Tag Archives: tools

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CRO Hero: Sam Clarke, Director of Growth Marketing at Placester

CRO Heroes

Admittedly, Conversion Rate Optimization is not the most sexy term in the marketing world – but if you’ve ever run an A/B test where the variant won by a landslide, or made a website design change that led to a significant increase in product purchases, you know firsthand how exciting and powerful CRO can be in action. Marketers who specialize in conversion rate optimization are often a rare mix of analytical and creative; tactical, and intuitive. They need to get inside a customer’s head, but they also need to dive deep into data. Often, CRO professionals are tasked with: Reducing…

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CRO Hero: Sam Clarke, Director of Growth Marketing at Placester

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Measuring Websites With Mobile-First Optimization Tools




Measuring Websites With Mobile-First Optimization Tools

Jon Raasch



Performance on mobile can be particularly challenging: underpowered devices, slow networks, and poor connections are some of those challenges. With more and more users migrating to mobile, the rewards for mobile optimization are great. Most workflows have already adopted mobile-first design and development strategies, and it’s time to apply a similar mindset to performance.

In this article, we’ll take a look at studies linking page speed to real-world metrics, and discuss the specific ways mobile performance impacts your site. Then we’ll explore benchmarking tools you can use to measure your website’s mobile performance. Finally, we’ll work with tools to help identify and remove the code debt that bloats and weighs down your site.

Responsive Configurators

How would you design a responsive car configurator? How would you deal with accessibility, navigation, real-time previews, interaction and performance? Let’s figure it out. Read article →

Why Performance Matters

The benefits of performance optimization are well-documented. In short, performance matters because users prefer faster websites. But it’s more than a qualitative assumption about user experience. There are a variety of studies that directly link reduced load times to increased conversion and revenue, such as the now decade-old Amazon study that showed each 100ms of latency led to a 1% drop in sales.

Page Speed, Bounce Rate & Conversion

In the data world, poor performance leads to an increased bounce rate. And in the mobile world that bounce rate may occur sooner than you think. A recent study shows that 53% of mobile users abandon a site that takes more than 3 seconds to load.

That means if your site loads in 3.5 seconds, over half of your potential users are leaving (and most likely visiting a competitor). That may be tough to swallow, but it is as much a problem as it is an opportunity. If you can get your site to load more quickly, you are potentially doubling your conversion. And if your conversion is even indirectly linked to profits, you’re doubling your revenue.

SEO And Social Media

Beyond reduced conversion, slow load times create secondary effects that diminish your inbound traffic. Search engines already use page speed in their ranking algorithms, bubbling faster sites to the top. Additionally, Google is specifically factoring mobile speed for mobile searches as of July 2018.

Social media outlets have begun factoring page speed in their algorithms as well. In August 2017, Facebook announced that it would roll out specific changes to the newsfeed algorithm for mobile devices. These changes include page speed as a factor, which means that slow websites will see a decline in Facebook impressions, and in turn a decline in visitors from that source.

Search engines and social media companies aren’t punishing slow websites on a whim, they’ve made a calculated decision to improve the experience for their users. If two websites have effectively the same content, wouldn’t you rather visit one that loads faster?

Many websites depend on search engines and social media for a large portion of their traffic. The slowest of these will have an exacerbated problem, with a reduced number of visitors coming to their site, and over half of those visitors subsequently abandoning.

If the prognosis sounds alarming, that’s because it is! But the good news is that there are a few concrete steps you can take to improve your page speeds. Even the slowest sites can get “sub three seconds” with a good strategy and some work.

Profiling And Benchmarking Tools

Before you begin optimizing, it’s a good idea to take a snapshot of your website’s performance. With profiling, you can determine how much progress you will need to make. Later, you can compare against this benchmark to quantify the speed improvements you make.

There are a number of tools that assess a website’s performance. But before you get started, it’s important to understand that no tool provides a perfect measurement of client-side performance. Devices, connection speeds, and web browsers all impact performance, and it is impossible to analyze all combinations. Additionally, any tool that runs on your personal device can only approximate the experience on a different device or connection.

In one sense, whichever tool you use can provide meaningful insights. As long as you use the same tool before and after, the comparison of each should provide a decent snapshot of performance changes. But certain tools are better than others.

In this section, we’ll walk through two tools that provide a profile of how well your website performs in a mobile environment.

Note: If can be difficult to benchmark an entire site, so I recommend that you choose one or two of your most important pages for benchmarking.

Lighthouse

Lighthouse audit tab


Lighthouse in the Google’s Web Developer Tools. (Large preview)

One of the more useful tools for profiling mobile performance is Google’s Lighthouse. It’s a nice starting point for optimization since it not only analyzes page performance but also provides insights into specific performance issues. Additionally, Lighthouse provides high-level suggestions for speed improvements.

Lighthouse is available in the Audits tab of the Chrome Developer Tools. To get started, open the page you want to optimize in Chrome Dev Tools and perform an audit. I typically perform all the audits, but for our purposes, you only need to check the ‘Performance’ checkbox:

Lighthouse audit selection


All the audits are useful, but we’ll only need the Performance audit. (Large preview)

Lighthouse focuses on mobile, so when you run the audit, Lighthouse will pop your page into the inspector’s responsive viewer and throttle the connection to simulate a mobile experience.

Lighthouse Reports

When the audit finishes, you’ll see an overall performance score, a timeline view of how the page rendered over time, as well as a variety of metrics:

Lighthouse performance audit results


In the performance audit, pay attention to the first meaningful paint. (Large preview)

It’s a lot of information, but one report to emphasize is the first meaningful paint, since that directly influences user bounce rates. You may notice that the tool doesn’t even list the total load time, and that’s because it rarely matters for user experience.

Mobile users expect a first view of the page very quickly, and it may be some time before they scroll to the lower content. In the timeline above, the first paint occurs quickly at 1.3s, then a full above-the-fold content paint occurs at 3.9s. The user can now engage with the above-the-fold content, and anything below-the-fold can take a few seconds longer to load.

Lighthouse’s first meaningful paint is a great metric for benchmarking, but also take a look at the opportunities section. This list helps to identify the key problem areas of your site. Keep these recommendations on your radar, since they may provide your biggest improvements.

Lighthouse Caveats

While Lighthouse provides great insights, it is important to bear in mind that it only simulates a mobile experience. The device is simulated in Chrome, and a mobile connection is simulated with throttling. Actual experiences will vary.

Additionally, you may notice that if you run the audit multiple times, you will get different reports. That’s again because it is simulating the experience, and variances in your device, connection, and the server will impact the results. That said, you can still use Lighthouse for benchmarking, but it is important that you run it several times. It is more relevant as a range of values than a single report.

WebPageTest

In order to get an idea of how quickly your page loads in an actual mobile device, use WebPageTest. One of the nice things about WebPageTest is that it tests on a variety of real devices. Additionally, it will perform the test a number of times and take the average to provide a more accurate benchmark.

To get started, navigate to WebPageTest.org, enter the URL for the page you want to test and then select the mobile device you’d like to use for testing. Also, open up the advanced settings and change the connection speed. I like testing at Fast 3G, because even when users are connected to LTE the connection speed is rarely LTE (#sad):

WebPageTest advanced settings form


WebPageTest provides actual mobile devices for profiling. (Large preview)

After submitting the test (and waiting for any queue), you’ll get a report on the speed of the page:

WebPageTest profiling results


In WebPageTest’s results, pay attention to the start render and first byte. (Large preview)

The summary view consists of a short list of metrics and links to timelines. Again, the value of the start render is more important than the load time. The first byte is useful for analyzing the server response speed. You can also dig into the more in-depth reports for additional insights.

Benchmarking

Now that you’ve profiled your page in Lighthouse and WebPageTest, it’s time to record the values. These benchmarks will provide a useful comparison as you optimize your page. If the metrics improve, your changes are worthwhile. If they stay static (or worse decline), you’ll need to rethink your strategy.

Lighthouse results are simulated which makes it less useful for benchmarking and more useful for in-depth reports and optimization suggestions. However, Lighthouse’s performance score and first meaningful paint are nice benchmarks so run it a few times and take the median for each.

WebPageTest’s values are more reliable for benchmarking since it tests on real devices, so these will be your primary benchmarks. Record the value for the first byte, start to render, and overall load time.

Bloat Reduction

Now that you’ve assessed the performance of your site, let’s take a look at a tool that can help reduce the size of your files. This tool can identify extra, unnecessary pieces of code that bloat your files and cause resources to be larger than they should.

In a perfect world, users would only download the code that they actually need. But the production and maintenance process can lead to unused artifacts in the codebase. Even the most diligent developers can forget to remove pieces of old CSS and JavaScript while making changes. Over time these bits of dead code accumulate and become unnecessary bloat.

Additionally, certain resources are intended to be cached and then used throughout multiple pages, such as a site-wide stylesheet. Site-wide resources often make sense, but how can you tell when a stylesheet is mostly underused?

The Coverage Tab

Fortunately, Chrome Developer Tools has a tool that helps assess the bloat in files: The Coverage tab. The Coverage tab analyzes code coverage as you navigate your site. It provides an interface that shows how much code in a given CSS or JS file is actually being used.

To access the Coverage tab, open up Chrome Developer Tools, and click on the three dots in the top right. Navigate to More Tools > Coverage.

Access the Coverage tab by clicking on More tools and then Coverage


The Coverage tab is a bit hidden in the web developer tools console. (Large preview)

Next, start instrumenting coverage by clicking the reload button on the right. That will reload the page and begin the code coverage analysis. It brings up a report similar to this:

The Coverage report identifies unused code


An example of a Coverage report. (Large preview)

Here, pay attention to the unused bytes:

The coverage report UI shows a breakdown of used and unused bytes


The unused bytes are represented by red lines. (Large preview)

This UI shows the amount of code that is currently unused, colored red. In this particular page, the first file shown is 73% bloat. You may see significant bloat at first, but it only represents the current render. Change your screen size and you should see the CSS coverage go up as media queries get applied. Open any interactive elements like modals and toggles, and it should go up further.

Once you’ve activated every view, you will have an idea of how much code you are actually using. Next, you can dig into the report further to find out just which pieces of code are unused, simply click on one of the resources and look in the main window:

Detail view of a file in the Coverage report, showing which pieces of code aren’t being used


Click on a file in the Coverage report to see the specific portions of unused code. (Large preview)

In this CSS file, look at the highlights to the left of each ruleset; green indicates used code and red indicates bloat. If you are building a single page app or using specialized resources for this particular page, you may be inclined to go in and remove this garbage. But don’t be too hasty. You should definitely remove dead code, but be careful to make sure that you haven’t missed a breakpoint or interactive element.

Next Steps

In this article, we’ve shown the quantitative benefits of optimizing page speed. I hope you’re convinced, and that you have the tools you need to convince others. We’ve also set a minimum goal for mobile page speed: sub three seconds.

To hit this goal, it’s important that you prioritize the highest impact optimizations first. There are a lot of resources online that can help define this roadmap, such as this checklist. Lighthouse can also be a great tool for identifying specific issues in your codebase, so I encourage you to tackle those bottlenecks first. Sometimes the smallest optimizations can have the biggest impact.

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Measuring Websites With Mobile-First Optimization Tools

20 Ways to Speed Up Your Website and Improve Conversion

Think the speed of your website doesn’t matter? Think again. A one-second delay in page load time yields: 11% fewer page views 16% decrease in customer satisfaction 7% loss in conversions A few extra seconds could have a huge impact on your ability to engage visitors and make sales. This means that having a fast site is essential — not just for ranking well with Google, but for keeping your bottom-line profits high. How speed influences conversions Slow speeds kill conversions. In fact, 47% of consumers expect websites to load in two seconds or less — and 40% will abandon a page…

The post 20 Ways to Speed Up Your Website and Improve Conversion appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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20 Ways to Speed Up Your Website and Improve Conversion

How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies

UX design hasn’t been the same since Sketch arrived on the scene. The app has delivered a robust design platform with a refreshing, simple user interface. A good product on its own, it achieved critical success by being extended with community plugins.

How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies

The open nature of the Sketch plugin system means that anyone can identify a need, write a plugin and share it with the community. A major barrier is stopping those eager to take part: Designers and front-end developers must learn how to write a plugin. Unfortunately, Objective-C is difficult to learn!

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How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies

Jekyll For WordPress Developers

Jekyll is gaining popularity as a lightweight alternative to WordPress. It often gets pigeonholed as a tool developers use to build their personal blog. That’s just the tip of the iceberg — it’s capable of so much more!

Jekyll For WordPress Developers

In this article, we’ll take on the role of a web developer building a website for a fictional law firm. WordPress is an obvious choice for a website like this, but is it the only tool we should consider? Let’s look at a completely different way of building a website, using Jekyll.

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Jekyll For WordPress Developers

Which Responsive Design Framework Is Best? Of Course, It Depends.

In 2017, the question is not whether we should use a responsive design framework. Increasingly, we are using them. The question is which framework should we be using, and why, and whether we should use the whole framework or just parts of it.

Which Responsive Design Framework Is Best? Of Course, It Depends.

With dozens of responsive design frameworks available to download, many web developers appear to be unaware of any except for Bootstrap. Like most of web development, responsive design frameworks are not one-size-fits-all. Let’s compare the latest versions of Bootstrap, Foundation and UIkit for their similarities and differences.

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Which Responsive Design Framework Is Best? Of Course, It Depends.

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Building Shaders With Babylon.js

Shaders are a key concept if you want to unleash the raw power of your GPU. I will help you understand how they work and even experiment with their inner power in an easy way, thanks to Babylon.js.

Building Shaders With Babylon.js

Before experimenting, we must see how things work internally. When dealing with hardware-accelerated 3D, you will have to deal with two CPUs: the main CPU and the GPU. The GPU is a kind of extremely specialized CPU.

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Building Shaders With Babylon.js

Key Pillars of a Successful CRO Program | Latest eBook by VWO

Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) has gradually become a known concept across enterprises, in recent years. The popularity of CRO can be owed to its ability to have a direct and significant impact on the bottom line.

However, application of CRO in most organizations has been far from optimal, which inadvertently causes them to leave money on the table. This money can be reclaimed by having a structured approach to CRO. Further, suboptimal optimization programs lead organizations to draw wrong conclusions, or statistically unsupported decisions, from their A/B tests and damage what’s not broken. Add to it the time and resources that are spent on CRO, and the real cost of an ill-structured CRO program begins to pinch where it hurts—ROI.

An optimal or structured CRO program requires certain key elements that ensure its success. The elements include tools, skills, processes, goals, and culture.

VWO’s latest eBook “Key Pillars of a Successful Conversion Optimization Program” covers all these elements in detail. This eBook features insights from industry experts and provides actionable takeaways to help you set up a CRO program or improve an existing one.

Key CRO Pillars eBOok Landing Page CTA

The eBook contains the following chapters:

1) Culture of CRO

The culture of CRO can be established in an organization with a two-step process. It starts with getting complete buy-in for a CRO program from the top management. Next, the process involves acceptance of the CRO approach by teams across the organization.

The chapter offers the following takeaways:

  • How to get top management buy-in for a CRO program
  • How to ensure that CRO is accepted by multiple teams in an organization

2) Competent Tools

A big part of the success of an organization’s CRO program depends on the set of tools being used. The tools that are essential for a CRO program can be clubbed into the following:

  • Website Analytics
  • User Behavior Analysis
  • A/B and Multivariate Testing

The chapter lists these tools and explores how they can be used to their full potential.

3) Key Goals

The effectiveness of a CRO program is heavily dependent on the goals you set. Without proper goals, a CRO program can lack direction.

This chapter offers the following points of learning:

  • The importance of different goals in a CRO program—micro and macro conversions
  • The appropriate time to use micro or macro conversions as the goal of a CRO campaign

4) People with the Relevant Skill Set

A CRO program involves a wide range of tools and activities. It demands a team of professionals that can coordinate effectively and make the most out of available resources.

This chapter highlights the following:

  • The skills that are critical for proper functioning of a CRO program
  • Job descriptions of different members of a CRO team

5) Documented Process

Last but not the least, a successful CRO program requires a well-defined process. It helps enterprises in identifying the most critical issues in their conversion funnel and treating those issues on priority.

This chapter offers insights on the following:

  • Setting up a long-term calendar for a CRO program
  • Prioritizing A/B testing hypotheses based on key attributes
  • Building a knowledge repository of learning from the past CRO campaigns

Conclusion

For a CRO program to be successful, it needs to be structured and process-driven. There are different key elements that contribute toward it—people, tools, process, goals, and culture.

When all these elements need to be fully optimized, a CRO program can run at its full potential.

Key CRO Pillars eBOok Landing Page CTA

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Key Pillars of a Successful CRO Program | Latest eBook by VWO

6 Tools That Will Help You Develop a Unified Visual Brand in Your Social Media Images

It’s no secret that beautiful, eye-catching imagery is a great tool to getting your brand noticed on social media. Tweets with images tend to get 150% more retweets than ones without and images are easily the most shared and fav’d content on Facebook. But with all the different social media platforms out there it can be hard to keep up and feel like you’re sending out a consistent message across all of them. Rather than sharing a patchwork of random images and hoping something somewhere takes off, here are some ways that you can create consistent content that your followers…

The post 6 Tools That Will Help You Develop a Unified Visual Brand in Your Social Media Images appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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6 Tools That Will Help You Develop a Unified Visual Brand in Your Social Media Images

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Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned

Static site generators are pretty en vogue nowadays. It is as if developers around the world are suddenly realizing that, for most websites, a simple build process is easy enough to render the last 20 years of content management systems useless. All right, that’s a bit over the top. But for the average website without many moving parts, it’s pretty close!

Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned

However, does that hold true for websites bigger than your humble technology blog? How do static site generators behave when the number of pages exceeds the average portfolio website and runs up into the thousands? Or when development is a team effort? Or when people of different technical backgrounds are involved? This is the story of how we managed to bring roughly 2000 pages and 40 authors onto a technology stack made for hackers.

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Using A Static Site Generator At Scale: Lessons Learned