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Scroll Bouncing On Your Websites




Scroll Bouncing On Your Websites

William Lim



Scroll bouncing (also sometimes referred to as scroll ‘rubber-banding’, or ‘elastic scrolling’) is often used to refer to the effect you see when you scroll to the very top of a page or HTML element, or to the bottom of a page or element, on a device using a touchscreen or a trackpad, and empty space can be seen for a moment before the element or page springs back and aligns itself back to its top/bottom (when you release your touch/fingers). You can see a similar effect happen in CSS scroll-snapping between elements.

However, this article focuses on scroll bouncing when you scroll to the very top or very bottom of a web page. In other words, when the scrollport has reached its scroll boundary.

Collecting Data, The Powerful Way

Did you know that CSS can be used for collecting statistics? Indeed, there’s even a CSS-only approach for tracking UI interactions using Google Analytics. Read article →

A good understanding of scroll bouncing is very useful as it will help you to decide how you build your websites and how you want the page to scroll.

Scroll bouncing is undesirable if you don’t want to see fixed elements on a page move. Some examples include: when you want a header or footer to be fixed in a certain position, or if you want any other element such as a menu to be fixed, or if you want the page to scroll-snap at certain positions on scroll and you do not want any additional scrolling to occur at the very top or bottom of the page which will confuse visitors to your website. This article will propose some solutions to the problems faced when dealing with scroll bouncing at the very top or bottom of a web page.

My First Encounter With The Effect

I first noticed this effect when I was updating a website that I built a long time ago. You can view the website here. The footer at the bottom of the page was supposed to be fixed in its position at the bottom of the page and not move at all. At the same time, you were supposed to be able to scroll up and down through the main contents of the page. Ideally, it would work like this:

Scroll bouncing in Firefox on macOS
Scroll bouncing in Firefox on macOS. (Large preview)

It currently works this way in Firefox or on any browser on a device without a touchscreen or trackpad. However, at that time, I was using Chrome on a MacBook. I was scrolling to the bottom of the page using a trackpad when I discovered that my website was not working correctly. You can see what happened here:

Scroll bouncing in Chrome on macOS
Scroll bouncing in Chrome on macOS. (Large preview)

Oh no! This was not what was supposed to happen! I had set the footer’s position to be at the bottom of the page by setting its CSS position property to have a value of fixed. This is also a good time to revisit what position: fixed; is. According to the CSS 2.1 Specification, when a “box” (in this case, the dark blue footer) is fixed, it is “fixed with respect to the viewport and does not move when scrolled.” What this means is that the footer was not supposed to move when you scroll up and down the page. This was what worried me when I saw what was happening on Chrome.

To make this article more complete, I’ll show you how the page scrolls on both Mobile Edge, Mobile Safari and Desktop Safari below. This is different to what happens in scrolling on Firefox and Chrome. I hope this gives you a better understanding of how the exact same code currently works in different ways. It is currently a challenge to develop scrolling that works in the same way across different web browsers.

Scroll bouncing in Safari on macOS. A similar effect can be seen for Edge and Safari on iOS
Scroll bouncing in Safari on macOS. A similar effect can be seen for Edge and Safari on iOS. (Large preview)

Searching For A Solution

One of my first thoughts was that there would be an easy and a quick way to fix this issue on all browsers. What this means is that I thought that I could find a solution that would take a few lines of CSS code and that no JavaScript would be involved. Therefore, one of the first things I did, was to try to achieve this. The browsers I used for testing included Chrome, Firefox and Safari on macOS and Windows 10, and Edge and Safari on iOS. The versions of these browsers were the latest at the time of writing this article (2018).

HTML And CSS Only Solutions

Absolute And Relative Positioning

One of the first things I tried, was to use absolute and relative positioning to position the footer because I was used to building footers like this. The idea would be to set my web page to 100% height so that the footer is always at the bottom of the page with a fixed height, whilst the content takes up 100% minus the height of the footer and you can scroll through that. Alternatively, you can set a padding-bottom instead of using calc and set the body-container height to 100% so that the contents of the application do not overlap with the footer. The CSS code looked something like this:

html 
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;
  position: relative;


body 
  width: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  font-family: sans-serif;
  height: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;


.body-container 
  height: calc(100% - 100px);
  overflow: auto;


.color-picker-main-container 
  width: 100%;
  font-size: 22px;
  padding-bottom: 10px;


footer 
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100%;

This solution works in almost the same way as the original solution (which was just position: fixed;). One advantage of this solution compared to that is that the scroll is not for the entire page, but for just the contents of the page without the footer. The biggest problem with this method is that on Mobile Safari, both the footer and the contents of the application move at the same time. This makes this approach very problematic when scrolling quickly:

Absolute and Relative Positioning
Absolute and Relative Positioning.

Another effect that I did not want was difficult to notice at first, and I only realized that it was happening after trying out more solutions. This was that it was slightly slower to scroll through the contents of my application. Because we are setting our scroll container’s height to 100% of itself, this hinders flick/momentum-based scrolling on iOS. If that 100% height is shorter (for example, when a 100% height of 2000px becomes a 100% height of 900px), the momentum-based scrolling gets worse. Flick/momentum-based scrolling happens when you flick on the surface of a touchscreen with your fingers and the page scrolls by itself. In my case, I wanted momentum-based scrolling to occur so that users could scroll quickly, so I stayed away from solutions that set a height of 100%.

Other Attempts

One of the solutions suggested on the web, and that I tried to use on my code, is shown below as an example.

html 
  width: 100%;
  position: fixed;
  overflow: hidden;


body 
  width: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  font-family: sans-serif;
  position: fixed;
  overflow: hidden;


.body-container 
  width: 100vw;
  height: calc(100vh - 100px);
  overflow-y: auto;
  -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;


.color-picker-main-container 
  width: 100%;
  font-size: 22px;
  padding-bottom: 10px;


footer 
  position: fixed;
  bottom: 0;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100%;

This code works on Chrome and Firefox on macOS the same way as the previous solution. An advantage of this method is that scroll is not restricted to 100% height, so momentum-based scrolling works properly. On Safari, however, the footer disappears:

Missing Footer on macOS Safari
Missing Footer on macOS Safari. (Large preview)

On iOS Safari, the footer becomes shorter, and there is an extra transparent (or white) gap at the bottom. Also, the ability to scroll through the page is lost after you scroll to the very bottom. You can see the white gap below the footer here:

Shorter Footer on iOS Safari
Shorter Footer on iOS Safari.

One interesting line of code you might see a lot is: -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;. The idea behind this is that it allows momentum-based scrolling for a given element. This property is described as “non-standard” and as “not on a standard track” in MDN documentation. It shows up as an “Invalid property value” under inspection in Firefox and Chrome, and it doesn’t appear as a property on Desktop Safari. I didn’t use this CSS property in the end.

To show another example of a solution you may encounter and a different outcome I found, I also tried the code below:

html 
  position: fixed;
  height: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;


body 
  font-family: sans-serif;
  margin: 0;
  width: 100vw; 
  height: 100vh;
  overflow-y: auto;
  overflow-x: hidden;
  -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch;


.color-picker-main-container 
  width: 100%;
  font-size: 22px;
  padding-bottom: 110px;


footer 
  position: fixed;

This actually works well across the different desktop browsers, momentum-based scrolling still works, and the footer is fixed at the bottom and does not move on desktop web browsers. Perhaps the most problematic part of this solution (and what makes it unique) is that, on iOS Safari the footer always shakes and distorts very slightly and you can see the content below it whenever you scroll.

Solutions With JavaScript

After trying out some initial solutions using just HTML and CSS, I gave some JavaScript solutions a try. I would like to add that this is something that I do not recommend you to do and would be better to avoid doing. From my experience, there are usually more elegant and concise solutions using just HTML and CSS. However, I had already spent a lot of time trying out the other solutions, I thought that it wouldn’t hurt to quickly see if there were some alternative solutions that used JavaScript.

Touch Events

One approach of solving the issue of scroll bouncing is by preventing the touchmove or touchstart events on the window or document. The idea behind this is that the touch events on the overall window are prevented, whilst the touch events on the content you want to scroll through are allowed. An example of code like this is shown below:

// Prevents window from moving on touch on older browsers.
window.addEventListener('touchmove', function (event) 
  event.preventDefault()
, false)

// Allows content to move on touch.
document.querySelector('.body-container').addEventListener('touchmove', function (event) 
  event.stopPropagation()
, false)

I tried many variations of this code to try to get the scroll to work properly. Preventing touchmove on the window made no difference. Using document made no difference. I also tried to use both touchstart and touchmove to control the scrolling, but these two methods also made no difference. I learned that you can no longer call event.preventDefault() this way for performance reasons. You have to set the passive option to false in the event listener:

// Prevents window from moving on touch on newer browsers.
window.addEventListener('touchmove', function (event) 
  event.preventDefault()
, passive: false)

Libraries

You may come across a library called “iNoBounce” that was built to “stop your iOS webapp from bouncing around when scrolling.” One thing to note when using this library right now to solve the problem I’ve described in this article is that it needs you to use -webkit-overflow-scrolling. Another thing to note is that the more concise solution I ended up with (which is described later) does a similar thing as it on iOS. You can test this yourself by looking at the examples in its GitHub Repository, and comparing that to the solution I ended up with.

Overscroll Behavior

After trying out all of these solutions, I found out about the CSS property overscroll-behavior. The overscroll-behavior CSS property was implemented in Chrome 63 on December 2017, and in Firefox 59 on March 2018. This property, as described in MDN documentation, “allows you to control the browser’s scroll overflow behavior — what happens when the boundary of a scrolling area is reached.” This was the solution that I ended up using.

All I had to do was set overscroll-behavior to none in the body of my website and I could leave the footer’s position as fixed. Even though momentum-based scrolling applied to the whole page, rather than the contents without the footer, this solution was good enough for me and fulfilled all of my requirements at that point in time, and my footer no longer bounced unexpectedly on Chrome. It is perhaps useful to note that Edge has this property flagged as under development now. overscroll-behavior can be seen as an enhancement if browsers do not support it yet.

Conclusion

If you don’t want your fixed headers or footers to bounce around on your web pages, you can now use the overscroll-behavior CSS property.

Despite the fact that this solution works differently in different browsers (bouncing of the page content still happens on Safari and Edge, whereas on Firefox and Chrome it doesn’t), it will keep the header or footer fixed when you scroll to the very top or bottom of a website. It is a concise solution and on all the browsers tested, momentum-based scrolling still works, so you can scroll through a lot of page content very quickly. If you are building a fixed header or footer on your web page, you can begin to use this solution.

Smashing Editorial
(rb, ra, yk, il)


Source:  

Scroll Bouncing On Your Websites

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What Is the Best Heatmap Tool and How to Use It to Get Better Results

heatmap-tool

A heatmap tool allows you to unlock the secrets behind your website users’ behavior. You’ve heard your friends and associates talking about using a heatmap tool to improve their website conversions and sales. Maybe you’ve even done a little research on the subject. But why exactly do you need a heatmap tool? And what does it do? You have questions. I have answers. Here’s the thing: User behavior reports like heatmaps give you information about your target audience that you can’t get anywhere else. Therein lies the value. Without heatmaps, you’re in the dark. So how do you see the…

The post What Is the Best Heatmap Tool and How to Use It to Get Better Results appeared first on The Daily Egg.

This article – 

What Is the Best Heatmap Tool and How to Use It to Get Better Results

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These 3 Simple Website A/B Tests Can Help You Save Millions

website-ab-tests

Have you ever thought, “If we could increase our traffic by X%, digital marketing would become so much easier”? If so, don’t worry—you’re not alone. Many companies choose to funnel a large percentage of their marketing spend into advertising, hoping to scale their business by attracting large numbers of new customers. Unfortunately, paid customer acquisition has become increasingly competitive and expensive. Steve Dennis writes for Forbes, “As it turns out, many online brands attract their first tranche of customers relatively inexpensively, through word of mouth or other low cost strategies. Where things start to get ugly is when these brands…

The post These 3 Simple Website A/B Tests Can Help You Save Millions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link – 

These 3 Simple Website A/B Tests Can Help You Save Millions

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How to Get Traffic to Your Website (Neil Patel’s Ultimate Guide)

how-to-get-traffic-to-your-website

I don’t think anyone would argue that I’ve written a ton of content over the years about how to get traffic to your website. Still, it’s one of the most important skills to learn. Optimizing your website for conversions won’t matter if you don’t have any traffic to begin with. It’s like expecting to sell merchandise when nobody visits your brick-and-mortar store. Once you know how to get traffic to your website, you can optimize your content and pages based on patterns among your target audience. That’s step two. But as they say, you have to walk before you can…

The post How to Get Traffic to Your Website (Neil Patel’s Ultimate Guide) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Taken from – 

How to Get Traffic to Your Website (Neil Patel’s Ultimate Guide)

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Linkbuilding: The Citizen’s Field Guide




Linkbuilding: The Citizen’s Field Guide

Myriam Jessier & Stéphanie Walter



Before buying followers on Instagram was a common practice, before Russian trolls made fake news an Olympic sport, we had linkbuilding. Today, we still have linkbuilding, its just that you haven’t noticed it — or have you?

Welcome, to the Twilight Zone, dear folks. You are about to go through a linkbuilding crash course. This will help you preserve your website, detect potential problems in content or consider why you keep receiving strange emails from strangers wanting to get their links all over your content.

Rod Sterling in the Twilight Zone TV series.
Rod Sterling in the Twilight Zone TV series.

Note: If you are a website owner, a marketer, a blogger, a social media specialist or a regular user of the internet (and everything else in between)…you should take the time to read this!

What Is Linkbuilding?

Links are basically a popularity contest. Linkbuilding is the process of gaining links to your online content in order to boost your visibility in search engines.

Through links, search engines can analyze popularity but also other vital metrics such as authority, spam, trust. Google uses links to establish which websites are popular with users, are trusted by users or are seen as spam by users.

Key Signals That Influence The Value Of a Link

You have the stock exchange, and then you have the link exchange. All links are not created equal. Some of you may get flooded with spammy requests while others are reading this article wondering why they’ve never heard of linkbuilding. Some websites are more valuable and thus more targeted than others by linkbuilding attempts. Here are some key metrics that help establish the value of a link:

Global Popularity

The more popular a website is, the more a link from that site will have value. Wikipedia or Huffington Post have a lot of websites pointing to them which is a signal for search engines that these websites are probably important or at least very popular. Here is an example of linkbuilders trying to sell links on well-known publications that may not be aware their platform is used to peddle paid links.


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Topical Or Local Popularity

Links that are topic-specific and highly related to your subject matter are worth more than links from general or off-topic sites. A link from a dog training business pointing to an SEO training website (like the one I run) will have less value than if Smashing Magazine (a website recognized for its topical authority on the web) will. Which means that placing a link on “SEO training website” would have been an amazing opportunity for me.

Placement In The Page

If a link is “editorially placed”, meaning that it looks like something the author placed in the content naturally, then Google will give it more credibility. If the link is something someone with a shady profile shared in the comments, the impact won’t be the same. The position of a link within a page is important. Most linkbuilders will always negotiate for a link at the beginning or in the middle of your main content. Links in footers and sidebars do not have the same value.1

1The Skinny On Black Hat Link Building,” Link Building For SEO: The Definitive Guide (2018 Update), Backlinko

Types Of Links Matter

A text link tends to have more weight than an image link. Furthermore, most people forget to provide an ALT attribute for their images, which means that Google will have a hard time getting context regarding the link placed on the image. Links can also be placed in iframes.

Anchor Text

You know what would be an even better anchor than “SEO training website” for me? I would love to also push a local signal on top of a topical one with “SEO training in Montreal” Why is that better than placing a link on a random word like “platypus”? Well, because one of the strongest signals used by search engines is anchor text. What is anchor text? Anchor Text is the visible, clickable text in a hyperlink. For most of us, it’s the blue text that’s underlined, like the ones you see below. As you can see, Smashing Magazine has made it a mission to explain why links should never say “Click Here”.


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Trust Score

The internet is made up of a lot of spam. In order to stay relevant to users, search engines use systems that analyze link profiles and provide a trust score. Earning links from websites with a high Trust metric can boost your own scoring metric and impact your organic visibility. That’s why most SEO experts will favor non-profit organizations, universities or government websites. Those websites benefit from great Trust Score normally. I call the trust factor a trust score because each SEO tool has its own nomenclature (TrustRank, TrustFlow, etc.). This is the Trust Score of Smashing Magazine:


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So of course, you can imagine that this makes Smashing Magazine a very desirable website to have a link on. This leads to hilarious situations like this comical email by a link builder trying to buy a link from me:


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Link Neighborhood

The notion of a “link neighborhood” means that if a website is spammy and links to another website, Google will be suspicious that the other website is spammy as well. This is important because sometimes, websites are targeted by negative SEO attacks. One of the quickest ways to sabotage a competitor’s organic visibility is to have a lot of spammy websites pointing to its website. This is where the notion of link neighborhood becomes incredibly important.

Freshness And Pertinence

Link signals tend to decay over time. That’s why it’s important to keep earning new links over time. This helps establish the pertinence of a website. But you have to be careful: If you keep earning links from hype websites that aren’t necessarily trustworthy, your website could be seen as pertinent but not trustworthy. It’s a fine balance between authority and pertinence.

Social Sharing

Search engines treat socially shared links differently than any other type of link. The SEO community is still debating how strong of a signal social links are.

The Importance Of A Link

Getting a link from a website that is considered a reputable and expert source of information is a highly valuable asset. Let’s use this article to do some good and give a link to someone in Web that deserves it. Meet Nicolas Steenhout, a great accessibility consultant in Montreal doing great work. Bonjour Monsieur! I hope this link helps give your work more visibility!

Common Linkbuilding Tactics

Here is a quick recap of what happens to some of us on a daily basis:

  • We receive some type of communication trying to get us to put things on our websites for strange reasons we don’t understand.
  • Someone requests or demands, depending on how combative their writing style is, that we guest blog for free on platforms that we do not know, trust or like.
  • We get folks peddling SEO services. They use scare tactics to push you to pay them for their services.
  • Websites get hacked for links…or worse.

Here are some of common linkbuilding tactics you should be aware of:

  • Broken linkbuilding
    If you notice a broken link in a quality website, you can email the owner and say what page the link is on and what could be a solid resource to replace the current webpage that’s no longer available. Of course, the replacement you offer just so happens to be from your own website that you want to rank in search engines.
  • Comment spam linkbuilding
    There is a reason why strange spammy comments keep trying to peddle certain products or websites – it’s called linkbuilding.
  • Negative SEO
    If you can’t be first because you are the best, then buy a bunch of links to make your competitors go down in Google. That’s basically what negative SEO is. Here is a real life case of negative SEO if you want to see how this can happen to any type of website owner, not just big startups or famous people.
  • Sponsored content linkbuilding
    I have had many bloggers complain to me because they had been duped by agencies “buying” a sponsored article for a year on their blog. They discovered later on that what the company actually bought was a link that they could control.
  • Hacking websites
    Oftentimes, websites will get hacked for SEO purposes. Because if you can’t rank honestly, then parasite good websites to rank no matter what! That’s the philosophy of some ruthless search engine optimization specialists. If you gain access to a website, you can place any link where you want, for as long as you want. As a website owner, it’s important that you secure your website and make sure nothing strange is going on in your content. Want to see what a hacked website can look like? I recently had a case where a very legitimate website in the IT sector was hacked to host and promote a discount NBA jersey store. This is the what the website looks like:


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    However, what they were not aware of was that the website had been hacked. Upon analyzing their incoming links, it was clear that this IT focused website was known for “cheap NBA jerseys” and “wholesale NBA jerseys” than anything else. I wondered why, and found a lot of pages were receiving links:


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    The wonderful developer team cleaned up the damage and made sure to patch any security breach they found. However, this specific hacker thrives in websites that have been hacked and are full of malware such as this one:


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  • Link outreach
    If you get bombarded with emails asking you to review a product or add a link in your blog article, chances are that you have been targeted during a link outreach campaign. You can always decline or simply not answer this unsolicited email. On the flipside of the coin, if you get offers to place your links in some highly regarded publications, know that this is an offer the person is making you to place your links on certain website.
  • Guest blogging
    If someone asks you to create an article on their platform, the often want free quality content with your notoriety to promote it in order to garner links. If on the other hand, someone offers you free content for your website, chances are that it is for linkbuilding purposes.
  • PBN
    A Private Blog Network is a network of websites with great SEO metrics used to build links to a main website in order to help it rank higher in search engines. It means that someone usually ranks multiple websites high in Google in order to use them to place links that will boost the visibility of a chosen site. Google does not appreciate PBN efforts or link exchange efforts and routinely penalizes networks of websites.
  • Creating awesome content
    There are many linkbuilding tactics that push for the creation of tools, content or other types of media that is so good, so useful and so relevant that they will naturally garner links from other website owners. We won’t detail them here but they usually work well because they provide something useful that deserves to be shared with others!

The Hidden Survival Guide To Linkbuilding

Read this part if you are a website owner, a UX, a customer, a visitor, a blogger, my friend Igor (hi Igor, please read this!) or anyone else using search engines regularly to find information. Let’s get started by giving you access to the official Google guidelines on the matter. Website guidelines vary from search engine to search engine. You can check each search engine’s guidelines but oftentimes, the broader concepts of what qualifies as a good website in terms of SEO are the same.

The Ugly Truth: Not All Linkbuilding Is Bad

Google clearly disagrees with paying for links or selling links. However, keep this in mind: not all linkbuilding efforts are bad. Earlier in this article, I gave a shout out to a friend of mine because I know that it will help give his website some visibility in search engines. Offering a link is a way to show your support for a product, an article, a tool, a website, a person. It is a vote of confidence in their favor. If you go out of your way to do it, technically, that counts as linkbuilding. Linkbuilding is also a way to make money. Some website owners may leverage linkbuilding to earn money despite legal regulations and Google’s guidelines.

If You See Something, Say Something!

You can signal bad links and anything strange going on that may be related to a hack, malware or even paid links to Google. You can report bad links very easily. If you want to review the entire list of what constitutes a bad practices in Google’s eyes, you can head on over to this official documentation.

Make It Clear If You Accept Or Refuse Linkbuilding Offers

If you are a blogger, make sure you are aware of your rights and responsibilities when it comes to linkbuilding efforts. Make sure to update your key pages to reflect your linkbuilding policy. This could be done in the about page, the services page if you offer services or the contact page.

Take the time to specify if you accept of refuse commercial or affiliate links in the content of a guest blog post for example. This will also help avoid nasty linkbuilding surprises in the future.

Nofollow: You Can Have Sponsored Content And Still Respect The Guidelines!

So what do you do if you realize that someone is using your website to place a link? Well, if this is something that was done legally, you can fix the situation by placing an attribute on your link that will signal to search engine bots not to follow the link. A nofollow link is a way to make sure that links from sponsored posts are not going against Google’s guidelines. This type of link cancels the linkbuilding benefits as Google gives them no love because the nofollow tag in the code signals “do not take this link into account.” Website owners and administrators should know how to make a link into a nofollow link as it can be done quickly and easily.

This is what a nofollow link looks like in the code:




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So, what do you do if you are asked for a link in exchange for a review?

This is the most common way most bloggers are approached in order to get links placed on their websites. Here are some guidelines for bloggers that receive free products in exchange for reviews.

If you think your website is hacked for links, you must first secure your website and do a security audit. The second step would entail cleaning up the links and the third step includes submitting a disavow file to Google that signals any shady domains that may be pointing to you because of hacker activity.

Red Flag #1 : You Start Seeing Your Organic Traffic Go Down

If you haven’t changed anything and you see your organic traffic go down, make sure it’s not a link issue. You could have suffered an attack. We recommend you use the Google Search Console tool available to all website owners and administrators. You must validate that you own the website and then, you will be able to receive an alert if Google detects something is very wrong with your website. Careful, if something is wrong with your website, it could mean a penalty and cause a substantial organic traffic drop. To know more about the types of penalties and alerts Google Search Console provides, you can read an article on this topic or check the official documentation.

Red Flag #2: Downloading A Premium Theme Or Plugin For Free

This is a very underhanded technique to obtain links. Some individuals will pay for a premium theme or plugin or software and offer it for free on torrent websites or forums where free or hacked versions of premium products are made available. When someone downloads the theme and uses it on a website, the doctored version of theme is used to place links in the website. Oftentimes, the owners never notice that their website is hosting parasite links.

Red Flag #3: You Start Getting Strange Feedback About Your Website Or See Strange Content Appear

If your readers, customers, visitors or even Google Search Console start telling you about strange content or links showing up on your website, this means that it’s time for an SEO audit and a security audit to assess the damage done to your website. Something tells me that Schneiters Gold did not plan on ever offering the BEST Online Viagra OFFERS…




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Red Flag #4: You Get A Google Search Console Warning

If you get an email from the Google Search Console team telling you about some spam issues or other problems that cause you to break their guidelines, you should investigate immediately the source of the problem and fix the issue fast or you could risk a penalty.

Red Flag #5: The Link Looks Like It Could Be A Hidden Affiliate Link Or A Redirect

Always check the links before placing them. Click the links and see where they lead. You could be provided a link that looks like a high-quality content but instead, it points to a spammy page.

Make sure to ask if a link is an affiliate link. Affiliate links are links that contain information that helps track a sale back to the person who promoted the product. These affiliate partners get a cut each sale that is attributed to them. Companies like Amazon and Forever21 among others have affiliate programs. You do not want someone promoting a product purely for money and you do not want to lose the trust of search engines and human visitors.

Advice For Linkbuilders, Growth Hackers And Anyone Looking to Gain More Visibility In Search Engines

Vet a website before getting in touch

Go ahead, click on the link and check out the website before you do anything else. Otherwise, you will end up contacting your competitors, unrelated blogs, spammy websites, etc.

Read the advertising page

Most websites have a page, it can be the contact, advertise or about page, that lists the specs and guidelines to collaborate with the websites. Respect what’s written on there! Do not bother folks that clearly said they do not want to be contacted for links. No, you are not the one that will make them change their minds. Yes, we’re sure.

Avoid metric blindness

My very good friend Igor, proud owner of Igor.io, gets contacted all the time by linkbuilding companies. Why? Because their website was once upon a time (before they removed their incredible archive of technical articles) had incredible metrics. For reference, Igor has a fully responsive, accessible website and it looks like this:


igor.io


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But Igor’s weblog’s metrics look like this (and they looked even more enticing to SEOs the last time I checked):




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This meant that a lot of companies wanted to contact the owner of a website that had more than 1000 high-quality websites referring to it. But if they had bothered to check out Igor’s website, they would have seen that nothing was on there. Back in the days, this website just read: igor’s weblog and the archive was hidden in the code. You had to know where to look for it… or you would find it very easily if you happened to be a bot. That’s why the metrics were the so high: only a bot and those in the know would discover and share Igor’s content.

Know who you are talking to

I get emails telling me to ask my boss if the company can place a link on my website. Now, quick reminder, if you go on myriamjessier.com and contact me, the person with an email that contains the words myriam + jessier, chances are that you are talking to the owner herself, right? Which leads me to another point: write my name correctly please and do not address me as sir, or dear, or dear sir. This is a common issue that Stéphanie Walter has as half of the Internet doesn’t seem to know how to spell her name.




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Not knowing or ignoring legal guidelines and Google’s guidelines

If you do not disclose why you are asking for a link and that there could be a risk to a website selling you a link, then you are not being transparent.

Bonus Tip

Don’t reach out to experts who do what you do for a living. I receive linkbuilding offers (buying and selling) from other search engine optimization “specialists” all the time. If you found me on the web and are offering to sell me links because my website isn’t visible enough, then maybe, just maybe, my SEO efforts are working no?

Conclusion

We hope that you learned a few things about linkbuilding. Here is a quick recap:

  • There’s money in the banana stand and in linkbuilding.
  • Not all links are equal, key metrics are : authority, freshness, placement, relevancy.
  • People will go to extremes to get links so if a “great deal” is offered to you, look for the hidden link in there!
  • Secure your website to avoid SEO problems. If you make it hard work for hackers, they will often give up and move on to an easier prey.
  • If you want to help someone out, make sure you give them a link with a good anchor! It really helps!
Smashing Editorial
(ra, yk, il)


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Linkbuilding: The Citizen’s Field Guide

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Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Ideas

tripwire marketing

You’re unhappy with your conversion rate. People just aren’t buying what you’re selling. The solution might lie in tripwire marketing. The term tripwire marketing might sound a little shady, like you’re trying to get one over on your customer. That’s not the case at all. Marketing and advertising experts have been using tripwire marketing for decades in one form or another, and it works just as well online as it does in brick-and-mortar stores. In fact, it’s even more effective because you can more easily stay in touch with the customer. What is tripwire marketing? And how does it work?…

The post Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Ideas appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Ideas

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Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Tripwire Ideas

tripwire marketing

You’re unhappy with your conversion rate. People just aren’t buying what you’re selling. The solution might lie in tripwire marketing. The term tripwire marketing might sound a little shady, like you’re trying to get one over on your customer. That’s not the case at all. Marketing and advertising experts have been using tripwire marketing for decades in one form or another, and it works just as well online as it does in brick-and-mortar sales. In fact, it’s even more effective because you can more easily stay in touch with the customer. What is tripwire marketing? And how does it work?…

The post Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Tripwire Ideas appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Tripwire Ideas

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9 Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Email Conversions

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My email list is one of my most valuable assets. I have tons of email subscribers even though I regularly scrub my list, and I’ve converted many subscribers to paying clients. I started in the same place as everyone else, though: zero email subscribers. Whether your list includes 10 subscribers, 100 subscribers, or 1 million subscribers, you probably want more. That’s the nature of marketing. So, how can you increase conversions to build your email list further? That’s the question I’m going to answer today. I’ll cover several topics, so here’s a list in case you want to skip around:…

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9 Tips to Get More Email Subscribers by Increasing Email Conversions

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The Definitive Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates

improve user experience

I’ve written a lot about user experience over the years: how to improve user experience, when to implement it, and how to test for it. There’s a reason I cover it so widely, though. It touches every aspect of your business, from SEO to customer service. If you owned a brick-and-mortar store, you would worry about things like end cap displays, signage, aisle navigation, and sales support. Those things matter online, too, except they’re more difficult to observe and track without specialized tools. You can’t enter your customers’ homes and look over their shoulders while they check out your social…

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The Definitive Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates

The 16 Website Design Best Practices For Conversions in 2018

website design best practices

First impressions matter more than you might think. When a visitor accesses your website for the first time, regardless of the page, he or she makes a split-second judgment about the design. In fact, three-quarters of consumers say they base their impression of a company’s credibility on its web design. Furthermore, 94 percent of first impressions are based exclusively on design. Before your visitor reads a single word of copy, he or she already has an impression of your company. That’s why it’s essential to follow website design best practices that directly impact conversions. You don’t just want your website…

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The 16 Website Design Best Practices For Conversions in 2018