few lines of code.

There are different navigation methods within React Navigation:

  • Stack,
  • Switch,
  • Tabs,
  • Drawer,
  • and more.

For our Application we will use a combination of StackNavigation and DrawerNavigation to navigate between the different screens. StackNavigation is similar to how browser history works on the web. We are using this since it provides an interface for the header and the header navigation icons. It has push and pop similar to stacks in data structures. Push means we add a new screen to the top of the Navigation Stack. Pop removes a screen from the stack.

The code shows that the StackNavigation, in fact, houses the DrawerNavigation within itself. It also takes properties for the header style and header buttons. We are placing the navigation drawer button to the left and the shopping cart button to the right. The drawer button switches the drawer on and off whereas the cart button takes the user to the shopping cart screen.

const StackNavigation = StackNavigator(
 DrawerNavigation:  screen: DrawerNavigation 
}, 
   headerMode: 'float',
   navigationOptions: ( navigation, screenProps ) => (
     headerStyle:  backgroundColor: '#4C3E54' ,
     headerTintColor: 'white',
     headerLeft: drawerButton(navigation),
     headerRight: cartButton(navigation, screenProps)
   })
 });

const drawerButton = (navigation) => (
 <Text
   style= padding: 15, color: 'white' }
   onPress=() => 
     if (navigation.state.index === 0) 
       navigation.navigate('DrawerOpen')
      else 
       navigation.navigate('DrawerClose')
     
   }
   }> (
 <Text style= padding: 15, color: 'white' }
   onPress=() =>  navigation.navigate('CartPage') }
 >
   <EvilIcons name="cart" size=30 />
   screenProps.cartCount
 </Text>
);

DrawerNavigation on the other hands provides for the side drawer which will allow us to navigate between Home, Shop, and Cart. The DrawerNavigator lists the different screens that the user can visit, namely Home page, Products page, Product page, and Cart page. It also has a property which will take the Drawer container: the sliding menu which opens up when clicking the hamburger menu.

const DrawerNavigation = DrawerNavigator(
 Home: 
   screen: HomePage,
   navigationOptions: 
     title: "RN WC Store"
   
 },
 Products: 
   screen: Products,
   navigationOptions: 
     title: "Shop"
   
 },
 Product: 
   screen: Product,
   navigationOptions: ( navigation ) => (
     title: navigation.state.params.product.name
   ),
 },
 CartPage: 
   screen: CartPage,
   navigationOptions: 
     title: "Cart"
   
 }
}, 
   contentComponent: DrawerContainer
 );

#


Left: The Home page (homepage.js). Right: The open drawer (DrawerContainer.js).

Injecting The Redux Store To App.js

Since we are using Redux in this app, we have to inject the store into our app. We do this with the help of the Provider component.

const store = configureStore();

class App extends React.Component 
 render() 
   return (
     <Provider store=store>    
       <ConnectedApp />    
     </Provider>    
   )
 }
}

We will then have a ConnectedApp component so that we can have the cart count in the header.

class CA extends React.Component 
 render() 
   const cart = 
     cartCount: this.props.cart.length
   
   return (
     <StackNavigation screenProps=cart />
   );
 }
}

function mapStateToProps(state) 
 return 
   cart: state.cart
 ;
}

const ConnectedApp = connect(mapStateToProps, null)(CA);

Redux Store, Actions, And Reducers

In Redux, we have three different parts:

  1. Store
    Holds the whole state of your entire application. The only way to change state is to dispatch an action to it.
  2. Actions
    A plain object that represents an intention to change the state.
  3. Reducers
    A function that accepts a state and an action type and returns a new state.

These three components of Redux help us achieve a predictable state for the entire app. For simplicity, we will look at how the products are fetched and saved in the Redux store.

First of all, let’s look at the code for creating the store:

let middleware = [thunk];

export default function configureStore() 
    return createStore(
        RootReducer,
        applyMiddleware(...middleware)
    );

Next, the products action is responsible for fetching the products from the remote website.

export function getProducts() 
   return (dispatch) => 
       const url = `$Constants.URL.wcproducts?per_page=100&consumer_key=$Constants.Keys.ConsumerKey&consumer_secret=$Constants.Keys.ConsumerSecret`
      
       return axios.get(url).then(response => 
           dispatch(
               type: types.GET_PRODUCTS_SUCCESS,
               products: response.data
           
       )}).catch(err => 
           console.log(err.error);
       )
   };
}

The products reducer is responsible for returning the payload of data and whether it needs to be modified.

export default function (state = InitialState.products, action) 
    switch (action.type) 
        case types.GET_PRODUCTS_SUCCESS:
            return action.products;
        default:
            return state;
    
}

Displaying The WooCommerce Shop

The products.js file is our Shop page. It basically displays the list of products from WooCommerce.

class ProductsList extends Component 

 componentDidMount() 
   this.props.ProductAction.getProducts(); 
 

 _keyExtractor = (item, index) => item.id;

 render() 
   const  navigate  = this.props.navigation;
   const Items = (
     <FlatList contentContainerStyle=styles.list numColumns=2
       data=this.props.products  
       keyExtractor=this._keyExtractor
       renderItem=
         ( item ) => (
           <TouchableHighlight style= width: '50%' } onPress=() => navigate("Product",  product: item )} underlayColor="white">
             <View style=styles.view >
               <Image style=styles.image source= uri: item.images[0].src } />
               <Text style=styles.text>item.name</Text>
             </View>
           </TouchableHighlight>
         )
       }
     />
   );
   return (
     <ScrollView>
       this.props.products.length ? Items :
         <View style= alignItems: 'center', justifyContent: 'center' }>
           <Image style=styles.loader source=LoadingAnimation />
         </View>
       }
     </ScrollView>
   );
 }
}

this.props.ProductAction.getProducts() and this.props.products are possible because of mapStateToProps and mapDispatchToProps.


Products listing screen. (Large preview)

mapStateToProps and mapDispatchToProps

State is the Redux store and Dispatch is the actions we fire. Both of these will be exposed as props in the component.

function mapStateToProps(state) 
 return 
   products: state.products
 ;
}
function mapDispatchToProps(dispatch) 
 return 
   ProductAction: bindActionCreators(ProductAction, dispatch)
 ;
}
export default connect(mapStateToProps, mapDispatchToProps)(ProductsList);

Styles

In React, Native styles are generally defined on the same page. It’s similar to CSS, but we use camelCase properties instead of hyphenated properties.

const styles = StyleSheet.create(
 list: 
   flexDirection: 'column'
 ,
 view: 
   padding: 10
 ,
 loader: 
   width: 200,
   height: 200,
   alignItems: 'center',
   justifyContent: 'center',
 ,
 image: 
   width: 150,
   height: 150
 ,
 text: 
   textAlign: 'center',
   fontSize: 20,
   padding: 5
 
});

Single Product Page

This page contains details of a selected product. It shows the user the name, price, and description of the product. It also has the ‘Add to cart’ function.


Single product page. (Large preview)

Cart Page

This screen shows the list of items in the cart. The action has the functions getCart, addToCart, and removeFromCart. The reducer handles the actions likewise. Identification of actions is done through actionTypes — constants which describe the action that are stored in a separate file.

export const GET_PRODUCTS_SUCCESS = 'GET_PRODUCTS_SUCCESS'
export const GET_PRODUCTS_FAILED = 'GET_PRODUCTS_FAILED';

export const GET_CART_SUCCESS = 'GET_CART_SUCCESS';
export const ADD_TO_CART_SUCCESS = 'ADD_TO_CART_SUCCESS';
export const REMOVE_FROM_CART_SUCCESS = 'REMOVE_FROM_CART_SUCCESS';

This is the code for the CartPage component:

class CartPage extends React.Component 

 componentDidMount() 
   this.props.CartAction.getCart();
 

 _keyExtractor = (item, index) => item.id;

 removeItem(item) 
   this.props.CartAction.removeFromCart(item);
 

 render() 
   const  cart  = this.props;
   console.log('render cart', cart)

   if (cart && cart.length > 0) {
     const Items = <FlatList contentContainerStyle=styles.list
       data=cart
       keyExtractor=this._keyExtractor
       renderItem=( item ) =>
         <View style=styles.lineItem >
           <Image style=styles.image source= uri: item.image } />
           <Text style=styles.text>item.name</Text>
           <Text style=styles.text>item.quantity</Text>
           <TouchableOpacity style= marginLeft: 'auto' } onPress=() => this.removeItem(item)><Entypo name="cross" size=30 /></TouchableOpacity>
         </View>
       }
     />;
     return (
       <View style=styles.container>
         Items
       </View>
     )
   } else {
     return (
       <View style=styles.container>
         <Text>Cart is empty!</Text>
       </View>
     )
   }
 }
}

As you can see, we are using a FlatList to iterate through the cart items. It takes in an array and creates a list of items to be displayed on the screen.


#


Left: The cart page when it has items in it. Right: The cart page when it is empty.

Conclusion

You can configure information about the app such as name and icon in the app.json file. The app can be published after npm installing exp.

To sum up:

  • We now have a decent e-commerce application with React Native;
  • Expo can be used to run the project on a smartphone;
  • Existing backend technologies such as WordPress can be used;
  • Redux can be used for managing the state of the entire app;
  • Web developers, especially React developers can leverage this knowledge to build bigger apps.

For the full application, you can visit my project on Github and clone it. Feel free to fork it and improve it further. As an exercise, you can continue building more features into the project such as:

  • Checkout page,
  • Authentication,
  • Storing the cart data in AsyncStorage so that closing the app does not clear the cart.
Smashing Editorial
(da, lf, ra, yk, il)


More here: 

Building Mobile Apps Using React Native And WordPress