Tag Archives: using

Using Latent Semantic Indexing to Improve Your SEO Ranking and Boost Organic Traffic

latent semantic indexing SEO

When was the last time you sat down to write an amazing piece of content, pulled out your mathematical matrix for determining the most valuable keyword phrases, and set to work with a smile on your face? Yeah, me neither. If SEO and content marketers were forced to use a mathematical model to discover valuable keywords, our jobs would be a hundred times harder than they are now. Thankfully, there’s a little thing called latent semantic indexing (LSI) which can take your SEO ranking game from “0” to “100” in a jiffy (more like “100” to “1” if we’re getting…

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Using Latent Semantic Indexing to Improve Your SEO Ranking and Boost Organic Traffic

Taming Advanced Color Palettes In Photoshop, Sketch And Affinity Designer

Creating large, harmonious and uniform color palettes can be a challenge. Good intentions and confident plans can be abandoned when things get a little unwieldy. But you can equip yourself with some tools to manage the complexity. With the right techniques, large color palettes can be created, refined and refactored at will. Large color palettes can be tamed.
Creating Color Palettes Using Adjustment Layers Quite a few techniques can be used to create large color palettes from a few base colors.

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Taming Advanced Color Palettes In Photoshop, Sketch And Affinity Designer

Glossary: Multivariate Testing

Multivariate Testing

A type of hypothesis testing where multiple variables are tested simultaneously to determine how the variables and combinations of variables influence the output. If several different variables (factors) are believed to influence the results or output of a test, multivariate testing can be used to test all of these factors at once.  Using an organized matrix which includes each potential combination of factors, the effects of each factor on the result can be determined. Also known as Design of Experiments (DOE), the first multivariate testing was performed in 1754 by Scottish physician James Lind as a means of identifying (or…

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Glossary: Multivariate Testing

3 Smart Moves for eCommerce to Fuel Customer Engagement

It is not enough for eCommerce establishments to provide exceptional one-off experiences to their users. eCommerce enterprises have been increasingly working on improving customer engagement with a view to forming long-term and meaningful relationships.

Gallup’s report on customer engagement 2014 states that fully engaged customers represent an average 23% premium in terms of share of profitability, revenue, and relationship growth.

Interestingly, Gallup defines fully engaged customers as those who are both emotionally attached and rationally loyal. To achieve complete engagement, rational loyalty as well as emotional connections need to be leveraged. The influence of social web and its impact on engagement is another aspect toward which eCommerce enterprises need to pay significant attention.

In this blog post, we discuss the three key attributes—emotions, participation, and user behavior—that eCommerce enterprises should focus on to improve customer engagement.

Leveraging Emotions to Drive Engagement

eCommerce enterprises have started paying a lot more attention to whether their customers really associate with the brand and the ways in which they can connect with customers at a deeper emotional level. Dove’s real beauty campaign is a classic example of using emotions to drive engagement. The campaign tapped into the emotions of many women about themselves and their appearance. In their new campaign—#MyBeautyMySay, Dove wants women to define their beauty their own way. Through this campaign, Dove attempts to connect to the self-respect aspect, which many women believe is a “battle still to be won.”

Customer Engagement - Emotional Connection

Targeting Emotions for Customer Engagement

Developing deeper levels of emotional engagement with consumers also requires eCommerce enterprises to foster transparency and trust in customer relationship. Using social proof, trust seals, and reviews on the website creates a sense of trust among their users.

Using humor has a strong emotional appeal, and when used appropriately, never fails to make an impact. For example, Hublogix includes Betabrand in its list of eCommerce excellent marketing for humorous product descriptions on its website.

Using Humor for Customer Engagement
The question, however, is that how do you use customer emotions to take a preferred course of action? A post published on My Customer gives a five-point list on building emotional engagement. The post talks about the following list:

  1. Know what emotional triggers exist currently in your experience.
  2. Define what emotion you want your experience to evoke.
  3. Listen to your customers…a lot.
  4. Identify your customers’ subconscious experiences.
  5. Never stop improving the experience.

Improving Engagement through Participation

Another way to improve user engagement is by soliciting participation. Involve your buyers in product creation and innovation. Consider the example of Vans. The leading shoe brand encourages users to design their own pair of sneakers, using a customization feature.

User Participation for Customer Enagement

Moreover, to increase the engagement level of people who understand the nitty-gritty of the products, eCommerce enterprises can focus on co-creation. McKinsey talks about what brands who have mastered co-creation do to gain an edge over others. They researched more than 300 companies in three European countries and identified three key areas where those who lead at co-creation focused: targeting co-creators, finding the motivation, and focusing on a sustainable pay-off.

Leveraging social media for participation is another way through which eCommerce enterprises can drive more engagement and purchases. According to a 2016 Yotpo consumer survey, 72% of customers say that seeing Instagram photos of a product increases customers’ chances of buying. These numbers give eCommerce enterprises a good reason to invest in social curation for driving user engagement. One way of doing this is using shoppable images on your site—product page, home page, or a dedicated photo gallery page. ASOS makes a creative and engaging use of Instagram images shared by customers, by running the #AsSeenOnMe campaign on its website.

ASOS Customer Engagement with UGC

Warby Parker’s started its home try-on services in 2012. It was also smart of them to start a user-generated content (UGC) campaign for the same. Warby’s customers become a part of the campaign by sharing their photographs while trying the five pairs of Warby glasses and sharing it on their social media with the hashtag #WarbyHomeTryOn.

Forever21 has created a single hashtag for all content generated by its users. (The benefit of using just one hashtag is that people associate better with the brand as well as with the hashtag.) Forever21 has the campaign #F21XME featured on its website, which asks participants to upload their favorite F21 outfit on Instagram using the hashtag, and get a chance to be featured.

User Generated Content for Customer Engagement

Twitter Product pages are helping eCommerce enterprises solicit more meaningful engagement through social media. Twitter product pages are tweets that lead to shopping information about an item. A buy button is included for those who wish to buy.

Twitter Customer Engagement

This post on Sprinkler can be your guide to social commerce.

Leveraging User Behavior to Drive Engagement On-Site

We discussed earlier how emotional loyalty and participation can be leveraged to increase engagement. However, it is equally important for eCommerce enterprises to focus on increasing customer engagement from rationally loyal consumers, which can be done by providing them an enhanced on-site experience. Continuously improving users’ on-site experiences requires eCommerce enterprises to dig deep into user insights, identify and resolve pain points, and discover what interests or repels users. This can be done with the help of tools such as heatmaps, visitor recordings, and form analysis.

Visitor recordings play back the actual interactions that any user has had on your website. These insights can be used further to analyze or validate whether any element on the website can prove to be a distraction for the user. In a case study by VWO, about UKToolCenter, removing the product filter improved site engagement by 27%. Using visitor recordings, the hypothesis that the product was a distraction was easily validated.

Heatmaps highlight areas of maximum engagement on a website and also pinpoint dead zones. eCommerce enterprises can study low-engagement areas and suggest actionable improvements, which include:

A form analysis can be run for understanding how users interact with forms. This interaction allows you to fetch insights from drop-offs per field, time taken to fill the form, fields ignored, and so on. This data can be used further for fixing the pain points that users face, and optimize web forms for more engagement and conversions.

Feedback and insights gathered from on-page surveys can also be used for improving on-site user engagement. For example, if a user spends more than five minutes on a product page, a survey can be triggered to find out whether the user intends to buy something or is searching for something specific.

Conclusion

User engagement is not just about metrics that show us click-through rates or pages viewed in a session. For eCommerce enterprises, driving robust engagement constitutes:

  • Leveraging the emotional connection that consumers form with brands
  • Encouraging participation across the website and social channels
  • Deploying user behavior data and insights to track and improve on-site interactions

How are you driving meaningful engagement for your eCommerce enterprise? Drop a comment or feedback below.

cta_fuelCustomerEngagement

The post 3 Smart Moves for eCommerce to Fuel Customer Engagement appeared first on VWO Blog.

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3 Smart Moves for eCommerce to Fuel Customer Engagement

Using Heuristics to Increase Your Ecommerce Conversion Rate

Every time I hear someone say, “Let’s test if the red button will be better for conversions than green (yellow, blue, etc.)”, my eyes get all bloodshot. I mentally curse whoever it was that wrote the first articles telling you that you can simply test different button colors and get extremely high lifts in conversion. And yet thousands of webmasters and digital marketers spend their time testing button colors. Some of them succeed in making conversions higher, some – not. The problem is, most of them just test color blindly without thinking about why this should work. The funny thing…

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Using Heuristics to Increase Your Ecommerce Conversion Rate

Axure 8: A Comprehensive Review

Behind every great invention lie dozens of sacrificed prototypes. It took Michele Ferrero almost five years to perfect the spherical wafer within the famous chocolates that bear his name. No great product or invention emerges fully formed, and this applies to great websites and software as well. Whether you’re working on digital products or chocolates, prototyping plays an important role in any successful project.
If you work in user experience or software development, chances are you will have encountered Axure RP at some point.

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Axure 8: A Comprehensive Review

PostCSS – A Comprehensive Introduction

The development of CSS, like all languages, is an iterative process. With every major release, we get new features and syntaxes that help us write our styles. CSS Level 3 introduced features that enable us to design interactions that previously were possible only with JavaScript. With every new day, tools emerge to make styling easier and more flexible.
One of the relatively recent tools introduced for styling is PostCSS.

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PostCSS – A Comprehensive Introduction

Guide To Using WebP Images Today (A Case Study)


They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But online, a picture can be worth a thousand kilobytes or more! HTTP Archive shows that images make up 64% of a web page’s total size on average. Given this, image optimization is key, especially considering that many users will abandon a request if it doesn’t load within a few seconds.

WebP Images And Performance

The problem with image optimization is that we want to keep file sizes small without sacrificing quality. Past attempts to create file types that optimize images better than the standard JPEG, PNG and GIF formats have been unsuccessful.

The post Guide To Using WebP Images Today (A Case Study) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Guide To Using WebP Images Today (A Case Study)

An Introduction To DOM Events

Click, touch, load, drag, change, input, error, resize — the list of possible DOM events is lengthy. Events can be triggered on any part of a document, whether by a user’s interaction or by the browser. They don’t just start and end in one place; they flow through the document, on a life cycle of their own. This life cycle is what makes DOM events so extensible and useful. As a developer, you should understand how DOM events work, so that you can harness their potential and build engaging experiences.

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An Introduction To DOM Events

Tips And Tricks For Testing WordPress Themes

Whether you offer free or premium themes, testing should be a major part of your development process. By planning in advance, you can foster a development environment that deters some bugs by design and that helps you prevent others. The aim of this article is to share some of the tricks I use personally during and after development to achieve a bug-free product.
This article is split into three distinct sections:

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Tips And Tricks For Testing WordPress Themes