Tag Archives: studio

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

(This is a sponsored article.) As users spend 89% of their mobile time inside apps — and 56% of all traffic is now mobile — creating a mobile app has become a top priority for many businesses. Statistics show that the average American spends more than two hours a day on their mobile device. Having a mobile app can be beneficial for your company for a number of reasons. But we all know that building an app from scratch is difficult — the gap between a concept and solution is wide and requires a lot of time, effort and money.

Source:

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Editor’s Note: Our dear friend Anselm Hannemann summarizes what happened in the web community in the past few weeks in one handy list, so that you can catch up on everything new and important. Enjoy!
Welcome back to our monthly reading list. Before we dive right into all the amazing content I stumbled upon — admittedly, this one is going to be quite a long update — I want to make a personal announcement.

Original link: 

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

How to Create More Actionable PPC Reports (That’ll Improve Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a now on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.

Source article – 

How to Create More Actionable PPC Reports (That’ll Improve Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a now on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.

Continued:

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Dwelling On The Past: The Importance Of Project Retrospectives (Part 1)

We should always look for opportunities to grow and improve. Retrospectives and reflections allow you to codify what you’ve learned from experience, to document mistakes and avoid future ones, and to increase your potential to grow in the future. Agile methodologies typically include time for retrospectives throughout a project. Regardless of your methodology, all teams would benefit from having a retrospective at the conclusion of a project.
Additionally, we can learn from our mistakes, identify what works well, and better understand ourselves through personal reflection.

More:  

Dwelling On The Past: The Importance Of Project Retrospectives (Part 1)

Challenge Yourself More Often By Creating Artwork Every Day

Whether you’re into good ol’ drawing and painting, or quick editing in Photoshop or Illustrator, one thing’s for sure: they’re all creativity’s best friends. Some draw pictures all day, while others find their inspiration in uncommon sources in order to break out of the box. Whatever it is that you decide to do, it’s good to challenge yourself more often and get out of your comfort zone. If you don’t, you may never discover something that you love doing, or perhaps even worse, never learn a whole lot about yourself.

This article – 

Challenge Yourself More Often By Creating Artwork Every Day

How To Create A Responsive 8-Bit Drum Machine Using Web Audio, SVG And Multitouch

In this little tutorial, I’m going to share some tips I recently followed to build a fun demo for the Build 2016 conference. The idea was to create a small 8-bit drum machine, with 8-bit sounds and graphics:

How To Create A Responsive 8-Bit Drum Machine Using Web Audio, SVG And Multitouch

This small web app was used in one of our demos to illustrate how you can easily provide a temporary offline experience when your hosted web app loses Internet connectivity. It works in all desktop browsers as well as on all smartphones (iOS, Android and Windows Mobile).

The post How To Create A Responsive 8-Bit Drum Machine Using Web Audio, SVG And Multitouch appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Excerpt from: 

How To Create A Responsive 8-Bit Drum Machine Using Web Audio, SVG And Multitouch

Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned

Static site generators are pretty en vogue nowadays. It is as if developers around the world are suddenly realizing that, for most websites, a simple build process is easy enough to render the last 20 years of content management systems useless. All right, that’s a bit over the top. But for the average website without many moving parts, it’s pretty close!

Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned

However, does that hold true for websites bigger than your humble technology blog? How do static site generators behave when the number of pages exceeds the average portfolio website and runs up into the thousands? Or when development is a team effort? Or when people of different technical backgrounds are involved? This is the story of how we managed to bring roughly 2000 pages and 40 authors onto a technology stack made for hackers.

The post Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

View the original here:  

Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned

How To Land A First-Rate Graphic Design Internship

My first experience in the design world came through an internship at a small motion graphics studio called Motion Theory. I was fresh out of school and had never worked with so many talented people before. It was intense, difficult and nerve-wracking.
And I loved it.
It made me a better designer. And the lessons I learned there have served me well throughout my years as a freelancer. Because my experience was so rewarding, I’ve developed the habit of scrutinizing internship programs at every new studio I visit.

Link to article: 

How To Land A First-Rate Graphic Design Internship

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Slimming Down Content on Category Page Increased Sales by 106.26% [Case Study]

The Company

Muc-Off started in 1994 as a manufacturer of cleaning products for bikes. As of today, they deal in a large range of cleaning products for electronic goods, apparel and motor vehicles as well as a new range for fitness goods.

To improve the conversion rate of their website, they hired Spot Studio, an international digital agency focussed on developing web solutions that generate profits. Spot Studio did a number of tests that improved the conversion rates of various entities of their website.

In this case study we will talk about how Spot Studio increased the conversion rate of category page of Muc-Off’s online store.

The Test

For one of their A/B tests, Spot Studio decided to tweak the design of the category page. Their goal was to increase product views and maximise sales.

The original web design featured information about Muc-Off at the user’s eye level. The purpose of this was to make the user engage with their sub-menus which offered them a guide on using their products as well as links to buy them. The team at Spot Studio felt that this was causing incongruity in the user experience — visitors came there to purchase products, but having landed on the page they were finding information resources instead of a shop front.

This is how the original category page looked:

A/B testing control

The hypothesis was simple. The team believed that by moving products above the fold, they could encourage users to buy. Employing strictly scientific statistical testing facilitated by VWO, they monitored user interaction with the original content as well as how users behaved once they had replaced the ‘above the fold’ content with eye-catching images of their products, complete with a slider.

Here’s how the modified design looked:

A/B testing variation

The Result

Keeping a close eye on how users interacted with the website by using heat maps and various analytic tools, they monitored where the user hovered, where they clicked and how far down the sales funnel they went.

Having rearranged the departments page, Muc-Off saw a dramatic increase in not only product views, but closed sales. Moving images of products above the fold increased product views by a total of 43.78% with a concurrent increase in sales by 106.26%.

A/B test result

Conclusion

Quoting Sebastian from SpotStudio, “We all know that user drop off from the home page is a big issue suffered by a lot of businesses, with the bounce rate also taken into consideration as a SERP. The key is to make sure that your users are engaged as a lead as soon as they land on your website, ensuring that those who are there to purchase are immediately directed towards a sale.

Utilizing striking imagery, which reinforced Muc-Off’s brand identity, was also a must. Just replacing the top of the page with products would have only alienated the user, thus creating incongruity in branding, which would in turn diminish trust. It’s that fine line between a push and a pull that we believe works so effectively in this case as we were not only selling a product, but a brand and a lifestyle.”

We’d love to hear your thoughts on this case study. Share them with us and Spot Studio in the comments section below.

The post Slimming Down Content on Category Page Increased Sales by 106.26% [Case Study] appeared first on VWO Blog.

Excerpt from:  

Slimming Down Content on Category Page Increased Sales by 106.26% [Case Study]