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Designing For The Tactile Experience




Designing For The Tactile Experience

The focus of digital technology in the last few decades has neglected human hands and bodies to a large extent. Our thoughts and feelings are strongly connected to the gestures, postures, and actions we perform. I aim to push you — as a designer — to think outside of the zone of screens.

I’d also like to ask you to start thinking critically about current technologies; touch and motor skills need to be taken into consideration when designing your very next product. Allow me to explain why.

Less Haptic Stimuli, Less Experience

According to Finnish neurophysiologist Matti Bergström, quoted in a lecture of Sofia Svanteson:

“The density of nerve endings in our fingertips is enormous. Their discrimination is almost as good as that of our eyes. If we don’t use our fingers during childhood or youth, we become “fingerblind,” this rich network of nerves is impoverished — which represents a huge loss to the brain and thwarts the individual’s development as a whole. Such damage may be likened to blindness itself. Perhaps worse, while a blind person may simply not be able to find this or that object, the fingerblind cannot understand its inner meaning and value”.

Hold, Push, Swipe, Tap

If you end up as a typical white-collar worker, you’ll probably spend a significant part of your day looking at your screen, without any possibility of physically touching the things you work with. How much time do you spend on your computer at work? How much time do you spend on your phone afterwards. What about during your spare time: What do you do during those hours? Hold, push, swipe, tap.

The word “touch” is in the word “touchscreen,” but tapping and swiping a cold flat piece of matter basically neglects the sense of touch. You are capable of experiencing only a fraction of what your sense of touch allows you to during the long hours of manipulation with touchscreens.

What actions do you physically perform with your body? Perhaps you are not a very active person. What posture are you usually in? What kind of impact can sitting over the screen of a mobile phone or computer all day have on a person? Pablo Briñol, Richard E. Petty and Benjamin Wagner claim in their research article that your body posture can shape your mind.

“… We argue that any postures associated with confidence (e.g., pushing one’s chest out) should magnify the effect of anything that is currently available in people’s minds relative to postures associated with doubt (e.g., slouching forward with one’s back curved).”

As the theory of embodied cognition states, your body affects your behavior.

Tactile Feedback

Many tangible things are disappearing from our surroundings and reappearing in digital form. They are improved upon and enriched with new functions that would not be possible in the material world. A few examples are maps, calendars, notebooks and pens, printed photos, music players, calculators and compasses. However, with the loss of their material form comes also the loss of the sensations and experiences that only physical interaction with objects can give us. The “… disembodied brain could not experience the world in the same ways that we do, because our experience of the world is intimately tied to the ways in which we act in it,” writes Paul Dourish in his book Where the Action Is.


Man holding an open book


Fingers are able to sense the progress of a book (Image: on Unsplash) (View large version)

Different Activities, Different Movements

Consider some actions we perform in the physical world:

I pay for a ticket. I pull my wallet out of my bag. I open it and take out banknotes. While holding the notes in one hand, I draw some coins with my other hand. I give the money to the salesperson.

I confess love. I sit or stand opposite to the person. I look into their eyes. I blush. I say, “You know, I love you.” I am kissed.

I look for a recipe. I choose a cookbook from the shelf. I take the book. I flip a few pages, forwards, backwards. I find a recipe.

Whereas in the world of screens:

I pay for a ticket. I fill text fields. I hit a button.

I confess love. I fill a text field. I hit a button.

I look for a recipe. I fill a text field. I hit a button.


Man with rings on his fingers holding paper notes and cigarette


(Image: Jeremy Paige on Unsplash) (View large version)

The environment surrounding us, the activities we perform and the things we come into contact with help us to perceive situations more intensely and meaningful. Phenomenologists such as Husserl, Schutz, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty have already explored the relationship between embodied action and meaning. “For them, the source of meaning (and meaningfulness) is not a collection of abstract, idealized entities; instead, it is to be found in the world in which we act, and which acts upon us. This world is already filled with meaning. Its meaning is to be found in the way in which it reveals itself to us as being available for our actions. It is only through those actions, and the possibility for actions that the world affords us, that we can come to find the world, in both its physical and social manifestations, meaningful.” Another quote from above-mentioned book by Paul Dourish.

Because so many different activities are being carried out in the same manner in the digital world, their value is becoming less clear. I believe that haptic sense has something to do, for instance, with the perception of paying by “real” or by virtual currency — that feeling of something tangible in your hand that you are giving to someone else, compared to just tapping a flat surface to confirm that the number on the screen will be deducted from your account.

Try a simple task. Suppose you want to remember something. Write it down and see how it affects your brain. Professor Anne Mangen, who studies the impact of digital technologies on reading and writing, has shown that writing helps your brain process information and remember it much better. Physical sensorimotor activities create a stronger connection to performed tasks. That’s probably one of the reasons why paper planners are seeing a rise in sales. Sales of paper books are also rising. Giving a digital book as a gift is much less impressive than giving its paper equivalent. This points to an interesting phenomenon. Physical presents just “feel” much better. There is a trend of returning to “tangible music”, which caused an increase in vinyl sales. But are those returns to “old forms” enough? Or can we act also from the current opportunities?

Designing For Touch

How can we create more material experiences in design? What are some tangible solutions, solutions that solve problems through our senses, through our contact with the physical, material world, solutions that let us act in our surrounding as much as possible without using our smartphones or any other flat screens? There are many possible ways to get back to the physical experience.

1. Interact With Digital Technology in a More Human Way.

Make digital information tangible. Interact with it by hand gestures and movements in the material world.

One of the most famous pioneering projects with that aim was SixthSense. Back in 2009, it linked digital devices and our interactions with the physical world. This kind of wearable technology consisted of a camera, a projector hanging on the user’s neck, and color markers stuck to their fingers. The user could dial a phone number using projected keys on their palm, while the camera would record their finger movements. They could read newspapers showing live video news, or draw a circle on their wrist to check the time. The whole principle was to project visuals into the world surrounding the user. With current technology, however, that principle has transformed. The outside world is no longer altered by some projection. The only altered thing is our vision. It’s enhanced by a new layer of augmented reality (AR), by special kinds of glasses, and there is a completely new reality created in virtual reality (VR) headsets.


Finger dialing number on a palm with projected numbers


Using a palm to dial a phone number. (Image: pranavmistry.com) (View large version)

A more modern example is Magic Leap, a secretive project that connects virtual reality and the “real” world in a mixed reality. You can see objects in your surroundings that are not part of your reality — for example, jellyfish flying in your room. This device is exceptional because it also enables hand tracking. You are able to shoot robots falling from your ceiling, holding a real plastic gun in your hand, meanwhile controlling the interface with hand gestures. This is big progress from mostly sequential activities, which screen interfaces enable the user to do. We are getting there.


Two open palms hold a tiny elephant


Magic Leap connects ‘real’ and virtual. (Image: magic-leap.reality.newsView large version)

Mixed, VR and AR projects could be the future. The good thing is that these technologies are built with a huge emphasis on human behavior, psychology, physics laws and ergonomics. The experience is lived, not just observed on a screen. They are not tearing you away from the natural (or virtual) environment and sticking you in a chair to stare into a flat square. You get involved in the action, immersed in doing things and feeling emotions. All of these technologies bring you experiences. Whether they’re real or not, you will remember them as things that happened to you.

Another advantage is that they make your body move — for example, by replacing your physical screens with virtual ones. They allow you to do your work practically everywhere, possibly on the move as well. Whether you are 3D painting with a virtual brush, throwing squares (a VR game) or organizing your desktop, you are using your fingers, your hands, your wrists and whole body movements. Technology is finally adapting to you.

2. Involve More Sensory Experiences In Your Design.

If sight sensors are already occupied by some functionality, don’t add more visual stimuli. Better to include some haptics, hearing or even olfactory stimuli — thus, creating so-called multi-sensorial design. As noted in their book Product Experience, Hendrik N. J. Schifferstein and Paul Hekkert state, “By now, many different studies have suggested that the greater the number of sensory modalities that are stimulated at any one time, the richer our experiences will be.”

Let’s discuss the topic of virtual reality further. Even though it doesn’t feel like virtual could satisfy the need for material or tangible experience, VR is a perfect example of connecting several senses together, not only sight and hearing, but also touch.

There are a couple of different ways to bring touch into VR:

  • The classic primitive controllers
    They give you the sense of being present, just like holding a mouse, i.e. it’s one object but has a single point of interaction. Well, it actually has two controllers that are controlled by two hands. Still, the full potential of your hands and ten fingers is not being used in this case.

Girl with VR head-mounted display and controllers in her hands and girl holding wire


Classic VR controllers. (Image credit) (View large version)

  • Haptic gloves
    These enable you to feel objects from VR in your hands. The sensors translate touch sensations into vibrations that enable you to perceive the shape of an apple or to experience rain. You can even feel the release of a virtual arrow. Obviously, all of these sensations are not the same as real ones in their fidelity. But as a whole virtual reality, they pose a question: What does it mean to be real? What makes for a real touch experience — a real touched object made of realistic, tangible material or a real feeling transmitted by neurons to your brain? Is it enough to fool your brain, without even using your hands? This is maybe the moment when we can ask, Are we just brains or whole bodies?

Set of images of man with haptic VR gloves


Haptic VR controllers still look a bit utopian. (Image: dextarobotics.com) (View large version)

  • Combining haptic gloves with material objects
    Various games layer VR over a physical playground. One of them is The Void. As a player, you wear a vest with 22 haptic patches that vibrate and shake you at the right times. The idea is that you are playing the game in VR but all of your surroundings are tangible, so instead of seeing four empty walls, you see a large territory around you. A big stone would be perceived as a mountain, and a normal door could be transformed into a magic one. But opening the magic one would feel real because, in the end, it is. All such little gimmicks with sight, touch, hearing and even smell involve more sensory experience and make VR even more immersive.

Man touching big rock with shining symbol


The Void game (Image: thevoid.com) (View large version)

3. When Designing For The Screen, Think About How the Task Could Be Performed In The Physical World Instead.

How would people act in their most “natural” way?

Time tracking is not always pleasant, maybe because you feel like a robot from constantly checking the time or opening and closing your time-tracking app. ZEI is a great example of tangible design. The developers found a way to get robots to do our job in the background so that we can act more like humans. This time-tracking device is an octahedron (eight sides). Each face is assigned one activity, so you can easily track time spent on different projects just by flipping it. It presents a very natural way to switch from task to task and to turn your attention from one thing to another.


Hand reaching for ZEI tracking device


ZEI moves screen tasks to tangible reality. (Image: timeular.com) (View large version)

When you’re designing a product, think of how users would perform without it. How do people track their work? Maybe they tend to take notes. How did people used to complete tasks in the past? Did we stand up from our chair and stretch a bit? What if every accomplished task were to be followed by a small exercise or at least standing up, to support users’ health? Many ridiculous ideas will probably appear in that kind of process, but you can get much closer to designing products for humans with such a human approach.

4. Transfer Your Digital Product To Tangible Experiences.

If you already have a product, program or app designed for the screen, think of whether there is some possibility to convert it to the physical world.

Computers made it possible to compose music by using various musical instruments that exist only in the digital world. But the dynamics of physical contact with the instrument cannot be replaced by using a computer mouse. Physically pushing keys on a piano or hitting drums with drumsticks, fast or softly, using mostly just your fingers and wrists, or blasting drums with your forearms and whole arms — these are experiences that seem to be non-transferable to computer programs.

Ableton, the well-known producer of software for music production, decided to create its own hardware, Ableton Push. The second edition of Ableton Push “puts everything you need to make music in one place — at your fingertips.” Push is basically a table with pads and controls that enable you to play drums or pitched instruments on one device. It offers a range of ways to play and manipulate samples, allowing you to capture ideas quickly. No technology stands in the way, and you can physically interact with music once again.


Man touching Ableton Push device


Ableton Push (Image: ableton.com) (View large version)

5. Think the Other Way Around: How Can You Upgrade Things That Already Exist With Some Digital Experience?

Classic toys, board games, paper books and notebooks, musical instruments — all of these have served us for decades and are beautiful, efficient and playful. However, many of them are disappearing because they are no longer attractive enough and are unable to compete with the digital experience. Sustain them. Upgrade them with some digital value and experience.

Playing with wooden toys is one of the best experiences for children. Their material and shape develop children’s building capacity and hand muscles. Their simplicity stimulates children’s imagination and creativity. We should not give up these benefits for a flat screen. Studio deFORM’s project KOSKI, a building block game, “connects the physical world and the digital gaming world together.” Physical, wooden toy blocks are mirrored in an iPad app and enhanced with imaginative worlds, characters and stories on the screen. The player physically alters the projected world on screen by manipulating the blocks in the real time.

While we can argue about whether this game develops a child’s imagination, I find it to be a good alternative to current tablet games.


Tablet mirroring kids playing game KOSKI, enhanced with imaginative plants, figures and waterfall


KOSKI (Image: koskigame.com) (View large version)

We’re already used to old-fashioned things. There’s no need to teach users new design patterns or ways of communication with hi-tech novelties. Everyone knows how to use a paper notebook. But often when I want to write with a pen on paper, I have to think twice about it. I know that, in the end, it will have to be rewritten in some digital form so that it can be easily shared and stored. This issue was tackled by Wacom with its notebook digitizer. Its solution was the SmartPad, which converts handwriting into digital files. It also offers the possibility to combine pages of notes and to edit them.

Even existing material can take on new qualities when enriched by the digital experience. Mixing together unexpected things can create very non-traditional objects. Consider FabricKeyboard, made by MIT Media Lab’s Responsive Environments Lab. As Meg Miller explains:

“This fabric made from textile sensors allows you to play the keys like one would on a normal keyboard, or you can create the sounds by manipulating the fabric itself — by pressing, pulling, twisting and even by waving your hands above the material. The e-fabric responds to touch, pressure, stretch, proximity and electric field.”


Man's hands stretching FabricKeyboard


FabricKeyboard (Image: Irmandy Wicaksono on MIT Media Lab) (View large version)

Finally, let’s consider one more reason why we should think carefully before letting traditional objects vanish away. They’ve been created from years of experience. They’ve evolved into their current form, one that fits their purpose very well. Think of how usable, convenient and pleasurable many printed books are. The rules of layout and typography from this established medium have been transferred very quickly to ebooks and web design, which are struggling to meet the standards of their physical counterparts. Think also of the non-transferable qualities: the tactile sense of progress, their collectibility, the sensuous aspects.

Some old-school materials are worth keeping, and their development should continue even in the digital era.

Tangible Future

As Andrea Resmini and Luca Rosati write in their book Pervasive Information Architecture:

“We are swinging like a pendulum. Fifty years ago we were rooted in material world. When you wanted to know something, you asked some person or read a book. Then desktop computers became our interface of choice to access information, and now we are swinging back to the real world, but we are bringing computers along. Information is becoming pervasive.”

One way to bring qualities of the real world to our daily used technologies is to learn from material things. Another way is to suss out the attributes we are missing in our interaction with screens. Let your senses lead you, and think about a solution that can replace a current discomfort. The classic human-centered approach still works. However, as advanced technologies improve and extend into multiple areas of our lives, we need to think more carefully about what it means to be human. Our bodies and senses are definitely a part of it.

Smashing Editorial
(cc, ra, al, yk, il)


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Designing For The Tactile Experience

How PPC Agency ParaCore Used Clever Account Management to Save a Client $30k in Ad Spend

Before digging into your or your client’s AdWords account, you might need to do some tidying up first. Image via Shutterstock.

When PPC agency ParaCore started working with a niche inspection company, they realized pretty quickly that before they could start optimizing this client’s AdWords account, they needed to do some necessary housekeeping.

The client — who shall remain nameless due to their highly competitive industry — was already pairing landing pages with their PPC ads. However, because they had so many market segments to target, they were juggling 60 different landing pages. This approach was certainly scrappy, but it was also incredibly challenging to maintain and optimize.

The client also lacked insight into both how many phone call leads they got, and exactly where these leads were coming from. Without this data they were unable to attribute leads to the appropriate campaign, making optimization —  let alone determining the ROI of their ad spend — virtually impossible.

In efforts to better manage this client’s account, ParaCore used Unbounce to reduce the number of landing pages from 60 to just four (while maintaining hyper segmentation), set up CallRail for improved phone call conversion tracking, and implemented a negative keyword approach in AdWords that ultimately saved the client $30k in ad spend and lowered the cost per lead over 40%. Needless to say, their client was thrilled.

Here’s how they did it.

Simplify market segmentation with landing pages

ParaCore’s client was already deep in the PPC game. They were spending $10k monthly on Bing and AdWords ads, and they had the wherewithal to pair their ads with targeted landing pages. But in order to target each individual market segment, they were using 60 landing pages (15 markets x 4 services).

Despite the benefit of better segmentation, juggling this many landing pages has its challenges, as ParaCore founder Adam Arkfeld can attest to:

Updating one thing on all landing pages takes forever. If you want to change content, it’s 60 changes. If you want to change something major like design, that’s a huge effort. It’s also just more difficult to track analytics and keep track of all the pages.

So ParaCore’s first task was to take those 60 pages and whittle them down to just a few manageable (but still high-converting) pages.

Using Unbounce’s drag-and-drop builder, ParaCore built their client four pages, each highlighting a specific service.

Using Dynamic Text Replacement on their Unbounce pages, ParaCore was able to reduce the amount of landing pages to maintain. Image via ParaCore.

To ensure they maintained the same hyper-relevance for each market segment, they implemented Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) on the landing pages, an Unbounce feature which allows you to automatically swap out keywords on your landing page based on someone’s search intent and the corresponding ad clicked.

That is — if someone searches “piano lessons in Arizona” that’s exactly what your corresponding landing page’s headline can read to match their query.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.
Preview DTR in action today to see how it can improve the relevancy of your landing pages.

With the help of DTR, ParaCore could still serve up those 60 hyper-customized messages, but using a much more manageable four pages. Their next move was to set out to optimize those four pages.

Clarify metrics with proper tracking and attribution

ParaCore’s client knew their ads were contributing to massive call volume but they didn’t have insight into the number of calls or which keywords were responsible.

After a bit of initial digging, ParaCore found that 76% of the client’s leads came via phone calls, but according to Adam:

There was so much more we could do to optimize their PPC campaigns if we had more data.

To get said data, Adam et al installed AdWords Call Conversion Tracking and CallRail on the client’s landing pages and set up keyword-level call tracking.

CallRail works similar to DTR, by dynamically populating a unique phone number depending on the original referrer. So when a visitor clicks on an ad and then calls the number on the landing page, that lead is attributed to the appropriate click-through ad.

Attributing your phone call leads to the original ad has never been easier. Image via CallRail.
Don’t know where all your phone call leads are coming from? CallRail integrates with Unbounce landing pages, so you can track which ads and landing pages result in calls. Find out more here.

Not only that, but CallRail allows you to create regional phone numbers, which was especially important to their client. Adam said it was key that their client’s prospects saw “a 480 number for Phoenix instead of an 888 number.”

AdWords Call Conversion Tracking, on the other hand, allowed ParaCore to see which keywords were converting so they could kill the underperforming keywords or ad sets.

For leads that came in through the landing page form, ParaCore also set up AdWords conversion tracking on all Unbounce form confirmation dialogues (a.k.a. thank you pages).

Within four months, this is what team ParaCore had found:

55% of leads came from calls made after seeing the new Unbounce landing pages, 24% came from landing page forms and roughly 20% came directly from ads.

Once they had the data they needed, it was time to actually dig into AdWords.

Optimize ad groups with negative keywords

Now that ParaCore had all the necessary data to determine which keywords were and weren’t working, they could start optimizing in AdWords.

ParaCore’s client had already done a significant amount of keyword research resulting in a robust collection of targeted keywords; however, a review of their analytics revealed not all of them were performing top-notch.

ParaCore added negative keywords to the client’s campaigns, followed by daily negative cleansing (which sounds like something you’d do with a smudge stick and quartz crystal, but is actually just excluding search terms that aren’t relevant).

After the initial cleanse, ParaCore scaled back to periodic reviews to ensure keyword relevancy. They kept an eye on conversion data over the first two months and turned off keywords that were, as Adam put it, “eating up the ad budget without producing good returns.”

Clever Account Management Pays Off

By adding negative keywords to their client’s AdWords account and turning off the keywords that weren’t bringing in results, team ParaCore managed to save their client $30,000 in annual ad spend and reduce their cost per lead by 40.7% in the first three months.

Not only that, with these all of the changes in place, ParaCore’s client was set up to scale. Now when the client wants to add additional markets, the agency doesn’t even have to create a new landing page, they simply “add dynamic text insertion with new phone numbers and local text.”

This kind of progress wouldn’t have been possible had they not first simplified their client’s landing page collection and clarified their metrics. Only then could they turn their efforts toward their client’s AdWords account.

According to Adam, the data collected during that initial exploration “continues to guide our efforts as we optimize the company’s PPC campaigns to bring in the highest quality leads at the lowest cost.”

And ParaCore’s client could not have been more pleased. Their Google+ review says it all:

These guys have been awesome for us so far! We love the reporting metrics they use as it really identifies the important information and tells us a lot about our PPC campaigns. We have also been very happy with how thorough they have been in implementing the crossover from our old PPC manager… All in all, we are very happy to have made the switch and wish we would have pulled the trigger sooner.

Sounds pretty dang blissful to me.

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How PPC Agency ParaCore Used Clever Account Management to Save a Client $30k in Ad Spend

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How do ad agencies win a Cannes Lion award?

Reading Time: 2 minutes

As the Cannes Lions Festival is wrapping up this week, we’re seeing the annual breathless, self-congratulatory statements coming out of agencies with photos of their awards and sun-tanned creative teams sipping champagne.

Cannes Lions
Thanks for the trip to the south of France, clients!
We’d like to thank the little people who made this possible.

They should feel proud. They’ve achieved a huge accomplishment that has been the recognized stamp of credibility for advertising creativity since 1954.

How do agencies win at the Cannes Lions festival?

When I worked at the big ad agencies, I was often shocked at how they used clients’ budgets for the purpose of winning awards and self-promotion.

I’ve seen ad agency executives planning how to maximize their billings for minimal work and use their clients’ budgets to submit campaigns for awards.

I vividly remember, shortly before I walked away from my ad agency career, being part of a team that created a poster to promote a lightbulb.

It involved an elaborate set rental, professional photography shoot, intensive image editing, and ultimately cost the client $17,000. For a poster.

It did nothing to communicate the benefits of the lightbulb for consumers. And there was not a single conversation at the agency about how we should measure results, or even what the goal was for the poster.

Was it a failed poster campaign?

It certainly didn’t achieve the goals in the official creative brief.

But, it did win a prestigious award for that agency and the creative director.

It was certainly a clever (if not esoteric) concept with beautiful, subtle photography, but it was entirely useless as an ad.

I watched as the client contacts turned a blind eye to the waste, knowing that they would be repaid with lavish expense account dinners in exchange for handing over their company’s cash.

CMOs are turning against award-obsessed agencies

That’s why today’s CMO’s are rejecting traditional award-seeking agencies. They know those agencies don’t care about their clients. Much less their clients’ customers.

Today’s CMOs know award-seeking agencies don’t care about their clients. Much less their clients’ customers.

They know that too-clever ads often don’t achieve results. Their digital transformation is changing their priorities. Data-informed ad campaigns are now revealing how ineffective the old gut-feeling approach can be.

They are seeking alternatives, and finding them in the Zen Marketing approach that balances intuition with data, big ideas with bold experiments, inspiration with rigorous validation.

The alternative to cleverness is customer insights that are validated by robust data.

The alternative to awards for cleverness is measurable results lift.

I firmly believe that creativity is still required for advertising. And a rigorous experimentation program is enabling today’s marketing innovation.

I’m reminded again, in this Cannes Lions Festival season, of why I started WiderFunnel to be the “anti-agency.” And again, why we will never make a recommendation if we haven’t tested its ability to lift the client’s revenue.

So, the next time you’re in an agency pitch where they’re bragging about their awards, don’t walk; run away from hiring them. They’re telling you they don’t care about you.

Why we will never win a Cannes Lion award

Short answer: Because we will never submit for one.

The post How do ad agencies win a Cannes Lion award? appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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How do ad agencies win a Cannes Lion award?

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Promo Code Box on your Shopping Cart Page could be Bleeding Dollars. A/B Test it.

The Company

Bionic Gloves is an online store that designs and sells a range of gloves, such as golf gloves, fitness gloves, and more. Their focus is to provide customers with gloves that have fine grip, comfort, and durability.

To increase sales from their eCommerce shop, they decided to optimize their website. The task was given to Portland-based marketing & conversion optimization agency, Sq1.

The Test

Sq1 performed many tests on the Bionic Gloves website. In this case study I’ll be taking you through an interesting test that was performed on one of the most important pages of any eCommerce website, the shopping cart page. In fact, one study by Surepayroll estimated that each year eCommerce websites lose a whopping $18 billion because of shopping cart abandonment.

To test their hypothesis that removing the ‘special offer’ and ‘gift card’ code boxes from the shopping cart page would result in more sales and less cart abandonment, they set up an A/B test in VWO.

This is how the original shopping cart page looked like:

Bionic AB - Control

The Result

The test was run on close to 1400 visitors for a duration of 48 days. This is how the variation page (without the code fields) looked like:

Bionic AB - Variation

The primary goal that they were tracking was the revenue made. The variation won and increased the total revenue by 24.7%, and revenue per visitor by 17.1%.

Why the Variation Won?

In the words of David from Sq1, “Anytime you leave the door open for a user to leave the conversion funnel – even if it seems like they’d come right back – you risk losing sales. By showing the Promo Code field on the cart, users were enticed to leave the site in search of a promo code. At that point, the conversion process is interrupted and you are more likely to lose potential customers. As such, hiding it was a very logical test.

A shopping freak myself, I wouldn’t lie that I, too, have gone looking for coupon codes a number of times in the middle of my purchasing process. This, as David pointed out, has a number of risks:

  • The sight of the coupon box triggers visitors to look for one on Google and other places. I did a quick Google search of “Bionic Glove”, and look what I found in the auto-complete searches:
    google_search_result1
    google_search_result_2
  • eCommerce websites also risk losing money to affiliates and websites offering deals, coupons, etc.
  • Many a times, visitors end up finding a better deal on another web store.

To avert this, I have seen many websites now show all available coupon codes right on the product page and also on the cart page. Not only does this help them reduce cart abandonment, but also helps them increase their average order value as many shoppers go ahead and buy more stuff to cross the threshold at which coupons can be applied.

See how Myntra, a fashion ecommerce website based out of India, does this beautifully:

myntra_coupon_codes

Let’s Talk

Tell me what you think about this case study in the comments section below. I am also available for intellectual discussions on CRO and A/B Testing which can fit in less than 140 characters on Twitter @taruna2309. See ya!

8 Checkout Optimization Lessons Based on 5+ years of Testing

The post Promo Code Box on your Shopping Cart Page could be Bleeding Dollars. A/B Test it. appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Promo Code Box on your Shopping Cart Page could be Bleeding Dollars. A/B Test it.

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Adding Certificates & Payment Options on Product Pages Increased Clicks on Add to Cart

The Company

Manna is a Hungary-based online store that sells chemical-free, organic and handmade personal-care products like soaps, body butters, essential oils, etc. Their products are available for purchase in Hungary, Germany, Austria and Serbia.

The Hypothesis

Being a Hungarian brand in Germany, they have to deal with a lot of trust issues. To overcome the same they decided to test various certifications and payment seals on the website. The hypothesis was that adding these certificates and payment icons near the “add to cart” button on the product page will increase clicks on the button as well as sales and revenue.

This is how the original product page looked like:

Original product page - Manna A/B test

The Test

The team at Manna decided to a/b test 2 variations of the product page against the original. The first version had a big banner showing the payment options and 3 certificates below it. This is how it looked:

Variation 1 - Manna A/B test

The second version had 2 rows of various certificates. This is how it looked:

Variation 2 - Manna A/B test

The test was run on more than 3000 visitors split equally between the 3 variations.

The Result

Variation 1 won and 11.26% of the visitors, who viewed this version, clicked “add to cart” button, in comparison to 1.48% in original (and 8.73% in variation 2).

Here’s a screenshot of the bar graph from the VWO app showing conversion rate of each variation:

Result graph - Manna A/B test

Why Variation 1 Outperformed the Other Two Versions of the Product Page?

As an online store selling natural and organic items, the pressure on Manna to prove their credibility is much more than any other web-shop selling cosmetics and skincare. This is because in addition to having great product pages and a seamless web experience they also have to constantly re-iterate the fact that they sell authentic natural products made from chemical-free substances. Having certifications, right on product pages, thus helped them boost the clicks on “add to cart” button. This is why even version 2 recorded a whopping increase of 490% in click rate.

Variation 1 emerged as a winner because of showing the certifications and ease of payment option together. This addressed the two most common concerns faced by customers — whether the product is authentic and if their preferred mode of payment is available as an option.

Let’s Talk!

Have you done any tests on your product pages? I’d love to know what you learnt about your visitors from them in the comments section below.

Also, since you are here, why not sign-up for our webinar by Siddharth Deswal on “7 Inspiring Tests to Create High-Converting eCommerce Product Pages”. I promise you lots of useful insights in just 45 minutes on Oct, 29.

The post Adding Certificates & Payment Options on Product Pages Increased Clicks on Add to Cart appeared first on VWO Blog.

Originally from:   Adding Certificates & Payment Options on Product Pages Increased Clicks on Add to Cart

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The Myth Of The Sophisticated User

Innovative Techniques To Simplify Sign-Ups And Log-Ins

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Innovative Techniques To Simplify Sign-Ups And Log-Ins

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Art Manifestos and Their Applications in Contemporary Design

The way you express yourself with words is a crucial extension of your creative identity. Professional designers are usually busy focusing on the visual aspects of their craft, but visual arts and literary arts collide and coincide regularly. The two fields meet not just in typography, but also in press releases, social networking communication, slogans, promotional materials, ‘About Me’ pages, marketing strategies, and every single pitch, contract, and email you’ve ever sent to a client.

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Art Manifestos and Their Applications in Contemporary Design