Tag Archives: social

Thumbnail

How to Calculate Your Landing Page Conversion Rate (And Increase It)

landing-page-conversion-rate-introduction

A landing page represents an opportunity. Your prospect or lead will either take advantage of it or they won’t. The landing page conversion rate tells you how well you’re doing. Some websites have one or two landing pages, while others have dozens. It all depends on how many products or services you sell and what referral source sends you the most traffic. For instance, if you get tons of traffic from Facebook and Instagram Ads, you might have a landing page for each of those referral sources. You’ll want to optimize each page to reflect the visual aesthetic and copy…

The post How to Calculate Your Landing Page Conversion Rate (And Increase It) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Excerpt from:  

How to Calculate Your Landing Page Conversion Rate (And Increase It)

Thumbnail

10 Common UI Design Mistakes That Are Killing Your Conversion Rate

ui-design-cluttered-layout

Leonardo da Vinci said, “Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication.” Whatever I’m designing, that is my mantra. It’s also one of the basic requirements for effective UI design. In order to attract, convert and retain, user interface must satisfy three criteria: It should be engaging, beautiful and elicit an emotional response from the user. The same applies to almost every other work of art; the only difference is, art can endure a certain dose of complexity. UI can’t. Being a vital part of UX, UI is one of the key factors that influence conversion rates. Conversion, on the other…

The post 10 Common UI Design Mistakes That Are Killing Your Conversion Rate appeared first on The Daily Egg.

View original – 

10 Common UI Design Mistakes That Are Killing Your Conversion Rate

Thumbnail

8 Effective Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Conversions

email-subscribers-9

My email list is one of my most valuable assets. I have tons of email subscribers even though I regularly scrub my list, and I’ve converted many subscribers to paying clients. I started in the same place as everyone else, though: zero email subscribers. Whether your list includes 10 subscribers, 100 subscribers, or 1 million subscribers, you probably want more. That’s the nature of marketing. So, how can you increase conversions to build your email list further? That’s the question I’m going to answer today. I’ll cover several topics, so here’s a list in case you want to skip around:…

The post 8 Effective Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Conversions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Originally posted here – 

8 Effective Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Conversions

Thumbnail

9 Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Email Conversions

email-subscribers-9

My email list is one of my most valuable assets. I have tons of email subscribers even though I regularly scrub my list, and I’ve converted many subscribers to paying clients. I started in the same place as everyone else, though: zero email subscribers. Whether your list includes 10 subscribers, 100 subscribers, or 1 million subscribers, you probably want more. That’s the nature of marketing. So, how can you increase conversions to build your email list further? That’s the question I’m going to answer today. I’ll cover several topics, so here’s a list in case you want to skip around:…

The post 9 Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Email Conversions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Original post: 

9 Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Email Conversions

Thumbnail

Optimizing Your SaaS Conversion Funnel (Guide)

saas conversion funnel

The average company used 16 SaaS apps in 2017. That’s a 33 percent increase from the year before. That doesn’t mean your SaaS business will flourish, though. If you want your piece of an industry that’s worth an estimated 116 billion globally, optimizing your SaaS conversion funnel most become a priority. Your conversion funnel describes the steps your prospective customers take to reach a buying decision. Narrowing the conversion funnel and pushing prospects through faster can result in higher profits. Do to so, you must learn how to nurture your leads and prospects. Let’s look at some of the most…

The post Optimizing Your SaaS Conversion Funnel (Guide) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Continue at source:  

Optimizing Your SaaS Conversion Funnel (Guide)

Thumbnail

Measuring Websites With Mobile-First Optimization Tools




Measuring Websites With Mobile-First Optimization Tools

Jon Raasch



Performance on mobile can be particularly challenging: underpowered devices, slow networks, and poor connections are some of those challenges. With more and more users migrating to mobile, the rewards for mobile optimization are great. Most workflows have already adopted mobile-first design and development strategies, and it’s time to apply a similar mindset to performance.

In this article, we’ll take a look at studies linking page speed to real-world metrics, and discuss the specific ways mobile performance impacts your site. Then we’ll explore benchmarking tools you can use to measure your website’s mobile performance. Finally, we’ll work with tools to help identify and remove the code debt that bloats and weighs down your site.

Responsive Configurators

How would you design a responsive car configurator? How would you deal with accessibility, navigation, real-time previews, interaction and performance? Let’s figure it out. Read article →

Why Performance Matters

The benefits of performance optimization are well-documented. In short, performance matters because users prefer faster websites. But it’s more than a qualitative assumption about user experience. There are a variety of studies that directly link reduced load times to increased conversion and revenue, such as the now decade-old Amazon study that showed each 100ms of latency led to a 1% drop in sales.

Page Speed, Bounce Rate & Conversion

In the data world, poor performance leads to an increased bounce rate. And in the mobile world that bounce rate may occur sooner than you think. A recent study shows that 53% of mobile users abandon a site that takes more than 3 seconds to load.

That means if your site loads in 3.5 seconds, over half of your potential users are leaving (and most likely visiting a competitor). That may be tough to swallow, but it is as much a problem as it is an opportunity. If you can get your site to load more quickly, you are potentially doubling your conversion. And if your conversion is even indirectly linked to profits, you’re doubling your revenue.

SEO And Social Media

Beyond reduced conversion, slow load times create secondary effects that diminish your inbound traffic. Search engines already use page speed in their ranking algorithms, bubbling faster sites to the top. Additionally, Google is specifically factoring mobile speed for mobile searches as of July 2018.

Social media outlets have begun factoring page speed in their algorithms as well. In August 2017, Facebook announced that it would roll out specific changes to the newsfeed algorithm for mobile devices. These changes include page speed as a factor, which means that slow websites will see a decline in Facebook impressions, and in turn a decline in visitors from that source.

Search engines and social media companies aren’t punishing slow websites on a whim, they’ve made a calculated decision to improve the experience for their users. If two websites have effectively the same content, wouldn’t you rather visit one that loads faster?

Many websites depend on search engines and social media for a large portion of their traffic. The slowest of these will have an exacerbated problem, with a reduced number of visitors coming to their site, and over half of those visitors subsequently abandoning.

If the prognosis sounds alarming, that’s because it is! But the good news is that there are a few concrete steps you can take to improve your page speeds. Even the slowest sites can get “sub three seconds” with a good strategy and some work.

Profiling And Benchmarking Tools

Before you begin optimizing, it’s a good idea to take a snapshot of your website’s performance. With profiling, you can determine how much progress you will need to make. Later, you can compare against this benchmark to quantify the speed improvements you make.

There are a number of tools that assess a website’s performance. But before you get started, it’s important to understand that no tool provides a perfect measurement of client-side performance. Devices, connection speeds, and web browsers all impact performance, and it is impossible to analyze all combinations. Additionally, any tool that runs on your personal device can only approximate the experience on a different device or connection.

In one sense, whichever tool you use can provide meaningful insights. As long as you use the same tool before and after, the comparison of each should provide a decent snapshot of performance changes. But certain tools are better than others.

In this section, we’ll walk through two tools that provide a profile of how well your website performs in a mobile environment.

Note: If can be difficult to benchmark an entire site, so I recommend that you choose one or two of your most important pages for benchmarking.

Lighthouse

Lighthouse audit tab


Lighthouse in the Google’s Web Developer Tools. (Large preview)

One of the more useful tools for profiling mobile performance is Google’s Lighthouse. It’s a nice starting point for optimization since it not only analyzes page performance but also provides insights into specific performance issues. Additionally, Lighthouse provides high-level suggestions for speed improvements.

Lighthouse is available in the Audits tab of the Chrome Developer Tools. To get started, open the page you want to optimize in Chrome Dev Tools and perform an audit. I typically perform all the audits, but for our purposes, you only need to check the ‘Performance’ checkbox:

Lighthouse audit selection


All the audits are useful, but we’ll only need the Performance audit. (Large preview)

Lighthouse focuses on mobile, so when you run the audit, Lighthouse will pop your page into the inspector’s responsive viewer and throttle the connection to simulate a mobile experience.

Lighthouse Reports

When the audit finishes, you’ll see an overall performance score, a timeline view of how the page rendered over time, as well as a variety of metrics:

Lighthouse performance audit results


In the performance audit, pay attention to the first meaningful paint. (Large preview)

It’s a lot of information, but one report to emphasize is the first meaningful paint, since that directly influences user bounce rates. You may notice that the tool doesn’t even list the total load time, and that’s because it rarely matters for user experience.

Mobile users expect a first view of the page very quickly, and it may be some time before they scroll to the lower content. In the timeline above, the first paint occurs quickly at 1.3s, then a full above-the-fold content paint occurs at 3.9s. The user can now engage with the above-the-fold content, and anything below-the-fold can take a few seconds longer to load.

Lighthouse’s first meaningful paint is a great metric for benchmarking, but also take a look at the opportunities section. This list helps to identify the key problem areas of your site. Keep these recommendations on your radar, since they may provide your biggest improvements.

Lighthouse Caveats

While Lighthouse provides great insights, it is important to bear in mind that it only simulates a mobile experience. The device is simulated in Chrome, and a mobile connection is simulated with throttling. Actual experiences will vary.

Additionally, you may notice that if you run the audit multiple times, you will get different reports. That’s again because it is simulating the experience, and variances in your device, connection, and the server will impact the results. That said, you can still use Lighthouse for benchmarking, but it is important that you run it several times. It is more relevant as a range of values than a single report.

WebPageTest

In order to get an idea of how quickly your page loads in an actual mobile device, use WebPageTest. One of the nice things about WebPageTest is that it tests on a variety of real devices. Additionally, it will perform the test a number of times and take the average to provide a more accurate benchmark.

To get started, navigate to WebPageTest.org, enter the URL for the page you want to test and then select the mobile device you’d like to use for testing. Also, open up the advanced settings and change the connection speed. I like testing at Fast 3G, because even when users are connected to LTE the connection speed is rarely LTE (#sad):

WebPageTest advanced settings form


WebPageTest provides actual mobile devices for profiling. (Large preview)

After submitting the test (and waiting for any queue), you’ll get a report on the speed of the page:

WebPageTest profiling results


In WebPageTest’s results, pay attention to the start render and first byte. (Large preview)

The summary view consists of a short list of metrics and links to timelines. Again, the value of the start render is more important than the load time. The first byte is useful for analyzing the server response speed. You can also dig into the more in-depth reports for additional insights.

Benchmarking

Now that you’ve profiled your page in Lighthouse and WebPageTest, it’s time to record the values. These benchmarks will provide a useful comparison as you optimize your page. If the metrics improve, your changes are worthwhile. If they stay static (or worse decline), you’ll need to rethink your strategy.

Lighthouse results are simulated which makes it less useful for benchmarking and more useful for in-depth reports and optimization suggestions. However, Lighthouse’s performance score and first meaningful paint are nice benchmarks so run it a few times and take the median for each.

WebPageTest’s values are more reliable for benchmarking since it tests on real devices, so these will be your primary benchmarks. Record the value for the first byte, start to render, and overall load time.

Bloat Reduction

Now that you’ve assessed the performance of your site, let’s take a look at a tool that can help reduce the size of your files. This tool can identify extra, unnecessary pieces of code that bloat your files and cause resources to be larger than they should.

In a perfect world, users would only download the code that they actually need. But the production and maintenance process can lead to unused artifacts in the codebase. Even the most diligent developers can forget to remove pieces of old CSS and JavaScript while making changes. Over time these bits of dead code accumulate and become unnecessary bloat.

Additionally, certain resources are intended to be cached and then used throughout multiple pages, such as a site-wide stylesheet. Site-wide resources often make sense, but how can you tell when a stylesheet is mostly underused?

The Coverage Tab

Fortunately, Chrome Developer Tools has a tool that helps assess the bloat in files: The Coverage tab. The Coverage tab analyzes code coverage as you navigate your site. It provides an interface that shows how much code in a given CSS or JS file is actually being used.

To access the Coverage tab, open up Chrome Developer Tools, and click on the three dots in the top right. Navigate to More Tools > Coverage.

Access the Coverage tab by clicking on More tools and then Coverage


The Coverage tab is a bit hidden in the web developer tools console. (Large preview)

Next, start instrumenting coverage by clicking the reload button on the right. That will reload the page and begin the code coverage analysis. It brings up a report similar to this:

The Coverage report identifies unused code


An example of a Coverage report. (Large preview)

Here, pay attention to the unused bytes:

The coverage report UI shows a breakdown of used and unused bytes


The unused bytes are represented by red lines. (Large preview)

This UI shows the amount of code that is currently unused, colored red. In this particular page, the first file shown is 73% bloat. You may see significant bloat at first, but it only represents the current render. Change your screen size and you should see the CSS coverage go up as media queries get applied. Open any interactive elements like modals and toggles, and it should go up further.

Once you’ve activated every view, you will have an idea of how much code you are actually using. Next, you can dig into the report further to find out just which pieces of code are unused, simply click on one of the resources and look in the main window:

Detail view of a file in the Coverage report, showing which pieces of code aren’t being used


Click on a file in the Coverage report to see the specific portions of unused code. (Large preview)

In this CSS file, look at the highlights to the left of each ruleset; green indicates used code and red indicates bloat. If you are building a single page app or using specialized resources for this particular page, you may be inclined to go in and remove this garbage. But don’t be too hasty. You should definitely remove dead code, but be careful to make sure that you haven’t missed a breakpoint or interactive element.

Next Steps

In this article, we’ve shown the quantitative benefits of optimizing page speed. I hope you’re convinced, and that you have the tools you need to convince others. We’ve also set a minimum goal for mobile page speed: sub three seconds.

To hit this goal, it’s important that you prioritize the highest impact optimizations first. There are a lot of resources online that can help define this roadmap, such as this checklist. Lighthouse can also be a great tool for identifying specific issues in your codebase, so I encourage you to tackle those bottlenecks first. Sometimes the smallest optimizations can have the biggest impact.

Smashing Editorial
(da, lf, ra, yk, il)


Visit link: 

Measuring Websites With Mobile-First Optimization Tools

7 Reasons to Lay a Bet on Instagram Micro-Influencers in 2018

If you believe that launching an advertising campaign is enough to beat your competitors, we have bad news for you then: those days are far behind us. And truth to be told: most customers opt for skipping an ad as they are fed up with the overly polished professional pictures that seem too good to be true. As Forbes has revealed, customers crave authenticity. Thus, marketers are seeking out ways to deliver the genuine messages that align with their brand principles. For this reason, the collaboration with influencers has been booming over the past few years. The numbers speak for…

The post 7 Reasons to Lay a Bet on Instagram Micro-Influencers in 2018 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Original article: 

7 Reasons to Lay a Bet on Instagram Micro-Influencers in 2018

How Crazy Egg is Helping Portsmouth City Council to Improve its User Experience

crazy egg case study portsmouth city council

If your company relies only on analytics software to interpret and give insights on raw numbers, you are probably missing out. Numbers can give answers to many questions, like where are your users coming from, which page they visit, how long do they stay on your website and many more. However, if you want to know also HOW they visit your website, then you should start using heat maps. This article is about a case study of how the city of Portsmouth (UK) is using Crazy Egg to improve user experience and to help reorganize key pages and services. In…

The post How Crazy Egg is Helping Portsmouth City Council to Improve its User Experience appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read the article:

How Crazy Egg is Helping Portsmouth City Council to Improve its User Experience

Designing for Subscription: 6 UX Musts for Increasing Sign Ups

Your music is being streamed on all your devices with Apple Music and your favorite shows find a home at Netflix. Your physical store can accept payments via your Shopify subscription and now you can even get your basics like underwear or healthy food delivered to you through services like Stance and Graze respectively. Subscription services are not just the future of e-commerce anymore. They are very much the present. Subscription services are great for consumers as they get to experience much more content than they do with one-off purchases (think entire music libraries instead of a single album). They…

The post Designing for Subscription: 6 UX Musts for Increasing Sign Ups appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Original article:

Designing for Subscription: 6 UX Musts for Increasing Sign Ups

Thumbnail

The Five Most Important Visual Elements Required for a Successful Company Blog

As a marketer, you cannot neglect the power of content. Sharing valuable information with your audience help you build trust with your audience and develop a strong and influential brand. We know that 61% of US online consumers are making purchases based on recommendations they read on blogs. Therefore, why wouldn’t you do the same thing? Why not set up a blog for your own company or the company you represent? I am not going into the technical details of setting up a company blog or how to make it web-ready for today’s environment, nor will I discuss the content…

The post The Five Most Important Visual Elements Required for a Successful Company Blog appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Source: 

The Five Most Important Visual Elements Required for a Successful Company Blog