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Don’t Use The Placeholder Attribute




Don’t Use The Placeholder Attribute

Eric Bailey



Introduced as part of the HTML5 specification, the placeholder attribute “represents a short hint (a word or short phrase) intended to aid the user with data entry when the control has no value. A hint could be a sample value or a brief description of the expected format.”

This seemingly straightforward attribute contains a surprising amount of issues that prevent it from delivering on what it promises. Hopefully, I can convince you to stop using it.

Technically Correct

Inputs are the gates through which nearly all e-commerce has to pass. Regardless of your feelings on the place of empathy in design, unusable inputs leave money on the table.

The presence of a placeholder attribute won’t be flagged by automated accessibility checking software. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s usable. Ultimately, accessibility is about people, not standards, so it is important to think about your interface in terms beyond running through a checklist.

Call it remediation, inclusive design, universal access, whatever. The spirit of all these philosophies boils down to making things that people—all people—can use. Viewed through this lens, placeholder simply doesn’t hold up.

The Problems

Translation

Browsers with auto-translation features such as Chrome skip over attributes when a request to translate the current page is initiated. For many attributes, this is desired behavior, as an updated value may break underlying page logic or structure.

One of the attributes skipped over by browsers is placeholder. Because of this, placeholder content won’t be translated and will remain as the originally authored language.

If a person is requesting a page to be translated, the expectation is that all visible page content will be updated. Placeholders are frequently used to provide important input formatting instructions or are used in place of a more appropriate label element (more on that in a bit). If this content is not updated along with the rest of the translated page, there is a high possibility that a person unfamiliar with the language will not be able to successfully understand and operate the input.

This should be reason enough to not use the attribute.

While we’re on the subject of translation, it’s also worth pointing out that location isn’t the same as language preference. Many people set their devices to use a language that isn’t the official language of the country reported by their browser’s IP address (to say nothing of VPNs), and we should respect that. Make sure to keep your content semantically described—your neighbors will thank you!

Interoperability

Interoperability is the practice of making different systems exchange and understand information. It is a foundational part of both the Internet and assistive technology.

Semantically describing your content makes it interoperable. An interoperable input is created by programmatically associating a label element with it. Labels describe the purpose of an input field, providing the person filling out the form with a prompt that they can take action on. One way to associate a label with an input, is to use the for attribute with a value that matches the input’s id.

Without this for/id pairing, assistive technology will be unable to determine what the input is for. The programmatic association provides an API hook that software such as screen readers or voice recognition can utilize. Without it, people who rely on this specialized software will not be able to read or operate inputs.


A diagram demonstrating how code gets converted into a rendered input, and how the code’s computed properties get read by assistive technology. The code is a text input with a label that reads Your Name. The listed computed properties are the accessible name, which is Your Name, and a role of textbox.


How semantic markup is used for both visual presentation and accessible content. (Large preview)

The reason I am mentioning this is that placeholder is oftentimes used in place of a label element. Although I’m personally baffled by the practice, it seems to have gained traction in the design community. My best guess for its popularity is the geometrically precise grid effect it creates when placed next to other label-less input fields acts like designer catnip.


Facebook’s signup form. A heading reads, “Sign Up. It’s free and always will be.” Placeholders are being used as labels, asking for your first name, last name, mobile number or email, and to create a new password for your account Screenshot.


An example of input grid fetishization from a certain infamous blue website. (Large preview)

The floating label effect, a close cousin to this phenomenon, oftentimes utilizes the placeholder attribute in place of a label, as well.

A neat thing worth pointing out is that if a label is programmatically associated with an input, clicking or tapping on the label text will place focus on the input. This little trick provides an extra area for interacting with the input, which can be beneficial to people with motor control issues. Placeholders acting as labels, as well as floating labels, cannot do that.

Cognition

The 2016 United States Census lists nearly 15 million people who report having cognitive difficulty — and that’s only counting individuals who choose to self-report. Extrapolating from this, we can assume that cognitive accessibility concerns affect a significant amount of the world’s population.

Self-reporting is worth calling out, in that a person may not know, or feel comfortable sharing that they have a cognitive accessibility condition. Unfortunately, there are still a lot of stigmas attached to disclosing this kind of information, as it oftentimes affects things like job and housing prospects.

Cognition can be inhibited situationally, meaning it can very well happen to you. It can be affected by things like multitasking, sleep deprivation, stress, substance abuse, and depression. I might be a bit jaded here, but that sounds a lot like conditions you’ll find at most office jobs.

Recall

The umbrella of cognitive concerns covers conditions such as short-term memory loss, traumatic brain injury, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. They can all affect a person’s ability to recall information.

When a person enters information into an input, its placeholder content will disappear. The only way to restore it is to remove the information entered. This creates an experience where guiding language is removed as soon as the person attempting to fill out the input interacts with it. Not great!

An input called “Your Birthdate” being filled out. The placeholder reads, “MM/DD/YYY” and the animation depicts the person filling it out getting to the year portion and having to delete the text to be able to go back and review what the proper formatting is.
Did they want MM/DD/YY, or MM/DD/YYYY? (Large preview)

When your ability to recall information is inhibited, it makes following these disappearing rules annoying. For inputs with complicated requirements to satisfy—say creating a new password—it transcends annoyance and becomes a difficult barrier to overcome.

An input called “Create a Password” being filled out. The placeholder reads, “8-15 characters, including at least 3 numbers and 1 symbol.” and the animation depicts the person filling it out having to delete the text to be able to go back and review what the password requirements are.
Wait—what’s the minimum length? How many numbers do they want again? (Large preview)

While more technologically-sophisticated people may have learned clever tricks such as cutting entered information, reviewing the placeholder content to refresh their memory, then re-pasting it back in to edit, people who are less technologically literate may not understand why the help content is disappearing or how to bring it back.

Digital Literacy

Considering that more and more of the world’s population is coming online, the onus falls on us as responsible designers and developers to make these people feel welcomed. Your little corner of the Internet (or intranet!) could very well be one of their first experiences online — assuming that the end user “will just know” is simple arrogance.

For US-based readers, a gentle reminder that new may not mean foreign. Access is on the rise for older Americans. While digital literacy will become more commonplace among older populations as time marches on, accessibility issues will as well.

For someone who has never encountered it before, placeholder text may look like entered content, causing them to skip over the input. If it’s a required field, form submission will create a frustrating experience where they may not understand what the error is, or how to fix it. If it’s not a required field, your form still runs the unnecessary risk of failing to collect potentially valuable secondary information.

Utility

Placeholder help content is limited to just a string of static text, and that may not always be sufficient to communicate the message. It may need to have additional styling applied to it, or contain descriptive markup, attributes, images, and iconography.

This is especially handy in mature design systems. The additional styling options created by moving the string of text out of the input element means it can take advantage of the system’s design tokens, and all the benefits that come with using them.

Placeholder text’s length is also limited to the width of the input it is contained in. In our responsive, mobile-first world, there stands a very good chance that important information could be truncated:


An input called Your YAMA Code, with a truncated placeholder that reads, You can find this code on the ba-


I guess I’ll never know where that code is. (Large preview)

Vision

Color Contrast

The major browsers’ default styles for placeholder content use a light gray color to visually communicate that it is a suggestion. Many custom input designs follow this convention by taking the color of input content and lightening it.

Unfortunately, this technique is likely to run afoul of color contrast issues. Color contrast is a ratio determined by comparing the luminosity of the text and background color values; in this case, it’s the color of the placeholder text over the input’s background.

See the Pen Default browser placeholder contrast ratios by Eric Bailey (@ericwbailey) on CodePen.

If the placeholder content has a contrast ratio that is too low to be perceived, it means that information critical to filling out a form successfully may not be able to be seen by people experiencing low vision conditions. For most common input font sizing, the ratio is 4.5:1.

Like all accessibility concerns, low vision conditions can be permanent or temporary, biological or environmental, or a combination. Biological disabilities include conditions like farsightedness, color blindness, dilated pupils, and cataracts. Environmental conditions include circumstances such as the glare of the mid-day sun, a battery-saving low brightness setting, privacy screens, grease and makeup left on your screen by your last phone call, and so on.

This ratio isn’t some personal aesthetic preference that I’m trying to force onto others arbitrarily. It’s part of a set of painstakingly-developed rules that help ensure that the largest possible swath of people can operate digital technology, regardless of their ability or circumstance. Consciously ignoring these rules is to be complicit in practicing exclusion.

And here’s the rub: In trying to make placeholder attributes inclusive, the updated higher contrast placeholder content color may become dark enough to be interpreted as entered input, even by more digitally literate people. This swings the issue back into cognitive concerns land.


The email address field on GoFundMe’s password reset page has a placeholder that reads email@address.com and is set to a dark black color that makes it look like entered input. Screenshot.


The placeholder text color on GoFundMe’s password reset page makes it appear like entered input. Additionally, the checkmark icon on the Request New Password button makes it seem like the request has already been processed. (Large preview)

High Contrast Mode

The Windows operating system contains a feature called High Contrast Mode. When activated, it assigns new colors to interface elements from a special high contrast palette that uses a limited number of color options. Here’s an example of what it may look like:


An input field with a label that reads “Donation amount” and a placeholder that reads “$25.00.” The screenshot is taken with Windows High Contrast mode active, so the placeholder element looks like entered text content. Screenshot.


Windows 10 set to use the High Contrast Mode 1 theme running Internet Explorer 11. (Large preview)

In High Contrast Mode, placeholder content is assigned one of those high contrast colors, making it look like pre-filled information. As discussed earlier, this could prevent people from understanding that the input may need information entered into it.

You may be wondering if it’s possible to update the styling in High Contrast Mode to make a placeholder more understandable. While it is possible to target High Contrast Mode in a media query, I implore you not to do so. Front-end developer Hugo Giraudel said it best:

“High contrast mode is not about design anymore but strict usability. You should aim for highest readability, not color aesthetics.”

The people that rely on High Contrast Mode use it because of how predictable it is. Unduly altering how it presents content may interfere with the only way they can reliably use a computer. In the case of lightening the color of placeholder content to make it appear like its non-High Contrast Mode treatment, you run a very real risk of making it impossible for them to perceive.

A Solution

To recap, the placeholder attribute:

  • Can’t be automatically translated;
  • Is oftentimes used in place of a label, locking out assistive technology;
  • Can hide important information when content is entered;
  • Can be too light-colored to be legible;
  • Has limited styling options;
  • May look like pre-filled information and be skipped over.

Eesh. That’s not great. So what can we do about it?

Design

Move the placeholder content above the input, but below the label:


An input with a label that reads, Your employee ID number, and help content below the label that reads, Can be found on your employee intranet profile. Example: a1234567-89. The example ID has been styled using a monospaced font.


Large preview

This approach:

  • Communicates a visual and structural hierarchy:
    • What this input is for,
    • Things you need to know to use the input successfully, and
    • the input itself.
  • Can be translated.
  • Won’t look like pre-filled information.
  • Can be seen in low vision circumstances.
  • Won’t disappear when content is entered into the input.
  • Can include semantic markup and be styled via CSS.

Additionally, the help content will be kept in view when the input is activated on a device with a software keyboard. If placed below the input, the content may be obscured when an on-screen keyboard appears at the bottom of the device viewport:


iOS’ on-screen keyboard is obscuring information about password requirements on a “Set a password” input. Screenshot.


Content hidden by an on-screen keyboard. 3rd party keyboards with larger heights may have a greater risk of blocking important content. (Large preview)

Development

Here’s how to translate our designed example to code:

<div class="input-wrapper">
  <label for="employee-id">
    Your employee ID number
  </label>
  <p
    id="employee-id-hint"
    class="input-hint">
    Can be found on your employee intranet profile. Example: <samp>a1234567-89</samp>.
  </p>
  <input
    id="employee-id"
    aria-describedby="employee-id-hint"
    name="id-number"
    type="text" />
</div>

This isn’t too much of a departure from a traditional accessible for/id attribute pairing: The label element is programmatically associated with the input via its id declaration of “employee-id”. The p element placed between the label and input elements acts as a replacement for a placeholder attribute.

“So,” you may be wondering. “Why don’t we just put all that placeholder replacement content in the label element? It seems like it’d be a lot less work!” The answer is that developer convenience shouldn’t take priority over user experience.

By using aria-describedby to programmatically associate the input with the p element, we are creating a priority of information for screen readers that has parity with what a person browsing without a screen reader would experience. aria-describedby ensures that the p content will be described last, after the label’s content and the kind of input it is associated with.

In other words, it’s what content the input is asking for, what type of input it is, then additional help if you need it — exactly what someone would experience if they look at form input.

User experience encompasses all users, including those who navigate with the aid of screen readers. The help content is self-contained and easy to navigate to and from, should the person using a screen reader need to re-reference it. As it is a self-contained node, it can also be silenced (typically with the Control key) without risking muting other important information.

Including the help content as part of the label makes it unnecessarily verbose. labels should be meaningful, but also concise. Adding too much information to a label may have the opposite of the desired effect, making it too long to recall or simply too frustrating to listen to all the way through. In fact, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines has rules that specifically address this: Success Criteria 2.4.6 and 3.3.2.

Example

Here is the solution implemented in live code:

See the Pen Don’t use the placeholder attribute by Eric Bailey (@ericwbailey) on CodePen.

And here’s a video demonstrating how popular screen readers handle it:

A Better Solution

“The less an interface requires of its users, the more accessible it is.”

Alice Boxhall

A final thought: Do you even need that additional placeholder information?

Good front-end solutions take advantage of special input attributes and accommodating validation practices to prevent offloading the extra work onto the person who simply just wants to use your site or app with as little complication as possible.

Good copywriting creates labels that clearly and succinctly describe the input’s purpose. Do a good enough job here and the label cuts through the ambiguity, especially if you test it beforehand.

Good user experience is all about creating intelligent flows that preempt people’s needs, wants, and desires by capitalizing on existing information to remove as many unnecessary questions as possible.

Accommodating the people who use your website or web app means taking a critical eye at what you take for granted when you browse the Internet. By not making assumptions about other people’s circumstances — including the technology they use — you can do your part to help prevent exclusion.

Take some time to review your design and code and see what doesn’t stand up to scrutiny — checking to see if you use the placeholder attribute might be a good place to start.

Standing on the shoulders of giants. Thanks to Roger Johansson, Adam Silver, Scott O’Hara, and Katie Sherwin for their writing on the subject.

Smashing Editorial
(rb, ra, yk, il)


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Don’t Use The Placeholder Attribute

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How To Speed Up The Wireframing Process With Photoshop And Adobe XD




How To Speed Up The Wireframing Process With Photoshop And Adobe XD

Manuela Langella



Before starting any design project, there is one word that is sure follow you from the very beginning: wireframing. Today, we will learn how to create a wireframe in Adobe XD and how to implement some graphics from Photoshop just by using libraries.

But first, what exactly is a wireframe?

A wireframe is a visual representation of your project’s structure. It defines the bones, the elements that will work in your layout, and the placement of the content for your prototype.

The great thing about wireframing is that it’s a combination of simple elements that make you concentrate on your project’s functionality. In this stage, you can draw without thinking too much about the style and design.

You just have to figure out what your project targets are and how to develop them through wireframing by using simple elements. As you move further through wireframing, you develop the best solutions as team component make comments and suggestions about your sketch.

The first step is to create a project and name it “sections”, then make a list of “elements” you need to complete the different steps, up to the creation of the final “architecture.”

Creating a wireframe “by hand” first makes a lot of sense. It helps you develop the entire idea on paper (without digital limits), and also lets your concepts flow easily. For those of you who work in a team, working with paper doesn’t seem the best approach if you want to share your notions with everyone involved in the project — especially if you work with your team online.

In this tutorial, we will cover the following steps:

  1. Create a wireframe, select, and insert PS assets through libraries;
  2. Update PS files and see the results in Adobe XD.

We will create a set of objects to use in our wireframe. We will put them aside in our assets as we had an extra panel from where we can take our tools.

Once you’ve done with it, you can save it and re-use for future projects, by using the same elements again and adding some more objects as well.

You will need these Photoshop elements I prepared to use in our wireframe.

Here’s what we will create:


wireframe


Wireframe (Large preview


complete layout


Complete layout (Large preview

1 . Create A Wireframe And Select And Insert PS Assets Through Libraries

The best place to begin developing a wireframe from scratch is to draw it by hand first.

In this project, I want to create a landing page for an online course site. I know I need to communicate essential information in it. It doesn’t have to be perfect the first time out, but in the end, its effectiveness is very much dependent on how I organized the wireframe and how closely it aligns with the initial purpose.

First Step: Here are my own hand-drawn wireframes.


wireframe


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wireframe


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As you can see, there is not much information on them. The first intention is just to show how the layout will be composed and which elements are to be considered. Clean and simple.

Second Step: Re-submit the wireframe in a smaller size and with some margin notes which I use to explain the elements and their use:


explaining elements on wireframe


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Third Step: Let’s begin to create our digital wireframe with Adobe XD.

Open Adobe XD and choose “Web 1920” from the open window.


chose web 1920 in adobe xd


Large preview

Save your project as “Wireframe” by selecting FileSave as.

Once your file is saved, create another artboard for iPhone 67 Plus as well.

Click on the A (Artboard) button on the left side, and choose “iPhone 6/7/8” in the right sidebar.


creating artboard for iPhone formats


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creating artboard for iPhone formats


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And here are our two artboards: one for desktop and one for mobile.


creating two artboards, one for desktop and one for mobile


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Now we can begin to create our wireframe objects. Following our hand-drawn sketches, we will now create the same objects in XD.

Hero Image
Select the Rectangle Tool (R) and draw a shape where your hero image should be. Then grab the Line Tool (L) and draw two lines joining the vertices. This kind of shape represents our image placeholder.

Group the shape and lines and call the group “Hero”:


grouping shapes and lines


Large preview

Now let’s continue with the “Icons” section. I put some text before my icons, and I’m going to represent that visually with some lines. Grab the Line Tool (L) again and draw a single horizontal line. Click on Repeat Grid Tool ( + R on Mac or CTRL + R on Windows), and drag your line until you have three of them.

creatings icons

We need three symbols for our icons, so click on Ellipse Tool /E) and draw a circle. Click again on Repeat Grid Tool ( + R on Mac or CTRL + R on Windows) and create three circles. Then select the space between the circles and drag to make it wider.

creating circles

Feature Section
Create a light grey background (#F8F8F8) by using the Rectangle Tool (R). Repeat the steps from the previous Hero Image section above to create an image placeholder, then repeat the steps from the Icons Section (also above) to create a line for text. Finally, create a simple button with the help of the Rectangle Tool (R) tool.

This is the final result:


Final result


Large preview

For the Testimonial Section, repeat the same steps as before in order to create an image placeholder and some text lines. As you can see from the complete wireframe image, there’s a quotation-mark symbol that we have to insert.

We’re going to do it using Photoshop.

Open the Photoshop file I provided by clicking on this link.

I want to insert this image as a symbol by using Libraries CC.

In Photoshop, be sure to see Libraries panel by going on WindowLibraries. Create a new library by clicking on the little icon top right (see image):


creating a new library


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I named my library “Wireframe”. Feel free to give your library the name you desire.

Now click and drag on the symbol you want to have in your library:

clicking and dragging symbols in library

Switch back to XD, and go to FileOpen CC Libraries and you will see the last symbol you just uploaded through Photoshop and the library you created.


symbols created in photoshop and moved to adobe xd


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Drag the quotation symbol into your wireframe in XD and position it wherever you need it to be.

positioning symbols into your wireframe

For the “Prices, Subscribe and Footer” sections, we will represent them by using additional boxes and lines like the ones you see in the image below.

Note: You can find the email icon in the Photoshop file which I’ve provided here.)

Follow the steps described in the Feature section to insert the symbol in the library through Photoshop, open it in XD, and drag it into your wireframe artboard.

This is the result:


result


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One last thing we need to do before going ahead is to order our layers. Be sure your layers are activated by clicking on the Layer Icon ( + Y for Mac or CTRL + Y for Windows).


ordering layers in adobe xd


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Group all of the section elements into folders (I assigned them the same name of the section they represent). This way, you will have all of your elements placed in order and won’t have any difficulty in finding them quickly (see image).


grouping section elements into folders


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grouping section elements into folders


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We are now done with our wireframe!

In the next step, we will build our design by using our wireframe and discovering how to modify Libraries’ elements instantly.

2. Adding A Layer Of Fidelity To Your Wireframe

We have just finished our wireframe and, at this point, we can double-check it to see if we have missed something. Once we are sure that we have all of the necessary information included in the wireframe, we can then share it with the project’s team.

We are ready to move on and update our wireframe to make it “live” with images, color, and placeholder copy.

Go ahead and create your design. Duplicate your wireframe by saving it with another name (e.g. “Wireframe-Layout”).

First, we’ll need an image for our Hero section (I went ahead and used this one by Priscilla Du Preez from Unsplash. .)

Open the image in Photoshop, and reduce the image size by clicking on ImageImage size and set the width at 3000px:


reducing image size


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Save your image and then drag it into your Libraries.

In XD, drag the image from Libraries to your Artboard. Let it fit with the shape we just created as the image placeholder.


dragging the image from Libraries to your Artboard


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I’m going to add a logo and some text to this image; I need the image to be a little darker so that the information is easy to read. Go back into Photoshop Libraries and double click on the image in the panel. Once the image is open, go on the Layer panel, select the image layer and click on Add a layer style at the bottom of the panel. Set a Color Overlay with the settings as shown below:


adding a logo and some text to the image


Large preview

Save it, and it will be automatically be saved in all of your libraries. Switch back to XD and you will see the image in your artboard updated (no need to drag it back from the library again).

Note: Depending on the image size, it could take a little more time for the libraries to update themselves.


updating images in libraries


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Now let’s insert our logo. Open the Photoshop file and drag the “Learn!” logo into the Libraries. This is the font I used.


inserting the logo in photoshop


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Since our background is dark, we will need a white logo. Switch back to Photoshop and double click on the logo from Libraries.

Grab the Type Tool, highlight the logo text, and make it white. Save it, and it will automatically be saved in your XD artboard as well.


creating a while logo on a dark background


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creating a while logo on a dark background


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Insert some text and a button to complete the Hero section.


inserting some text and a button to complete the Hero section


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Next, I’m going fill out the next section by adding text and icons. The ones I used are from a free pack I created for Smashing Magazine that you can find here.

As previously done, open up the icons and add them to your libraries in Photoshop, then switch back to XD to place them in your wireframe. Here is the result:


adding text and icons, result


Large preview

Now we’ll move on to the Feature section. As before, we’ll drag an image onto the image placeholder (I used this image by Sonnie Hiles found on Unsplash). Add in some text and a button as I have shown you in the previous steps above.


feature section


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Open the Photoshop file I provided and add the check symbol into your Libraries. Open Libraries in XD and put the icon near the text. Use the Repeat Grid to make three copies of it:

making copies of an icon and playing them next to the text

Now let’s change the color of the check symbol. Go back to Photoshop, open it from the Libraries and give it a Color Overlay as shown below:


changing the color of the check symbol


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Save it, and see your icons in XD directly updated.


changing the color of the check symbol


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Now let’s finish our layout.

For the Testimonial section, add in text and an image for the testimonial (I took mine from UI Faces).


adding in text and an image for the testimonial


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Finally, we’ll add information for the Price section, the Subscribe section, and the footer. You can find Price tables in the Photoshop file I provided. Drag them into your Libraries in Photoshop, then open Libraries in XD and drag them into your artboard. Feel free to modify them as you want.

And… we’re done!

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we have learned how to work with Photoshop and Adobe XD to create a wireframe, and then how to quickly add fidelity to it by modifying Libraries elements. For your reference, I’ve created a mobile wireframe which you can use to practice and follow along to this tutorial. Follow the steps as we did for the desktop version to add text and images.

Let me see your result in the comments!

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(il)


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How To Speed Up The Wireframing Process With Photoshop And Adobe XD

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Monthly Web Development Update 6/2018: Complexity, DNS Over HTTPS, And Push Notifications




Monthly Web Development Update 6/2018: Complexity, DNS Over HTTPS, And Push Notifications

Anselm Hannemann



We see complexity in every corner of a web project these days. We’ve read quite a bunch of articles about how complex a specific technology has become, and we discuss this over and over again. Coming from a time where we uploaded websites via FTP and had no git or anything comparable, now living in a time where we have a build system, transpilers, frameworks, tests, and a CI even for the smallest projects, this is easy to understand. But on the other hand, web development has grown up so much in the past 15 years that we can’t really compare today to the past anymore. And while it might seem that some things were easier in the past, we neglect the advantages and countless possibilities we have today. When we didn’t write tests back then, well, we simply had no test — meaning no reliable way to test for success. When we had no deployment process, it was easy to upload a new version but just as easy to break something — and it happened a lot more than today when a Continuous Integration system is in place.

Jeffrey Zeldman wrote an interesting article on the matter: “The Cult of Complex” outlines how we lose ourselves in unnecessary details and often try to overthink problems. I like the challenge of building systems that are not too complex but show a decent amount of responsibility (when it comes to ethics, privacy, security, a great user experience, and performance) and are working reliably (tests, deployments, availability, and performance again). I guess the problem of finding the right balance won’t go away anytime soon. Complexity is everywhere — we just need to decide if it’s useful complexity or if it was added simply because it was easier or because we were over-engineering the original problem.

News

  • The upcoming Safari version 12 was unveiled at Apple’s WWDC. Here’s what’s new: icons in tabs, strong passwords, as well as a password generator control via HTML attributes including two-factor authentication control, a 3D and AR model viewer, the Fullscreen API on iPads, font-display, and, very important, Intelligent Tracking Prevention 2.0 which is more restrictive than ever and might have a significant impact on the functionality of existing websites.
  • The headless Chrome automation library Puppeteer is now out in version 1.5. It brings along Browser contexts to isolate cookies and other data usually shared between pages, and Workers can now be used to interact with Web Workers, too.
  • Google released Lighthouse 3.0, the third major version of their performance analyzation tool which features a new report interface, some scoring changes, a CSV export, and First Contentful Paint measurement.
  • Chrome 67 is here, bringing Progressive Web Apps to the Desktop, as well as support for the Generic Sensor API, and extending the Credential Management API to support U2F authenticators via USB.
  • We’ve seen quite some changes in the browsers’ security interfaces over the past months. First, they emphasized sites that offer a secured connection (HTTPS). Then they decided to indicate insecure sites, and now Chrome announced new changes coming in fall that will make HTTPS the default by marking HTTP pages as “not secure”.
Desktop PWA in Chrome 67
Desktop Progressive Web Apps are now supported in Chrome OS 67, and the Chrome team already started working on support for Mac and Windows, too. (Image credit)

General

  • In “The Cult of the Complex”, Jeffrey Zeldman writes about how we often seem to forget that simplicity is the key and goal of everything we do, the overall goal for projects and life. He explains why it’s so hard to achieve and why it’s so much easier — and tempting — to cultivate complex systems. A very good read and definitely a piece I’ll add to my ‘evergreen’ list.
  • Heydon Pickering shared a new, very interesting article that teaches us to build a web component properly: This time he explains how to build an inclusive and responsive “Card” module.

UI/UX

  • Cool Backgrounds is a cool side project by Moe Amaya. It’s an online generator for polygonal backgrounds with gradients that can generate a lot of variants and shapes. Simply beautiful.

Tooling

Security

  • As security attacks via DNS gain popularity, DNS over HTTPS gets more and more important. Lin Clark explains the technology with a cartoon to make it easier to understand.
  • Windows Edge is now previewing support for same-site cookies. The attribute to lock down cookies even more is already available in Firefox and Chrome, so Safari is the only major browser that still needs to implement it, but I guess it’ll land in their Tech Preview builds very soon as well.
DNS Over HTTPS
Lin Clark created a cartoon to explain how you can better protect your users’ privacy with DNS over HTTPS. (Image credit)

Privacy

Web Performance

  • KeyCDN asked 15 people who know a lot about web performance to share their best advice with readers. Now they shared this article containing a lot of useful performance tips for 2018, including a few words by myself.
  • Stefan Judis discovered that we can already preload ECMA Script modules in Chrome 66 by adding an HTML header tag link rel=“modulepreload”.

Accessibility

  • It’s relatively easy to build a loading spinner — for a Single Page Application during load, for example —, but we rarely think about making them accessible. Stuart Nelson now explains how to do it.
  • Paul Stanton shares which accessibility tools we should use to get the best results.

JavaScript

  • JavaScript has lately been bullied by people who favor Elm, Rust, TypeScript, Babel or Dart. But JavaScript is definitely not worse, as Andrea Giammarchi explains with great examples. This article is also a great read for everyone who uses one of these other languages as it shows a couple of pitfalls that we should be aware of.
  • For a lot of projects, we want to use analytics or other scripts that collect personal information. With GDPR in effect, this got a lot harder. Yett is a nice JavaScript tool that lets you block the execution of such resources until a user agrees to it.
  • Ryan Miller created a new publication called “The Frontendian”, and it features one of the best explanations and guides to CORS I’ve come across so far.
  • The folks at Microsoft created a nice interactive demo page to show what Web Push Notifications can and should look like. If you haven’t gotten to grips with the technology yet, it’s a great primer to how it all works and how to build an interface that doesn’t disturb users.
  • Filepond is a JavaScript library for uploading files. It looks great and comes with a lot of adapters for React, Vue, Angular, and jQuery.
  • React 16.4 is out and brings quite a feature to the library: Pointer Events. They’ll make it easier to deal with user interactions and have been requested for a long time already.
The Frontendian
Inspired by the parallels between basic astrological ideas and push notification architecture, the team at Microsoft explains how to send push notifications to a user without needing the browser or app to be opened. (Image credit)

CSS

Work & Life

  • Anton Sten wrote about the moral implications for our apps. A meaningful explanation why the times of “move fast and break things” are definitely over as we’re dealing with Artificial Intelligence, social networks that affect peoples’ lives, and privacy matters enforced by GDPR.
  • Basecamp now has a new chart type to display a project’s status: the so-called “hill chart” adds a better context than a simple progress bar could ever do it.
  • Ben Werdmüller shares his thoughts about resumes and how they always fail to reflect who you are, what you do, and why you should be hired.

I hope you enjoyed this monthly update. The next one is scheduled for July 13th, so stay tuned. In the meantime, if you like what I do, please consider helping me fund the Web Development Reading List financially.

Have a great day!

— Anselm

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Monthly Web Development Update 6/2018: Complexity, DNS Over HTTPS, And Push Notifications

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Monthly Web Development Update 5/2018: Browser Performance, Iteration Zero, And Web Authentication




Monthly Web Development Update 5/2018: Browser Performance, Iteration Zero, And Web Authentication

Anselm Hannemann



As developers, we often talk about performance and request browsers to render things faster. But when they finally do, we demand even more performance.

Alex Russel from the Chrome team now shared some thoughts on developers abusing browser performance and explains why websites are still slow even though browsers reinvented themselves with incredibly fast rendering engines. This is in line with an article by Oliver Williams in which he states that we’re focusing on the wrong things, and instead of delivering the fastest solutions for slower machines and browsers, we’re serving even bigger bundles with polyfills and transpiled code to every browser.

It certainly isn’t easy to break out of this pattern and keep bundle size to a minimum in the interest of the user, but we have the technologies to achieve that. So let’s explore non-traditional ways and think about the actual user experience more often — before defining a project workflow instead of afterward.

Front-End Performance Checklist 2018

To help you cater for fast and smooth experiences, Vitaly Friedman summarized everything you need to know to optimize your site’s performance in one handy checklist. Read more →

News

General

  • Oliver Williams wrote about how important it is that we rethink how we’re building websites and implement “progressive enhancement” to make the web work great for everyone. After all, it’s us who make the experience worse for our users when blindly transpiling all our ECMAScript code or serving tons of JavaScript polyfills to those who already use slow machines and old software.
  • Ian Feather reveals that around 1% of all requests for JavaScript on BuzzFeed time out. That’s about 13 million requests per month. A good reminder of how important it is to provide a solid fallback, progressive enhancement, and workarounds.
  • The new GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) directive is coming very soon, and while our inboxes are full of privacy policy updates, one thing that’s still very unclear is which services can already provide so-called DPAs (Data Processing Agreements). Joschi Kuphal collects services that offer a DPA, so that we can easily look them up and see how we can obtain a copy in order to continue using their services. You can help by contributing to this resource via Pull Requests.

UI/UX

Product design principles
How to create a consistent, harmonious user experience when designing product cards? Mei Zhang shares some valuable tips. (Image credit)

Security

Privacy

  • The GDPR Checklist is another helpful resource for people to check whether a website is compliant with the upcoming EU directive.
  • Bloomberg published a story about the open-source privacy-protection project pi-hole, why it exists and what it wants to achieve. I use the software daily to keep my entire home and work network tracking-free.
GDPR Compliance Checklist
Achieving GDPR Compliance shouldn’t be a struggle. The GDPR Compliance Checklist helps you see clearer. (Image credit)

Web Performance

  • Postgres 10 has been here for quite a while already, but I personally struggled to find good information on how to use all these amazing features it brings along. Gabriel Enslein now shares Postgres 10 performance updates in a slide deck, shedding light on how to use the built-in JSON support, native partitioning for large datasets, hash index resiliency, and more.
  • Andrew Betts found out that a lot of websites are using outdated headers. He now shares why we should drop old headers and which ones to serve instead.

Accessibility

Page previews
Page previews open possibilities in multiple areas, as Nirzar Pangarkar explains. (Image credit: Nirzar Pangarkar)

CSS

  • Rarely talked about for years, CSS tables are still used on most websites to show (and that’s totally the correct way to do so) data in tables. But as they’re not responsive by default, we always struggled when making them responsive and most of us used JavaScript to make them work on mobile screens. Lea Verou now found two new ways to achieve responsive tables by using CSS: One is to use text-shadow to copy text to other rows, the other one uses element() to copy the entire <thead> to other rows — I still try to understand how Lea found these solutions, but this is amazing!
  • Rachel Andrew wrote an article about building and providing print stylesheets in 2018 and why they matter a lot for users even if they don’t own a printer anymore.
  • Osvaldas Valutis shares how to implement the so-called “Priority Plus” navigation pattern mostly with CSS, at least in modern browsers. If you need to support older browsers, you will need to extend this solution further, but it’s a great start to implement such a pattern without too much JavaScript.
  • Rachel Andrew shares what’s coming up in the CSS Grid Level 2 and Subgrid specifications and explains what it is, what it can solve, and how to use it once it is available in browsers.

JavaScript

  • Chris Ashton “used the web for a day with JavaScript turned off.” This piece highlights the importance of thinking about possible JavaScript failures on websites and why it matters if you provide fallbacks or not.
  • Sam Thorogood shares how we can build a “native undo & redo for the web”, as used in many text editors, games, planning or graphical software and other occasions such as a drag and drop reordering. And while it’s not easy to build, the article explains the concepts and technical aspects to help us understand this complicated matter.
  • There’s a new way to implement element/container queries into your application: eqio is a tiny library using IntersectionObserver.

Work & Life

  • Johannes Seitz shares his thoughts about project management at the start of projects. He calls the method “Iteration Zero”. An interesting concept to understand the scope and risks of a project better at a time when you still don’t have enough experience with the project itself but need to build a roadmap to get things started.
  • Arestia Rosenberg shares why her number one advice for freelancers is to ‘lean into the moment’. It’s about doing work when you can and using your chance to do something else when you don’t feel you can work productively. In the end, the summary results in a happy life and more productivity. I’d personally extend this to all people who can do that, but, of course, it’s best applicable to freelancers indeed.
  • Sam Altman shares a couple of handy productivity tips that are not just a ‘ten things to do’ list but actually really helpful thoughts about how to think about being productive.

Going Beyond…

  • Ethan Marcotte elaborates on the ethical issues with Google Duplex that is designed to imitate human voice so well that people don’t notice if it’s a machine or a human being. While this sounds quite interesting from a technical point of view, it will push the debate about fake news much further and cause more struggle to differentiate between something a human said or a machine imitated.
  • Our world is actually built on promises, and here’s why it’s so important to stick to your promises even if it’s hard sometimes.
  • I bet that most of you haven’t heard of Palantir yet. The company is funded by Peter Thiel and is a data-mining company that has the intention to collect as much data as possible about everybody in the world. It’s known to collaborate with various law enforcement authorities and even has connections to military services. What they do with data and which data they have from us isn’t known. My only hope right now is that this company will suffer a lot from the EU GDPR directive and that the European Union will try to stop their uncontrolled data collection. Facebook’s data practices are nothing compared to Palantir it seems.
  • Researchers sound the alarm after an analysis showed that buying a new smartphone consumes as much energy as using an existing phone for an entire decade. I guess I’ll not replace my iPhone 7 anytime soon — it’s still an absolutely great device and just enough for what I do with it.
  • Anton Sten shares his thoughts on Vanity Metrics, a common way to share numbers and statistics out of context. And since he realized what relevancy they have, he thinks differently about most of the commonly readable data such as investments or usage data of services now. Reading one number without having a context to compare it to doesn’t matter at all. We should keep that in mind.

We hope you enjoyed this Web Development Update. The next one is scheduled for Friday, June 15th. Stay tuned.

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Monthly Web Development Update 5/2018: Browser Performance, Iteration Zero, And Web Authentication

Designing For User Interfaces: Icons As Visual Elements For Screen Design

(This is a sponsored article.) Icons are everywhere. They have been around for a long time, and it’s difficult to imagine a world without icons or symbols today. Only designers will know how much effort and time is needed to not only make them helpful but also simple and expressive.
What makes icons particularly special is perhaps the fact that their meaning can be understood without having to add any text or further details.

More here: 

Designing For User Interfaces: Icons As Visual Elements For Screen Design

Automated Browser Testing With The WebDriver API

Manually clicking through different browsers as they run your development code, either locally or remotely, is a quick way to validate that code. It allows you to visually inspect that things are as you intended them to be from a layout and functionality point of view. However, it’s not a solution for testing the full breadth of your site’s code base on the assortment of browsers and device types available to your customers.

Excerpt from – 

Automated Browser Testing With The WebDriver API

Designing For A Browserless Web

What happens when we take the web browser out of web browsing? Google’s new “Add to Homescreen” feature delivers fast, focused web experiences that are indistinguishable from those of a native app. What can designers learn from the successes of early adopters such as Twitter, and how can we leverage app-like design patterns to tackle this brand new set of user experience challenges?
The “Add to Homescreen” installation process, as shown on Google Chrome Developer’s mobile website (Image source) (Large preview) We’ve seen debates on the topic of native versus web experiences.

Visit site – 

Designing For A Browserless Web

Django Developer

We’re looking for developers to join us in our office in central Bristol, developing websites, tools and apps for huge audiences. Our clients include Google, YouTube and Tate. We are proud to be a part of the AKQA network.
This role will see you working as part of a friendly, expert team. The workload will sometimes be hectic, but the atmosphere is cheerful and proactive. We want to put you in a position to write and deploy the best code that you can.

Original source: 

Django Developer

Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

Earlier this year, support for CSS grid layout landed in most major desktop browsers. Naturally, the specification is one of the hot topics at meet-ups and conferences. After having some conversations about grid and progressive enhancement, I believe that there’s a good amount of uncertainty about using it. I heard some quite interesting questions and statements, which I want to address in this post.

Progressively enhanced CSS Layout, with Flexbox and CSS Grid.

“When can I start using CSS grid layout?” “Too bad that it’ll take some more years before we can use grid in production.” “Do I need Modernizr in order to make websites with CSS grid layout?” “If I wanted to use grid today, I’d have to build two to three versions of my website.” The CSS grid layout module is one of the most exciting developments since responsive design. We should try to get the best out of it as soon as possible, if it makes sense for us and our projects.

The post Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

How To Write Content Without…Well…Having To Write It

how to write content without writing it

Early morning, dew still fresh on the grass, sunrise beautifully lighting a home office, aromatic steam rising from hot coffee, fog melting away from the world outside. And — unfortunately — the first flashes of carpal tunnel pain go pulsing through your wrist. Indeed, the consequences of a repeated routine can manifest themselves in painful ways. Furthermore, doing something in only one way limits personal growth. My suggestion? Maybe it’s time to stop exclusively typing all your content and start dictating some of it. Dictation is a vastly underused feature across all PC and smartphone platforms. Lawyers have been known…

The post How To Write Content Without…Well…Having To Write It appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How To Write Content Without…Well…Having To Write It