Tag Archives: social

Infographic: How To Create The Perfect Social Media Post

It’s easy to get into the habit of robotically posting content to social media every day. However, how you post to social media is just as important as the content itself. You need people to click on your post to see your content. So, before you rush around doing your daily social media tasks, pause, take a step back and think about how you can improve what you’re doing. Study this infographic and use it as a cheat sheet the next time you post to social media. One last hint: It’s a good idea to measure your social media efforts…

The post Infographic: How To Create The Perfect Social Media Post appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Continued here – 

Infographic: How To Create The Perfect Social Media Post

Top 7 Ways to Build Brand Loyalty

Brand Consistent

Modern customers scour websites and research products they’re thinking of buying before making their actual purchase. When customers are 60% to 80% of the way down the funnel before they talk to anyone at your business, you can’t rely on traditional methods to generate loyalty. At the same time, fewer and fewer clients remain loyal to one specific brand. Loyal customers are profitable customers: repeat customers are cheaper to market to, spend more, and make more frequent purchases. Yet, only 27% of initial sales go on to become repeat customers. Companies need to invest in building loyalty among their customers….

The post Top 7 Ways to Build Brand Loyalty appeared first on The Daily Egg.

See original article here – 

Top 7 Ways to Build Brand Loyalty

Building an App or Online Business in 2017? Here’s A DIY Resource Kit of Free Tools & Tips!

building an app

Last year, I started working on an idea for a platform, called Counsell, currently available as an app on iOS and Android devices, that lets all professionals give and get paid advice. As a designer, I was fortunate to be working with an incredible developer from the very start so we knew we could turn the idea into a working product. However, it was only when I, bolstered by my marketing background, decided to build a business around the app that I realized how haphazard and unsystematic the realities of setting up a new online business could be. Thanks to…

The post Building an App or Online Business in 2017? Here’s A DIY Resource Kit of Free Tools & Tips! appeared first on The Daily Egg.

From:

Building an App or Online Business in 2017? Here’s A DIY Resource Kit of Free Tools & Tips!

How to Optimize the Post-Purchase Experience for Higher Conversions & More Profit

post-purchase

Give yourself a pat on the back. It’s time to celebrate, right? After all your hard work you’ve finally got the sale or sign up you’ve been searching for. You’ve used your audience data to optimize your landing page design, finesse your language, and ensure everything on the page is as perfectly personalized as possible. So here’s to a job well done. But, and I’m gonna rain on your parade here. Your job is far from over. Sure, you’ve managed to get the sale, but that’s not the end of your job. It’s the end of the purchase journey, and…

The post How to Optimize the Post-Purchase Experience for Higher Conversions & More Profit appeared first on The Daily Egg.

This article: 

How to Optimize the Post-Purchase Experience for Higher Conversions & More Profit

How to Boost Conversions by Letting the Customer Do Your Marketing for You

how-to-boost-conversions-by-letting-the-customer-do-your-marketing-for-you

Your customer testimonials deserve the spotlight. They should be front-and-center on your landing page. The headliner. The star attraction. And yet, all-too-often, you see these vital elements of social proof treated like bit-players on the most important conversion-focused pages. They’re buried far below the hero section or crammed into some tough-to-see spot. And that is one huge missed opportunity. Sorta like casting De Niro to play the dead guy on CSI. Now, there’s been loads of articles written about how quality customer testimonials build trust, add credibility and generally fire up the conversion rate of landing pages. So I’m not…

The post How to Boost Conversions by Letting the Customer Do Your Marketing for You appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Originally posted here – 

How to Boost Conversions by Letting the Customer Do Your Marketing for You

How Tough Mudder Gained a 9% Session Uplift by Optimizing for Mobile Users

The following is a case study about how Tough Mudder achieved a 9% session uplift by optimizing for mobile. With the help of altima° and VWO, they identified and rectified pain points for their mobile users, to provide seamless event identification and sign-ups. 


About the Company

Tough Mudder offers a series of mud and obstacle courses designed to test physical strength, stamina, and mental grit. Events aren’t timed races, but team activities that promote camaraderie and accomplishment as a community.

Objective

Tough Mudder wanted to ensure that enrolment on their mobile website was smooth and easy for their users. They partnered with altima°, a digital agency specializing in eCommerce, and VWO to ensure seamless event identification and sign-ups.

Research on Mobile Users

The agency first analyzed Tough Mudder’s Google Analytics data to identify any pain points across participants’ paths to enrollment. They analyzed existing rates from the Event List, which demonstrated that interested shoppers were not able to identify the events appropriate for them. The agency began to suspect that customers on mobile might not be discovering events easily enough.

Test

On the mobile version of the original page, most relevant pieces of information like the event location and date, were being pushed too far down below the fold. In addition, lesser relevant page elements were possibly distracting users from the mission at hand. This is how it looked like:

tough mudder
Event location and date way below the fold on ‘original’

The agency altima° decided to make the following changes in the variation:

  1. Simplified header: Limiting the header copy to focus on the listed events. The following image shows how this looked.

    img2
    Simplified header copy
  2. List redesign: Redesigning the filter and event list to prominently feature the events themselves. The following image shows the same:
    List redesign to optimize event location and date
  3. Additionally, an Urgency Message was added to encourage interested users to enroll in events nearing their deadline. See the following image to know how it was done:
    Urgency message to push quicker enrollments

For these three variations, seven different combinations were created and a multivariate test was run using VWO. The test experienced over 2k event sign-ups across 4 weeks. The combinations of variations are shown below:

Test Results

After 4 weeks, Variation 2, which included the redesigned event list, proved to be the winning variation. This is not to say that other test variations were not successful. Variation 2 was just the MOST successful:

The winning variation produced a session value uplift of 9%! Combined with the next 2 rounds of optimization testing, altima° helped Tough Mudder earn a session value uplift of over 33%!

Why Did Variation 2 Win?

altima° prefers to let the numbers speak for themselves and not dwell on subjective observations. After all, who needs opinions when you’ve got data-backed results? altima°, however, draws the following conclusions on why Variation 2 won:

Simplified header:

Social proof has demonstrated itself to be a worthy component of conversion optimization initiatives. These often include customer reviews and/or indications of popularity across social networks.

In fact, Tough Mudder experienced a significant lift in the session value due to the following test involving the addition of Facebook icons. It’s likely that the phrase Our Events Have Had Over 2 Million Participants Across 3 Continents warranted its own kind of social proof. 

List redesign:

The most ambitious testing element to design and develop was also the most successful.

It appeared that an unnecessary amount of real estate was being afforded to the location filter. This was resolved by decreasing margins above and below the filter, along with removing the stylized blue graphic.

The events themselves now carried a more prominent position relative to the fold on mobile devices. Additionally, the list itself was made to be more easily read, with a light background and nondistracting text.

Urgency message:

The underperformance of the urgency message came as a surprise. It was believed that this element would prove to be valuable, further demonstrating the importance of testing with VWO.

Something to consider is that not every event included an urgency message. After all, not every enrolment period was soon to close. Therefore, it could be the case that some customers were less encouraged to click through and enroll in an individually relevant event if they felt that they had more time to do so later.

They might have understood that their event of interest wasn’t promoting urgency and was, therefore, not a priority. It also might have been the case that an urgency message was introduced too early in the steps to event enrolment.

Let’s Talk

How did you find this case study? There are more testing theories to discuss! Please reach out to altima° and VWO to discuss. You could also drop in a line in the Comments section below.

Multivariate Testing CTA

0

0 ratings

How will you rate this content?

Please choose a rating

The post How Tough Mudder Gained a 9% Session Uplift by Optimizing for Mobile Users appeared first on VWO Blog.

See the article here: 

How Tough Mudder Gained a 9% Session Uplift by Optimizing for Mobile Users

Infographic: What Are The Best Times & Days to Post to Social Media?

people facebook more at the end of the week

Trying to find the optimal times and days for your social media posts can be a difficult challenge. It requires months of testing. You have to make an effort to post at different times each day for each social media account, while tediously recording your results. There are tools out there that make this process easier, but it still requires a conscious effort to scatter your posting times around the clock. However, you may find a sweet spot that doubles your engagement and traffic. Sometimes it’s a good idea to use heuristics. Instead of starting your social media “science project”…

The post Infographic: What Are The Best Times & Days to Post to Social Media? appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Source – 

Infographic: What Are The Best Times & Days to Post to Social Media?

6 Ways To Send Emails Your Customers Will Love

e-mail me candy hearts
Young love in the 21st century, amirite? Image via Shutterstock.
Psst: This post was originally published in 2014, but we recently gave it a refresh during our two-week publishing hiatus. Since launching the Unbounce Marketing Blog, this post has become one of our top-performing posts of all time. We hope you enjoy the read.

Research shows there are over 205,000,000,000 emails sent each day. 205 BILLION.

The average professional sends and receives 122 emails per day and spends 3.2 hours of their working day in their inbox. That’s a lot of competition.

To give yourself the best chance of cutting through with your email marketing, you need to send emails your customers love.

But how?

By thinking about each customer’s current relationship with your business, you can send emails each individual customer will find relevant. Here are six ways you can send emails your customers will love.

1. Segment your users

The most obvious place to start in order to send emails your customers want to see is segmentation. Don’t send everyone the same thing! This sounds obvious, but very few businesses take the time to do any segmentation at all.

There are many, many ways to slice your customer base, ranging from something as basic as RFM:

  • Recency (when did a customer last buy from you)
  • Frequency (how often does a customer buy from you)
  • Monetary Value (how much do they spend)

…to much more complex statistical models that try and factor in a whole range of historical data and future estimates.

intermix
Click for full-size image. Internet Retailer covers this example from Intermix, who used this strategy to increase email conversions by 1,000%.

Even some simple segmentation will put you ahead of the pack. Next time you send out a promotional newsletter I’d recommend having at least two segments: Customers that have purchased before and new customers.

Use simple segments to change your offer in each email you are sending and, ultimately, improve your profit from this campaign.

For example, why not offer new customers — who have subscribed but never bought — a discount. Give past, loyal customers access to a “hidden” series of products for the new season as a reward for their loyalty.

The best part? Implementing this type of segmentation can be as simple as pulling the order history out of your database and adding a true or false value to your email marketing list.

And don’t forget to measure the net result and see how it compares to your normal promotions. I’d be surprised if the results haven’t improved.

Already doing basic segmentation?

A clever, more advanced trick, is to use trigger-based emails to send very specific emails to your customers based on what they do on your site.

Amazon is always a great example of this in action, as they hone in on your browsing history and actively follow-up on-site activity with a series of emails.

Setting up emails like this can be done with good lifecycle email marketing software that allows you to track your customers’ actions and trigger a series of emails to users who look at product category (cameras, for example) but do not checkout.

The point:

The web is a powerful place, and you are now able to access and use more information about your customers than ever before.

Use your customers’ information to segment when sending marketing emails and you’ll be ahead of (or at the very least on par with) your competition!

Subject line cheat sheet

Write a winning subject line every time

Download our FREE Cheat Sheet to learn how to identify bad subject lines… and how to fix them.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

2. Set up an automated campaign

Automated emails give you the power to personalize in a way you simply cannot recreate manually. Below are a few examples of quality automated emails that show their power:

1. A founder sending an email within an hour of a customer signing up

At scale this sort of email is impossible to keep on top of if you’re emailing manually. With a little engineering and (ensuring you keep things simple) you can quickly implement an email like this that goes out to customers automatically.

As long as you actually follow up on any responses, you’ll find that this campaign really resonates with new customers.

hellofax founder email

This example from HelloFax is a great one.

2. Drilling down your funnel, like this example from Flightfox

Every business has a funnel of some sort. You should be tracking where your customers are in your funnel and using email to move customers from one step to the next.

The best way to do this is to provide useful information each step of the way. Sending tens, hundreds or thousands of customers an individual email based on where they are in your funnel could not be done manually, but automated emails give you the power to send something individually relevant.

flightfox drilling down funnel email
Click for full-size image

This doesn’t mean you have use formal language or lots of pictures. Take a look at the example above from Flightfox, who used a simple, plain-text question-and-answer format to double the conversions on a lifecycle email.

3. This hyper-relevant example from Amazon

amazon lifecycle email

Sending emails based on a customer’s specific browsing habits is something you could never do with a team of people (it wouldn’t be very efficient!), but using automated emails allows you to trigger an email with content related to your customers’ experiences so far on your website.

Don’t underestimate the power of automated emails!

(I could spend a lot of time going through how to setup automated lifecycle emails, but this slideshow does the job faster and smoother than I can!)

3 Steps To Make Your Lifecycle Emails Soar by — you caught me, it’s me — Chris Hexton.

The point:

  1. Setup an automated email to guide customers through your funnel.
  2. Use a simple, personal question-and-answer style format to make sure the email is helpful.
  3. Consider sending a series of emails, not just one, and don’t be afraid to send the first email a few hours after your customer first triggers the action in question.

3. Send from YOUR email address

I did a search of my inbox the other day for the term “noreply” and got over 1,000 results since the start of March. Admittedly, I get a lot more emails than the average user, but that’s a lot of noreply@domain.com addresses.

These emails were from startups, big brands and everything in between. In many cases they were simple promotional emails or updates.

There is no REAL reason to use a noreply email address for a marketing email. Even if you’re sending the email to hundreds of thousands of people you can use an address like info@yourdomain.com or support@yourdomain.com. Active communication with your customers is the way of the future.

As HubSpot points out in their slideshow, What The F*ck Is Social Media?, brands are winning engagement with their customers at every opportunity across every medium.

There are all sorts of tools out there to help with managing customer responses, my favourite being HelpScout.

Bottom line: you should use a personal email and give your customers the chance to respond if they want, because…

What if your customers have a question about your sale?

What if your customers respond and ask how to setup a new feature?

For every 10% of customers that bother to head back to your site and find your support email or create a ticket, you can guarantee that 90% will simply bail when they can’t hit reply.

Do you want to miss out on 90% of what your customer base are saying? Talking to customers is everything when it comes to running an online business. You can’t chat to them over the counter but you can chat to them via email!

The point:

Use a REAL email address, not noreply@domain.com.

4. Run a simple A/B test

Thanks to awesome tools like Visual Website Optimizer and Unbounce (shameless shelf plug), savvy online businesses use A/B testing to regularly improve their landing pages and funnels.

…but hardly anyone I talk to A/B tests email campaigns like they should. Running an A/B test might sound complex but it can be as simple as you want.

As an example close to home, I have recently been testing the format of my blog post update emails:

  • Do customers prefer to receive the entire post in an email or do they prefer a summary with a link to the blog post?
  • Do customers want to see a “hand-written” synopsis of the post by me (adding a little flare to the summary) or are they happy to simply get to the point?
  • Does having an image in the blog post update email make a difference?

All of these questions stem from wanting to write emails that your customers will love more. Getting customers to open, click and convert from your emails is important, and seeing the results of tests like those above is simple, thanks to the email marketing software on the market today.

So… next time you’re writing a campaign, have it in your head to create a second variation.

  • Test the ‘From’ address (for example, using “Chris from Vero” as opposed to “Chris Hexton” lifted my open rates)
  • Test the subject line (are you better with all caps, no caps, shorter subjects, longer subjects, a subject the same as the heading, etc.)
  • Test the template
  • Test the format
  • Test the offer

…and so on. Here’s the results of a recent A/B test on a subject line I ran. To test a hypothesis I simply removed “[Vero]” from the subject line and changed my approach to try and be mysterious or enticing — interestingly, the open rate dropped dramatically with this variation. Lesson learned!

vero email subject A/B tests
Click for full-size image

The point:

The value of a simple A/B test can be very powerful stuff. With a few extra hours work (or even less), you can find some permanent ways to send emails your customers love.

5. Simplify your copy

Ryan Hoover wrote a great post sharing his theory on Email first startups. He mentions a number of reasons email is a great medium on which to build a business. Email forces you to be simple. There’s no room for bloat and, unless your emails are focused and to the point, they won’t get your readers attention.

Although Ryan was talking about email in the context of starting a business, the same concept applies to any email you send

Simplify your copy, spend more time writing content that relates to where the customer is in their relationship to your business and provide a single call to action. Joanna Wiebe also has some great tips in her article “Tone of Voice 101“.

Here are four steps that you should go through mentally when writing a new email campaign (or any content you’re going to publish):

  1. Would I want to read this? This is really the starting point. When you re-read what you’ve written, you should constantly be asking yourself, “Would I keep reading? Or would I stop?”
  2. Am I speaking as I wish to be spoken to? Tone is hard to master: you need to be yourself and find a “voice” that makes sense to your customers and your business. You should always sense-check whether you’re talking in a way that is respectful, professional and consistent.
  3. Can I cut more out? Most people have a nasty habit of repeating themselves and writing too much. There’s nothing wrong with long copy (it often converts better) but long does not equal effective by default. Get someone to proofread your content and, if you need to, cut the crap!
  4. What is the call to action? Having a single call to action and repeating that CTA is something you should aim for in every email you send out. Keep it simple, keep it direct and make sure your customers get where you’re going with it.

The point:

Review your emails properly before you send them! Focus your emails with consistent, well-written content (take your time) and repeat your single call to action (CTA).

6. Give away your knowledge, for free

A tried and true tactic — customers will love you if you share your secrets with them.

Too many business owners worry about giving away information, as though a successful business is built on ideas alone.

The world’s most successful online business such as 37Signals, HubSpot and Net-a-Porter all use sharing as a core part of their marketing.

Take the 37Signals blog, Signal vs. Noise. Since 1999 they’ve shared their ups, downs and ideas about starting businesses, design and management online. This has led to successful books and has certainly been a dramatic aspect of the success of their products such as Basecamp or Highrise.

Net-a-Porter has always shared great content and style guidance on how to dress and look good. This magazine-first approach is a great way for Net-a-Porter to consistently market to their customers without seeming overbearing by simply offering coupons every week. Customers don’t buy clothes for the sake of buying clothes: they buy clothes to look and feel good.

netaporter 560
Click for full-size image

By sharing the secrets of how to do this Net-a-Porter constantly builds momentum, driving over 30% of their sales via email.

The point:

Give away as much information as you can to your customers. HELP them by teaching and they’ll love you for it. Email is a great medium for sharing content. It’s direct, it’s personal and it’s focused. Embrace this.

Rock and roll!

Focus on making your customers love your emails and you’ll increase your conversions as well. Use the huge amount of data you can now capture about your customers to send smarter emails, not more emails. Make each email count and you’ll be a long way ahead of the competition.

How do you send emails your customers love? Share success stories in the comments!

Source: 

6 Ways To Send Emails Your Customers Will Love

Facebook Organic Reach is Dying: Here’s Why It’s a Good Thing

Facebook reach
More and more our News Feeds are full of updates from friends… not companies — but there are benefits to this. Image via Shutterstock.

Facebook wears many hats. It does everything, and is everything. It’s where we turn to celebrate many important life milestones, share our lives with our friends, organize events, consume media and much, much more. But for marketers, it’s an advertising tool.

Social media marketing has changed a great deal over the past few years. One of the biggest changes is Facebook’s shift away from organic reach into a paid marketing channel.

If you manage a Facebook Page, I’m sure you’re familiar with this subject, and you’ve probably noticed a sharp drop in the number of people who are seeing and interacting with your content organically.

As a marketer, this change has been tough to stomach. It’s now much harder to reach your audience than it was a few years ago. And with recent updates that Facebook is, again, shifting its algorithm to focus on friends and family, it’ll be harder still to reach people who are already fans of your page.

Facebook organic reach is hard
TFW you can almost reach your audience… but not quite. Image via Giphy.

Before we dive into why the plight of organic reach is a good thing, let’s first take a look at what brought along this decline in the first place.

Want more awesome content to help you crush your marketing goals?

Sign up to get the latest digital marketing tips delivered straight to your inbox.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Understanding how social reach is declining

In 2014, Social@Ogilvy released its much-cited report, “Facebook Zero: Considering Life After the Demise of Organic Reach.”

In the report, Ogilvy documented the harsh decline of organic reach between October 2013 and February 2014. In that short period of time, organic reach dropped to around 6% for all pages, and for large pages with more than 500,000 likes, the number was just 2%.

Ogilvy graph

Based on this data, a Facebook Page with around 20,000 fans could expect fewer than 1,200 people to see its posts, and a page with 2 million fans would, on average, reach only 40,000 fans.

The reasoning behind this change from Facebook’s perspective is twofold, as Facebook’s VP of Advertising Technology, Brian Boland, explained in a blog post.

The first reason for the decline in organic reach is purely the amount of content being shared to Facebook. Advances in smartphone technology means we can now create and share this content with just a few swipes of the finger or taps on a screen. More and more of our friends and favorite brands are also active on the platform, meaning competition for attention is higher. Boland explains:

There is now far more content being made than there is time to absorb it. On average, there are 1,500 stories that could appear in a person’s News Feed each time they log onto Facebook. For people with lots of friends and Page likes, as many as 15,000 potential stories could appear any time they log on.

The second reason for the decline in organic reach on Facebook is how the News Feed works. Facebook’s number one priority is to keep its 1.5 billion users happy, and the best way to do that is by showing only the most relevant content in their News Feeds.

Of the 1,500+ stories a person might see whenever they log onto Facebook, News Feed displays approximately 300. To choose which stories to show, News Feed ranks each possible story (from more to less important) by looking at thousands of factors relative to each person.

To a marketer, this may feel like a negative, but it’s actually a good thing, because what we’re left with now is a far more powerful marketing tool than we had when reach was free.

Let me explain…

Why the decline of organic reach is a good thing

When a social network first achieves mainstream popularity (think Facebook circa 2009, Instagram in 2014-15, Snapchat in 2016) organic reach rules the roost. As a marketer, it’s all about figuring out what content your audience craves and giving it to them.

Then, we hit a peak, and suddenly the social network all but transforms into a pay-to-play platform — bringing with it another huge marketing opportunity. At Buffer, it’s something we like to call The Law of the Double Peak:

Buffer double peak

Facebook hit the organic peak in 2014, and since then reach has declined to a point where it’s almost at zero now. But, on the other hand, we’re left with a far more powerful advertising tool than we had before.

It’s also important to remember that before social media — with print, radio, TV, banner ads, direct mail or any other form of advertising — there was no such thing as organic reach. You couldn’t create a piece of content and get it seen by thousands (even millions) with no budget.

Facebook, now, is probably one of the most cost-effective digital ad products we’ve ever seen. It’s the best way to reach a highly targeted audience and drive awareness about your product or service, and probably an even better marketing channel than it was back in 2012 when organic reach hit its peak.

4 ways to maximize the paid marketing opportunities on Facebook

Once you’re over the fact that not everyone on Facebook gets to discover your brand for free anymore…

1. Ensure your ads are relevant

With more than 3 million advertisers all competing for attention in more than a billion users’ News Feeds, Facebook uses what’s called an ad auction to deliver ads.

The ad auction pairs individual ads with particular people looking for an appropriate match. The social network’s ad auction is designed to determine the best ad to show to a person at a given point in time. This means a high-quality, hyper-relevant ad can beat an ad that has a higher advertiser bid, but is lower quality and less relevant.

The two major factors you need to work on to ensure Facebook sees your ad as relevant are your targeting and ad creative.

For example, if you’re targeting a broad audience such as men and women, ages 18–25, living in the United Kingdom, chances are your ad may not be relevant to every person. However, if you were to break your audience down into smaller, more specific groups your message may be more relevant (and therefore successful).

2. Test different messages and creative

There are endless opportunities for testing on Facebook Ads: titles, texts, links, images, age, gender, interests, locations and so on.

The image is the first thing people see when your ad shows up in their News Feed. It’s what grabs their attention and makes them stop and click, which means it’s essential to get the image right. Though, you probably won’t hit the nail on the head first time ‘round. Thankfully, Facebook allows you to upload multiple images for each advert and optimizes to display best performing ones.

Your creative can have a huge difference when it comes to conversions. AdEspresso recommends coming up with at least four different Facebook Ad variations and then testing each one. For example, you might test two different images with two different copy texts (2 images x 2 texts = 4 variations).

AdEspresso also found that creative with a picture of a person performs far better:

Facebook ad variations

When you create ads, plan out a number of variations — changing copy, images and CTAs in order to discover what works best for each audience you’re targeting.

Want more awesome content to help you crush your marketing goals?

Sign up to get the latest digital marketing tips delivered straight to your inbox.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

3. Be specific with your content

Combining the first two points above, targeting to a specific segment using creative that is specifically built for that target audience is incredibly powerful.

Many businesses have a range of customers, all with slightly different needs. For each customer your business is targeting, jot down as much information as you can about them and try to form a few customer personas to create specific ads for.

Then, with your target personas in place, think about how you can use Facebook Ads to target each individual group. This could mean creating an ad set for each group and testing different images and copy within your ads to see what works best for each group.

By tailoring ads to specific personas, you can vastly improve your advert’s relevancy and also serve the needs of your customer better.

4. Pay attention to real metrics

With social media, it can be easy to fall into the trap of measuring only soft metrics — the things that don’t correlate directly with sales or revenue growth, but can still be good indicators of performance. On Facebook, this means things such as Likes, Comments and Shares.

When it comes to paid marketing channels, like Facebook Ads, it’s important to have some solid goals in mind and pay attention to the metrics that translate into your ultimate goal. For example, having a post receive a few hundred Likes or a high engagement rate could be seen as success, but that’s probably not the ultimate goal of your campaign.

Paid advertising on Facebook is a lot like paid-for marketing has always been. For 90% the end goal is sales or, for larger companies, brand awareness. And with paid-for ads you’ll want to be a little stricter with yourself when it comes to measurement. That’s not to say ALL advertising on Facebook must be purely focused on selling — that strategy likely wouldn’t work — but certainly any specific advertising campaigns should be focused on increasing your bottom line.

How do you use Facebook?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the evolution of Facebook as a marketing channel. How have your strategies changed over recent years? Are you one of the 3 million businesses who advertise on the platform? I’d love to hear your learnings and perspectives too.

Thanks for reading! And I’m excited to join the conversation in the comments.

See original article here: 

Facebook Organic Reach is Dying: Here’s Why It’s a Good Thing

10 Reasons Why Every Business Should Turn Employees into Social Media Brand Advocates

Did you know that over 50 million businesses have pages on Facebook? Marketer-bloggers everywhere have repeatedly referred to this increase as “noise” on social media, and they have discussed how critical it is to “cut through the noise” and reach your target audience. The great news for businesses is that the solution to this very real problem is staring them right in the face, or, more accurately, sitting right in the very same building. Are you aware of what your employees could achieve for your business as brand advocates? 10 Reasons You Should Get Started Now Ted Rubin once said…

The post 10 Reasons Why Every Business Should Turn Employees into Social Media Brand Advocates appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Original post – 

10 Reasons Why Every Business Should Turn Employees into Social Media Brand Advocates