Tag Archives: reading

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Web Development Reading List #189: Sync Via Push API, RTL CSS, And The Disaster Factory

Do you feel stressed from time to time? I do. Recently, I experimented with meditation and yoga, just to see if and how they work. There’s a lot of advice you can find online and they all claim to transform your life entirely.

The post Web Development Reading List #189: Sync Via Push API, RTL CSS, And The Disaster Factory appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Web Development Reading List #189: Sync Via Push API, RTL CSS, And The Disaster Factory

Web Development Reading List #185: Safari 11, New Edge Build, Chrome 59, And CSS Optimization Insights

This week was full of great browser vendor news: Safari 11 was announced with long-awaited features such as WebRTC and tracking protection, and a new Edge build with new CSS features is now available, too. But the past few days also had some valuable articles up their sleeves: about implementing HTTP/2 push, using datetime-local, and slimming down your CSS, for example. I collected everything in this reading list for you, so you don’t miss out on anything.

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Web Development Reading List #185: Safari 11, New Edge Build, Chrome 59, And CSS Optimization Insights

Web Development Reading List #181: Mass Deployments, Prepack, And Accessible Smart Cities

In a world between building accessible interfaces, optimizing the experiences for users, and big businesses profiting from this, we need to find a way to use our knowledge meaningfully. When we read that even the engineers who built it don’t know how their autonomous car algorithm works or that the biggest library of books that mankind ever saw is in the hand of one single company and not accessible to anyone, we might lose our faith in what we do as developers.

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Web Development Reading List #181: Mass Deployments, Prepack, And Accessible Smart Cities

Web Development Reading List #179: Firefox 53, The Top Web Browsers, And Vue.js Authentication

Bots and Artificial Intelligence are probably the most hyped concepts right now. And while some people praise the existing technologies, others claim they don’t fear AI at all, citing examples where it fails horribly. Examples of Facebook or Amazon advertising (both claim to use machine learning) that don’t match our interests at all are quite common today.
But what happens if we look at autonomous cars, trains or planes that have the very same machine learning technologies in place?

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Web Development Reading List #179: Firefox 53, The Top Web Browsers, And Vue.js Authentication

Web Development Reading List #174: The Bricks We Lay, Remynification, And 0-RTT

We’re all designers. Whether we do a layout, a product design or write code to design a product technically doesn’t matter here. What does matter though, is that we always take the context of a project into consideration. Because as someone shaping a project so that it is appealing to the clients and works in the best way possible for the target audience, we have a pretty big responsibility.

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Web Development Reading List #174: The Bricks We Lay, Remynification, And 0-RTT

Web Development Reading List #172: On Reporting Bugs, DNS Subdomain Takeovers, And Sustainable UX

As web developers, we all approach our work very differently. And even when you take a look at yourself, you’ll notice that the way you do your work does vary all the time. I, for example, have not reported a single bug to a browser vendor in the past year, despite having stumbled over a couple. I was just too lazy to write them up, report them, write a test case and care about follow-up comments.

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Web Development Reading List #172: On Reporting Bugs, DNS Subdomain Takeovers, And Sustainable UX

Web Development Reading List #170: Hamburger Alternatives, Libsodium In PHP And Choosing Profit

As web developers, we need to rely on our knowledge, and choosing solutions we’re already familiar with is often the most convenient approach to solving a problem. However, not only technology is evolving but also our knowledge of how to use it.
For a while, we thought it’s best to use base64 encoding for inlining assets into CSS files, for example, and that loading JavaScript asynchronously will make websites faster.

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Web Development Reading List #170: Hamburger Alternatives, Libsodium In PHP And Choosing Profit

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Web Development Reading List #169: TLS At Scale, Brotli Benefits, And Easy Onion Deployments

Everyone here can have a big impact on a project, on someone else. I get very excited about this when I read stories like the one about an intern at Google who did an experiment that saves tons of traffic, or when I get an email from one of my readers who now published an awesome complete beginner’s guide to front-end development.
We need to recognize that our industry depends on people who share their open-source code and we should support them and their projects that we heavily rely on.

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Web Development Reading List #169: TLS At Scale, Brotli Benefits, And Easy Onion Deployments

Web Development Reading List #167: On Team Retreats, Immutable Cache, And Eliminating Clearfix Hacks

When working in a team, we focus so much on the work, that we often forget that we all have something in common. Something that is so obvious that we underestimate it: we all are human beings. And well, if we want to grow as a team and get better at what we do, we should embrace this fact more. In fact, I just came back from a week-long team retreat where we had team activities, team games, and sessions and discussions about how we can achieve just that.

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Web Development Reading List #167: On Team Retreats, Immutable Cache, And Eliminating Clearfix Hacks

Web Development Reading List #164: Enjoy The End Of 2016, It Wasn’t The Worst

Welcome to the last reading list of the year. I’m happy to still have you as a reader and very grateful to all the people who value and support my work. I hope you’ll be on vacation for the upcoming days or can relax a bit from your daily work. Remind to take care of yourself, and see you next year!
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Getting Ready For HTTP/2: A Guide For Web Designers And Developers How To Prepare For A Front-End Job Interview How Functional Animation Helps Improve User Experience The @Font-Face Rule And Useful Web Font Tricks Concept & Design Sarah Drasner on why it’s important to properly describe and document animations in a design system.

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Web Development Reading List #164: Enjoy The End Of 2016, It Wasn’t The Worst