Tag Archives: shopping

Thumbnail

Google Marketing Live: An Advertiser’s Take on the Highlights

Updates from the Google Marketing Live keynote

For advertisers, the Google Marketing keynote is a hotly anticipated annual event where we get to hear about all of the new features coming up in Google’s suite of marketing tools. It’s also a great indicator of what’s top of mind for Google, and what betas you can expect to roll out (or bug your Google rep to let you into early).

Yesterday’s presentation kicked off with consumer trends, then covered improvements and launches across a range of Google ad platforms. Throughout the event we heard data control and privacy come up often, reminding us that privacy is still a major theme of 2018. And while professional paid media managers may have found the keynote a bit of a bore, there were some decent things to get excited about too.

If you don’t have an hour to watch the full recording, read on for our key highlights (or skim ‘em, if that’s more your thing).

AdWords is no more

Whoah whoah, don’t panic. The ad platform that you know and love (and rely on for your business) is still intact. In fact, if you follow PPC news or read the Google Ads blog, you probably already heard about the shift from Google AdWords to Google Ads that’s coming at the end of this month. Like the old Google Ads interface, you’ve probably already forgotten about ‘AdWords’, right?

the new Google Ads rebrand takes effect July 24th

What’s actually changed?
Here’s a breakdown of what this rebrand means, and what terms to use so you sound smart in front of your boss and clients:

  • AdWords will become Google Ads.
  • DoubleClick and Google Analytics 360 will now be combined into Google Marketing Platform.
  • DoubleClick Search is now Search Ads 360.
  • The rebrand becomes official July 24th, 2018.

Page speed is critical (and more visibility means more control)

We recently shared that we’re close to launching a beta program for Accelerated Mobile Pages at Unbounce, and that page speed is a top priority for us as a leading landing page builder—so naturally we were nodding along yesterday morning as Anthony Chavez, Product Management Director at Google Ads, explained the impact that page speed can have on conversion rates.

Chavez opened his speed segment by reminding us that:

“even the best ads may not perform if your landing pages aren’t up to par, especially on mobile.”

Chavez admitted that landing page speed is often a lower priority for advertisers, who are focused on optimizing keywords, bids, and ad copy. When that’s not enough, “one of the best ways to get better performance on mobile is to improve the speed of your landing pages,” says Chavez. And we couldn’t agree more.

This is why we were giddy when he announced that Mobile Speed Score is now available in Google Ads. Mobile Speed Score is a new score telling you how fast your ad’s resulting landing pages are. This score is on a ten-point scale (ten being the fastest) and includes secret-sauce factors visible to Google—like the relationship between your mobile landing page speed and conversion rates. Plus, it’s updated daily, so you won’t have to wait weeks to figure out if your speed optimizations are working for you.

New from the Google Marketing Keynote: Landing page speed score

Since it’s a column built into your Google Ads account, you’ll be able to sort and filter the landing pages that could use some love. You can find this new column in the Landing Pages tab of your Google Ads account:

Access your landing page speed score in a new column

Chavez went on to suggest using AMP landing pages as a “powerful and easy way to supercharge your site speed,” something we can definitely agree with. By using AMP landing pages together with Mobile Speed Score, you’ll be leaps and bounds ahead of your competition.

Want to get even further ahead of your competition? Sign up for early access to Unbounce’s AMP beta program right here.

Search ads are going responsive

For a while now Google has been integrating machine learning and automation into its ad platform, and it looks like the future is no different. Much like last year’s launch of Smart Display campaigns, Google dedicated quite a bit of time to explaining Responsive Search Ads. However, this may not come as news to you as the Responsive Search Ads beta has been available to many advertisers for months already.

Similar to how Smart Display campaigns combine images with text on the fly, Responsive Search Ads combine headlines and descriptions from variations you’ve inputted to create an ad that’s deemed “most relevant to the searcher.” Ideally this means your ads will be more catered to each user and query, instead of serving up a rotation of generic ads.

This is a step forward in more personalized search results, but also means less control for advertisers, and makes it complicated to test ad copy. One big benefit, however, is that these ads can show up to 90% more copy than Expanded Text Ads, meaning you take over more real estate on the SERP. If this is the future of search ads, SEOs should be worried.

Your ad could show up to three 30-character headlines (vs. just one) and two 90-character description lines (compared to one 80-character description line). And PPC-er’s seem to be on board with this extra space, with the reaction mostly positive, if not a little hesitant:

Not seeing Responsive Search Ads as an option in your account? The beta is still rolling out to English-language advertisers and will be rolling out to more advertisers and languages throughout 2018.

Also, if you still prefer man over machine, you can continue to use Expanded Text Ads in your campaigns.

Even more assorted product updates & improvements

Better cross-device tracking

Tracking users across devices has always been a pain for paid advertisers, but this has been improving over the years. Google reaffirmed its commitment to solving this pain by announcing cross-device reporting and remarketing in Google Analytics (to what sounded like the largest applause of the keynote).

Google Shopping updates

If you’ve ever launched Product Listing Ads (PLAs) on Google Shopping, you know that it can be a whole other beast. Starting this year, Google will be rolling out Automated Feeds which create a feed by crawling your website (no more troubleshooting feeds). Keeping with the theme, Google also talked about the recently launched Smart Shopping campaigns that automatically optimize around a goal.

These changes will make PLAs a lot more accessible to advertisers, but oppositely could increase competition for those of us already advertising on Google Shopping. In fact, Smart Campaigns will soon be integrated with Shopify, meaning Shopify merchants will be able to manage their Smart Shopping campaigns without leaving the platform. This reduces barriers for the 600,000+ Shopify users that may have been previously intimidated by the Google Merchant Center.

Updates to YouTube

On the video side of things, Google announced that later this year they will be bringing a new option to TrueView for Reach ads. In addition to a call to action button, the new Form Ads will allow you to collect leads through a form directly on the ad. Because we didn’t see any examples of how these would look in the wild, I’ll say it sounds like this feature won’t be released very soon. For now though, I can guess it will be something similar to Facebook’s Lead Ads, maybe even more simple.

They also kept YouTube on the machine learning bandwagon, announcing Maximize Lift Bidding. They describe this as a bidding strategy to help you “reach people who are more likely to consider your brand after exposure to an ad.” Google added a bit more context to this feature—currently in beta—on its blog, saying, “it automatically adjusts bids at auction time to maximize the impact your video ads have on brand perception throughout the consumer journey.”

We’ll have to wait until it rolls out officially later this year to learn even more.

Machine learning for small business

If you run a small business, Google used a small slice of the keynote to remind you that you’re still an important customer. They announced the upcoming launch of something called Smart Campaigns, and—you guessed it—it involves machine learning. Google Ads is a sophisticated platform, but can still be intimidating for a small business, or a non-marketer.

Using information scanned from the company’s website and their Google My Business listing, the Smart Display campaign automatically generates ads on both search and display. The goal is to get small business owners up and running with ads as quickly as possible and to help them overcome the learning curve that can come with online advertising (or the cost of hiring an agency). After launch, the campaigns automatically optimize themselves.

Going further, the campaigns automatically generate quick and simple landing pages for small businesses, for when you’re running without a website. While these landing pages include super basic information like your location and phone number, you don’t get any control over brand messaging or even the images that get selected.

As a paid advertiser by trade myself, I’m wary of handing this much control over my ads to Google’s machine learning, but that doesn’t mean this can’t work for a small business customer. The audience for Smart Campaigns is an advertiser starting from scratch (as in, no website-from-scratch) so there would be no historical performance to compare to.

What all these updates mean

While not everything was technically fresh news at this year’s Google Marketing Live, we still had some interesting key takeaways.

What stood out the most to us at Unbounce was the critical need for fast landing pages, especially on mobile. Undeniably though, the strong thread throughout the keynote was the shift toward machine learning.

My prediction is that—over the coming months and years—Google will shift to more and more “Smart” features and campaigns until eventually machine learning becomes so intertwined that we drop the “Smart.” I’m not quite ready to give Google the wheel on all of my ad copy, bids, and optimization just yet, but I’m curious to see the data and hear the results as we move into this new era of online advertising.

Excerpt from:

Google Marketing Live: An Advertiser’s Take on the Highlights

Thumbnail

How to Create and Optimize an Effective Exit Popup

exit-popup-11

What if you could boost email signups by 1,375 percent (or more)? And what if I told you that the secret to those kinds of results lies in something as simple as an exit popup? Craft blogger Nikki McGonigal used to just have an email signup form in her website’s sidebar. Then she added an exit popup. Her conversion rate increased by more than 1,300 percent. Before you dismiss her results as industry related or as an aberration, you should know that businesses in just about every industry use exit popups. How do you get results from exit popups? I’m going…

The post How to Create and Optimize an Effective Exit Popup appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Taken from – 

How to Create and Optimize an Effective Exit Popup

7 Advanced Google Shopping Strategies

Google Shopping

I definitely don’t envy anyone that has to compete on Google Shopping. To be successful, it requires quite a bit of spreadsheet chops, constant adjusting and a deep understanding of your customer lifetime value. It’s possible that lowering your prices to just the right point will significantly build your customer base in the long run. Although it may seem like you’re losing money on first-time customers that come from Google Shopping, you’re ultimately profiting on their future business. In a sense, you’re turning that first-time monetary loss into marketing spend. It’s definitely tricky. And yes, it is a science project….

The post 7 Advanced Google Shopping Strategies appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read this article – 

7 Advanced Google Shopping Strategies

Thumbnail

What You Need to Know About Google Maps’ Promoted Pins

promoted-pins-featured-image-650
Image via Shutterstock.

According to the most recent numbers, about one billion people around the world have downloaded Google Maps and use it to reach 1.5 billion destinations each year.

That’s a lot of searches and web traffic. But of equal interest to Google and its customers is foot traffic. Shopping online is great, but forecasts indicate 90 percent of retail sales will happen in physical stores rather than online, and half of smartphone users who search for something locally will end up visiting a retail location within 24 hours.

The latest update to Google Maps is called promoted pins. Google hopes it will help bridge the gap between online traffic and foot traffic. It will give local businesses an opportunity to have their voices heard in a new way and take advantage of our glorious, mobile-first future.

So what are promoted pins and why should you care?

If you’re a Google Maps user, and you probably are, you’re likely already intimately familiar with the ordinary red “pins.” These indicate nearby landmarks, businesses or other places of interest.

Promoted pins will provide a handy contrast, as they now come in royal purple — allowing your business to very visibly stand out from the rest of the locations in your area.

But drawing the eye with fresh new colors is just the start of it.

When you perform a search for, say, children’s bicycles, you might see promoted pins from Toys ‘R Us or other local toy stores populating the top of your search results.

These will also be accompanied by promotions and coupons tailored precisely to your search history. Maybe it’ll be a $5 off coupon for that bike, or, in a different search, $1 off your Grande Mocha Whatever from Starbucks.

promoted-pins-phone

Sounds exciting, yes?

What do you need to get started?

Naturally, you’ll need to do a little bit of work before you can get your own promoted pins off the ground.

First and foremost, if you haven’t already, you’ll need to have your business officially verified by Google. This can take a week or two, and involves receiving a postcard at your physical location to verify the address you’ve provided actually exists, and matches up with existing USPS records.

But to enable promoted pins specifically, you’ll also need to meet Google’s advertiser eligibility requirements and enable “location extensions” in AdWords. This involves linking your Google My Business account to your Adwords account. You can do this by following these steps:

  1. Sign into your AdWords account and go to the “Ad Extensions” tab.
    ad-extensions
  2. Select the “View: Location Extensions” option from this dropdown menu:
    location-extensions
  3. Click “+ Extension” and you’ll be asked to link your Google My Business account.
    screen-shot-2016-09-20-at-2-43-50-pm

Want to learn about using landing pages for PPC?

Download this ebook and become an expert at designing high-converting landing pages for your PPC campaigns.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Planning your promoted pins strategy

Local businesses will be charged per click for their participation in promoted pins. But just what constitutes a “click”? Here’s the rundown:

  • “Click-to-call” actions on your smartphone
  • “Get directions” interactions
  • “Get location” clicks

Knowing this, how much of your PPC spend should be directed at promoted pins?

Like many other aspects of online marketing and digital advertising, some strategies are simply going to be more effective for certain industries than others. For example, I could see promoted pins working really well for drugstores, gas stations or restaurants – places that people tend to frequent often, even when traveling.

However, I don’t see promoted pins being overly beneficial for places like colleges or event venues. People do extensive research and planning when spending money with these organizations, and buying decisions are influenced by many, many other factors outside of location or even pricing.

To put it simply, there’s not going to be a magic percentage of PPC spend you can put towards promoted pins to get your ideal results.

You’ll need to play around with this new feature and gradually adjust how much money you want to allocate to it after a few months of testing. I will say that I don’t think a promoted pins budget should be a majority part of any organization’s PPC spend, but you can pick a starting budget based on your past successes with PPC and adjust said budget up or down as you start to see results.

In other words, budgeting for your local search campaign in Google Maps shouldn’t feel at all out of step with other forms of digital advertising that charge according to the traffic you generate.

Tracking your promoted pins campaign

All of this is pretty academic if you don’t have access to real-time data about your promoted pins, along with the traffic they’re generating and some key information about who’s interacting with them.

Here’s how to access the traffic data for your promoted pins campaign:

  1. Sign into your AdWords account and go to “Campaigns”:
    adwords-promoted-pins-campaigns
  2. Click “Segment,” then “Click type”:
    adwords-promoted-pins-segments-ad-types

That should bring you to the all-important data about the types of traffic your promoted pins are bringing in. This traffic might show up in a breakdown similar to your normal “Local” PPC ad analytics, with data for click-to-call, driving directions and location detail actions taken:

mobile-clicks-to-call-promotedpins

What you find there will be the key to tailoring your hyperlocal marketing approach in the months and years ahead.

Sales funnelling from Google Maps

How can you turn your promoted pins into real sales? How do prospective customers become, you know, customers?

The key is hyperlocal marketing, which is marketing tailored to a very small geographic area, such as a single zip code, neighborhood or city.

People are already shopping locally. Your job is merely to make sure they visit your establishment and not somebody else’s. Promoted pins should make this easier than ever, by letting you cater directly to the people who are most likely to visit your business in the first place.

Promoted pins also encourage — even require — you to stay up-to-date with what people in your area are actually searching for.

You’ll be able to optimize your business’ page within Google Maps to reflect the language people are using to find you. Just like you would do keyword analysis and competitor research for your main website, you can take the information you learn about how people find you on Google Maps and apply it to your Google My Business page or promoted pins ads.

This whole process is like a snowball that just needs one gentle push to get started.

One national brand that figured this out early is PetSmart. It learned how to tie together data from its search ads with data from Google’s Store Visits. It found that between 10 and 18 percent of folks who clicked on its ads ended up inside a PetSmart store within a month. PetSmart used this information to make more informed budgeting decisions for their online marketing strategies moving forward, and was able to provide data driven proof of the value in search ads for their merchandising partners.

It’s this ability to truly understand the customer “journey” that really speaks to the usefulness of promoted pins.

Quick bonus tip: Be transparent about inventory

Here’s one more key action you’ll need to take, if you haven’t already: Become super transparent about the products you have in stock. One in four mobile users avoids visiting brick-and-mortar stores because they fret over the product, or products, they’re searching for not being in stock.

Fortunately, Google’s already developed a way for companies to do this: local product inventory feeds. This is a list of all the products you sell in each of your stores, and you can choose to update your full product inventory or only the products whose inventories have changed that day. Inventory feeds help consumers feel more confident that they can find what they’re looking for at your store, and that they won’t arrive to find said item out of stock.

When done in conjunction with promoted pins, inventory feeds assure potential customers that a product is actually in stock and that it can be found at a location in their immediate area.

How promoted pins can help you

If you’ve read this far, you’re probably one of two types of people:

  1. You’re excited to dig into the nitty gritty of a new type of ad platform, and you’re ready to see what kind of return on investment this can bring to your local business
  2. You’re fretting over yet another skill set you need to learn to keep your business viable in an increasingly digital-minded world.

Though, the perfectly sane businessperson probably falls somewhere in between.

It’s true. There are a couple little tricks you’ll have to pick up before you have your promoted pins strategy up and running and actually delivering real-world results.

But for the most part, we think you’ll find the process actually dovetails pretty nicely with what you’re already familiar with. AdWords is an established platform, and promoted pins is an offshoot of that. You were always going to have to become savvy with local marketing to survive and thrive. It was inevitable. And, thankfully, Google has made it pretty easy to get started.

View original: 

What You Need to Know About Google Maps’ Promoted Pins

83 Flat Line UX And E-Commerce Icons For Free

How often do you have to explain the purpose of a study, objectives, goals or measurements within your company? Maybe you need to prepare a presentation or a brief overview of what next steps should be taken, or maybe you simply need to build a shiny, new pattern library?
Whatever project you may be working on, today’s icon sets will come in handy. All of the vector icons were tirelessly crafted by the design team at Ecommerce Website Design, and come in various formats that can be used for personal as well as commercial purposes.

Link: 

83 Flat Line UX And E-Commerce Icons For Free

Mastering eCommerce Conversions with VWO and Demandware

Shopping Cart and Conversion Optimization platforms together have been making lives simpler for eCommerce business owners. With its latest release, VWO adds Demandware to its kitty of third-party app integrations to allow easy configuration of VWO SmartCode on Demandware stores. In addition, eCommerce stores using Demandware can also track their store revenue and configure custom URLs to run tests.

Using the plug-in, Demandware users can now directly add their preferred type of VWO SmartCode (Asynchronous or Synchronous) to all pages on their shopping website and get cracking with their A/B testing campaign. The plug-in also allows eCommerce websites to track revenue conversions in their preferred format, using different combinations of tax and shipping charges along with the actual value of each order.

A key outcome of this integration is that businesses running Demandware can enable custom URL tracking. This tracking allows running test campaigns on SEO-friendly URLs that don’t have a common pattern. In a typical eCommerce store, URLs are often morphed to match frequent search queries. However, the changing nature of these URLs makes it difficult for marketing platforms to recognize their page types. VWO’s custom URL tracking allows users to easily classify URLs into different categories such as Product Page, Category Page, or Checkout Page, and then run test campaigns on a specific group of pages together.

How Does it Work?

Installing the VWO code on your Demandware store is a one-minute process. Simply download the VWO plug-in and import it into your Demandware studio. Now, follow these simple steps to configure the VWO cartridge for your store with your preferred settings.

In simple words, there is no need to individually add the VWO code to all pages on your Demandware store. The VWO plug-in does all that for you in no time! Also, don’t forget to configure your revenue tracking with VWO and enable custom URLS for running targeted campaigns.

VWO Free-trial CTA

The post Mastering eCommerce Conversions with VWO and Demandware appeared first on VWO Blog.

Link:  

Mastering eCommerce Conversions with VWO and Demandware

How to NOT Distract, Destroy and Decimate Your Google Shopping Traffic

Google Shopping is taking off like a rocket ship. Consumers love the visually based Product Listing Ads, especially on mobile. Retailers are also taking note, spent big on the channel in 2015. That spending paid off: Research showed that Google Shopping Product Listing Ads (PLAs) drove 15% of retailers’ sitewide revenue during Holiday 2015, up from 9.6% in 2014. It’s safe to say that competition in Google Shopping is sure to continue heating up — especially now that Google Shopping ads dominate the right-hand side of the desktop SERP (pictured): So the time is now for Google Shopping users to…

The post How to NOT Distract, Destroy and Decimate Your Google Shopping Traffic appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read original article: 

How to NOT Distract, Destroy and Decimate Your Google Shopping Traffic

Building A First-Class App That Leverages Your Website: A Case Study

Mark Zuckerberg once said, “The biggest mistake that we made, as a company, is betting too much on HTML5 as opposed to native… because it just wasn’t there. And it’s not that HTML5 is bad. I’m actually, long term, really excited about it.” And who wouldn’t be excited by the prospect of a single code base that works across multiple platforms?
Further Reading on SmashingMag: A Beginner’s Guide To Progressive Web Apps The Building Blocks Of Progressive Web Apps Creating A Complete Web App In Foundation For Apps Unfortunately, Facebook felt that HTML5 didn’t offer the experience it was looking to build, and that’s what it’s really about: the experience.

More here: 

Building A First-Class App That Leverages Your Website: A Case Study

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons.
  • The Payment methods.

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold!  Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’.

That’s precisely what persuades them to press the CTA button.
Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door.The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracaha.”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy , the store manager , the staff member, the options, the distractions ,the freebies, the branding ,the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits.

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, we haven’t added any timers .

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

The post 101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page appeared first on VWO Blog.

Visit source: 

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page

Thumbnail

Three Award Winning A/B Test Cases You Should Know About

(This is a guest post, authored by Danny de Vries, Senior CRO Consultant with Traffic4U)

Every year, Conversion Optimizers around the world vie for the annual WhichTestWon Online Testing Awards, which are awarded by an independent organization situated in the USA. Anyone can enter the competition by submitting their A/B and multivariate test cases which are then reviewed and judged on multiple factors. The most interesting and inspiring cases are then eligible to win either a Gold, Silver or Bronze badge across a range of categories.

This year, twelve out of the thirty test case winners of the 6th annual international WhichTestWon Online Testing Awards are Dutch. With one golden award, two silver awards and an honorable mention, Traffic4u emerged as one of the strong pillars of the Dutch Optimization prowess. This blog covers our three award winning A/B test cases, starting with the golden award winner.

De Hypothekers Associatie: Users Need Guidance

The test case of De Hypothekers Associatie, the biggest independent mortgage consultancy service in the Netherlands, received a golden award in the category ‘Form Elements’. As a consultancy firm, they rely on advising clients about mortgages and other related financial decisions. However, before contacting a consultancy, users typically want to understand for themselves what their financial possibilities are regarding mortgages and buying of properties. So, a user who’s just begun exploring options is unlikely to contact De Hypothekers Associatie or check for an appointment.

Case Situation

In order to empower users to research the possibilities regarding mortgages, De Hypothekers Associatie created several pages on which users could calculate their maximum mortgage loan, monthly mortgage payments, etc. The experiment included the control page shown below, on which users could calculate their mortgage loan:

Translated Version Control

Hypothesis

Previous A/B tests on the website of De Hypotheker Associatie clearly showed the need for guidance on the website, which was the result of testing call-to-action buttons. For instance, a button that said ‘Next step’ significantly outperformed other CTAs with copy like ‘Contact us’ and ‘Advise me’. This result implied two things:

  • Users want information in small digestible chunks
  • Users like to explore what lies ahead instead of being plainly told what the next step is

The follow-up action was to apply this insight to the calculation page, as the lack of guidance could potentially result in fewer mortgage appointments and paying clients.

The hypothesis was that users need to be guided through the process of calculating the maximum loan amount they could receive. The test variation of the “Loan calculation page” included a clear step-by-step flow guiding users through the calculation process. This was in stark contrast with the control situation that had a more simplistic flow. It was assumed that guiding users through the calculation process would lead to more calculations and hence, more appointments for the consultancy. The screenshot of the variant can be found below.

De Hypotheker Associatie - Variation for A/B test

Results

Guiding customers through the loan-calculation process resulted in a significant uplift of more than 18% in terms of number of loan calculations on that particular page. Furthermore, the number of mortgage appointments also increased by more than 18%.

Why Do Users Need Guidance?

It goes without saying that mortgages are boring and complex. But it becomes a necessity when you are (or want to be) a home owner. Also, taking out a mortgage is a high stakes financial decision that isn’t typically made in a day without sufficient information. Because of this, people need advice on where to begin, what steps to undertake, what the possibilities are and what options suit their situation best. The test results show that including clear guidance on the steps to follow can result in a statistically significant uplift in conversion.

Fietsvoordeelshop: Display Customer Savings Prominently

In the category ‘Copy Test’, the A/B test of Fietsvoordeelshop received a Silver Award. Fietsvoordeelshop is one of the leading bike web-shops in the Netherlands offering an assortment of bikes from top brands for discounted prices.

Case Situation

The website lacked a prominently visible indication of the actual discount users would get on the different products. Discounts were displayed in an orange text right next to the big orange CTA button.

Control Image - for A/B Test

Hypothesis

It was hypothesized that Fietsvoordeelshop was losing potential sales by not showing customer savings very effectively. We expected an increase in click-through-rate to the shopping cart by making the savings prominently visible. The discount, which was shown in orange text Uw voordeel: €550,00, was changed to a more visible green badge that contrasted with the orange CTA button (here’s more on the importance of contrast in design). See the variant below:

Variation Image - for A/B Test

Results

Results showed that the variation outperformed the control with 26.3% statistically significant uplift in Shopping Cart entries. So it’s one thing to offer discounts on products, but unless the benefit clearly stands out, users are likely to miss it and never convert.

Follow-through and Stay Consistent

Although we found an increase in click-throughs to the shopping cart, we didn’t see this effect (or somewhat similar) in the checkout steps following the shopping cart entry. The reason for this could be that the discount badge was only shown on the pages before ‘add to shopping cart’ and not on the subsequent check out pages. In order to sustain the positive influence, it might be a good idea to retain the badge all the way through the checkout. However, it has to be tested if repeatedly showing the savings during the final steps in the checkout process leads to an increase in actual sales.

Omoda: Icons Perform Better (on mobile devices)

The second Silver Award Winning test case belongs to the Dutch shoe retailer Omoda. It came in second in the category ‘Images & Icons’. Omoda is one of the top shoe retailers in The Netherlands offering a range of shoes from world-class brands for women, men and kids. The case serves to show how important it is to segment your test results. Read more about visitor segmentation and how it can help increase website conversions.

Case Situation

Each of the Omoda product pages feature their unique selling points. While these were placed near the call-to-action Plaats in shopping bag and were definitely visible, we believed they weren’t visible enough. The Reasons?

  • The USPs appeared in a bulleted list, but it blended too well with other text on the page and did not command attention.
  • The page also included a big black area for customer service elements. Because the page was largely white, the black areas would get more attention, distracting users from the primary goal of the page – viewing shoe details and adding the product to the shopping bag.

Below is an image of the control version:

Omoda Control for Multivariate Test

Hypothesis

The hypothesis was that addressing both these issues to make the USPs more visible would lead to an increase in sales. We created a Multivariate test which allowed us to test both assumptions – USPs aren’t visible enough and the black area is too distracting. All variations are shown below:

Combination 2

Omoda - Combination 2 for Multivariate Test Combination 2: changing the black color to a more neutral grey and moving the customer review rating to the top of the box

Combination 3

Omoda Combination 3 for Multivariate Test Combination 3: using icons and black text instead of grey text to let the USPs stand out better

Combination 4

Omoda Combination 4 for Multivariate Test Combination 4: using elements from combination-2 and combination-3

Results

Overall results for this test told us that the hypothesis should be rejected; there was no convincing proof that any combination would perform significantly better or worse than the control situation. But, through segmentation we found that the hypothesis did work positively on mobile devices and resulted in a whopping 13.6% uplift in sales. Initially, the overall results seemed inconclusive because of a 5.2% drop in sales on desktop and tablet devices.

Users Behave Differently on Different Devices

The results of this test show the device-dependency of hypotheses and the effectiveness of using icons to make USPs stand out better. On the basis of this test, we recommend that you always segment test results to observe the effect of the hypothesis through different dimensions and not make blind decisions.

In the light of previous A/B tests, we believe that the reason why icons perform better on mobile is because desktop and tablet users are more likely to click on the prominent USPs — like terms of payment or delivery — in order to see more details. But, since the USPs aren’t clickable, desktop users would not able to get any additional information. This could irk potential buyers and get them to bounce away. On a mobile device however, with less screen real-estate and the device being less suited to opening multiple tabs, users are less likely to search for additional information.

Understand What Drives Your Visitors And Keep Testing

The above cases have one thing in common. No, it’s not the awards. The commonality is that in each of these cases, we were able to successfully ‘assume’ what drove website visitors. Research using data and/or user feedback told us that a certain effect was occurring. We put this understanding in the required perspective (depending on the type of website and/or product, device, seasonality, user flow etc.) and made certain assumptions about the possible causes for these effects. Then we used A/B and multivariate testing to check if our assumptions were correct. Testing, in fact, is all about learning from your website visitors.

The post Three Award Winning A/B Test Cases You Should Know About appeared first on VWO Blog.

Link – 

Three Award Winning A/B Test Cases You Should Know About