Tag Archives: videos

How To Turn Your iPhone Into A Video Marketing Machine

These days, being able to produce video is becoming more of a necessity than a “nice-to-have” for online marketers. Check out these stats: Creating a video of a product increases the likelihood of a purchase by 144% Having a video on your homepage can increase conversion rates by 64-85%. 100 million hours of video was watched on Facebook just over a year ago. Guess what that number is now? As the figures show, video is the future, and video marketing is the key to the right promotion of your product or service. Lucky for us, the iPhone shoots beautiful video…

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How To Turn Your iPhone Into A Video Marketing Machine

How to Leverage eCommerce Conversion Optimization Through Different Channels to Maximize Growth

Note: This is a guest article written by Sujan Patel, co-founder of Web Profits. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Sujan’s.


“If you build it, they will come” only works in the movies. In the real world, if you’re serious about e-commerce success, it’s up to you to grab the CRO bull by the horns and make the changes needed to maximize your growth.

Yet, despite the potential of conversion rate optimization to have a major impact on your store’s bottom line, only 59% of respondents to an Econsultancy survey see it as crucial to their overall digital marketing strategy. And given that what’s out of sight is out of mind, you can bet that many of the remaining 41% of businesses aren’t prioritizing this strategy with the importance it deserves.

Implementing an e-commerce CRO program may seem complex, and it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the number of possible things to test. To simplify your path to proper CRO, we’ve compiled a list of ways to optimize your site by channel.

This list is by no means exclusive; every marketing channel supports as many opportunities for experimentation as you can dream up. Some of these, however, are the easiest to put into practice, especially for new e-commerce merchants. Begin with the tactics described here; and when you’re ready to take your campaigns to the next level, check out the following resources:

On-Page Optimization

Your website’s individual pages represent one of the easiest opportunities for implementing a conversion optimization campaign, thanks to the breadth of technology tools and the number of established testing protocols that exist currently.

These pages can also be one of the fastest, thanks to the direct impact your changes can have on whether or not website visitors choose to buy.

Home Page

A number of opportunities exist for making result-driven changes to your site’s home page. For example, you can test:

  • Minimizing complexity: According to ConversionXL, “simple” websites are scientifically better.
  • Increasing prominence and appeal of CTAs: If visitors don’t like what you’re offering as part of your call-to-action (or worse, if they can’t find your CTA at all), test new options to improve their appeal.
  • Testing featured offers: Even template e-commerce shops generally offer a spot for featuring specific products on your store’s home page. Test which products you place there, the price at which you offer them, and how you draw attention to them.
  • Testing store policies – Free shipping is known to reduce cart abandonment. Implement consumer-friendly policies and test the way you feature them on your site.
  • Trying the “five-second test” – Can visitors recall what your store is about in 5 seconds or less? Attention spans are short, and you might not have longer than that to convince a person to stick around. Tools like UsabilityHub can get you solid data.

Home Page Optimization Case Study

Antiaging skincare company NuFACE made the simple change of adding a “Free Shipping” banner to its site header.

Original

eCommerce conversion Optimization - Nuface Control

Test Variation

eCommerce conversion Optimization - Nuface Variation

The results of making this change alone were a 90% increase in orders (with a 96% confidence level) and a 7.32% lift in the average order value.

Product Pages

If you’re confident about your home page’s optimization, move on to getting the most out of your individual product pages by testing your:

  • Images and videos
  • Copy
  • Pricing
  • Inclusion of social proof, reviews, and so on

Product Page Optimization Case Study

Underwater Audio challenged itself to simplify the copy on its product comparison page, testing the new page against its original look.

Original

Underwater Audio Control

Test Variation

Underwater Control Variation - eCommerce conversion rate optimization

This cleaner approach increased website sales for Underwater Audio by 40.81%.

Checkout Flow

Finally, make sure customers aren’t getting hung up in your checkout flow by testing the following characteristics:

Checkout Flow Optimization Case Study

A Scandinavian gift retailer, nameOn, reduced the number of CTAs on their checkout page from 9 to 2.

Original

nameon-1

Test Variation

nameon-2

Making this change led to an estimated $100,000 in increased sales per year.

Lead Nurturing

Proper CRO doesn’t just happen on your site. It should be carried through to every channel you use, including email marketing. Give the following strategies a try to boost your odds of driving conversions, even when past visitors are no longer on your site.

Email Marketing

Use an established email marketing program to take the steps below:

Case Study

There are dozens of opportunities to leverage email to reach out to customers. According to Karolina Petraškienė of Soundest, sending a welcome email results in:

4x higher open rates and 5x higher click rates compared to other promotional emails. Keeping in mind that in e-commerce, average revenue per promotional email is $0.02, welcome emails on average result in 9x higher revenue — $0.18. And if it’s optimized effectively, revenue can be as high as $3.36 per email.”

Live Chat

LemonStand shares that “live chat has the highest satisfaction levels of any customer service channel, with 73%, compared with 61% for email and 44% for phone.” Add live chat to your store and test the following activities:

Case Study

LiveChat Inc.’s report on chat greeting efficiency shares the example of The Simply Group, which uses customized greetings to assist customers having problems at checkout. Implementing live chat has enabled them to convert every seventh greeting to a chat, potentially saving sales that would otherwise be lost.

Content Marketing

Content marketing may be one of the most challenging channels to optimize for conversions, given the long latency periods between reading content pieces and converting. The following strategies can help:

  • Tie content pieces to business goals.
  • Incorporate content upgrades.
  • Use clear CTAs within content.
  • Test content copy, messaging, use of social proof, and so on.
  • Test different distribution channels and content formats.

Case Study

ThinkGeek uses YouTube videos as a fun way to feature their products and funnel interested prospects back to their site. Their videos have been so successful that they’ve accumulated 180K+ subscribers who tune in regularly for their content.

thinkgeek

Post-Acquisition Marketing

According to Invesp, “It costs five times as much to attract a new customer, than to keep an existing one.” Continuing to market to past customers, either in the hopes of selling new items or encouraging referrals, is a great way to boost your overall performance.

Advocacy

Don’t let your CRO efforts stop after a sale has been made. Some of your past clients can be your best sources of new customers, if you take the time to engage them properly.

  • Create an advocacy program: Natural referrals happen, but having a dedicated program turbocharges the process.
  • Test advocacy activation programs: Install a dedicated advocacy management platform like RewardStream or ReferralSaaSquatch and test different methods for promoting your new offering to customers with high net promoter scores.
  • Test different advocate incentives: Try two-way incentives, coupon codes, discounted products, and more.
  • Invest in proper program launch, goal-setting, and ongoing evaluation/management: Customer advocacy programs are never truly “done.”

Case Study

Airbnb tested its advocacy program invitation copy and got better results with the more unselfish version.

airbnb

Reactivation

As mentioned above in the funnel-stage email recommendation, reactivation messages can be powerful drivers of CRO success.

Pay particular attention to these 2 activities:

  • Setting thresholds for identifying inactive subscribers
  • Building an automated reactivation workflow that’s as personalized as possible

Case Study

RailEasy increased opens by 31% and bookings by 38% with a reactivation email featuring a personalized subject line.

raileasy

Internal Efforts

Lastly, make CRO an ongoing practice by prioritizing it internally, rather than relegating it to “something the marketing department does.”

Ask CRO experts, and they’ll tell you that beyond the kinds of tactics and strategies described above, having a culture of experimentation and testing is the most important step you can take to see results from any CRO effort.

Here’s how to do it:

Have an idea for another way CRO can be used within e-commerce organizations? Leave your suggestions in the comments below.

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How to Leverage eCommerce Conversion Optimization Through Different Channels to Maximize Growth

How To Leverage Facebook’s Live 360 Videos

facebook 360

In case you hadn’t noticed – though I’m guessing you have – consumption of online video has been steadily rising in recent years. According to a forecast by Cisco, video will represent 80% percent of all consumer-based internet traffic by 2019. In the information age, the average person has a shorter attention span than a goldfish, and unless your content is extra special, people are unlikely to pay attention. A compelling video stands out from generic mass marketing and communicates your message more impactfully than text-based content. In terms of generating engagement, text-based content simply can’t compete with sensory-rich, emotive…

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How To Leverage Facebook’s Live 360 Videos

The Small Business Guide on How to Create Simple Branded Videos

the small business guide on how to create simple branded videos

2015 may have been touted as the year of the video in the marketing world, but despite that, branded videos have continued earning their space within every marketer’s toolkit throughout the entirety of 2016. While it may seem that only big companies have the resources at hand to create extraordinarily well made branded videos, you should not let the highly visual, artistically edited elements convince you that you cannot replicate a similar video for your business. You do not have to be a world-class creative mind with a massive budget to produce viable video content that people actually want to…

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The Small Business Guide on How to Create Simple Branded Videos

Never Bring an Opinion to a Data Fight: Day 1 of the Call to Action Conference

Why do people come to marketing conferences?

Some might say it’s for the networking, parties, workshops and insightful talks… or for more wacky stuff, like a money tornado booth, t-rex VR simulations and human inflatable foosball.

Testing out important conference equipment #CTAConf

A video posted by Dustin Bromley (@dustinjbromley) on

But some of the juiciest takeaways come from presentations about A/B tests that thought leaders are running, and how unexpected changes can yield big results.

… However, these aren’t always the kind of insights that will move the needle for your business. Without context — without your own data sets — these types of “takeaways” are really just opinions.

Telling your colleagues, “So-and-so changed their button copy to increase conversions, and I think we should do the same!” just won’t cut it anymore. As Orbit co-founder Andy Crestodina put it:

Never bring an opinion to a data fight. Because the highest-paid person’s opinion (HiPPO) always wins… unless you have data.

CI1KDeKUMAApabp Many of the talks at day one of the Call to Action Conference broke down processes and tips for being a more responsible data-driven marketer: Google Analytics reports you can run and templates for building a tracking plan.

Juicy. Here’s a taste.

We’ve become comfortably numb

Morgan Brown, COO of Inman News, thinks that marketers have become far too comfortably numb with the little data they have access to:

Even if you use Google Analytics, you’re still missing out on a large part of the picture.

Clicks, visitors and time on page provide you some insights, but if you can’t see your customer from the moment they touch your company — from the beginning to the end of the lifecycle — you’re flying blind. But whose job is it to dig into the data to ensure your team isn’t flying blind? Andy says it’s on everyone:

Analytics isn’t something that’s just one specialist’s responsibility.

That said, it doesn’t hurt to build a bomb-ass team to manage your data and growth. Morgan advises against hiring “another marketer.” Instead, bolster your growth team with individuals who live numbers — people who treat new customer acquisitions (and customer churn) with the same diligence as accounts receivables/payables.

Eventually, machines will tell us what’s important

As advancements in machine learning technology accelerate, we’re approaching an era where we won’t need to be so hands-on with data.

Machines will identify opportunities and provide testing recommendations for marketers, massively increasing the scale and impact of conversion optimization.

The future of marketing and conversion rate optimization, according to Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner, is in megavariate testing — mass split tests hypothesized and deployed by machines. CTAs will automatically be positioned to where they’re most likely to be clicked. Videos will be placed for optimal interactions.

Imagine a Slack bot that sends you a message with an A/B test recommendation — just type “yes” to switch the test live. That’s the future.

But…

We’re not there yet, so start hoarding your data

According to Andy, fewer than 30% of small businesses are using analytics — and those who are proactive about collecting data will have the competitive advantage. Morgan urged attendees to track all activity happening on their websites:

Stuff it into a data warehouse and let it sit there. It’ll at least be there when you need it.

If you don’t have the bandwidth to set up that kind of tracking, Morgan suggests you should at the very least be documenting important user flows — end-to-end tracking of your customer’s lifecycle:

Don’t settle for anything less than complete waterfalls.

Don’t have the time or know-how to set that kind of stuff up? Tough, says Morgan. Bribe an engineer colleague or friend. (… Or, uh, steal Morgan’s Tracking Plan Blueprint here.)

Develop a culture of experimentation

Tracking and collecting data isn’t enough. Here’s how Andy put it:

When you look at your analytics dashboard in the morning, the line goes up and you smile. Or the line goes down and you frown. And then you go back to checking your email. But you need to take action.

Morgan agreed that you’ve got to just do it. He’s found that all rapidly growing companies (think Uber, Airbnb and Facebook) have one main thing in common: a culture of experimentation and aggressive optimization.

Rapid experimentation — and the accelerated learning that comes with it — is key to fast growth.

Behind every conversion

While it’s tempting to get swept up in data and numbers, Andre Morys (founder of Web Arts AG) reminds us that every conversion is the result of user motivation.

Yes, data can tell us a lot in terms of user behaviour, but user motivation is harder to distil down to pure numbers. It relates to an individual’s implicit goals (owning a BMW for status) versus their explicit goals (owning a vehicle for transportation needs).

In order to tap into these implicit goals, Andre suggests asking yourself, “Who is your customer? What real problem are you solving?”

Morgan opts for a slightly different route, instead using surveys — such as pricing surveys, net promoter score surveys and customer satisfaction surveys — to get a pulse on his customers and prospects.

Whatever the route you take, it’s important to not lose sight of the people behind the clicks.

Because at the end of the day, Morys reminds us, conversions are really just people.

Psst. There’s one day of the Call to Action Conference left and we don’t want you to miss out on any of the learnings — sign up for all the notes here.

Visit link – 

Never Bring an Opinion to a Data Fight: Day 1 of the Call to Action Conference

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons
  • The Payment methods

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold! Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’. There are 101 elements to put together on a product page to complete that experience. If you are one of the lazy lot like most, there’s a quick checklist to save at the bottom of this page.

To know how these elements work, stay with us..

Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door. The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracha!”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy, the store manager, the staff member, the options, the distractions, the freebies, the branding, the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, we haven’t added any timers.

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

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101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

Video Marketing Without a Goal is Just Moving Pictures [PODCAST]

videoinpost
Don’t just point and shoot: are your video campaigns backed up by data? Image by J. Sawkins via Flickr.

How can you make your marketing videos delightful while still reaching your business goals?

In this episode of the Call to Action podcast, Unbounce’s Dan Levy talks to Jennifer Pepper (Unbounce’s Customer Success Content Strategist) about this tricky task. They dive deep into the importance of a data-driven approach to video marketing campaigns, and share some tried-and-true storytelling methods that’ll give your videos that extra kick.

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Mentioned in the podcast

Read the transcript

In this episode: Stephanie Saretsky chats with Felix Cha, Unbounce’s Videographer. Then, Dan Levy, Unbounce’s Content Strategist, interviews Jennifer Pepper, Unbounce’s Customer Success Content Strategist.

Stephanie: Hey podcast listeners, just a heads up we will be taking a break from the podcast next Wednesday, July 1st, due to holidays in the US and Canada. You can expect another episode to be posted on Wednesday, July 8th. Now, onto the show!

[theme music]

Stephanie: Every video campaign needs to start with a goal. An engaging concept just isn’t enough. For example, when Felix first started at Unbounce on the Customer Success team, one of his first tasks was to make a marketing explainer video for our website. It was a fun video that showcased our office, our awesome customer success team, and Unbounce’s great features. But it never saw the light of day. Here’s why.

Felix: The interesting thing was that it tried to target not just our current customers but also target the new customers, new prospects, as well as actually showcase how friendly we are and how good of a customer support team we have. And because that video had way too many messages, it was trying to say three different things. At the same time, it didn’t take into account who we were trying to target, and then also it didn’t take into account our positioning statement.

It didn’t even get published. So that was a big learning experience because I had spent about two or three months making this video, and it was pretty much done. And it is still sitting there ready to be rolled out. I should have thought of what this video should have been in the first place and then how the messaging should have been crafted instead of kind of going in like, “Oh, I think we need a video on our website and this should be the messaging and we will target these audiences and they’ll love it.”

Stephanie: Because Felix was looking at his video through a Customer Success lens – you know, make everything as delightful as possible – he got a bit carried away with the different messaging and lost sight of the marketing goal. So Felix took this lesson to heart and his next videos for product feature launches had more refined messages and a larger impact.

Felix is now on our creative team so we’re super excited to be able to work with him on more marketing features. But with a new department comes new responsibilities.

Felix: I kind of realized okay, I really gotta start making use of data. As creative people, we kind of tend to not think of data as much; we just think about how it’s gonna look, how is it gonna feel, how is it gonna affect our audience. But I am trying to learn how Unbounce’s marketing actually works and how it’s been doing and where we are going to actually better understand okay, how can videos or anything I make contribute to the campaigns. So that’s like the new challenge. Because I don’t have a marketing background; I’ve been just making videos on my own a lot of the time. And to actually try to learn what marketing is and how we can take data and lessons from those campaigns and bring it back into the creative part of it is – it’s a new challenge but it’s really exciting.

Stephanie: I’m Stephanie Saretsky and this is Call to Action, Unbounce’s podcast about doing marketing better. In this episode, we’re tackling a conundrum that it seems a lot of marketers are facing: getting started on producing cool and delightful video marketing that also achieves tangible business goals. Luckily, we knew just who to talk to.

Jennifer: I’m Jennifer Pepper and I’m the Content Production Manager for the Customer Education team.

Stephanie: Unbounce’s Content Strategist, Dan Levy, spoke with Jen about the importance of data driven video marketing and the different methods of video storytelling that she wrote about in a post for the Unbounce blog: “Don’t Bother Using Video on Your Landing Pages Unless You’re Doing These 5 Things.

Dan: Video marketing, eh?

Jennifer: Oh, yeah.

Dan: What’s the deal with video marketing?

Jennifer: It’s hot, Dan, it’s hot.

Dan: I’ll rephrase that for you. Video is, I feel like, one of these things that we all have the sense we should be using more in our marketing because we know the stats about engagement and that YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google. But it’s also kind of expensive and a bit complicated and time consuming. So how do marketers know whether it’s worth investing in video?

Jennifer: Well, it’s definitely a different medium to get right for most brands but experimenting with your audience and your content is the key to getting started. So a lot of people think they want to get in on the video game, but it’s only really worth investing in once you’ve figured out the plan for content creation – so what you’ll create and for who – and have an understanding of how you want your videos to contribute to guiding people along the marketing funnel.

So ideally, you can start with creating one to two to three videos at the top of your funnel. And then after you’ve distributed those videos strategically the best you can, you follow up by reviewing the engagement data for this first set. So you don’t want to create a ton of video series of 18 videos only to find out that they’re not really resonating. So you’ve got to start small but you also have to have the tools in place to start measuring engagement, which, for marketers, that’s gonna be a video marketing platform.

But after a while of creating videos, you kind of want to calculate the overall ROI on the content. And to do this, you’re going to look at whether you’re making more money back than you’re spending on producing the assets in the first place. So take the amount of sales attributed back to video conversions and divide it by the amount of money spent to create the video.

Dan: That’s a really good answer. But let’s take a step back maybe, for a moment.

Jennifer: Sure.

Dan: One of the things that you say in the post is that it’s crucial to define what your goal is before even starting the concept for the video. You actually wrote about a video marketing campaign by the company Vidyard that converted at 33 percent. So could yo tell us about that campaign and how they approached it from the ground up?

Jennifer: Sure. So at Vidyard we were writing articles all the time to get our message out there, like many startups. But when you write about the same story all the time, you start to wonder: okay, how can I scale this message more effectively and is there a content asset that I can make as sales enablement so that we can use this message all the time on a bigger scale?

Dan: Right. Sorry, we should just clarify that you were at Vidyard before Unbounce.

Jennifer: Yeah. So we made a strategic video campaign about the two types of people we were always writing about and for. So the video is about what happens to a marketer who posts videos blindly and hopes that they do well versus a marketer who is super smart about where she distributes her video and is just more strategic.

So we wrote this “once upon a time” type story about Post-and-Pray Pete and Strategic Sue that would speak directly to our audience of B2B marketers who weren’t really sure what to do with their videos. And even though videos don’t always have a strategic purpose these days, we’re a startup and we needed the content we created to help us with lead generation month over month. So we decided the video had to have a bigger purpose for lead viewers to complete more of a meaningful action so that they had to enter our funnel somehow.

So at the end of the video, the narrator tells you that the main character in the story is a real marketer, not just a cartoon, and this call to action prompts the download of a case study about this exact marketer – one of our customers. In other words, the video leads viewers to reach the end of the content to engage with even more content that speaks to the middle of the funnel. Does that make sense?

Dan: Yes. So in this case, the campaign itself was instructional in the sense of distinguishing between the type of marketer who starts the video campaign with a strategy in place versus the one who just sort of thinks if we build it, they will come. But it was also itself a campaign that had a “lead you in” component to it.

Jennifer: Absolutely. So we ended up finding that those who converted were pretty high quality because the video served as a way to qualify their interest. So if we get you to watch a two-minute video and then you download a case study, you’ve gone through two actions and it’s likely that you’re more interested or you’re worth a call or you’re trying to figure out what our business actually does, you know?

Dan: So the goal of the campaign was what, to generate a certain amount of leads or to get people to watch a certain amount of the video?

Jennifer: So basically it was a lead gen campaign so we were trying to get more people in the top of the funnel. So the content is very high touch, I guess. It’s not – you can be almost anybody and get something out of the video but it was targeted toward a B2B marketer; somebody with marketing automation in place and a marketing stack that was pretty sophisticated. So we cast a wide net but then it gets I guess more narrow as you go through the video. And then you realize okay, this is a marketer; you’re either interested or you’re not interested in how she was doing all these great things with video, and then you’re going to download the asset to find out what that person in real life actually did.

Dan: Very cool. So it cast a wide net in terms of the education and awareness part but there was still like a very strict focus on generating qualified leads through the campaign as well.

Jennifer: Yes, absolutely.

Dan: Cool. So like any other part of a marketing campaign, even an email or blog post or a landing page, what sets apart a marketing video from a home movie or something is that it needs to contain some sort of call to action. Do you have any tips on crafting a successful video call to action, or CTA?

Jennifer: Yeah. So you’re gonna want to keep your CTA aligned with the viewer stage in your funnel. So if it’s a top of funnel video, maybe have the CTA lead to a next step in the discovery phase as a prospect. If it’s a mid-funnel video, consider if it’s persuasive enough to prompt a more meaningful action like a trial or a demo at this point. So back to our campaign, it was very top of funnel but then it led to – so it was very discovery phase but then it led to a case study. So you can really gauge that the leads that you take in from that campaign are more qualified because they’re interested in a case study. So you can sort of set up your next step in the funnel. Does that make sense?

Dan: Yeah. No, totally. So maybe can you paint a bit more of a picture of what the CTA was, like what the button said, for example?

Jennifer: Sure. Actually, I’m really embarrassed because on the landing page it said “submit,” which we never say to do. It’s a terrible thing to do.

Dan: In your defense, you weren’t at Unbounce yet so you didn’t know better.

Jennifer: No. Actually, a good example for B2B brands that want an effective CTA, you can look at what Salesforce Marketing Cloud’s content does with their videos. So they’ll create stuff to prompt you on to the next piece of content. So say if they’ve done an ebook, for example. They make a mini video trailer about the content of the ebook to prompt you then to go download it. So the end of the video on YouTube contains an annotated download button, which leads to the ebook landing page where you can get the report. And this is super clever because the ebook’s launch date comes and goes but a video trailer keeps the evergreen content useful to a brand because you can release it over and over and over again on your social channels. But it can live on YouTube because it’s pointing people back to your website.

Dan: Right, and the CTA doesn’t necessarily have to be at the end of the video, right? It could be anywhere depending, I guess, on the tool that you’re using for video?

Jennifer: Absolutely. So some video marketing platforms have a feature built in where you can have a pop-out CTA, for example. So you don’t always have to think end-of-video CTA because there’s no guarantee that someone’s gonna even get to the end. But you can use something like a pop-out CTA so if you’re going to mention a product, maybe it’s a product demo but they’ve seen half the video and maybe they’re convinced. You can have some slide-out on the side that says, “Hey, like already sold? Check out the demo,” or I don’t know, something but they can click and go explore.

Dan: I love the honesty of “Already sold.” It’s like, “Already sold; want to stop watching this video? Just click. Just click already.”

Jennifer: “You done? Good.”

Dan: I want to talk a little bit about storytelling. And I know storytelling has become another one of those buzzwords that’s buzzing around marketing circles over the last few years. But when it comes to video, story really is crucial. How can you use story to drive people toward that call to action?

Jennifer: Yeah. Everyone talks about video stories but the strength of a story is whether it can evoke any emotion. So I’ve found it kind of surprising that it doesn’t even really matter which emotion you pick because they all kind of work. So you can make people feel delighted or you can leave them feeling anxious, but you just want them to feel something as a result of watching your content because this helps prompt the all-important next action.

Dan: Even if it’s terrible.

Jennifer: Oh, yeah. I have an example of that for later, I guess. But you just want them feeling something at the end. Because the classic brand generic video leaves people feeling like, “Okay, I’m done with this.” And then they drop off. But if you’ve done a video right, it should have people thinking, “Okay, what else can I watch from these guys?” Like they seem to know what’s up or they really resonate with your message. But it’s good to be aware of what you want your audience to do. So if you want people to like your brand, you might want them laughing, like with a comedic story angle. But if you want them to resonate with your brand, you might want to evoke feelings of empathy and be really, really transparent and honest.

If you want them to take action, fear or even a light anxiety can be a good motivator. So again, not those positive emotions but you can make them feel kind of like they’re missing out on something. So whether it’s like a new service or a trend, something of value like people hate missing out. So you could also make them feel silly on account of current mistakes. So it doesn’t always have to be a positive emotion. But as long as they’re feeling something in their gut, it’s good.

Dan: Right. So before you set out on that campaign, you’re thinking about what the goal is, but also how do you want this piece to make people feel, which is a really interesting secondary questions, I guess. One of the emotional triggers that you mention on your posts is anxiety, which is I guess one of the – you know – maybe more negative ones. Can you explain how Adobe stirred up anxiety in a video of theirs called “Click, Baby Click”?

Jennifer: So this is a video Adobe did a while ago and it featured the CEO of an encyclopedia company who happens to get data back about a marketing campaign that seems to suggest that people are buying tons and tons of encyclopedias. So you see him stir the plant into heavy production of more of the books and there are massive shipping containers sent out, and it’s pretty epic. But the end of the video shows a baby with an iPad who’s just mindlessly clicking the brand’s ad over and over again like in a banner ad.

Dan: Oh, no.

Jennifer: So the ad ends with a voiceover that asks, “Do you know what your marketing is doing?” And it’s great because the majority of the target audience of marketers has to wonder, well, do I know? Like how do I know? So it’s a terrific campaign and there’s more of that set of ads that they did that are just so good because they just stir up a sort of anxiety. And when they leave you with that, you’re sort of prompted to take an action. You’re prompted to go see a trial of the software – of their analytics software. So I think it’s really smart.

Dan: Yeah, in this case the solution is to put them out of their misery, right? Cool. Let’s talk about metrics for a second. What are some of the ways to measure whether a video marketing campaign is successful? I’m guessing it goes beyond views on YouTube.

Jennifer: For sure. So you can post videos to YouTube but I always say that they have to point back to your site where you have a video marketing platform in place tracking visitors’ engagement on your site where it matters. But you want to look for a video marketing platform that allows you to integrate with marketing automation, in most cases, because this is how you can leverage the data to its fullest.

So in terms of engagement stats, YouTube alone isn’t really enough for marketers at this time because it can only tell you how many people are watching; not who’s watching, where they’re located, and what other videos they’re browsing through on your site. For this info, marketers kind of have to look at video marketing platforms and how video marketing integrates with other key tools that they have in place. But after releasing your first few videos, you’re gonna look at things like how many people are watching total, the percentage of people who click through to watch a video, what percentage of a video do they watch before they drop off, what other videos they’re watching on your properties.

So did one video lead them to another or even to download a resource from you? What was their next step and the amount of content people consumed total on your site? So which video led to another one, and so on and so forth. And you can also A/B test your landing pages to see whether videos are actually helping to persuade more people to convert.

Dan: Right. I keep talking about YouTube because that’s often what comes to mind when you hear online video. But like you said, you really want to host your videos on that dedicated landing page. Beyond A/B testing, what are some reasons for doing that, or is A/B testing the answer and I gave it away?

Jennifer: You’re definitely going to want to test out whether videos help your landing pages because the entire purpose of the landing page is to persuade, and videos happen to be the best way, I think, to convince someone of anything. So they’re inherently persuasive because they usually contain people and faces and we all really like consuming information in that palatable way. Unruly found that enjoyment of a video asset increases purchase intent by 97 percent and brand association by 139 percent. So that’s huge. And Unbounce found with previous research that it can impact conversion by up to 80 percent just having that video on your landing page. But it all depends on whether that asset is actually good.

But one of the best examples of video on a landing page I’ve seen recently is the example on Unbounce’s site: Paper Anniversary by Anna V. It’s so good. There’s this lady, Anna V., who sells paper anniversary jewelry. So she makes jewelry for people’s first wedding anniversaries out of paper. But she has a video at the top of her click-through page so the landing page leads to where you can go see the actual jewelry pieces. But the top of the page contains this video featuring the owner of the company talking about how the first anniversary is so important and why men should consider buying a paper gift, a traditional paper gift – meaning her jewelry – to make it special. But it’s just such a persuasive video and it’s got high production quality, which you don’t always have to have, but that one definitely contributes to a better experience. And yeah, you should check it out; it’s really good.

Dan: I will do that. So it’s interesting. I guess videos help reinforce a landing page in terms of engagement, in terms of making the sale, I guess, and persuading them to click the CTA. While on the other hand, the fact that it’s on a landing page helps the video actually convert, right? Because ideally if it’s a properly designed landing page, especially with when they have only that one thing to do, which is click the CTA either in the video or on the page itself, which hopefully I guess are lined up, right? You don’t want two conflicting CTAs between the page and the video?

Jennifer: Oh, yeah. The video should definitely – if you’re going to include one, it can’t be the video brand generic thing that has nothing to do with the offer on the page. You really, really want the two of them to be highly aligned. So don’t just put your startups explainer video on the landing page; it’s got to be something like – if you’re offering a trial, it’s got to be a video explaining why or who maybe would want a trial. So explain the specific audience for who you’re after and that way it gives viewers a chance to self-qualify.

Dan: So what happens after viewers have clicked that CTA on your video or on the page itself? What’s the next step?

Jennifer: So once people exchange their contact info on a landing page, it’s your job to send them to a confirmation or a thank you page. You can send them a follow up email allowing them to opt into your brand communications, or you could follow up with a call. So something along the lines of, “Hey, I noticed you downloaded our e-book on monkey sweaters. Do you like monkey sweaters? Oh, yeah? What kinds are the best?”

Dan: How do you know I like monkey sweaters?

Jennifer: Exactly. I saw that you watched a video because I was monitoring on my marketing automation system.

Dan: Oh man, marketing.

Jennifer: Crazy, right? But this follow up is based on a resource that they took interest in, and it can really help you determine someone’s needs and how you can help them. So it just helps extend the conversation past after they have followed through with your CTA. But it can be an email, too.

Dan: Yeah, even suggest setting up triggers to send emails like once visitors have watched a certain percentage of a video. So does that include folks who didn’t actually click your CTA?

Jennifer: Yeah, so your best bet is to reach out to folks who have watched at least 50 percent or more of a video is what I lean toward. So you can set up those kinds of triggers in your marketing automation software but you don’t have to wait for those who only click the CTA, basically. So imagine the impact of watching a video on a brand site and then even after you’ve dropped off, you get an email in your inbox seconds later about a particular product you were viewing. That’s exactly what the future of marketing is all about; the right message at the right time and the right context. I think it can be pretty impressive for brands to follow up that way.

Dan: Yeah, and that’s another example of how the video and the landing page reinforce each other because on a page, people click the CTA when they’re ready to click. But here you’re saying video is a way to engage people who might not be ready to click the CTA or might not have gotten there but have shown a certain amount of intent so you could continue to market them maybe in a little bit of a softer way.

Jennifer: Absolutely. That’s where the lead nurturing comes in. Yeah, you can do a great job of that based on the context of what they watched. So if your offer is very specific, you can sort of get an idea for what exactly that customer is interested in.

Dan: Very cool. All right, so what’s the easiest way for marketers to get started with video without investing a huge amount of time and money right off the bat?

Jennifer: Well, to get started, think about the questions that your brand is in the best place to answer. So think about which topics you’re an industry leader in and how you could do how-to video series or even interview questions about this particular topic. So these kinds of how-to videos help your search rankings for the particular query phrases that you answer. And when people turn to YouTube or Google with questions like “What is cloud software?” your cloud software company can show up as the answer that has the video next to it, which is inherently more interesting to click on as a search result.

But you can start with three videos and go from there. So work on getting the distribution just right because that’ll have a huge, huge impact on whether you’re getting the traffic that is actually valuable to you. Work on syndicating the content in articles that you shop out to various sources on the web to get the right traffic going to those videos is a good idea. So if you are talking about – you’re talking to B2B marketers, let’s say, about something very business-specific, you might want to write for Inc.com. Ask the editors, “I want to include this video. Can I embed it with my embed code?” So then your video marketing platform on your site can be tracking the results of who’s watching that somewhere else so you can get an idea of where the traffic is coming from and who that is and stuff like that. But most outlets will let you do that.

Dan: Right, and probably they’ll be more willing to let you do that than to embed like a really obvious product-related CTA right in the article.

Jennifer: Definitely, definitely. It’s definitely got to be something that their audience is interested in. So if you make, say, a video infographic – so say you have a static infographic. Maybe you want to make that into more of an interactive of one through video. And then a lot of companies will want to capitalize on the research that you did so you can syndicate it with their audience. But work on capturing the right audience and the right channels and getting that engagement metric higher and higher. So try and cap off the drop off. You don’t want people dropping off ten seconds into your videos because then they probably weren’t that good to begin with.

So you can adjust and refine based on the metrics that you look at. So if people are dropping off after ten seconds, there’s either something not right about where you put the video and the audience that comes with that spot, or there’s something wrong with your video. So you can rework the content with edits. So you could take out content that your audience is constantly skipping over, for example, and then see how the recut does.

Dan: I like that. These metrics basically force you to – they keep you honest. They force you to make sure that the video is actually good, not just “good enough.”

Jennifer: You can definitely keep iterating and making sure that you’re catering to your audience with video, which I don’t think a lot of people do. They think, “Okay, I made one, it’s not that great, that’s it.” But there’s also nothing wrong about using your webcam or your iPhone to film, either. You just need to consider your audience’s time and you have to get the edit right. So I find like some people think they need a talking head for 30 seconds, you know? But even that, you’ve got to break up with B roll and keep it interesting. You just want to make sure that your content delivers the most value possible.

Dan: I think that’s what it’s all about, right? Delivering as much value possible.

Jennifer: Yup.

Dan: Yup. All right, well, I’m gonna go get myself a monkey sweater so I’ll let you go.

Jennifer: Excellent.

Dan: Thanks so much for taking the time to chat, Jen.

Jennifer: Thank you.

Stephanie: That was Jennifer Pepper. Her title has changed since the time of recording, and she is now Unbounce’s Customer Success Content Strategist. You can find her blog post and this episode’s show notes at Unbounce.com/podcast.

So we’re six months into the production of Call to Action and we’d really love to hear what you think. Do you like the format? What do you think about our guests? And what do you want to hear more of? So if you have a sec, please drop us an email at podcast@unbounce.com.

That’s your call to action. Thanks for listening!

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Video Marketing Without a Goal is Just Moving Pictures [PODCAST]

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A/B Testing Case Study: Redoing Navigation Bar on Homepage Increased Sales By 15.68%

The Company

Harvard Business Services is a Delaware-registered agent and helps people incorporate their companies in Delaware. They also help their clients form LLCs and corporations and assist with filling their franchise taxes.

To encourage more people to buy their services they decided to redo the navigation bar on their homepage. With that in mind, they tweaked certain tabs, did away with some and also introduced a new tab.

The goal was to get more people to click on the tabs, engage them with the website and ultimately make them buy.

On the original homepage, there were 10 tabs namely — Home, Get Started Now, Our Services, Compare, Learning Center, Blog, Make a Payment, Videos, About Us and Contact Us.

This is how it looked:

ab_testing_control

In the variation, they made a couple of changes:

  1. The “Compare” tab was renamed to “Compare Prices”
  2. “Get Started Now” was renamed to “Form a Company Now”
  3. A new tab “How to Incorporate” was introduced, which is also present as a link in the left pane on the original homepage
  4. The tabs Blog, About Us and Contact Us were removed

Here’s how it looked:

ab_testing_variation

The Test

The test was run on close to 32,000 visitors. The goals that they were tracking were visits to the price comparison page, “How to Incorporate” page. And primarily, the actual sales.

The variation emerged as a winner and recorded 15.68% increase in total orders completed. Visits to the price comparison page and “How to Incorporate” page also increased by 66.26% and 382.45% respectively.

Here’s why I think the variation was able to increase the engagement on their website and also give them a whopping 16% increase in sales:

  1. Renaming the “Compare” tab to “Compare Prices” made it absolutely unambiguous. The word “compare” alone didn’t really give users a clear understanding of what they would see if they click on the tab.

    This was an important business change as Korin, who setup this test, puts it, “This (visits to the comparison page) is especially important for us because we work in a competitive industry and our prices are an obvious way that we stand out from the competition. We’re thrilled that this small change has enticed visitors on our site to click through to a page that compares us with the competition, so that they can be more confident in their purchase.

  2. Changing “Get Started Now” to “Form a Company” made the tone of the tab more authoritative. The new verbiage instilled a sense of confidence and made the mundane process of getting started sound more purposeful.
  3. The new tab “How to Incorporate”, which was originally also present as a link, got them an astounding 382% more visits to the page. This clearly proved to DelawareInc. that a large number of their visitors want to be educated first before they make a purchase.

    Essentially, A/B testing allowed them to hear their users speak — that they needed to understand the process before incorporating their company and wanted to see that information upfront. And not sift through multiple links in the left pane.

    This was an important business learning for HBS. Their analytics tool also told them that a lot of people from this page moved to the final purchase page bridging the much-required gap between bouncing off and making an informed purchase.

Let’s Talk

Korin was thrilled with the results. She told us that she loves VWO and is constantly trying out new tests. Shout-out to Korin — we love power users like you too!

Let us and Korin know your views about this case study in the comments section below.

The post A/B Testing Case Study: Redoing Navigation Bar on Homepage Increased Sales By 15.68% appeared first on VWO Blog.

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A/B Testing Case Study: Redoing Navigation Bar on Homepage Increased Sales By 15.68%

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15 Essential Elements of an Effective eCommerce Product Page

Product pages are the doorways that lead to conversions and revenue for an eCommerce store. A good product page plays a pivotal role in taking a customer from just browsing to actually adding the product to the cart. Most eCommerce websites, therefore, invest a significant portion of their time and money in making their product pages more attractive and persuasive.

But then, how do you do this?

Essentially, it comes down to creating a great User Experience for your customer. An effective User Experience (UX) requires relevant and useful information designed in a manner which takes the customer seamlessly through the buying process. In this blog post, we are going to talk about 15 product page elements that add to the UX for your product pages and makes them high-converting. You will be familiar with most, if not all, of these. My intention here is to create a short checklist for every element that you can use to optimize that element. There’s also a surprise for you at the end of this post, so hold on!

1) Product Name

  •  Product Name should be descriptive. This gives more clarity to the customer as well as boosts SEO for that page. For example, ’24 Carat Gold Ring’ is much more descriptive and SEO-friendly than ‘Gold Ring’
  • The name should be unique. This sounds like common sense but you’ll be surprised by how often eCommerce websites give similar names to their products which makes finding them through search really difficult. Needless to say, this also negatively affects the SEO for the products.

2) Call to Action (CTA) Button

  • This is the most important element on any product page. The CTA affects the decision – making of the customer through its size, color and text. Thus, marketers should pay significant attention to optimizing all these aspects.
  • Different colors denote different things across different cultures. When deciding on color, keep in mind two things. Firstly, whether that color triggers the emotion in your target audience that you are hoping for. And secondly, how does it contrast with the color scheme of the rest of the page. Ideally, you want the CTA to stand out so that it grabs customer attention.
  • When deciding on the text, keep in mind that certain words mean different things in different countries. For example, see how Amazon changes the CTA text on its US and UK websites to adhere to the local flavor.

Amazon US Page
Amazon US page with CTA text as 'Add to Cart'

Amazon UK Page
Amazon UK page with CTA text as 'Add to Basket'

3) Product Price

  • Understandably, this is the least controllable of the page elements. As a marketer, your main focus should be the appearance of the price tag.
  • The price should be placed close to the Buy button. In fact, the product name, price and CTA should form a kind of visual hierarchy so that the act of buying flows seamlessly in the mind of the customer.

4) Product Image

  • Photos have a huge impact on the usability and overall UX of the website as well as increasing conversions and sales. For product page images, you should be mindful of download times. You need to keep in mind that not everyone has a super-fast
    internet connection, and that high load time can negatively affect the bottom line.
  • Use multiple images clicked from different angles to give the overall look of the product.
  • Use inspirational product images (product image used in a setting; for example, a customer wearing the dress that is displayed on the product page). These images add social proof as well as make the product more desirable.

5) Product Description

  • Keep product descriptions short and make sure to include important keywords so that the page ranks well in search engine rankings

6) Quantity Option

  • Quantity option takes a very small amount of screen real estate but can lead to a bigger sale. For example, if I want to buy 5 copies of a book, I shouldn’t be forced to go to the page and click 5 times on the ‘Buy’ button. Not having this element means you are potentially leaving a lot of money on the table.
  • It should be placed near the CTA.

7) Product Reviews & Testimonials

  • According to an iPerceptions study, 61% of customers read online reviews before making a purchase decision, while 63% of customers are more likely to make a purchase from a site which has user reviews.
  • The problem with having reviews on your product pages is that so many pages just have so few reviews. This can result in negative social proof. To combat this, follow the eBay model of buyer/seller feedback. That means, as soon as someone purchases a product, send them an email asking for feedback about the product. Many customers feel that such feedback request is part of the buying process and they are more likely to fill in the feedback form. This will ensure that your review section is filled.
  • Ask people to rate reviews. This ensures that the most helpful reviews rise to the top.

8) ‘Add to Wish List’

  • This option is particularly helpful in case of indecisive customers who are evaluating your product. Also, while browsing, some customers may stumble upon a product which they like but are not yet ready to buy. This option gives them the flexibility to ‘bookmark’ the product to which they can return later.

9) Cost Savings

  • Many times, if a product has been discounted, the product page shows the original price along with the discounted price. This is a smart trick used by marketers to cash in on the loss aversion tendency of people.
  • Show both the percentage saving as well as the actual saving made on the product. Different customers are induced by different messages.

10) Cross-selling & Up-selling Options

  • As a business owner, you want the user to purchase add-ons, related products and accessories of the products they buy. One way to achieve this is to provide good options for up-selling and cross-selling on the product pages.
  • Good suggestions for similar and related products not only improve the browsing experience but also aid in product exploration.

11) Social Media Integration

  • Social media buttons provides the friends/followers with social proof, which may result in increased purchases of the same item.
  • It helps to spread brand awareness.
  • It may also increase traffic on your website which will help in increase in overall sales, quite apart from the particular product which has been shared.
  • Keep in mind, however, that if the number of likes and share are too few in number, it may result in negative social proof.

12) Delivery & Returns Information

  • Nothing is more irritating to a customer than selecting a product, making a purchase and reaching the checkout section only to discover the addition of unexpectedly high delivery charges and hidden taxes.
  • Posting the total cost on the product page eliminates the surprise of a high shipping cost and also lets the customer factor in the total cost before adding the product to the cart.

13) Live Chat Widget

  •  According to an Econsultancy reportLive chat has the highest satisfaction levels for any customer service channel, with 73%, compared with 61% for email and 44% for phone.
  • Often times people have questions that may not have been answered in the product description or in the customer reviews. If you force them to guess, or leave them wondering, they are going to leave and find the answer to their question elsewhere.

14) Product Videos

  • Visuals work much better than text when it comes to conveying a message. Many eCommerce sites are using videos in different ways to improve customer understanding
    of their products as well as make their content more engaging and intimate. SixPackAbsExercises.com, a VWO customer, A/B tested videos on the sales page which resulted in increased conversions by 46%.
  • Videos also help the customers to gain a more intimate understanding of product look as well as functionality.
  • If you decide to have videos on your website, you may also look at having transcripts for the
    videos. These not only ensure that viewers with hearing disability can access your video content, it also improves the SEO for that video.

15) Breadcrumb Navigation

Flipkart's Breadcrumb Navigation

  • Breadcrumb navigation helps the user to understand the product hierarchy as well as navigate to other areas of interest. They are also known to reduce bounce rates.

That’s it! One last piece of advice: keep testing. One thing that we at VWO have learned over the years is never to trust experts. The best way to improve product page performance is to keep testing out new ideas and concepts with A/B testing and keep optimizing your product pages.

Now it’s time for the surprise we told you about. We’ve designed a beautiful eCommerce product page template for you which employs many of the elements we just talked about. Scroll down to see it.

1-ecommerce-product-page-template

We have designed 4 more templates specially for you. Click on the button below to get a free eBook on ’5 eCommerce Product Page Templates to Boost your Sales and Conversions”.

The post 15 Essential Elements of an Effective eCommerce Product Page appeared first on VWO Blog.

Read this article:  15 Essential Elements of an Effective eCommerce Product Page