Tag Archives: rule

Glossary: What is the Fold?

what is the fold

The fold is a term used by web designers and Internet marketers to describe the interface that separates all the web content above a web browser’s bottom border. It’s a slightly dated term since the web has evolved to accommodate mobile devices. However, the term and its implications are still important for those engaged in conversion rate optimization and user experience improvement activities. The illustration above shows how the “the fold” is defined on a laptop computer. Why is the fold important? Generally speaking, the first things visitors see when they arrive at one of your webpages will be “above…

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Glossary: What is the Fold?

Building Web Software With Make

Most web developers use a build tool of some sort nowadays. I’m not refering to continuous integration software like Jenkins CI (a very popular build system), but the lower-level software it uses to actually acquire dependencies and construct your applications with.
There is a dizzying array of options to choose from:
Apache Ant (XML-based) Rake (Ruby-based) Grunt (JS-based) Gulp (JS-based) Broccoli (JS-based) NPM (JS-based) Good ol’ shell scripts (although no real orchestration around it) The build tool I want to look at in more detail here though is the granddaddy of them all: Make.

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Building Web Software With Make

Sassy Z-Index Management For Complex Layouts

Z-index is an inherently tricky thing, and maintaining z-index order in a complex layout is notoriously difficult. With different stacking orders and contexts, keeping track of them as their numbers increase can be hard — and once they start to spread across CSS files, forget about it! Because z-index can make or break a UI element’s visibility and usability, keeping your website’s UI in working order can be a delicate balance.

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Sassy Z-Index Management For Complex Layouts

PrefixFree: Break Free From CSS Prefix Hell

This article is the first piece in our new series introducing new, useful and freely available tools and techniques presented and released by active members of the Web design community. Lea Verou is well-known for her experiments with CSS and JavaScript and in this post she presents her recent tool, prefixfree, which will hopefully help you break free from the CSS prefix hell.
So What’s the Problem With Prefixes? I’m sure we all agree that CSS3 is pretty cool and that it enables us to do things that were previously impossible.

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PrefixFree: Break Free From CSS Prefix Hell

Breaking The Rules: A UX Case Study

I read a lot of design articles about best practices for improving the flow of sign-up forms. Most of these articles offer great advice, such as minimizing the number of steps, asking for as little information up front as possible, and providing clear feedback on the status of the user’s data.
If you’re creating a sign-up form, you could do worse than to follow all of these guidelines. On the other hand, you could do a lot better.

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Breaking The Rules: A UX Case Study

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Pricing Tables: Examples And Best Practices

Pricing tables play an important role for every company that offers products or services. They are a challenge from both a design and usability standpoint. They must be simple but at the same time clearly differentiate between features and prices of different products and services.
A pricing table should help users pick the most appropriate plan for them. A company should carefully examine its product portfolio and pick the most important features to present in its pricing plans.

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Pricing Tables: Examples And Best Practices

Applying Divine Proportion To Your Web Designs

Effective web design doesn’t have to be pretty and colorful — it has to be clear and intuitive; in fact, we have analyzed the principles of effective design in our previous posts. However, how can you achieve a clear and intuitive design solution? Well, there are a number of options — for instance, you can use grids, you can prefer the simplest solutions or you can focus on usability. However, in each of these cases you need to make sure your visitors have some natural sense of order, harmony, balance and comfort.

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Applying Divine Proportion To Your Web Designs