Tag Archives: washington

Building A Large-Scale Design System For The U.S. Government (Case Study)

Editor’s Note: We’ve been closely working with Maya on this article, and we’re happy to see the final result now being published on 18F. We highly encourage more teams to share the lessons they learned when building design systems or pattern libraries, and we’re always happy to support them in writing, editing and shaping that article. This post is a re-post of Maya’s final article.
Today, there are nearly 30,000 U.

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Building A Large-Scale Design System For The U.S. Government (Case Study)

How To Translate Your Website Content & 5 Useful Tools To Do The Job

website translation

The global economy has expanded your potential market in a way that was not possible even ten years ago, leveling the playing field for small and big business. However, it does come with some issues. One of them is the language barrier. If your website is in English, you will get your message across to about 27% of the market. Put another way, about 73% of the global market prefers websites with content in their native language. If people don’t understand the contents of your website, you cannot hope to make a sale. You need to give your visitors the…

The post How To Translate Your Website Content & 5 Useful Tools To Do The Job appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How To Translate Your Website Content & 5 Useful Tools To Do The Job

5 Useful Tools for Translating Your Website Content

website translation

The global economy has expanded your potential market in a way that was not possible even ten years ago, leveling the playing field for small and big businesses. However, it does come with some issues. One of them is the language barrier. If your website is in English, you will get your message across to about 27% of the market. Put another way, about 73% of the global market prefers websites with content in their native language. If people don’t understand the content of your website, you cannot hope to make a sale. You need to give your visitors the…

The post 5 Useful Tools for Translating Your Website Content appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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5 Useful Tools for Translating Your Website Content

Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation

Pull-to-refresh is one of the most popular gestures in mobile applications right now. It’s easy to use, natural and so intuitive that it is hard to imagine refreshing a page without it. In 2010, Loren Brichter created Tweetie, one of numerous Twitter applications. Diving into the pool of similar applications, you won’t see much difference among them; but Loren’s Tweetie stood out then.

Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation

It was one simple animation that changed the game — pull-to-refresh, an absolute innovation for the time. No wonder Twitter didn’t hesitate to buy Tweetie and hire Loren Brichter. Wise choice! As time went on, more and more developers integrated this gesture into their applications, and finally, Apple itself brought pull-to-refresh to its system application Mail, to the joy of people who value usability.

The post Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation

GPU Animation: Doing It Right

Most people now know that modern web browsers use the GPU to render parts of web pages, especially ones with animation. For example, a CSS animation using the transform property looks much smoother than one using the left and top properties. But if you ask, “How do I get smooth animation from the GPU?” in most cases, you’ll hear something like, “Use transform: translateZ(0) or will-change: transform.”

gpu-animation-done-right

These properties have become something like how we used zoom: 1 for Internet Explorer 6 (if you catch my drift) in terms of preparing animation for the GPU — or compositing, as browser vendors like to call it. But sometimes animation that is nice and smooth in a simple demo runs very slowly on a real website, introduces visual artifacts or even crashes the browser. Why does this happen? How do we fix it? Let’s try to understand.

The post GPU Animation: Doing It Right appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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GPU Animation: Doing It Right

Progressive Web AMPs

If you’ve been following the web development community these last few months, chances are you’ve read about progressive web apps (PWAs). It’s an umbrella term used to describe web experiences advanced that they compete with ever-so-rich and immersive native apps: full offline support, installability, “Retina,” full-bleed imagery, sign-in support for personalization, fast, smooth in-app browsing, push notifications and a great UI.

From Google’s Advanced Mobile Pages (AMP) to progressive web apps

But even though the new Service Worker API allows you to cache away all of your website’s assets for an almost instant subsequent load, like when meeting someone new, the first impression is what counts. If the first load takes more than 3 seconds, the latest DoubleClick study shows that more than 53% of all users will drop off.

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Progressive Web AMPs

I Contributed To An Open-Source Editor, And So Can You

A few months ago, Jason Grigsby’s post about autocompletion in forms made the rounds. I loved the idea of allowing users to fill in their credit card details by taking a picture of their card. What I didn’t love was learning all of the possible values for autofill by heart. I’m getting lazy in my old age.

Contributing to the open source community is easy

Lately, I’ve gotten spoiled from using an editor that does intelligent autocompletion for me, something that in the past only massive complex IDEs offered. Opening my editor of choice, I created an input element and added an autocomplete attribute, only to find that the code completion offered me the state of on or off. Disappointing.

The post I Contributed To An Open-Source Editor, And So Can You appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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I Contributed To An Open-Source Editor, And So Can You

The Aesthetic Of Non-Opinionated Content Management: A Beginner’s Guide To ProcessWire


Systems for managing content are more often than not rather opinionated. For example, most of them expect a certain rigid content structure for inputting data and then have a specific engraved way of accessing and outputting that data, whether or not it makes sense. Additionally, they rarely offer effective tools to break out of the predefined trails if a case requires it.

The Aesthetic Of Non-Opinionated Content Management: A Beginner’s Guide To ProcessWire

ProcessWire is a content management system (CMS) distributed under the Mozilla Public License version 2.0 (MPL) and MIT License. It is designed from the ground up to tackle the issues caused by exactly this kind of opinionatedness (which, inevitably, results in frustrated developers and users) by being — you guessed it — non-opinionated. At its heart, it is based on a few simple core concepts and offers an exceptionally easy-to-use and powerful API to handle content of any kind. Let’s get right into it!

The post The Aesthetic Of Non-Opinionated Content Management: A Beginner’s Guide To ProcessWire appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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The Aesthetic Of Non-Opinionated Content Management: A Beginner’s Guide To ProcessWire

Breaking Out Of The Box: Design Inspiration (June 2016)

There’s no doubt that simple design is hard, since it requires much more thought and inspiration. It’s about understanding exactly what your users need. Colors play a major role, and today I’d like to show you a couple of illustrations that may motivate you to try out some new color combinations and techniques.
Take a look at the following photographs, posters and book covers that have been created with some really inspiring shades and color palettes, and some even show how to cleverly use negative space.

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Breaking Out Of The Box: Design Inspiration (June 2016)

A Never-Ending Story On Ad-Blockers

Desperate times call for desperate measures. In attempts to fight back against the growing adoption of ad-blockers, many publishers and ad-dependent websites adopt all kinds of techniques from introducing “light” paywalls to limiting access to the site to fully blocking ad-blocker users from accessing the content altogether.
It seems a bit ironic that a website would send away potential customers that are taking measures to actually access the site faster, and read the content published on the site without annoying distractions.

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A Never-Ending Story On Ad-Blockers