Tag Archives: pseudo

How To Benefit From CSS Generated Content And Counters

Generated content was first introduced in the CSS2 specification. For several years, the feature was used by relatively few Web authors due to inconsistent browser support. With the release of Internet Explorer 8 in 2009, generated content was rediscovered, and many interesting implementations were adopted for the first time. In this article, we’ll discuss some possible uses of generated content.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: An Ultimate Guide To CSS Pseudo-Classes And Pseudo-Elements Learning To Use The :before And :after Pseudo-Elements In CSS !

Continued: 

How To Benefit From CSS Generated Content And Counters

Learning To Use The :after And :before Pseudo-Elements In CSS

If you’ve been keeping tabs on various Web design blogs, you’ve probably noticed that the :before and :after pseudo-elements have been getting quite a bit of attention in the front-end development scene — and for good reason. In particular, the experiments of one blogger — namely, London-based developer Nicolas Gallagher — have given pseudo-elements quite a bit of exposure of late. [Links checked February/08/2017]

Nicolas Gallagher used pseudo-elements to create 84 GUI icons created from semantic HTML.

Link – 

Learning To Use The :after And :before Pseudo-Elements In CSS

How To Use CSS3 Pseudo-Classes

CSS3 is a wonderful thing, but it’s easy to be bamboozled by the transforms and animations (many of which are vendor-specific) and forget about the nuts-and-bolts selectors that have also been added to the specification. A number of powerful new pseudo-selectors (16 are listed in the latest W3C spec) enable us to select elements based on a range of new criteria.

Before we look at these new CSS3 pseudo-classes, let’s briefly delve into the dusty past of the Web and chart the journey of these often misunderstood selectors.

Source article: 

How To Use CSS3 Pseudo-Classes

CSS Differences in Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8

One of the most bizarre statistical facts in relation to browser use has to be the virtual widespread numbers that currently exist in the use of Internet Explorer versions 6, 7 and 8. As of this writing, Internet Explorer holds about a 65% market share combined across all their currently used browsers. In the web development community, this number is much lower, showing about a 40% share.
The interesting part of those statistics is that the numbers across IE6, IE7, and IE8 are very close, preventing a single Microsoft browser from dominating browser stats — contrary to what has been the trend in the past.

Original link: 

CSS Differences in Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8