Tag Archives: professional

How To Translate Your Website Content & 5 Useful Tools To Do The Job

website translation

The global economy has expanded your potential market in a way that was not possible even ten years ago, leveling the playing field for small and big business. However, it does come with some issues. One of them is the language barrier. If your website is in English, you will get your message across to about 27% of the market. Put another way, about 73% of the global market prefers websites with content in their native language. If people don’t understand the contents of your website, you cannot hope to make a sale. You need to give your visitors the…

The post How To Translate Your Website Content & 5 Useful Tools To Do The Job appeared first on The Daily Egg.

View the original here: 

How To Translate Your Website Content & 5 Useful Tools To Do The Job

Web Development Reading List #176: Safari 10.1, Prompt()-Deprecation, And Professional Pride

What a busy week! To stay on top of things, let’s review what happened in the web development world the last few days — from browser vendors pushing new updates and building new JavaScript guidelines and security standards to why we as web professionals need to review our professional pride. How can we properly revoke certificates in browsers, for example? And how can we build accessibility into a style guide? Let’s take a look.

Web Development Reading List 176

Safari 10.1 was announced a while ago already, and this week it finally came to Macs and iOS devices around the world. The new Safari version ships CSS Grid Layouts, fetch(), IndexedDB2.0, Custom Elements, Form Validation, Media Capture, and much more.

The post Web Development Reading List #176: Safari 10.1, Prompt()-Deprecation, And Professional Pride appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Original link:  

Web Development Reading List #176: Safari 10.1, Prompt()-Deprecation, And Professional Pride

How Mail.Ru Reduced Email Storage From 50 To 32 PB

When the Russian ruble’s exchange rate slumped two years ago, it drove us to think of cutting hardware and hosting costs for the Mail.Ru email service. First, we had to take a look at what email consists of. Indexes and bodies account for only 15% of the storage size, whereas 85% is taken up by files. So, optimization of files (that is, attachments) is worth exploring in more detail.

How We Reduced Email Storage At Mail.Ru From 50 To 32 PB

At the time, we didn’t have file deduplication in place, but we estimated that it could shrink the total storage size by 36%, because many users receive the same messages, such as price lists from online stores and newsletters from social networks that contain images and so on. In this article, I’ll describe how we implemented a deduplication system under the guidance of PSIAlt.

The post How Mail.Ru Reduced Email Storage From 50 To 32 PB appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Visit site:

How Mail.Ru Reduced Email Storage From 50 To 32 PB

4 Stupid Mistakes You’re STILL Making On Your Landing Page

stupid-mistakes-landing-page-650
Are you still making these landing page mistakes? Image by Brandon Grasley via Flickr.

Believe it or not, many of the world’s most aesthetically beautiful landing pages fail miserably when it comes to conversion.

Why? Because when you focus too much on design and not enough on your customers, it’s easy to lose sight of the bigger picture and fall into common conversion-killing traps.

In this post, I go through four of the worst mistakes you can make on your landing page, with real-world examples. Fixing even one of these mistakes should result in a serious conversion rate improvement – so let’s get started!

1. Not showing the product

Let’s take a look at this landing page for iMenuPro – an app that allows restaurant owners to design menus online:

imenu-pro-650
Click for full-length landing page.

It’s a nice enough page, right? Solid design, pretty engaging content and it even has a bit of personality. But there’s one crucial thing missing: they never show the product.

iMenuPro is a menu designer, yet we never see any actual menus that have been designed with the tool. Believe it or not, this is an incredibly common mistake.

If this seems like a huge oversight to you, it should. Neglecting to show your product is the #1 cardinal sin of landing page design, and here’s why: humans aren’t just visual learners, they’re visual purchasers.


Do you show & tell? If I can’t see myself using your product, I can’t see myself buying it.
Click To Tweet


If I can’t see your product or what it does, how in the world am I supposed to want it? Imagine trying to buy a car that has only been verbally described to you.

The solution

Show your product up-front and clearly. Make it the hero shot of your page.

And when possible, show your product in action.

This technique, called context of use, helps show prospects how your product works and helps them envision themselves using it:

This is precisely the reason that ShamWow has become a household name – they show their product in action with real people, in real situations you can relate to.

Showing and telling will help you convert browsers into customers.

2. Not explaining what you do

It’s all too easy to forget one of the main purposes of your landing page: educating your prospects.

Many prospects who visit your landing page know nothing about you, your company or what it is that you do. It’s your landing page’s job to fill in the blanks. When you don’t do that, you get a page like this:

marketing-genesis-live-650
Click for full-length landing page.

Marketing Genesis is a paid seminar for aspiring marketers – or, at least, that’s what I think it is. They never actually say.

If you carefully read a few hundred words into the text, you’ll eventually infer what Marketing Genesis is, but it takes some effort. They’re assuming that I know something about their business, but I don’t.

They make this same mistake dozens of times throughout this page:

  • The main headline on the page tells me to “Register Now,” but I don’t know what I’m registering for yet.
  • The CTA asks me to click for tickets, but again, what am I getting tickets to?
  • They even assume that I know where the event is taking place (hint: I don’t).

If you’re thinking, “how could someone possibly forget those things on a page?”, you should know that this sort of thing happens with shocking frequency.

When you’re elbow-deep in the goings-on of your own company, it’s easy to forget what it’s like to not know about your company.

The solution

When in doubt, treat your clients as though they know truly nothing about you.

Explain what you do, why you’re better than your competition and how your product can improve your potential customers’ lives.

The people at Webflow do a brilliant job of this – take a look at their homepage:

webflow-650
Click for larger image.

Even though they’re selling a relatively high-tech product, their opening headline tells me exactly what they’re all about in just a few words: “Professional-looking websites without writing code.”

That’s the kind of quick sales pitch we’re looking for.

Note: explaining what you do does not mean telling prospects about everything you do. As we’ll see below, you want to test making your copy as minimal as possible.

3. Using lots of paragraph text

If there’s one immutable truth about your customers, it’s this: whether you’re Apple or a mom-and-pop shop, nobody wants to read the long paragraphs of text on your landing pages.

Take for example this page from Newschool of Architecture and Design in San Diego:

newschool-architecture-design-650
Click for larger image.

They seem like a lovely university, but they fall into a common trap: they’re over-explaining.

In order to get my questions answered, I need to read through at least a few paragraphs of relatively dry copy. I’m willing to bet that many potential students would rather leave the page than put in the effort.

It might feel like your business is too complicated to explain quickly but in reality, even the most complex businesses can be to be boiled down to a series of short, benefit-driven sentences.

If you absolutely need to write a longer page, communicate your unique value proposition up front and don’t write a word more than you have to.

The solution

Be kind to skimmers and impatient users by cutting down on text, focusing on the key points of your service and providing visual examples.

If you routinely have issues with including too much copy, try writing your copy first before even looking at a landing page template.

That way, you’ll be sure to design a page that complements your copy and only includes the words you absolutely need. Not sure what you need? You should test that.

4. Making users choose (or even think)

Many businesses have multiple buyer personas, which makes marketing to them kind of tough.

How do you tailor a landing page to drastically different groups of people while still resonating with your ideal customers? We’ve all heard it before: Try to appeal to everyone and you’ll appeal to no one.

As a solution to this, many companies add a click-through page that asks users to self-select what kind of customer they are. For example, take a look at this landing page by PerfumesForABuck, an ecommerce outlet for cheap fragrances:

PerfumesforaBuck

Before you can see any product, you’re forced to choose between jewelry for men, women and gift baskets. Until you choose, you can’t see anything about the business or their products – and that’s problematic.

When you force users to choose before seeing content, a strange thing happens: many prospects leave and don’t come back.

Forcing choice adds friction – you’re putting extra work on the visitor, and the visitor doesn’t like work. They shouldn’t have to think.

The solution

Even if you have a segmented customer base, you can market to all of them individually without forcing them to make choices. It just takes a little finesse.

If you’re marketing to multiple personas, create separate ad campaigns for each one and drive those separate campaigns to customized landing pages.

Instead of buying clicks for “perfume” in AdWords, buy clicks for “men’s perfume” and send the traffic to a dedicated landing page. This eliminates choice from the equation and helps drive more targeted, valuable traffic to your site.


Don’t make users self-select. Do the heavy lifting with PPC & customized landing pages.
Click To Tweet


Wrapping things up

It’s tempting to run tests on granular stuff such as your call to action and headlines.

But doing so can lead you to lose site of the bigger picture: at the very least, are you explaining what you do and showing people what you have to offer?

If you’ve made one of these mistakes, count yourself lucky. An error like this is a huge opportunity for improvement. And many of the mistakes outlined above are relatively easy to fix.

So fess up. Are you making any of these mistakes? I want to hear in the comments!

Link:  

4 Stupid Mistakes You’re STILL Making On Your Landing Page

Thumbnail

Why No One is Reading Your Emails on Mobile

keanu-email-featured
Optimize your emails and help Keanu turn that frown upside down!

Did you know that almost 66% of all emails are now opened on a mobile device? A statistic all marketers should be aware of, no doubt, but what should really grab your attention is that 75% of people who receive email that isn’t optimized for mobile will just delete it.

If you’re a marketer who is sending emails that haven’t been optimized for mobile, you’re missing out on so much of the action that you might as well choose another profession.

The good news is that there are solutions to your mobile woes, none of which require you to be a rocket surgeon. Just a little bit of data mixed with a little bit of design with a dash of common sense thrown in for good measure.

Here are four reasons your emails might not be getting opened and read on mobile – and what you can do to correct it.

1. You’re not teasing the content of the email

The crucial first step of any marketing email is getting people to open it. In most mobile email apps you have three lines to convince your audience to open and read that email: the subject line, the first line and the from line.

image-subject-line-image

Our friend Aaron Orendorff has written a handy guide that breaks down the importance of these three fields and how to get the most out of them. Here’s what he says, in a nutshell.

Subject lines

An ellipsis can’t tell anyone what you really mean, so before your subject lines start trailing off into a mess of meaningless dots, remember that you have just 20-30 characters to reach your mobile readers.

That actually works out quite well, as 28-39 character subject lines get the highest click rates.

With so few words at your disposal, you may wonder which ones will do the best job of reaching your future readers. Aaron breaks that down as well, with a little help from the good folks over at Retention Science:

  • Personal words like “you” and “I” work well, as do slang terms and colloquialisms. Even emoticons are starting to help open rates here at Unbounce, however slightly. The point is that your email should sound like it’s coming from a human.
  • Emotional words that give your audience some sort of attachment to your value proposition are super good.
  • In one study, using pop culture references saw an open rate of 26% over ones with traditional subject lines, which were opened only 16% of the time.

But don’t get carried away. You still have to make sure that you’re matching your subject line with the copy on your landing page. “You can learn to dance like Beyonce!” might fit the criteria above, but if you’re selling car parts, you probably won’t get too far.

Mobile email message match
Make it your own. Image credit: vi.wikipedia.org

First lines

The best kind of marketing is sincere and personal. According to Aaron:

The first line of your automated emails should read as much like the first line of a real email as possible.

Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner often does this in his emails to prospects. A couple of examples of first lines from Oli:

CRO Day was one of the proudest moments of my professional career.

Hard to believe, but Page Fights is one year old!

They read much like an email that you’d get from a friend, which prospects are more likely to open.

From lines

Automated emails should come from a real person and not look like they’re coming from an automated system.

Again, Aaron sums it up perfectly:

Avoid from lines like support@yoursite.com, customerservice@yoursite.com, sale@yoursite.com, or, worst of all, the dreaded word auto.

Instead of sending the email from your company as a whole, send it from a specific person with a face and a name.

This article from Crazy Egg reveals some numbers behind personalized From lines. According to one study, personalized emails had a 29% higher open rate and 41% unique click-through rate.


Personalized emails can receive 29% higher open rates and 41% unique CTR!
Click To Tweet


As a marketer who is trying to get email content opened, read and acted on, adding a personal touch is a simple way of getting your audience to open your emails and click through to the next stage.

2. Your font size is creating friction

You work hard on the content of your emails, and so you want to make sure people are actually able to read them.

I subscribed to The Economist the other day. Their content is great, their delivery through their apps is spot on, but this email that I got after I signed up was a prime example of what not to do.

mobile-email-fail

What is that, an email for ants? Here’s a better job from our friends at Inbound.org.

inbound-email

Well, that’s much easier to read! The text is much larger and doesn’t require a microscope or any pinching or zooming.

So, how do you make sure that your text is readable on any given device?

While the iPhone automatically resizes tiny text, other devices won’t – so you want your font to be legible by default.

This comprehensive article on the Salesforce Canada blog recommends a minimum font size of 14 pixels for text in the body of the email, with minimum 22 pixels for headers.

But you’ve really got to test yourself to find that sweet spot for your audience.


If no one can read the tiny font in your mobile emails, you’re better off not sending them.
Click To Tweet


3. The design of your emails is getting in the way

Good email design is all about enabling readers to actually see your content.

As my colleague Brad puts it: “Get out of my way so I can read the damn email.”

This isn’t a statistical analysis, but it does speak to the heart of what we’re trying to get at: the best designs are the ones where the people reading the mobile emails are not aware of the design.

If you include images in your emails to mobile readers, there’s a good chance they won’t even be seen. As Rose Barrett at Storyports points out, 43% of Gmail users read email without turning the image display on. Some mobile email clients, like the Blackberry and Windows phone clients, block images by default.

Mobile-Email-Client-Image-Blocks
Image credit: Storyports.com

The way around this, according to Barrett, is to use HTML emails instead of text emails with images added. You’ll still get to send highly stylized and informative text to your readers, and because CTA buttons are separate from the images, they’ll still appear in your email.

And if you do decide to use images, don’t forget to keep the design consistent between your email and your landing page. Good design match never hurts conversions.

The key is to keep it simple. And don’t forget to test. What works for one audience may not work for yours, so make sure you’re testing all the things!

4. Your call to action isn’t very touching

By now you get that there is limited space on a mobile device, and the real estate that you do have is valuable. The point of your email is to get people to click a link that takes them to your awesome landing page.

Give your email readers the ability to click that link by making your call to action button big enough for them to see, and big enough for them to actually be able to tap it with their thumbs.

You want to avoid text links as CTAs in your mobile emails. Remember, your mobile audience is all thumbs (badoom pssh), and you can reduce friction by making your CTA big and beautiful.

Below is another email from Oli that shows this in action. The CTA button is large enough to see and large enough to actually tap.

Mobile email cta

Make your CTA buttons in mobile emails big enough so readers will want to tap that.
Click To Tweet


Chris Hexton at Optimizely does a great job of breaking down the art of the email CTA. The goal here is not so different from that of your landing page: make your CTA stand out.

Chris is fond of using the CRAFT method of CTA design. That means making your CTAs:

  • Colorful: Make them stand out from the rest of the text
  • Relevant: Keep CTAs in line with the message in the email
  • Actionable: Keep it clear, direct and understandable
  • Forceful: Tell your readers what to do
  • Targeted: Speak to what your readers’ needs and aspirations

By doing so, you give your readers a reason to take action and convert.

Mobile is not going anywhere

Take the time to get to know them by going through your email analytics to see how many are interacting with your emails via mobile. Dig in deep and see what you can learn about them. Offer them great experiences whether they’re on mobile or desktop by making sure that both your emails and your landing pages are mobile responsive.

Not adjusting to the needs of your mobile customer means that you’re leaving money on the table. And we’d hate to see you do that.

As always, we’d love to hear from you. Are you seeing a lift in your conversions by making use of any of these tactics? Let us know in the comments below!


View the original here – 

Why No One is Reading Your Emails on Mobile