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Text Editing Tips And Tricks Roundup




Text Editing Tips And Tricks Roundup

Rachel Andrew



We asked the Smashing Community for their favorite text editing tricks, shortcuts, and features that save them time. Here’s a roundup of what we’ve found quite useful along with a couple of other suggestions you may find handy.

Favourite Keyboard Shortcuts

Many of you have favorite keyboard shortcuts. Some of these will be editor or operating system specific, although in many cases you’ll be able to find a similar shortcut with the tools you are using. I’ve rounded up a few from the community below.

Ste Grainer shared a tip about the movement and selection shortcuts:

The basic movement/selection shortcuts that many don’t know about:

Hold Cmd + Arrow Key to move to the beginning/end of a line or top/bottom of a document.

Hold Opt + Arrow Key to move word to word horizontally and block to block vertically.

Shift to select while doing those.

From Jo Frank:

Select all occurences of current selection (Ctrl + SHIFT + L in VSCode) and duplicate line/selection which I set up as Ctrl + D.

Loris Gillet shared a few favorite shortcuts for hopping around or deleting text:

+ forward/back arrows allows to jump to the next word instead of the next letter
+ up/down arrows allows to jump to the beginning/end of the paragraph
+ Backspace deletes the whole word instead of letters by letters.

Many of the suggested tips came from web developers — tips for the editors they used most frequently. We also received suggestions for Android Studio from Maher Nabeel:

In Android Studio:

  • Ctrl + D — Duplicate line
  • Ctrl + Y — Delete line
  • Ctrl + W — Select block
  • Ctrl + O — Override methods
  • Ctrl + ALT + L — Reformat code

Editor Shortcut Cheatsheets

As we can see from the tips already posted, learning the keyboard shortcuts for your editor saves a lot of time. It is always worth taking a look at what is available for your editor, as learning a few of these shortcuts can save a lot of typing over the course of a day writing code.

On Twitter, Tobin Saunders recommended the Atom Editor Cheat Sheet which is a detailed list of shortcuts for Atom. I also took a look at what was available for other frequently used editors.

Visual Studio Code

The VS Code website has a number of downloadable cheatsheets in PDF format, if you find it useful to keep a cheatsheet printed out on your desk.

Joel Reis noted that if you are switching to VS Code from Sublime Text, Atom, Vim or Visual Studio, then you can download the keymap extensions. This means that you can maintain the keyboard shortcuts from your previous editor. This tip was also noted on Smashing Magazine earlier this year when Burke Holland shared with us some of the things that you might be surprised to find that VS Code can do, in his article “Visual Studio Code Can Do That?

Sublime Text

A good selection of Sublime Text 3 shortcuts for Windows, Mac, and Linux can be found here.

We also have an article here on Smashing Magazine in which Jai Panda shares some of his favorite Sublime Text Tips and Tricks.

Customizing Your Environment

Our keyboards and default computer settings are designed more for typing text than typing code. Some commenters have made changes to their defaults in order to make it faster to type the things they most often need to type.

Alex Semenikhine made this suggestion:

I minimize the number of times I have to hold Shift and press a button. If I make brackets (( )) far more often than I use 9 and 0, I customize the keyboard to reflect that, my 9 is ( and Shift + 9 is 9, etc.

Paul van den Tool sets his ‘Key Repeat’ and ‘Delay Until Repeat’ to their highest setting in order that his cursor just “flies across the screen when using the arrows.”

Jarón Barends told us how he, “created Alt + ; as a shortcut to insert a semicolon at the end of a current line.”

Using Emmet

A number of people mentioned the text expansion system of Emmet. If you hand-code a lot of HTML and CSS then Emmet can save you a great deal of typing time. When writing HTML, Emmet abbreviations will be familiar to anyone who understands CSS. For example, if you want to create an unordered list inside a div element, you could use the following:

div>ul>li

Which would then turn into:

<div>
  <ul>
    <li></li>
  </ul>
</div>

The abbreviation is exactly the selector that would select the li in CSS. A div with a ul as a direct child, and a li as a direct child of the ul. Take a look at the Emmet Cheat Sheet for more examples.

Emmet is built into VS Code and is available as a plugin for many other editors.

Use A Clipboard Manager

Erik Verbeek suggests using a clipboard manager so that you can grab copied code from the history. He suggests using ClipMenu for OS X, which sadly seems to be discontinued.

Similar tools include:

Many editors also include a clipboard history for copy and paste actions within the editor. On Twitter, @codevoodoo noted that Webstorm had such a feature. There is a Clipboard History extension for VS Code and a package for Atom; Sublime Text has this built in, as this tutorial on the Sublime Text Clipboard History explains.

There were a few specific tools recommended in the comments, so here is a roundup of useful tools you may not have heard of.

Vim

People who like Vim, really really like Vim. It certainly comes with a learning curve, however, if you are very keen on optimizing your keyboard editing then the time invested is likely to be worth it. As Jess Telford points out, you can do things like type 13k to move the cursor 13 lines up.

Take a look at the Vim Cheat Sheet for a list of commands. You can use Vim emulation in many other editors. The key mapping mentioned earlier for VS Code include mappings for Vim, and there is a plugin available for Atom as well.

Prettier

Prettier is an open-source opinionated code formatting tool. Using Prettier ensures that all code is formatted to a consistent style. This is incredibly helpful when working in a team as it means that a consistent style is enforced, without anyone really needing to think about it.

There are downloads available for several editors, in order that you can use Prettier within whichever environment you chose.

AutoHotkey

I had not heard of the tool AutoHotkey until this suggestion from @Hobbesenero. AutoHotkey is an automation scripting language for Windows. Using the scripting language you can create shortcuts for common tasks, for example, to insert a template.

Converting Text Formats With Pandoc

One of my favorite tools is Pandoc. I use Pandoc when I need to convert one text format to another. One of the really useful things Pandoc can do is turn HTML or Markdown into EPUB format. I frequently do this in order to turn a set of notes into a file I can read using iBooks on my iPad. I do this in order to have an easily accessible set of notes for my workshops or to turn lengthy documentation into an easy to read offline format to read on an airplane.

Pandoc can convert from and to many different file formats. In addition to creating quick EPUB files, I also use it to convert copy from Word documents to Markdown or other useful formats. This can be very useful if you get some messy copy from a client that needs to be converted to enter into a CMS.

TextExpander And Typinator

TextExpander is available for MacOS and Windows and is a tool that helps you create snippets which can be inserted using keyboard shortcuts or common abbreviations. TextExpander was recommended by Anders Norén. If you prefer a solution that isn’t a subscription service then you might like to give Typinator a try.

These text expansion tools can be useful outside of writing code. If you often find yourself typing the same information in answer to emails or support requests, creating a shortcut to insert that text can quickly pay dividends in terms of time saved.

Textwasher

Recommended on Facebook by Dennis Germundal, Textwasher is a very simple tool for cleaning any formatting from text.

Add Your Suggestions In The Comments

There are a vast number of ways to enhance productivity in the tools we use every day, and it is also incredibly easy to completely overlook them. I hope that among these suggestions there will be something for you to try out. Or perhaps this will be a prompt for you to dig a little deeper into the documentation for your editors and other tools. I have certainly been inspired to do so.

If you missed the tweet and have some great tips to share, then add them to the comments. We’d love to hear them!

Smashing Editorial
(il)


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Text Editing Tips And Tricks Roundup

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How Mobile Optimization Can Affect your Conversions in 2018

mobile optimization

For a long time, responsive design dominated the web as the format of choice for business and personal sites. Now, however, mobile optimization has begun to gain credence as a potentially preferable strategy. Mobile optimization refers to optimizing a website specifically for mobile devices. Instead of simply compressing and slightly rearranging the content on the screen, you design the entire experience for smaller screens. You’ve probably heard the term “mobile-friendly.” It’s a bit outdated, so even though it sounds like a good thing, it’s not enough. People are using their mobile devices more and more, as I’ll explain in a…

The post How Mobile Optimization Can Affect your Conversions in 2018 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How Mobile Optimization Can Affect your Conversions in 2018

Learning Framer By Creating A Mobile App Prototype

The time of static user interfaces is long gone. Designing interactive prototypes is the best approach to expressing your ideas and explaining them to clients and stakeholders. Or, as Jerry Cao of UXPin puts it: “Nothing brings you closer to the functionality of the final product than prototyping. It is the prototype that brings to life the experience behind user experience.”
Prototyping is an important part of the modern UX design process.

Visit site: 

Learning Framer By Creating A Mobile App Prototype

Live Stream From Awwwards Berlin 2018: Showcasing Trends In UX Design

Designing the best experience is a challenge, and every designer and developer has their own way of tackling it. But, well, no matter how different our approaches are, one thing is for sure: We can learn a lot from each other.
To give you your dose of UX inspiration, we are happy to announce that our dear friends at Adobe, are streaming live from the Awwwards Conference which will take place in Berlin on February 8th and 9th.

View this article – 

Live Stream From Awwwards Berlin 2018: Showcasing Trends In UX Design

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

(This is a sponsored article.) As users spend 89% of their mobile time inside apps — and 56% of all traffic is now mobile — creating a mobile app has become a top priority for many businesses. Statistics show that the average American spends more than two hours a day on their mobile device. Having a mobile app can be beneficial for your company for a number of reasons. But we all know that building an app from scratch is difficult — the gap between a concept and solution is wide and requires a lot of time, effort and money.

Source:

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Editor’s Note: Our dear friend Anselm Hannemann summarizes what happened in the web community in the past few weeks in one handy list, so that you can catch up on everything new and important. Enjoy!
Welcome back to our monthly reading list. Before we dive right into all the amazing content I stumbled upon — admittedly, this one is going to be quite a long update — I want to make a personal announcement.

Original link: 

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

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How to Create More Actionable PPC Reports (That’ll Improve Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a now on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.

Source article – 

How to Create More Actionable PPC Reports (That’ll Improve Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a now on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.

Continued:

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Dwelling On The Past: The Importance Of Project Retrospectives (Part 1)

We should always look for opportunities to grow and improve. Retrospectives and reflections allow you to codify what you’ve learned from experience, to document mistakes and avoid future ones, and to increase your potential to grow in the future. Agile methodologies typically include time for retrospectives throughout a project. Regardless of your methodology, all teams would benefit from having a retrospective at the conclusion of a project.
Additionally, we can learn from our mistakes, identify what works well, and better understand ourselves through personal reflection.

More:  

Dwelling On The Past: The Importance Of Project Retrospectives (Part 1)

Challenge Yourself More Often By Creating Artwork Every Day

Whether you’re into good ol’ drawing and painting, or quick editing in Photoshop or Illustrator, one thing’s for sure: they’re all creativity’s best friends. Some draw pictures all day, while others find their inspiration in uncommon sources in order to break out of the box. Whatever it is that you decide to do, it’s good to challenge yourself more often and get out of your comfort zone. If you don’t, you may never discover something that you love doing, or perhaps even worse, never learn a whole lot about yourself.

This article – 

Challenge Yourself More Often By Creating Artwork Every Day