Tag Archives: webpack

Adding Code-Splitting Capabilities To A WordPress Website Through PoP

Speed is among the top priorities for any website nowadays. One way to make a website load faster is by code-splitting: splitting an application into chunks that can be loaded on demand — loading only the required JavaScript that is needed and nothing else. Websites based on JavaScript frameworks can immediately implement code-splitting through Webpack, the popular JavaScript bundler. For WordPress websites, though, it is not so easy. First, Webpack was not intentionally built to work with WordPress, so setting it up will require quite some workaround; secondly, no tools seem to be available that provide native on-demand asset-loading capabilities for WordPress.

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Adding Code-Splitting Capabilities To A WordPress Website Through PoP

Web Development Reading List #187: Webpack 3, Assisted Writing, And Automated Chrome Testing

This week, we’ll explore some rather new concepts: What happens if we apply artificial intelligence to text software, for example? And why would a phone manufacturer want its business model to be stolen by competitors? We’ll also take a look at how we can use the new headless Chrome browser for automated testing and learn to build smarter JavaScript bundles with Webpack 3’s new scope hoisting. Sometimes it’s easy to be excited about all the improvements and new things our industry has to offer.

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Web Development Reading List #187: Webpack 3, Assisted Writing, And Automated Chrome Testing

Webpack – A Detailed Introduction

JavaScript module bundling has been around for a while. RequireJS had its first commits in 2009, then Browserify made its debut, and since then several other bundlers have spawned across the Internet. Among that group, webpack has jumped out as one of the best. If you’re not familiar with it, I hope this article will get you started with this powerful tool.
What’s A Module Bundler? In most programming languages (including ECMAScript 2015+, which is one of the most recent versions of the standard for JavaScript, but isn’t fully supported across all browsers yet), you can separate your code into multiple files and import those files into your application to use the functionality contained in them.

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Webpack – A Detailed Introduction

Web Development Reading List #159: Code Splitting, A New Bundler, And Blake2x

As developers, are we paid to write code? This challenging question raises concerns about product quality, code quality, and our purpose as developers in a world of coded applications. You’ll find an interesting post that dives deeper into the matter in the “Work & Life” section of our reading list this week.
But we have other amazing resources to look at this week, too: new tools, new tutorials, and we’ll also take some time to reconsider CSS print styles.

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Web Development Reading List #159: Code Splitting, A New Bundler, And Blake2x

Web Development Reading List #156: Browser News, Webpack 2, And Lessons Learned From HPKP

Is a person who is sitting by herself in a room alone? From an outside perspective, it might seem so, but the human brain is way more interesting in these regards. We carry a map of relationships inside ourselves, and it depends on this map if the person actually does feel alone or not.
I just read “Stress and the Social Self: How Relationships Affect Our Immune System”, and I feel that we can learn a lot from it.

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Web Development Reading List #156: Browser News, Webpack 2, And Lessons Learned From HPKP