Tag Archives: windows

Designing For A Browserless Web

What happens when we take the web browser out of web browsing? Google’s new “Add to Homescreen” feature delivers fast, focused web experiences that are indistinguishable from those of a native app. What can designers learn from the successes of early adopters such as Twitter, and how can we leverage app-like design patterns to tackle this brand new set of user experience challenges?
The “Add to Homescreen” installation process, as shown on Google Chrome Developer’s mobile website (Image source) (Large preview) We’ve seen debates on the topic of native versus web experiences.

Visit site – 

Designing For A Browserless Web

Django Developer

We’re looking for developers to join us in our office in central Bristol, developing websites, tools and apps for huge audiences. Our clients include Google, YouTube and Tate. We are proud to be a part of the AKQA network.
This role will see you working as part of a friendly, expert team. The workload will sometimes be hectic, but the atmosphere is cheerful and proactive. We want to put you in a position to write and deploy the best code that you can.

Original source: 

Django Developer

Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

Earlier this year, support for CSS grid layout landed in most major desktop browsers. Naturally, the specification is one of the hot topics at meet-ups and conferences. After having some conversations about grid and progressive enhancement, I believe that there’s a good amount of uncertainty about using it. I heard some quite interesting questions and statements, which I want to address in this post.

Progressively enhanced CSS Layout, with Flexbox and CSS Grid.

“When can I start using CSS grid layout?” “Too bad that it’ll take some more years before we can use grid in production.” “Do I need Modernizr in order to make websites with CSS grid layout?” “If I wanted to use grid today, I’d have to build two to three versions of my website.” The CSS grid layout module is one of the most exciting developments since responsive design. We should try to get the best out of it as soon as possible, if it makes sense for us and our projects.

The post Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Original article:

Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

How To Write Content Without…Well…Having To Write It

how to write content without writing it

Early morning, dew still fresh on the grass, sunrise beautifully lighting a home office, aromatic steam rising from hot coffee, fog melting away from the world outside. And — unfortunately — the first flashes of carpal tunnel pain go pulsing through your wrist. Indeed, the consequences of a repeated routine can manifest themselves in painful ways. Furthermore, doing something in only one way limits personal growth. My suggestion? Maybe it’s time to stop exclusively typing all your content and start dictating some of it. Dictation is a vastly underused feature across all PC and smartphone platforms. Lawyers have been known…

The post How To Write Content Without…Well…Having To Write It appeared first on The Daily Egg.

View original article:  

How To Write Content Without…Well…Having To Write It

Web Development Reading List #179: Firefox 53, The Top Web Browsers, And Vue.js Authentication

Bots and Artificial Intelligence are probably the most hyped concepts right now. And while some people praise the existing technologies, others claim they don’t fear AI at all, citing examples where it fails horribly. Examples of Facebook or Amazon advertising (both claim to use machine learning) that don’t match our interests at all are quite common today.
But what happens if we look at autonomous cars, trains or planes that have the very same machine learning technologies in place?

See the article here: 

Web Development Reading List #179: Firefox 53, The Top Web Browsers, And Vue.js Authentication

Web Development Reading List #178: On CAA, Pong.js, And Meaningful Work

Looking at recent discussions, I feel that more and more people are starting to think about ethically and morally correct work. Many of us keep asking themselves if their work is meaningful or if it matters at all. But in a well-functioning society, we need a variety of things to live a good life. The people writing novels that delight us are just as important as those who fight for our civil rights.

Excerpt from:

Web Development Reading List #178: On CAA, Pong.js, And Meaningful Work

Figma Vs Sketch: The Showdown

The past year has seen quite a rise in UI design tools. While existing applications, such as Affinity Designer, and Sketch, have improved drastically, some new players have entered the field, such as Adobe XD and Figma.
For me, the latter is the most remarkable. Due to its similarity to Sketch, Figma was easy for me to grasp right from the start, but it also has some unique features to differentiate it from its competitor, such as easy file-sharing, vector networks, “constraints” (for responsive design) and real-time collaboration.

Link:  

Figma Vs Sketch: The Showdown

Conversational Design Essentials: Tips For Building A Chatbot

Human interactions are incredibly fascinating if you take a close look at them — the social awkwardness, the communication styles, the way knowledge is transferred, the way stories are told and trust is built. But what happens when a machine evokes the same response?

Conversational Design Essentials: Tips For Building A Chatbot

Conversational interfaces have become the new hotness in UX design. Google is about to release a new virtual assistant chatbot; Facebook has already launched the updated Messenger platform with chatbots; and Microsoft went as far as to claim that the operating system of the future isn’t Windows, but “conversation as a platform.”

The post Conversational Design Essentials: Tips For Building A Chatbot appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Source: 

Conversational Design Essentials: Tips For Building A Chatbot

App Development Showdown: Why You Should Care About Revisiting The Native Vs. Hybrid Debate In 2017

Back in 2007, the world met the iPhone for the very first time. After Apple’s product debut, it took less than six months for work to begin on PhoneGap, which would become one of the first and most adopted frameworks for hybrid mobile app development — that is, for apps written simultaneously for multiple platforms using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, rather than coded in native languages.
When compared with the prospect of learning an entirely new language and development environment in order to program iOS (and soon Android) apps, the appeal of this type of development to the already huge population of web developers in the world was palpable.

See the original post:  

App Development Showdown: Why You Should Care About Revisiting The Native Vs. Hybrid Debate In 2017

Why Traffic Shaping is So Dang Fantastic for Conversion Rates

Do you remember the Windows game Pipe Dream? In it, the player creates a continuous “goo” path using randomly assigned pieces of pipe.

pipe-dream-traffic-shaping

Fail to build a path in time and the goo oozes everywhere… Game over.

For a marketer, the pipe pieces are your web pages. And the goo? Your visitors. Fail to provide your visitors with a logical next step and it’s game over.

A logical next step could mean many things, like a sale or a signup. Or maybe it’s simply to keep your prospects on your website by strategically presenting them with opportunities to learn more about what you have to offer.

Like pipe building, traffic shaping is all about creating incentivized pathways that convince users to go where you want them to go. It’s effective for:

  • getting visitors from low-converting to high-converting pages.
  • showing visitors relevant offers based on what they’re currently browsing.
  • recommending further reading thereby keeping visitors on site.

But first, why is this tactic even necessary?

Take a look at your analytics. You’ll probably find your highest-traffic pages aren’t necessarily your highest-converting pages. In many cases, that’s okay; the purpose of a blog post is different from a pricing page. But that’s not to say you should ignore your organic visitors. Instead, you should provide them with clear paths to the “next step.” And that’s when traffic shaping comes in.

Using overlays as a traffic-shaping tool

So how can marketers engage users on high-converting pathways that produce better results? How can we move users through the pipes and follow our desired path?

One great way of doing this is by using a traffic shaping overlay.

Psst: Unbounce recently launched our own suite of overlays called Convertables. Install one in seconds on any of your web pages, and set it to trigger on exit, on arrival, on scroll or after delay.

Traffic shaping overlays are designed to either move visitors from low-converting pages to high-converting pages or to re-engage them with additional content. They never have a form, and they’re best triggered either on exit or after delay.

Here’s a diagram of how traffic shaping with overlays works:

traffic-shaping
Not unlike Pipe Dream, amirite?

As you can see, traffic shaping overlays offer a unique way to better align your needs with the needs of your visitors: you want to move them farther down your sales funnel and they want the incentive to do so.

Here are a few use cases with real-life examples to get you thinking ‘bout how you can use traffic shaping overlays in your own overlay strategy:

Use case #1: Cross-Sell

Blog visitors are prime candidates for traffic shaping overlays because they’ve already spent time absorbing your content and familiarizing themselves with your brand. They likely recognize your brand — heck, they may even be regular readers — but they may overlook your on-site calls to action.

A cross-sell overlay can help focus a user’s attention on a relevant offer.

Here’s an example…

cta-conf-traffic-shaping-overlay

This overlay (yes, it’s ours) was installed on a high-traffic post about the best digital marketing conferences to attend in 2016.

Figuring that people who read about conferences also go to conferences, we saw an opportunity to cross-sell tickets to our own conference at a greatly reduced price.

Use case #2: Re-engage with more content

Keeping visitors on your blog or resource library has a lot of advantages. The more they stick around, the more opportunities you have to:

  • Show visitors that you understand their pain and are uniquely qualified to help alleviate it
  • Educate visitors about your solution (ideally the solution to their burning marketing pain)

A strategically placed exit overlay on your blog can help keep visitors on site by recommending content similar to what they were reading previously:

content-re-engage-traffic-shaping-overlay

This type of overlay is most effective when targeted at first-time visitors. These are the prospects that need a lil’ warming up before you ask them for their email address.

But back to Pipe Dream…

When you think of traffic shaping like playing Pipe Dream, you realize that building a logical path is just as important for you as it is the user. You don’t want to lose your visitors any more than your visitors want to be stopped in their tracks.

By implementing traffic shaping overlays on your web pages, you can better align your needs with the needs of your visitors. And that, my friends, is how everyone wins.

Find out how you can use overlays for traffic shaping, lead gen, sales and more!

Download Unbounce’s newest ebook, 12 Proven Ways to Convert with Overlays
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Jump to original – 

Why Traffic Shaping is So Dang Fantastic for Conversion Rates