Tag Archives: server

A Complete Guide To Switching From HTTP To HTTPS

HTTPS is a must for every website nowadays: Users are looking for the padlock when providing their details; Chrome and Firefox explicitly mark websites that provide forms on pages without HTTPS as being non-secure; it is an SEO ranking factor; and it has a serious impact on privacy in general.

A Complete Guide To Switching From HTTP To HTTPS

Additionally, there is now more than one option to get an HTTPS certificate for free, so switching to HTTPS is only a matter of will.

The post A Complete Guide To Switching From HTTP To HTTPS appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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A Complete Guide To Switching From HTTP To HTTPS

Using Slack To Monitor Your App

For the past few months, I’ve been building a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application, and throughout the development process I’ve realized what a powerful tool Slack (or team chat in general) can be to monitor user and application behavior. After a bit of integration, it’s provided a real-time view into our application that previously didn’t exist, and it’s been so invaluable that I couldn’t help but write up this show-and-tell.
It all started with a visit to a small startup in Denver, Colorado.

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Using Slack To Monitor Your App

Next Generation Server Compression With Brotli

Chances are pretty good that you’ve worked with, or at least understand the concept of, server compression. By compressing website assets on the server prior to transferring them to the browser, we’ve been able to achieve substantial performance gains.

Next Generation Server Compression With Brotli

For quite some time, the venerable gzip algorithm has been the go-to solution for reducing the size of page assets. A new kid on the block has been gaining support in modern browsers, and its name is Brotli. In this article, you’ll get hands-on with Brotli by writing a Node.js-powered HTTP server that implements this new algorithm, and we’ll compare its performance to gzip.

The post Next Generation Server Compression With Brotli appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Next Generation Server Compression With Brotli

React Server Side Rendering With Node And Express

Web applications are everywhere. There is no official definition, but we’ve made the distinction: web applications are highly interactive, dynamic and performant, while websites are informational and less transient. This very rough categorization provides us with a starting point, from which to apply development and design patterns.
These patterns are often established through a different look at the mainstream techniques, a paradigm shift, convergence with an external concept, or just a better implementation.

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React Server Side Rendering With Node And Express

Love Generating SVG With JavaScript? Move It To The Server!

I hope that by now, in 2014, there is no need to explain why SVG is a blessing to developers who want to ensure that their graphics look sharp on all devices, especially with their huge diversity of resolutions.
But just like any other technology, SVG has its limitations. And in this article, we’ll talk about how to bypass some of them.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: The Math Behind JavaScript Animations The Illusion Of Life: An SVG Animation Case Study Generating SVG With React A Few Different Ways To Use SVG Sprites In Animation What’s The Problem?

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Love Generating SVG With JavaScript? Move It To The Server!

An Introduction To Node.js And MongoDB

Node.js is a rapidly growing technology that has been overtaking the world of server-side programming with surprising speed. MongoDB is a technology that’s revolutionizing database usage. Together, the two tools are a potent combination, thanks to the fact that they both employ JavaScript and JSON.
At first glance, coming to grips with Node.js and MongoDB can seem both time-consuming and painful. Read on to learn how to wield these tools quickly and easily.

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An Introduction To Node.js And MongoDB

Improve Mobile Support With Server-Side-Enhanced Responsive Design

In many ways, responsive Web design deserves a big share of the honor for making the Web more usable on non-desktop devices. This trend of letting the browser determine more about how a Web page should be displayed makes sense, especially now that mobile browsers are slightly more trustworthy than in the old days of mobile.
However, a responsive website is not automatically a mobile-friendly website. Amid the buzz of trendy Web development techniques, the good ol’ Web server doesn’t get the spotlight it deserves.

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Improve Mobile Support With Server-Side-Enhanced Responsive Design

Introduction to DNS: Explaining The Dreaded DNS Delay

Imagine that your biggest client calls because they are having trouble retrieving their email. Or they want to know what their best-selling item is right now. Or their most popular blog post. Perhaps their website has suddenly gone down. You can hardly reply, “No problem, I’ll get back to you in 24 to 48 hours.”
And yet DNS gets away with it! If you need to move a website or change the way a domain’s email is handled, you’ll be faced with a vague 24 to 48-hour delay.

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Introduction to DNS: Explaining The Dreaded DNS Delay

Speeding Up Your Website’s Database

Website speed has always been a big issue, and it has become even more important since April 2010, when Google decided to use it in search rankings. However, the focus of the discussion is generally on minimizing file sizes, improving server settings and optimizing CSS and Javascript.
The discussion glosses over another important factor: the speed with which your pages are actually put together on your server. Most big modern websites store their information in a database and use a language such as PHP or ASP to extract it, turn it into HTML and send it to the Web browser.

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Speeding Up Your Website’s Database

Web Security: Are You Part Of The Problem?

Website security is an interesting topic and should be high on the radar of anyone who has a Web presence under their control. Ineffective Web security leads to all of the things that make us hate the Web: spam, viruses, identity theft, to name a few.
The problem with Web security is that, as important as it is, it is also very complex. I am quite sure that some of you reading this are already part of an network of attack computers and that your servers are sending out spam messages without you even knowing it.

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Web Security: Are You Part Of The Problem?