Tag Archives: style

A Comprehensive Guide To User Experience Design

(This is a sponsored article.) Having undertaken initial user research and analyzed your research findings, the next phase of the design process is to apply what you’ve learned by developing a series of designs to test your assumptions. In the fourth article in my series for Adobe XD, I’ll be focusing on the initial phase of the design process.
Within this overall series of ten articles, this is the first of three that tie together the design process.

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A Comprehensive Guide To User Experience Design

Why Spending $1,000 on Instagram Influencer Marketing is Worth It

instagram influencers

You might have noticed that influential Instagrammers are doing a lot of promotions for brands relevant to their niche. Being such a visual platform, Instagram may be the best platform for you to run your influencer marketing campaign. Maybe you’re tempted to try it out, but you’re not too keen on investing in a platform that you’re not sure would deliver results. So let’s take a look at some of the reasons why it’s worth it to spend your marketing dollars on Instagram influencer marketing. You’ll Reach a Massive Audience While Facebook still dominates social media usage, Instagram is the…

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Why Spending $1,000 on Instagram Influencer Marketing is Worth It

Minimalistic Design With Large Impact: Functional Minimalism For Web Design

(This is a sponsored post). As web design focuses more and more on good user experience, designers need to create the most usable and attractive websites possible. Carefully applied minimalist principles can help designers make attractive and effective websites with fewer elements, simplifying and improving users’ interactions.
In this article, I will discuss some examples of minimalism in web design, things to consider when designing minimalist interfaces, and explain why sometimes “less is more”.

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Minimalistic Design With Large Impact: Functional Minimalism For Web Design

Glossary: Guerilla Marketing

guerilla marketing

Guerrilla marketing is a form of marketing that utilizes unconventional tactics to get maximum results when promoting a business or service. As the name suggests, this style of marketing relies heavily upon surprise, creativity and shock and awe tactics. Thus, large quantities of money are not necessarily required to perform guerrilla marketing — making it an ideal strategy for startups, small businesses and enterprises alike. It’s a much more personal form of marketing and tends to humanize even the largest of brands. Regardless of the size of your company, a little excitement and buzz surrounding your brand can always be…

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Glossary: Guerilla Marketing

Web Development Reading List #185: Safari 11, New Edge Build, Chrome 59, And CSS Optimization Insights

This week was full of great browser vendor news: Safari 11 was announced with long-awaited features such as WebRTC and tracking protection, and a new Edge build with new CSS features is now available, too. But the past few days also had some valuable articles up their sleeves: about implementing HTTP/2 push, using datetime-local, and slimming down your CSS, for example. I collected everything in this reading list for you, so you don’t miss out on anything.

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Web Development Reading List #185: Safari 11, New Edge Build, Chrome 59, And CSS Optimization Insights

A/B Test Ideas for Fashion Ecommerce Websites

The face of fashion ecommerce is undergoing a change. The transition from a brick-and-mortar store to an online one is accompanied by perennial problems, leading to a high return rate of ordered items.

However, the online fashion and apparel industry continues to adapt to this change through use of new technologies and strategies. Other than adhering to prevalent industry best practices, you can also come up with innovative ideas that can help you attract, engage, and retain more visitors on your website.

Here are 6 ideas on how you can grow your online apparel business while maintaining your brand esthetics. Based on these ideas, you can create variations and run A/B tests on your website.

Cross-Selling Style-Based Combinations

Cross-sell an entire set based on season, style, festival, and others, while providing a stand-out description.

Cross-selling idea for fashion ecommerce
Source: Zalando

You plan to add sneakers with a new design, an offbeat color, and a slightly higher price compared to your current best-seller in the same category. On your website, it would show up in the Shoes and New Launches categories. Other than this, what can you do to have your visitors go for it?

Don’t leave the sneakers alone. Showcase those along with items from other categories with which these can go along well.

Look at what Zalando, UK does. Within each category such as Men, Women, and others, it has a subcategory Inspiration, which includes the Looks of the Week section.

This section showcases a new item with additional items to complete the suggested outfit. Over and above this is the vivid description, which can attract visitors to go for more than they are looking for.

The updates ensure freshness through new themes every week.

The above idea is primarily used for new launches during a particular season; but you can also A/B test and apply it for upcoming festivals, events, and other special days.

What to measure:

  • Increase in % of sales through clicks to the new upselling category link
  • Average order value (because of the new category)
  • Increase in clicks to the upselling category link
  • Increase in the revenue (with this category also contributing to the increase)

Resolving Customer Concerns through Additional Filters

Add sale discount percent and cloth material as filters along with size and other filters within a category/subcategory.

Filters for easy search on fashion ecommerce websites
Source: Lyst

At times, it becomes tricky for your customers when they find the desired apparel item, but not the desired price. The reverse is also a common sight. How do you save them from an endless search on your website pages?

Lyst has addressed this problem to an extent. There are additional, unique filters for its customers to fine-tune their search. In the above screenshot, two of these filters—sales discount and material—are used to narrow down the available options.

What to measure:

  • Pages/session
  • Average session duration
  • Number of visits to the product page as a result of these clicks
  • Total transactions
  • Total revenue due to this A/B test
  • Revenue per visit

Adding Variety to Navigation Options

Add color and designer name as filters along with size and price.

Displaying only red-colored and blue-colored apparel items
Source: Otte NY

While adding size and price filters helps your visitors shortlist and display what’s available for them, having colors as a filter helps them personalize their choices. If this, along with other filters, still leaves the visitors with a high number of displayed options, you can provide more filters, such as designers.

In the screenshot from Otte New York, selecting 2 colors and 3 designers in the New category narrows down the comprehensive product listing to a more manageable 10 products on the screen.

What to measure:

  • Increase in the number of visits to the product page as a result of clicks on new search filters
  • Increase in the number of purchases as a result of the number of visits

Interaction Analytics: Use heatmaps to see if new options are resulting in increased activity on the filters.

Offering Customer Choices through Sale

Allow products to be earmarked by visitors for a sales reminder.

Tagging specific products on a fashion website
Source: Lyst

Do you see the message between two products on the Lyst category page? While it’s good to have increased visitor engagement on your website pages, this message tells the visitors that if price is a bottleneck, then they have the option to “wait and get” what they are looking for. This can encourage them to not only indicate their choices, but also bookmark the website for a future revisit.

While you can go ahead with this idea and A/B test it; on the same lines, you can also go for similar triggers checking with the customers softly if they need any help while finalizing their current purchase.

Note: You should not test similar ideas together. It may make it difficult to attribute your results with the correct idea. Also, excessive triggers and interruptions can lead to unpredictable visitor behavior.

What to measure:

  • Change in the purchase frequency of repeat customers
  • Change in the repeat purchase rate
  • Change in the revenue for specific durations (when the earmarked products go on sale)

Providing Cross-Selling Offers on the Product Page

Share cross-selling offers on the apparel product page.

Cross-selling on a fashion product page
Source: Farfetch

Use heatmaps and past data while planning such promotions. In the screenshot from Farfetch, UK, note the brevity and clarity in the cross-sell message, and the optimum position in which it is placed, as opposed to a “Recommended products” carousel after the product details. Your offer details should not mix with the product description.

Offer similar or complementary products together. Such offers should not distract visitors away from the product page they are on. Instead, the combined value of the products should attract them to go for it.

Note: Amazon makes about 35% of its revenue from cross-selling.

What to measure:

  • Number of products purchased per order
  • Increase in the average order value

Personalizing Visitor Experience on Product Pages

1) Provide the option to view close-ups of items on fashion product pages.

Close-up of a linen coat on a fashion product page
Source: Ralph Lauren

Remember those models on your television screen posing with the latest designer suits, followed by close-ups of the suits from different angles. This idea goes on to mirror the same experience for your customers. The above image from Ralph Lauren shows how visitors on your site can get to see a zoomed-in view when they select a particular section of the product.

What to measure:

  • Pages per session and session duration for product pages providing this option
  • Add-to-cart numbers from products with the new option

Interaction Analytics: Use session replays to see engagement with the feature.

There may not be a direct correlating impact on the revenue as a result of this change. However, increased engagement could mean a better customer experience.

2) Target Categories for Specific Situations

Targeting unique categories in fashion ecommerce
Source: Old Navy

Segmentation based on multiple requirements would just make it so easy for your customers. Here, Old Navy comes up with a standout idea. On the home page itself, size comes into picture right after the gender. For example, Women and Women’s Plus are two categories differentiated on the basis of size. Maternity comes out as another unique category.

In addition, the visitors can also specify their body types to narrow down their search. For example, the Boys category has Husky and Slim as two differentiators.

The category pages continue with the practice, as they ease your search further. For example, the tagline for Women’s Petite says “Specially designer for Women 5’4” & Under.”

What to measure:

  • Time to purchase should go down, as the visitors should be able to quickly self-select.
  • Conversion rate should go up.

Interaction analytics: Engagement should be higher.

Your Turn

By now, these ideas would have created a chain reaction of sorts for you, helping you come up with more ideas to A/B test. So if there’s something that you would want to add or suggest, please share your responses in the Comments section below.

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The post A/B Test Ideas for Fashion Ecommerce Websites appeared first on VWO Blog.

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A/B Test Ideas for Fashion Ecommerce Websites

Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

Building user interfaces on the web is hard, because the web and, thus, CSS were inherently made for documents. Some smart developers invented methodologies and conventions such as BEM, ITCSS, SMACSS and many more, which make building user interfaces easier and more maintainable by working with components.

Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

After this shift in mindset towards building component-based user interfaces, we are now in what we like to call the “component age.” The rise of JavaScript frameworks such as React, Ember and recently Angular 2, the effort of the W3C to standardize a web-native component system, pattern libraries and style guides being considered the “right way” to build web applications, and many other things have illuminated this revolution.

The post Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

React Native For Web: A Glimpse Into The Future

One of the hardest decisions to make when starting a new app is which platforms to target. A mobile app gives you more control and better performance but isn’t as universal as the web. If you’re making a mobile app, can you afford to support both iOS and Android? What about trying to build a mobile app and a responsive web app? Ultimately, the best experience for your customers is for your app to work everywhere, but the development and maintenance costs of that can be prohibitive.

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React Native For Web: A Glimpse Into The Future

How To Make And Maintain Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2

The benefits of UI design systems are now well known. They lead to more cohesive, consistent user experiences. They speed up your team’s workflow, allowing you to launch more stuff while saving huge amounts of time and money in the process. They establish a common vocabulary between disciplines, resulting in a more collaborative and constructive workflow.
They make browser, device, performance, and accessibility testing easier. And they serve as a solid foundation to build upon over time, helping your organization to more easily adapt to the ever-shifting web landscape.

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How To Make And Maintain Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2

Making And Maintaining Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2


The benefits of UI design systems are now well known. They lead to more cohesive, consistent user experiences. They speed up your team’s workflow, allowing you to launch more stuff while saving huge amounts of time and money in the process. They establish a common vocabulary between disciplines, resulting in a more collaborative and constructive workflow.

Making And Maintaining Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2

They make browser, device, performance, and accessibility testing easier. And they serve as a solid foundation to build upon over time, helping your organization to more easily adapt to the ever-shifting web landscape. This article provides a detailed guide to building and maintaining atomic design systems with Pattern Lab 2.

The post Making And Maintaining Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2 appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Making And Maintaining Atomic Design Systems With Pattern Lab 2