Tag Archives: sport

CSS Grid Challenge: Winners and Templates

CSS Grid is the new layout standard for the web, but we still are just getting started with new layout ideas. Many assume that CSS Grid is just a replacement for table layouts, but that’s simply not true. Others might think that we can use CSS Grid to replicate more advanced print layouts, which brings us closer to what’s possible.
One of the main reasons behind the idea of the CSS Grid Challenge was to have some starting points for layouts, and show what can be achieved with CSS Grids today.

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CSS Grid Challenge: Winners and Templates

How Sport Chek is getting more value out of its value proposition

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TL;DR Canada’s largest sporting goods retailer has a multi-faceted optimization program, but two recent tests revealed impactful insights about the company’s ‘Free Shipping’ value proposition. Read the full case study here.

The Company

Sport Chek is Canada’s largest national retailer of sporting goods, footwear and apparel. We partnered with Sport Chek just over a year ago and have been working together to optimize their e-­commerce experiences, with the goal of increasing conversions in the form of transactions.

While Sport Chek’s conversion optimization program is multi-faceted, two different tests recently revealed impactful insights about one of the company’s value propositions.

What is a value proposition?

Value proposition can be thought of as a cost versus benefits equation that shows your prospects’ motivation. But it’s all about perception: if your perceived benefits outweigh the perceived costs, your prospects will be motivated to act.

Motivation = Perceived Benefits - Perceived Costs

Michael St Laurent

All value propositions have varying degrees of value depending on how they’re interpreted and how they’re communicated. Your benefits hold different weight for different people―it’s all about finding out which of your benefits are perceived to be most important to your prospects.

Michael St Laurent, Optimization Strategist, WiderFunnel

The value of ‘Free Shipping’

Sport Chek offers free shipping on online orders over a certain dollar amount. Of course, offering some degree of free shipping is basically par for the course in today’s e-commerce world. It’s a Point of Parity―these are the features that are important to your prospects that you also share with your competitors (the basic entry requirements to the game).

The question in this case was: How can Sport Chek communicate this offer in a way that provides more value to their customers? How can they make this Point of Parity look like a Point of Difference​―a feature that’s important to the prospect and unique to your business.

Related: For more on Points of Parity, Points of Difference and Points of Irrelevance, check out Chris Goward’s post “U​se these 3 points to create an awesome value proposition​“.

In this case study, you’ll read about:

  • Two experiments, one on the cart page and one on the product page, that led to substantial lift for Sport Chek
  • An unexpected variable that revealed an insight about the company’s ideal ‘Free Shipping’ threshold

The results of these experiments showed that ‘Free Shipping’ is an extremely elastic value proposition point for Sport Chek. At varying “you-qualify-for-free-shipping” price points, there are major swings in user behavior.

In the past, their ‘Free Shipping’ offer was an under-utilized value proposition because it wasn’t being emphasized in the right way. Now, this value proposition point is more visible and being communicated with more clarity.

Read the full case study here

Learn more about how Sport Chek extracted more value from their value proposition. Read the full case study here.

The post How Sport Chek is getting more value out of its value proposition appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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How Sport Chek is getting more value out of its value proposition

How To Sell Your UX Design Solution To Clients

How do you convince clients to trust you with their valuable and much-loved product? In my experience, the best way to sell work to clients is to apply user-centered design not only to the work we produce, but also to the clients who commission that work.
We have to understand who our clients are, what is important to them and what their goals are. And then we have to deliver work that not only meets the needs of end users, but also satisfies the personalities within the company itself.

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How To Sell Your UX Design Solution To Clients