Tag Archives: three

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Expert Email Design Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Two

Klaviyo:BOS

Welcome! For those of you just tuning in: Last week I attended Klaviyo: BOS, a two-day summit focused on growth tactics and business strategy for online merchants and ecommerce brands. Session topics ranged from Facebook Messenger bots and segmentation to email design and marketing automation. I took a ton of very squiggly, sometimes illegible notes and thought it would be a shame to keep them on paper, so I sat down and started writing a blog post titled “Expert SEO and CRO Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit.” I was at about 2,000 words when I had to take a break, so here…

The post Expert Email Design Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Two appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Expert Email Design Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part Two

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Are You Optimizing Your SaaS Conversion Funnel? Don’t Forget These Essential Steps

saas conversion funnel

If you have a strong conversion funnel, you’ll generate more sales. Optimizing your SaaS conversion funnel allows you to visualize the buyer’s journey, collect the right data, and apply what you learn from reports, recordings, and other analytics. The conversion funnel is often misunderstood, though, which is why we need to break it down into stages, figure out what data to track, and optimize accordingly. Your conversion funnel contains the general steps your prospective customers take to reach a buying decision. Narrowing the conversion funnel and pushing prospects through faster can result in higher profits. To do so, you must…

The post Are You Optimizing Your SaaS Conversion Funnel? Don’t Forget These Essential Steps appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Are You Optimizing Your SaaS Conversion Funnel? Don’t Forget These Essential Steps

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How To Deliver A Successful UX Project In The Healthcare Sector




How To Deliver A Successful UX Project In The Healthcare Sector

Sven Jungmann & Karolin Neubauer



A mid-career UX researcher was hired to understand the everyday needs, perceptions, and concerns of patients in a hospital in Berlin, Germany. She used rigorous observation and interviewing methods just like she teaches them to design thinking students at a nearby university. She returned with a handful of actionable insights that our product team found useful, somewhat at least.

However, we were surprised that her recommendations gravitated towards convenience issues such as “Patients want to know the food menu” or “Users struggle to remember who their doctors are.” Entirely missing were reports of physical and psychological complaints. We would at least have expected sleeping problems: Given that 80% of working Germans don’t sleep well and nearly 10% even appear to have severe sleeping disorders (link in German), why did no one mention it?

“We only see what we know.”

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

If you are a UX researcher about to embark on a project with hospitalized patients and you want to avoid missing out on deep concerns and problems of users, then maybe this article can help you strengthen your awareness for particular challenges of clinical UX.

It is difficult to get in touch with real patients and get permission from clinical staff to access the right people. We are fortunate to have access to a network of more than 100 hospitals in Germany thanks to our sister Helios Kliniken GmbH, which is Europe’s largest private hospital provider. Our experience with clinical UX research taught us the importance of stressing that we cannot assume that patients bring up relevant concerns by themselves.

We describe three reasons we think are important to improve the quality and quantity of your findings. Generally speaking, this article emphasizes the need for UX practitioners to be mindful of their participants’ emotional and physical state. But we also discuss how we think UX researchers should prepare for and conduct a research project in the healthcare sector.

The Three B’s That Complicate UX Research In Hospitals

We’ve been thinking much about user research in hospital settings recently. Our new company, smart Helios, a digital health development firm, is a spin-off of Helios Kliniken, Europe’s largest private hospital chain. To inform our lean software development, we thoroughly embrace iterative empathetic observation and end-user interviews at each step of a development cycle (i.e., ideation, prototyping, and testing).

We learned that qualitative research in a hospital setting brings its challenges. We think it is worth considering them, especially those we discuss here, called the three B’s: Biases, Barriers, and Background.

Here’s an overview:

  1. Biases
    Psychological mechanisms can affect our patients’ thinking and hence diminish the results of our findings.
  2. Barriers to trust
    Patients rarely share intimate needs with a non-medical interviewer easily. This can create blind spots in our research.
  3. Background
    Internal and external factors such as wealth, socio-economic status, sanitation, education, and access to healthcare can influence our health as well as the care patients receive. The quality of care also depends on the hospital’s infrastructure and staff experience with a particular disease or procedure. These differences make it challenging to generalize findings.

We also discuss remedies that can help overcome these challenges and distill more valuable insights. They include:

  • Conducting a thorough and well-prepared interview.
  • Including healthcare providers in the process.
  • Drawing on quantitative data to guide some of the qualitative user research.

Biases: We Are Fantastic At Lying To Ourselves, Whether Or Not We’re Patients

Psychologists call them cognitive biases: they negatively affect how accurately we perceive and remember events or feelings, and we possess impressive amounts of them.

For example, people remember information better if it is more recent or salient. If you ask a patient about the initial appointment with her oncologist (this is rarely good news), don’t be surprised if she remembers only a quarter of it. Hospitalized patients are typically overwhelmed by the unfamiliar situation they’re in and often under stress and that influences their memory.

Hence it makes a difference when you ask them in their patient journey. Even in one day, patients face different problems that affect what’s top of mind at the moment you observe or interview them:

  • In the morning, when the painkillers have worn off during sleep, regaining control over physical pain is all that matters.
  • During the day, worries about upcoming procedures might dominate their thoughts or they could be focused on their hunger while they’re not allowed to eat or drink ahead of a diagnostic test.
  • In the evening, they might be afraid that they won’t be able to update their relatives appropriately.
  • At night, some struggle to sleep because of the hospital noise or their worries.

Takeaways:

  • Try interviewing users at different times of the day and different moments of their journey and take note of how findings vary.
  • Always get an orientation about where your users stand within their patient journey. Explore what happened in the previous hours or days and what diagnostics or treatments lie ahead of them.
  • Beware that our psyches possess a plethora of mechanisms to limit rationality and prevent past events from entering our conscious mind. You cannot control them all, but it improves your research if you notice them.

Barriers To Trust: Who Is Asking Matters, Too

It’s not just about how and when; it also matters who is asking. Even if a patient agrees to speak with us, what she shares will highly depend on how much she trusts us. One of us observed as a clinician how often his patients need to build up trust, sometimes over days until they ‘confess’ certain concerns. That’s especially true when problems have a psychological component (e.g., sleeping disorders) or are stigmatized (e.g., certain infectious diseases).

The more knowledgeable you are about health problems, the better you can steer interviews towards relevant issues. If you do this empathetically, your interviewees might find it easier to speak about them. Don’t get frustrated, however, if they don’t. Some people need a lot of trust, and there’s rarely a shortcut to earning it. In these cases, there’s something else you can do: include subjects who are not your target users but still have crucial insights in your interviews.

Take the nurse, for example. She might know from her previous night shift how many patients had trouble sleeping and who might agree to talk about it. The doctors will know which crucial questions they get asked frequently. And the housekeeping staff can share stories about the patients’ hygiene concerns. Listen closely to them: many of the staffs’ pain points likely hint to patients’ pain points, too. The more observers you allow to shed light on one subject, the better your chances to understand your patients’ experiences and the broader your perception of the system will be.

Takeaways:

  • Try to interview people involved in your users’ care.
  • Ask the clinical staff for guidance on which patients to ask about specific problems.
  • Even if patients are your primary users, make sure to ask health care providers, such as doctors, nurses, or therapists about common patient needs.
  • Schedule repeated interviews with patients if possible to build the trust necessary for sharing critical concerns.

The ‘living’ patient journey map.


A large, printed and ‘living’ patient journey helps to constantly challenge and refine assumptions. (Large preview)

Background: Mind The Worlds In And Around The Patients

Different patients have different needs. This is obvious, and part of the reason why UX researchers develop personas, conduct semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, and observe subjects to explore the multiple realities of our participants. But there’s still a problem we can’t dismiss. Even within our hospitals inside Germany, people’s realities can differ greatly depending on their income, education, insurance, place of residence, etc.

What you discover in one hospital or region might not apply elsewhere. This can be a problem if you want to deploy your products at scale. If you have the opportunity, you should go the extra mile to conduct UX research in different hospitals to understand the needs and what drives adoption.

If some regions show poor sales, conduct field research in these regions to revisit your personas. In fact, don’t just challenge the personas, also explore the environment.

Here’s an example of why that matters: We developed a tool that relies on data from a hospital information system. This worked well in one clinic were staff was spread over different parts of the building, turning digital communication into an effective medium. In another hospital, however, the relevant people sat in the same room, making face-to-face communication significantly better than typing information into electronic records.

Takeaways:

  • Go beyond personas or archetypes and seek to understand the different realities between hospitals, wards, and regions.
  • Develop and constantly improve a rollout-playbook that lists local challenges and how you solved them to inform future expansions.

Sorry, Ignorance Is Not Bliss

Some UX researchers seem to believe that it is beneficial to enter an interview unprepared to avoid bias. Some shy away from acquiring relevant medical knowledge, thinking that (since they are not trained medical professionals) they won’t grasp the concepts anyway. Some feel that understanding the medical context of their interviewees’ situation will not add value to their research since they solely focus on the subjective experience of the disease.

But in evidence-based healthcare, conducting research on patients without previous peer-reviewed literature and guideline research is not only unprofessional but often even considered unethical. We should not fall prey to the illusion that ignorance frees us from bias.

The good news is that in healthcare, we are privileged to have a large body of well-conducted studies and systematic reviews available online, many of them free to access. PubMed is an excellent and open source, tutorials on how to use are abundantly available online (we think this is a good primer). Or if you have the budget, paid sites like UpToDate provide comprehensive disease reviews written both for professionals and for laypeople.

We know that UX researchers who are rightfully focused on ‘getting out of the building’ might not enjoy spending many hours on literature research but we are convinced that this will help you form better hypotheses and questions.

Moreover, if you start with clearly predefined research questions and seek answers in the scientific medical literature, you might save time and discover questions that you wouldn’t have thought of. For example, it is advised that individuals undergoing hip surgery should practice using crutches before the operation because it is already difficult enough even without the postoperative pain and swelling. This knowledge, obtained from literature research, could help move from more open questions, such as:

  • “How do patients prepare for a hip replacement surgery?” or
  • “What perceived needs to patients have ahead of hip surgery?”

To more concrete questions such as:

  • “What are the most important preparatory measures that many patients are currently unaware of?”

Takeaway:

  • Do a systematic literature review to inform your research.

Let The Data Guide You And You Guide The Data

To take this further, we’re also developing methods to use quantitative analytics and Deep Learning to guide our qualitative research. Our machine learning engineer just deployed AI to crawl the web for colon cancer blogs to identify hot topics that remained unmentioned in qualitative reviews. We defined “hot” as having many views, many comments, and many likes.

Or you can uncover semantic structures (see picture). These findings can then guide the UX researchers. Similarly, qualitative research can yield hypotheses that we can try to validate with passively collected data. For example, if you think that sleeping problems are common, you could (user consent provided) use your app to measure phone use at night as a proxy for sleeplessness.


Informing our researchers about hot topics in colon cancer using machine learning (topic modeling, credits Yuki Katoh and Ellen Hoeven)


Deploying topic modeling to find semantic structures in texts on colon cancer to inform our qualitative researchers. (Large preview)

Conclusion

Many of our suggestions are not new to well-trained UX researchers. We are aware of that. But in our experience, it is worth stressing the importance of mindfulness towards the three Bs: Biases, Barriers to trust, and Background. Here’s a summary of some of the recommendations to overcome the 3 Bs:

  • Prepare interviews with literature research on the topic (e.g., on Pubmed.gov).
  • Ask doctors which patients are suitable for interview.
  • Include those who care for your users, including nurses, therapists, and relatives.
  • Cooperate with the data scientists or web analysts in your team, if you have them.
  • Understand that it takes users time to build trust to tell you about some needs.
  • Explore how realities differ not only by personas, but also by regions and hospitals.
  • Stay aware that, no matter how much you try, the influence of the 3Bs can only be reduced, and not entirely removed.

We wish you well and thank you for making the world a healthier place.


The authors would like to thank their former colleague, Tim Leinert, for his thoughtful input to this piece.

Smashing Editorial
(cc, ra, yk, il)


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How To Deliver A Successful UX Project In The Healthcare Sector

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Psychology and The Perfect Design

In this talk, Joe will take you on a journey to find the holy grail we are all looking for: the “perfect” design. We’ll look at a practical strategy that uses psychology to produce the ideal design for those tricky user experience design problems we face everyday.
What exactly is the perfect design? Well, that’s what you will find out in the session. We’ll look at the three aspects that define the perfect design and how you can make it work in your projects.

More here:  

Psychology and The Perfect Design

Free Adobe XD Icon Sets Made By Legendary Designers

(This is a sponsored article.) Our friends at Adobe unveiled a very special goodie at the Awwwards Conference in Berlin today. A goodie which is too good to miss: They asked three renowned designers to create exclusive free icon sets to use in Adobe XD. And, well, we are very happy to feature them here on Smashing Magazine, too.
The icon kits were created by design legend Lance Wyman, award-winning design studio Anton & Irene, and the Swiss design group Büro Destruct.

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Free Adobe XD Icon Sets Made By Legendary Designers

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

When first learning how to use Grid Layout, you might begin by addressing positions on the grid by their line number. This requires that you keep track of where various lines are on the grid, and also be aware of the fact the line numbers reverse if your site is displayed for a right-to-left language.

Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Built on top of this system of lines, however, are methods that enable the naming of lines and even grid areas. Using these methods enables easier placement of items by name rather than number, but also brings additional possibilities when creating systems for layout. In this article, I’ll take an in-depth look at the various ways to name lines and areas in CSS Grid Layout, and some of the interesting possibilities this creates.

The post Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Naming Things In CSS Grid Layout

Don’t Ever Launch an Overlay Without This Checklist [FREE DOWNLOAD]

24-point-overlay-checklist-650

Did you know I’m psychic? It’s true. Your favourite color is orange. You once lived on Chestnut Lane. You’ve googled “email best practices” at some point in your marketing career.

Okay, so one out of three ain’t bad — amirite?

The point is, best practices are important to marketers. Whether it’s email, landing pages or social media, best practices provide a jumping off point for a lot of what we do. And guess what, overlays — whether you’re already using them or thinking about using them — are no exception.

Overlays can sometimes get a bad rap for being intrusive or irrelevant. Often, though, these UX offenders are simply not designed or targeted with best practices in mind.

So, before you launch a new overlay…

Download the 24-Point Overlay Checklist

Never launch another mediocre overlay.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

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Don’t Ever Launch an Overlay Without This Checklist [FREE DOWNLOAD]

Breaking Out Of The Box: Design Inspiration (August 2016)

How about trying a very different drawing technique or illustration style for your next project? Maybe a weird geometric shape? Or a more abstract form? Or a retro-futuristic color scheme? Not sure about you, but holiday or no holiday, my need for some fresh inspiration never stops.
This month, I’ve continued my journey in search for some inspiring and beautiful artwork — and I’ve found some real treasures! As a designer, I feel that there is so much that I can learn from the techniques and color combinations in these little gems.

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Breaking Out Of The Box: Design Inspiration (August 2016)

The Silent Landing Page Conversion Killer (And How to Stop It)

When creating a landing page, you’ve likely wondered, “How much copy should I include?” — a question to which copywriters usually reply, “Well, that depends…”

And it really does depend on the complexity of your offer and about a billion other factors.

Crafting concise copy is tough, so it’s only natural that many landing pages contain too many details.

You might be thinking, “Don’t added details help build a persuasive case for your landing page offer?” (Hey, sometimes you have a high-commitment offer on the table and y’gotta include what’cha gotta include.)

Well, yes… and no.

Including too much irrelevant info on your landing pages is dangerous because it dilutes your message, overwhelms visitors and hurts your conversion rate. If your visitors are slammed with excess copy, they can’t quickly determine what you’re offering, identify whether they want your offer or convert with your (buried) CTA.

excess-copy-killing-conversions-650
Don’t stand by and watch your landing page conversions get murdered by excess copy. Image via Shutterstock.

You can often recognize a page suffering from information overload because it’ll use external links to direct visitors to even more info (oof!). Using links this way directs your visitors away from your page and, once visitors navigate elsewhere, you’ve lost a conversion opportunity.

Because excess copy is such a common problem, in this post we’ll explore:

  • How to tell if your landing page suffers from info overload
  • How to distinguish between need-to-know and nice-to-know information, and
  • How to start including nice-to-know info on your landing pages without the visual clutter that hurts conversion rates

But first…

Why your pages might suffer from information overload

Typically, people err on the side of too much copy on their landing pages for the following reasons:

  • The page is trying to be everything to everybody. Imagine if Adobe made a landing page for Photoshop and used just one page to appeal to designers, publishing houses, design schools and potential employees. This would result in including too many benefits. If you want your page to convert, you need to be clear on your persona and their specific needs.
  • You’re not clear on your target audience’s stage in the buyer journey. Is your copy trying to appeal to customers in the discovery phase (those who are encountering your product or service for the very first time), or leads in the evaluation stage (determining if they want to purchase from you or a competitor)? Your audience’s level of familiarity with you will inform the amount of detail you should include.
  • There’s confusion around how much info visitors need to convert. Sometimes offers are complex or high-commitment (like a conference ticket purchase) and you need to include fine details. Ask yourself (and test) which details are absolutely essential to persuade prospects to convert.
  • You’re disregarding web writing best practices. Large paragraphs of text are overwhelming and people don’t read web pages like they do books. Everybody scans text online, so break up your copy into easily digestible pieces.
  • The page contains more than one offer — meaning it’s not really operating as a true landing page with only one CTA). Stick to one single landing page (and a singular goal) for each offer you pitch.

An example of info overload in real life

To help illustrate how a good page and good intentions can become a victim to excess copy, let’s take a look at a real example. Art & Victus, an online monthly food subscription box, set up an Unbounce lead gen landing page to collect subscribers for their service:

Art&Victuswithoughtlightbox

The page’s CTA prompts visitors for their email address in exchange for an access code to the invite-only food service.

Great, right?

But this page has limited conversion potential because it includes so much unnecessary info. Just look at those two massive paragraphs!

Moreover, the curators of the service are featured on the page using external links to their social profiles. If visitors click these links, they leave the page and the opportunity to convert is gone. We’re lookin’ at a classic case of info overload, folks.

The large paragraphs of text are signs that Art & Victus haven’t clearly defined need-to-know info versus nice-to-know info for the target audience of this landing page. Decluttering the page to display absolutely needed info more prominently would help this brand prompt a desire for their subscription service and hopefully increase this page’s conversion rate.

Pro tip: Info overload is often a result of skipping the copy development phase in a rush to build a page. Always write your copy first, then start your design in the your page builder.

Introducing a helpful hierarchy

High-converting landing pages often follow a logical sequence of info that’s designed to persuade. The hierarchy is based on answers your target audience need to know to evaluate the offer on a base level, and these answers are provided in order of their importance (or relevance to the call to action).

While the Art & Victus’ example landing page is packed with seemingly random details on the monthly food themes, their food charity and even their reward points, these details don’t directly contribute to a visitor’s decision to want to sign up to receive a subscription box. The audience of the page needs to see other info first.

When creating copy for your pages, consider the questions your potential customers will ask and the order they might ask those questions in.

If a piece of info is directly relevant to your CTA – explaining the offer, or how to claim your offer – it’s need-to-know info. If it’s info describing an extra of any kind (like Art & Victus’ food themes, a charity your company takes part in, or your loyalty points), it’s likely nice-to-know info that you’ll want to include after your key points are covered.

It’s helpful to rank each piece of copy’s direct relevance to your CTA (like we’ve done below) as a means of deciding where it should be placed in the visual design of your page.

The more relevant something is to your CTA, the closer it should appear to the top of the linear design of your landing page.

For Art & Victus’ offer, the hierarchy might look something like this:

information hierarchy
* Including price is tricky and at your discretion for your industry/offer. You can choose to include it on your pages if you believe visitors need pricing information to convert.

But what about all those nice-to-know details?

On the example page shown above, Art & Victus had a lot of nice-to-know info they wanted to convey, like their reward points, the custom guide included in the box to help you learn about the food, profiles of the individuals preparing the boxes and more.

Luckily, there’s an easy way to strategically sprinkle in nice-to-know info on your landing pages without the visual clutter associated with information overload…

Lightboxes: A remedy for excess copy

Lightboxes are modal windows that open over a landing page, filling the screen and dimming the content behind. They allow you to prominently display content requested by your page visitor (your visitors click a button to prompt them). You can see an example lightbox for a speaker bio below:

lightbox bio

Lightboxes help you add nice-to-know details onto your landing pages (like speaker bios, featured products, your privacy policy or terms of service), all the while keeping your audience’s focus on your CTA. By designing your page with these in mind, you can include information a visitor would otherwise have to navigate away from your page to find.

Art & Victus could make their landing page offer more clear by using lightboxes to feature their nice-to-know information. After addressing all of their must-have info prominently, they could add lightboxes like:

  • “Reward Points”
  • “Also included in your box”
  • “Who curates our boxes?”

They could also use lightboxes to:

  • Outline the three different types of boxes available in their service (i.e. “Intro box,” “Amateur box” and “Expert Box”)
  • Feature the curators’ profiles for those interested (instead of linking out to external profiles and losing potential subscribers).

Each lightbox would be triggered by visitors who want or need extra info before they convert (some will, some won’t), and would help to break up the massive paragraphs on the page.

Start using lightboxes to unclutter your pages

You too can use lightboxes to combat info overload and tidy up your copy.

Here are some examples of nice-to-have content that fits nicely in lightboxes:

  • Speaker bios: Include details about your keynotes or location in a lightbox so visitors don’t navigate away from a potential ticket purchase.
  • Extras and fine details: Extra product features, limitations, terms and contest rules
  • Privacy policies: Every landing page collecting lead info should link to a privacy policy, but you don’t want to link away from your page. Include your policy in a lightbox so visitors don’t veer off-course.
  • leadgenform
  • Lead gen forms – It’s a fairly popular marketing trend to include your contact form for a call to action in a lightbox. This tactic takes advantage of buyer psychology by empowering your visitor to decide when they’re ready to fill out your form. Check out this post to learn more about why you’d want to include a form in a lightbox.

Examine your own pages for potential lightbox opportunities

Start by reviewing your existing landing pages to see where they might be suffering from info overload.

Remember to check if you’re linking out to external pages — this is a sure sign that you’re confusing need-to-know and nice-to-know information.

Start making the distinction between these two info types for your audience, organizing your page with a better information hierarchy, and you’ll have a more streamlined message and more conversions in no time.

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The Silent Landing Page Conversion Killer (And How to Stop It)

How To Get A Logo Accepted: 8 Steps To A Better Design Workflow

On Dribbble, brand designers are in the minority. The greater part of the Dribbble community comprises those who deal with interfaces, UX and animations. So when traveling to Gdańsk, Poland last July to their first Dribbble Meetup, I expected to meet a similar audience. Indeed, there were mostly freelance web designers and multidisciplinary folks who have been asked to design a logo at least once.
However, I decided not to talk about how to create a good logo.

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How To Get A Logo Accepted: 8 Steps To A Better Design Workflow