Tag Archives: reviews

Afraid Of AI? Conquer Your Fears By Learning How It Can Boost Your Sales

It’s 2017, and the robots are here. However, artificial intelligence (AI) is nothing to be feared. In fact, AI will help boost your sales, increase conversions while ensuring that your business thrives and stays relevant in an ever-changing world. If you have resisted AI up until now because it sounded too complex, we’re going to explain how it can turbocharge your sales in plain, understandable English. We’ll be covering everything from chatbots, personal assistants to how AI can ramp up your email marketing efforts – as well as tighten up your security. As a business owner, this could be the…

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Afraid Of AI? Conquer Your Fears By Learning How It Can Boost Your Sales

A Simple Guide to Link Prospecting

link prospecting

You can break down SEO into two major categories: On-Page SEO: Ensuring your title tags, meta tags, site architecture and content are optimized for near-perfect search engine comprehension and indexing. Link Building: Getting other websites to link back to your site. In today’s post, we’re going to focus on #2 because it can be the most rewarding in terms of traffic gains, but it’s also the most difficult because a lot of it is beyond your control. Link building is truly an art and link prospecting is the smartest way to ensure your highest level of success. Let’s get into…

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A Simple Guide to Link Prospecting

Why a Killer UX Doesn’t Always Translate into Conversions

killer ux does not translate into conversions

One person’s killer UX is another’s UX killer. Why not copy the killer user experience of a famous site in your industry? The short answer? You’re not them. The longer answer is that unless you’re copying a fully optimized site with all the same variables, targets, and exact same audience, you’re likely setting yourself up for failure. Take Target for example. Following the success of Amazon’s review software, Target purchased it and sought to implement it on their own site. Even after copying the software and interface, the engagement with their reviews suffered. In fact, in the first month after…

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Why a Killer UX Doesn’t Always Translate into Conversions

How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization

An increasing number of companies and agencies are following a structured approach to Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO). Presently, we will be looking at how a tea eCommerce website increased revenue using conversion optimization.

About the Company

Your Tea is an online tea eCommerce site serving health and lifestyle-focused consumers. Tiny Tea Teatox is one of their largest sellers in their diversifying everyday tea product ranges.

Your Tea signed on We Are Visionists (WAV), a digital agency that partners with eCommerce agencies and startups, to help solve their clients’ digital problems ranging from paid advertising to conversion rate optimization.

We got in touch with Joel Hauer, founder at WAV, to know all about their successful optimization exercise that resulted in a 28% improvement in revenue.

Onboarding Your Tea

WAV pitched CRO as part of a raft of complementary services, including SEO and PPC, to improve Your Tea’s online presence.

Joel says, “It made business sense and so it was a straightforward decision for Your Tea. If you can create an uplift in your revenue by improving your product page, why wouldn’t you? We were able to make projections based on anticipated improvements to the site, and those projections were what got us over the line. We are lucky to have such a pragmatic client!

Process of Optimization

What WAV wanted to do was to insulate Your Tea’s revenue stream against any potential declines in traffic and maximize revenues in the periods of high traffic.

While doing so, they decided to follow a formalized approach to CRO, that is, researching their website data and visitors’ behavior intently to create hypothesis and running A/B tests that would impact revenues the most.

The Research Phase

To begin with, they analyzed their website data using Google Analytics (GA) to understand the journey of the visitors. They detected a large number of drop-offs on the product pages of the website, that is, a lot of people were landing on the product pages but not adding anything to the cart. They discovered that the Tiny Tea Teatox product page in particular was attracting the largest amount of traffic, and decided to optimize it first.

On further research on that page, they found that more than 50% of visitors were browsing through mobile. This information compelled WAV to closely analyze the mobile version of Tiny Tea Teatox. They found multiple optimization opportunities. For instance, the CTA was not prominent, there was no detailed description of the products, and more.

Here’s how the original page looked:

A/B test Control

Hypothesis Creation

Since a majority of traffic was coming from mobile in particular, WAV decided to optimize both the desktop and mobile versions of the Your Tea website. They hypothesized that adding a more prominent CTA, along with a detailed description of the product and user reviews would increase add-to-cart from the product page.

Using Visitor Behavior Analysis, they were able to develop their hypotheses further. For instance, by looking into heatmap analysis, they realized that visitors mostly browsed the product description and its benefits.

A large number of visitors also visited the reviews section, thereby making it clear that they were looking for trust elements. WAV decided to add more product information and benefits, along with credible “before and after” images and testimonials to the page. WAV also conducted website surveys and user testing sessions, which confirmed their hypothesis of adding more “credibility proofs” to the page.

The Test

WAV concluded that a full redesign of the product pages could yield better results than a series of incremental improvements from smaller tests. Such a massive redesign required heavy technical work, and WAV used VWO’s Ideact service to create a variation. Below is the screenshot of the control and variation:

Your Tea Control Variation Here’s how the Before And After section in the variation looked like:

Here’s the Why Buy From Us section in the variation that aimed to improve the website’s credibility :

Credibility Proof in the VariationResults

With the tests, they tracked two goals, that is, the add to cart conversion rate and the revenue.

The improvement in add-to-cart actions led to an impressive 28% increase in the revenue. In terms of add-to-cart conversions, control of the test was yielding a conversion rate of 11.3% in contrast to the variation which emerged to be the winner with a conversion rate of 14.5%.

Road Ahead

To capitalize on these higher conversions, an optimized checkout experience is required.

The agency could identify that the checkout pages were receiving multiple views from the same visitors. Users were getting stuck in loops around the checkout page. After they identified what to look for, the data from analytics supported it. Currently, they are testing to optimize the mobile experience on parameters such as anxiety and trust signals.

When asked about his biggest learning of the test, Joel responded: “One thing that came out of this test was learning more about the checkout experience—particularly on mobile.”

Experience Using VWO

Joel remarks, “The work of VWO’s Ideact team in setting up the tests on the technical front to help us record users through the checkout experience was invaluable.”

“We loved working with Rauhan and Harinder from VWO. The willingness to go the extra mile and help us get the maximum insight from our tests was fantastic. Having spoken about the features in the pipeline, we’re excited to see what’s to come.”

What Do You Think?

Do you have any similar experiments to share? Tell us in the comments below.

cta

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How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization

A Lean Approach To Product Validation


One of the biggest risks of building a product is to build the wrong thing. You’ll pour months (even years) into building it, only to realize that you just can’t make it a success. At Hanno, we see this happening time and time again. That’s why we’ve put together a Lean Validation Playbook.

A Lean Approach To Product Validation

“Lean” in this case means that you’re moving swiftly to figure out what you’re going to build and how you’re going to build it with as few resources as possible. These resources might include time, money and effort. The lean startup methodology is advocated by Eric Reis, who has massively influenced the way we work through his book The Lean Startup.

The post A Lean Approach To Product Validation appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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A Lean Approach To Product Validation

Improving Reviews And Testimonials Using Science-Based Design

Reviews, testimonials and word of mouth are winning the war in branding. A sea of research is out there about social proof and what to do and what not to do about soliciting customer reviews. It’s overwhelming to read and digest it all, let alone to know which nuggets are gold and which are fool’s gold. For a designer or business owner or marketer, knowing who or what to listen to can be difficult.

Original link – 

Improving Reviews And Testimonials Using Science-Based Design

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons.
  • The Payment methods.

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold!  Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’.

That’s precisely what persuades them to press the CTA button.
Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door.The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracaha.”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy , the store manager , the staff member, the options, the distractions ,the freebies, the branding ,the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits.

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, we haven’t added any timers .

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

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101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page

Drunk User Reviews VWO: Beer, Tequila and the World’s Easiest A/B Testing Tool

When was the last time you conducted a usability test (what?) and the reviewer began this way:

I have a lot of tequila in my hand, which is pretty cool.

A good two years ago, Will Dayble, UI and UX expert, told the world “Great UI isn’t there.” The user should feel no friction, and be able to use the website as if there is no boundary between them and the website. But Will also realized that this was easier said than done. So he suggested a way out — design websites like they were meant for drunk users.

Drunk User is a Lot Like The Average User

Inebriated people are distracted, emotional and childish. Also, they really, really don’t care what your site is supposed to do. If they don’t understand your site, they leave. The bottom-line? If even a drunk user can comfortably use your website, the average user is going to find it easy as well.

The only question was, how could you ever tell?

Earlier this year, Richard Littauer, a front-end developer and UX designer, decided to take a bullet for the world of UX. He’d get piss drunk and review websites. Lo and behold, TheUserIsDrunk.com is born. We were thrilled!

Paras, our CEO, wasted no time in paying Richard to get himself wasted and do his thing.

Richard Littauer got himself lots of beer, tequila and VWO. He finished the review and sent us the screen recording.

Here’s a look at how it played out, start to finish, broken down in to 5 different segments with a little time-line to guide you along.

Time Zero: User is Wasted

User is Druser

Signing Up – 1 Minute and 4 Seconds

Signing Up

Smart Code Installation – 1 Minute and 11 Seconds

Installing the Code

First Campaign – 1 Minute and 11 Seconds

First Campaign

The Fumble – 1 Minute and 45 Seconds

The Fumble

Finishing Up – 10 Seconds

The Finish

So, How Easy Is The World’s Easiest A/B Testing Tool?

Here’s what we found most interesting: from his first look at the homepage to making his first A/B test live on VWO, Richard — a drunk user — took exactly 7 minutes and 3 seconds. Let me put that in perspective: with VWO, the average Joe can get done with an A/B test in the same time it would take a user to read a good online post.

Whether you know javascript or jacks***, using VWO to set up a basic test is a breeze.Tweet: Whether you know javascript or jacks***, using VWO to set up a basic test is a breeze! @VWO http://ctt.ec/55R96+

Go on, sign up here for a 30-day trial, create your first test and make it live! Tell us how fast you are able to do it ;) ..but, I digress.

Would You Get A Drunk User To Review Your Website?

All the fun aside, Richard’s review was incredibly useful to us. It revealed a couple of places that we could improve upon. But it does sound weird, even outright crazy.  It comes down to this, is a drunk user a good approximation of the average user?

What’d you say? Tell us below in the comments section.

And if you do think so, would you have a drunk user review your site?

Fire away @VWO (use #vwoblog) or, let’s keep it private @SharanTheSuresh.

Have a great day people!


Richard, on the VWO Experience (a brief transcript)

..It’s so cool. This is actually..that was incredibly quick..

I feel like I’m getting this really quickly. Like, I think the flow is pretty quick. I messed up a couple of times, probably because I’m mildly inebriated.

So I think I’m doing okay.. and I think your site is well done..and I’m surprised how easy that was. I always thought A/B testing was a total ****ing bitch. It’s really annoying.

That was really easy. You made that easy, which is like a total win for you guys.

Because, I’m drinking Tequila.

Well done!

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Drunk User Reviews VWO: Beer, Tequila and the World’s Easiest A/B Testing Tool

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5 Consumer Insights from VWO eCommerce Survey 2014

With more than $262 billion in annual spend last year and the figure projected to touch a massive $370 billion in 2017, online shoppers are the most important piece of the eCommerce jigsaw. And as these consumers mature, converting them to customers can become increasingly difficult.

So VWO set out to survey more than 1,000 online shoppers to find out what catches their attention, what frustrates them and, most importantly, what makes them “buy” in 2014. We got our hands on some really interesting consumer insights, particularly around how to turn cart abandoners into customers.

In this post, I will summarise 5 insights derived from the report. If you want to check out the rest of the data, get the full report here (It’s free). I hope this information will help brands and eCommerce stores to optimize their communication and business strategies to better serve the rapidly evolving customer.

1. Retarget with discounts to boost conversions 

Retargeting

According to the survey results, a massive 54% of online shoppers said they will purchase products left in their cart, if they are offered again at a discounted price. This is a huge opportunity for eCommerce firm – it  means that not all carts are abandoned forever and there’s a huge potential to retrieve lost sales.

Marketers could capitalize on this data by offering abandoned products at a discounted price – either through emails or ads. This means that you should try to get their email addresses even before their names in the checkout funnel. What’s even more encouraging is that among Millennials (age 25-34), the number is significantly higher at 72 percent.

54% shoppers will purchase abandoned cart products if offered at a discounted price

2. Facebook is THE social channel to target Millennials

Social commerce

There’s no denying that there’s increasing convergence of social networking and eCommerce. And among these social networks, Facebook is the most influential among Millennials. 53% shoppers said Facebook keeps them informed about the latest in online shopping. While women chose Pinterest as the second-most influential social network when it comes to online shopping, men opted for Twitter. Which makes sense since Pinterest is more suitable for products which are visually appealing, such as fashion and home decor.

3. Reviews are a huge purchase driver

eCommerce reviews

55% of online shoppers say reviews are important for them before making purchase decisions. Customers want to know what others thought of the product and the experience with a particular store before making a purchase. The smartest online stores already understand this and ask customers to leave reviews for their purchases. You can put up online review badges and widgets that aggregate and present customers’ ratings to win the trust of the visitors.

4. The young are downloading shopping apps, but few actually use them

Mobile apps

Mobile and tablet use is shifting quickly, rapidly emerging with younger age groups as compared to the older groups. An interesting trend that emerged from the data is that despite 40% consumers saying they have shopping apps installed on their smartphones and tablets, just a portion of them actually use the app to shop online.

5. Consumers would rather spend on additional purchases than on shipping

Free Shipping

The results of two separate questions have clearly indicated that shipping charges are a bane to conversions. When asked what made consumers abandon their shopping carts, unexpected shipping cost emerged as the biggest reason. In a different question, a fourth of consumers said they would spend on additional purchases instead of paying for shipping.

Gear up for the holiday shopping season

The holiday shopping season is in full swing. Make the most of it by using these insights to market more effectively to your website visitors and make them buy from you. Get the full report by clicking on the banner below.

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5 Consumer Insights from VWO eCommerce Survey 2014

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Adding Customer Reviews Increased Revenue by 7.5%

Disclaimer: The winner of this case study hasn’t been revealed in the post below. Please watch out for an update on the same space on October 16, 2014.

The Company

Czc.cz is a leading computers and electronics online store in the Czech Republic. They have a wide range of products from mobile phones, laptops, gaming devices to electronics and IT specialities.

To encourage first time visitors to buy from their website, they decided to test adding ratings from one of the Czech Republic’s most popular price comparison site, Heureka, on their product pages. Initially wary of sharing their customer details with another site, they decided to test the badge only on 50% of their traffic. The good part about having Heureka widget is that it runs a script which shows real time customer reviews, ratings and statistics to visitors.

Here’s how the original product page looked like:

original product page czc.cz

The Test

Tomas at Czc not only wanted to test the impact of the Heureka badge on the product pages but also find out where to place it for maximum effect. So he created four versions of the product page and tested them against the original.

Here are the four variations he tested:

Version 1: Heureka badge along with ratings just below the add to cart button

variation1

Version 2: Only the badge just below the add to cart button

variation2

Version 3: Slide-in ratings on the right side

variation3

Version 4: Slide-in ratings on the left side

variation4

If you hover over the ratings sidebar, it expands to show details of ratings and reviews like this:

left_side_slider_expanded

More than 90,000 visitors became a part of the test with revenue tracking being the primary goal.

The winner recorded an increase of 7.5% in revenue with 95% statistical significance. We will reveal which variation won on this same space, one week from now, on October 16, 2014.

Tell us which Version you Think Won. And why?

Meanwhile, we would love to hear your thoughts on the test. Which version according to you got the company an additional 7.5% revenue? We will share the best answers in next week’s edit.

Share your thoughts in the comments section below or join the discussion on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook or G+

Don’t forget to add the hashtag #VWOCaseStudy with your answers. See ya!:)

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Adding Customer Reviews Increased Revenue by 7.5%